Colorado WINS

Colorado WINS

Colorado Workers for Innovative and New Solutions (WINS) is the union representing more than 28,000 classified state employees who work to ensure our quality of life in communities across the state and provide essential services to more than 5.7 million Coloradans.

Colorado WINS Website

University of Colorado Board of Regents

CU Regent, 6th Congressional District

  • Ilana Spiegel is a highly experienced and well-respected grassroots organizer, columnist, and public education advocate. A mother and a former public school teacher, her platform emphasizes accessibility in higher education, opportunity, affordability, and inclusivity. Her history as a staff developer, coach, and consultant demonstrates that she will follow through on her promise to “fight for Colorado students and families.”

    Spiegel’s organizing led to the creation of the Standards and Assessment Task Force, where she worked with stakeholders on legislation to improve standardized testing in Colorado. Spiegel also spearheaded groups such as Taxpayers for Public Education and SPEAK for Cherry Creek to oppose a conservative-majority school board in Douglas County that threatened the vitality of public education. Spiegel organized and spoke at a 2017 teach-in to educate the public about and protest an ALEC (American Legislative Exchange Council) conference where Betsy DeVos was a speaker.

    Her fierce advocacy and organizing work proves she will stand for progressive values by fighting rising tuition, encouraging academic freedom, and making higher education more accessible and diverse.

    She faces Republican Richard Murray and the Unity Party’s Robert Worthey. Murray is an attorney from Highlands Ranch and frequently refers to his desire to run for regent because of his “double buff” status. While he does say that he’s worried about the cost of college, he seems to have more ideas about how to make CU’s football team better than he does about the cost of higher education. We think voters should not vote for Murray.

    Worthey is a music teacher and former Green Party candidate for the 6th Congressional District. He is now running with the independent Unity Party, whose platform mostly reflects a Republican or conservative agenda. He seems to have no published policy positions or public statements reflecting what he would do once he’s in office.
    We recommend voting for Spiegel, a candidate whose agenda aligns with our values.

    Ilana Spiegel

    Ilana Spiegel is a highly experienced and well-respected grassroots organizer, columnist, and public education advocate. A mother and a former public school teacher, her platform emphasizes accessibility in higher education, opportunity, affordability, and inclusivity.

    Ilana Spiegel

    Ilana Spiegel is a highly experienced and well-respected grassroots organizer, columnist, and public education advocate. A mother and a former public school teacher, her platform emphasizes accessibility in higher education, opportunity, affordability, and inclusivity.

State Senate

State Senator, District 8

  •  

    Karl Hanlon is an attorney and the Democratic candidate to represent District 8. He is a bastion of the Western Slope community, having grown up on a ranch in Jackson County to parents who survived the Great Depression and World War II. He knows the struggles people have in this area and what life is like for regular folks. And with Hanlon’s experience working on water law and environmental issues, he knows that climate change really means something to working people. This is exactly why District 8 needs a change in representation — Hanlon will go to Denver prepared to fight for the people. He is the best choice in this race.

    He hopes to unseat appointed State Sen. Bob Rankin. Rankin, who represented House District 57 before moving into the state senate, says he “share[s] extreme frustrations with our state government that’s controlled by one party with very progressive leadership” with conservatives. However, that progressive leadership was swept into office in 2018 and has already accomplished a lot for the state of Colorado. We don’t recommend keeping Rankin in office.

    Karl Hanlon

     

    Karl Hanlon is an attorney and the Democratic candidate to represent District 8. He is a bastion of the Western Slope community, having grown up on a ranch in Jackson County to parents who survived the Great Depression and World War II. He knows the struggles people have in this area and what life is like for regular folks. And with Hanlon’s experience working on water law and environmental issues, he knows that climate change really means something to working people. This is exactly why District 8 needs a change in representation — Hanlon will go to Denver prepared to fight for the people. He is the best choice in this race.

    He hopes to unseat appointed State Sen. Bob Rankin. Rankin, who represented House District 57 before moving into the state senate, says he “share[s] extreme frustrations with our state government that’s controlled by one party with very progressive leadership” with conservatives. However, that progressive leadership was swept into office in 2018 and has already accomplished a lot for the state of Colorado. We don’t recommend keeping Rankin in office.

    Karl Hanlon

     

    Karl Hanlon is an attorney and the Democratic candidate to represent District 8. He is a bastion of the Western Slope community, having grown up on a ranch in Jackson County to parents who survived the Great Depression and World War II. He knows the struggles people have in this area and what life is like for regular folks. And with Hanlon’s experience working on water law and environmental issues, he knows that climate change really means something to working people. This is exactly why District 8 needs a change in representation — Hanlon will go to Denver prepared to fight for the people. He is the best choice in this race.

    He hopes to unseat appointed State Sen. Bob Rankin. Rankin, who represented House District 57 before moving into the state senate, says he “share[s] extreme frustrations with our state government that’s controlled by one party with very progressive leadership” with conservatives. However, that progressive leadership was swept into office in 2018 and has already accomplished a lot for the state of Colorado. We don’t recommend keeping Rankin in office.

State Senator, District 14

  • Incumbent State Sen. Joann Ginal is a doctor and medical researcher who has served the people of Fort Collins in the state legislature since 2012. She was appointed to the state senate two years ago, where she has continued to fight for lowering the cost of prescription drugs, insurance premiums, and hospital care. We recommend reelecting Ginal.

    Challenging her for the seat is Hans Hochheimer, a former professor at Colorado State University. His ideas run the conservative gamut, from opposing red-flag laws that would protect domestic violence victims to deregulating the oil and gas industry so they can put up operations right here in the district. He will not represent progressive values.

    Joann Ginal

    Incumbent State Sen. Joann Ginal is a doctor and medical researcher who has served the people of Fort Collins in the state legislature since 2012. She was appointed to the state senate two years ago, where she has continued to fight for lowering the cost of prescription drugs, insurance premiums, and hospital care. We recommend reelecting Ginal.

    Challenging her for the seat is Hans Hochheimer, a former professor at Colorado State University. His ideas run the conservative gamut, from opposing red-flag laws that would protect domestic violence victims to deregulating the oil and gas industry so they can put up operations right here in the district. He will not represent progressive values.

    Joann Ginal

    Incumbent State Sen. Joann Ginal is a doctor and medical researcher who has served the people of Fort Collins in the state legislature since 2012. She was appointed to the state senate two years ago, where she has continued to fight for lowering the cost of prescription drugs, insurance premiums, and hospital care. We recommend reelecting Ginal.

    Challenging her for the seat is Hans Hochheimer, a former professor at Colorado State University. His ideas run the conservative gamut, from opposing red-flag laws that would protect domestic violence victims to deregulating the oil and gas industry so they can put up operations right here in the district. He will not represent progressive values.

State Senator, District 17

  • Sonya Jaquez Lewis is a pharmacist living outside of Longmont and is the current state representative for House District 12. Jaquez Lewis has an extensive amount of experience dealing with the health care system at large, especially the Child Health Plan Plus, where she helped to establish a plan to get health care access for thousands of children across the state. Other priority issues for this one-time president of Boulder Pride are affordable housing and doing whatever it takes to keep fracking out of the community. Jaquez Lewis is the kind of official that progressive voters need in the state senate.

    Battling her for the office is Republican Matthew Menza, a Navy veteran and engineer. His campaign leans heavily on promises of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” He wants to end the “over-regulation” of small businesses during COVID-19. Outside of fueling criticism and outrage about “broken systems” and funding, he doesn’t have many actionable policy ideas.

    We suggest going with the experience and action-taking that Democratic candidate Jaquez Lewis brings to the table.

    Sonya Jaquez Lewis

    Sonya Jaquez Lewis is a pharmacist living outside of Longmont and is the current state representative for House District 12. Jaquez Lewis has an extensive amount of experience dealing with the health care system at large, especially the Child Health Plan Plus, where she helped to establish a plan to get health care access for thousands of children across the state. Other priority issues for this one-time president of Boulder Pride are affordable housing and doing whatever it takes to keep fracking out of the community. Jaquez Lewis is the kind of official that progressive voters need in the state senate.

    Battling her for the office is Republican Matthew Menza, a Navy veteran and engineer. His campaign leans heavily on promises of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” He wants to end the “over-regulation” of small businesses during COVID-19. Outside of fueling criticism and outrage about “broken systems” and funding, he doesn’t have many actionable policy ideas.

    We suggest going with the experience and action-taking that Democratic candidate Jaquez Lewis brings to the table.

    Sonya Jaquez Lewis

    Sonya Jaquez Lewis is a pharmacist living outside of Longmont and is the current state representative for House District 12. Jaquez Lewis has an extensive amount of experience dealing with the health care system at large, especially the Child Health Plan Plus, where she helped to establish a plan to get health care access for thousands of children across the state. Other priority issues for this one-time president of Boulder Pride are affordable housing and doing whatever it takes to keep fracking out of the community. Jaquez Lewis is the kind of official that progressive voters need in the state senate.

    Battling her for the office is Republican Matthew Menza, a Navy veteran and engineer. His campaign leans heavily on promises of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” He wants to end the “over-regulation” of small businesses during COVID-19. Outside of fueling criticism and outrage about “broken systems” and funding, he doesn’t have many actionable policy ideas.

    We suggest going with the experience and action-taking that Democratic candidate Jaquez Lewis brings to the table.

State Senator, District 18

  • Incumbent State Sen. Steve Fenberg is a small-business owner in Boulder and has represented District 18 for four years. He has submitted bills to help alleviate student loan debt, protect people from the harmful effects of oil and gas operations, allow all Colorado workers to earn paid sick leave, and ensure our democracy through automatic voter registration. While others are talking politics, Fenberg speaks to and acts on the issues of the day. This is what we want from our elected officials, and progressive voters should reward Fenberg with a second term.

    Seeking to unseat him is Peg Cage, who is the chair of the Boulder County Republican Party. Her platform is solidly along old-school party lines with a big emphasis that “citizens should control government.” But a strikingly distressing bit about Cage is from 2019: The day before the county’s GOP annual dinner, its featured speaker made a statement supporting Hitler’s brand of nationalism, and Cage’s response, published by the Colorado Times Reporter, was only to say that speaker was “pretty bold” and “is her own person.” Someone who’s fine to stand by for that is a clear no all around.

    Steve Fenberg

    Incumbent State Sen. Steve Fenberg is a small-business owner in Boulder and has represented District 18 for four years. He has submitted bills to help alleviate student loan debt, protect people from the harmful effects of oil and gas operations, allow all Colorado workers to earn paid sick leave, and ensure our democracy through automatic voter registration. While others are talking politics, Fenberg speaks to and acts on the issues of the day. This is what we want from our elected officials, and progressive voters should reward Fenberg with a second term.

    Seeking to unseat him is Peg Cage, who is the chair of the Boulder County Republican Party. Her platform is solidly along old-school party lines with a big emphasis that “citizens should control government.” But a strikingly distressing bit about Cage is from 2019: The day before the county’s GOP annual dinner, its featured speaker made a statement supporting Hitler’s brand of nationalism, and Cage’s response, published by the Colorado Times Reporter, was only to say that speaker was “pretty bold” and “is her own person.” Someone who’s fine to stand by for that is a clear no all around.

    Steve Fenberg

    Incumbent State Sen. Steve Fenberg is a small-business owner in Boulder and has represented District 18 for four years. He has submitted bills to help alleviate student loan debt, protect people from the harmful effects of oil and gas operations, allow all Colorado workers to earn paid sick leave, and ensure our democracy through automatic voter registration. While others are talking politics, Fenberg speaks to and acts on the issues of the day. This is what we want from our elected officials, and progressive voters should reward Fenberg with a second term.

    Seeking to unseat him is Peg Cage, who is the chair of the Boulder County Republican Party. Her platform is solidly along old-school party lines with a big emphasis that “citizens should control government.” But a strikingly distressing bit about Cage is from 2019: The day before the county’s GOP annual dinner, its featured speaker made a statement supporting Hitler’s brand of nationalism, and Cage’s response, published by the Colorado Times Reporter, was only to say that speaker was “pretty bold” and “is her own person.” Someone who’s fine to stand by for that is a clear no all around.

State Senator, District 19

  • Incumbent State Sen. Rachel Zenzinger was first appointed to the District 19 seat in 2013, lost in 2014, and then returned for the win in 2016. Her original background is as an educator, but she has much experience in government and policy. She served as a council member and mayor pro tempore on the local level in Arvada and knows what kind of problems her constituents face every day. One of her main dedications is to finding bipartisan solutions — a focus that’s led to significant legislation.

    That she’s naturally concerned about education is clear: Last session, she championed a bill to expand adult education and literacy programs. But her priorities are expansive, including investment in public transportation and infrastructure; securing tax credits and grants for affordable housing, particularly for low-income seniors; working to raise the minimum wage as well as delivering relief for businesses struggling during COVID-19; and finding affordable, accessible health care solutions. Groups as various as unions, the state chamber of commerce, environmental organizations, and professional associations endorse her re-election campaign. 

    Zenzinger is an all-around solid candidate for progressives to continue to support.

    Challenging her for the seat is Republican Lynn Gerber, who worked for a long time in Adams County public schools and is a small-business owner. But while she might boast an interest in things like access to quality health care and boosting funding for teachers, progressives need to know that Gerber doesn’t want “socialized medicine” and is an adamant supporter of school choice and the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR). She says she wants to divert budget money to roads, but she wants that money for fixing “inefficient traffic lights” to come from “liberal politicians’ spending.” It’s a lot of conflicting talk without solutions. Meanwhile, Zenzinger has experience acting on the issues and getting successful results.

    Rachel Zenzinger

    Incumbent State Sen. Rachel Zenzinger was first appointed to the District 19 seat in 2013, lost in 2014, and then returned for the win in 2016. Her original background is as an educator, but she has much experience in government and policy. She served as a council member and mayor pro tempore on the local level in Arvada and knows what kind of problems her constituents face every day. One of her main dedications is to finding bipartisan solutions — a focus that’s led to significant legislation.

    That she’s naturally concerned about education is clear: Last session, she championed a bill to expand adult education and literacy programs. But her priorities are expansive, including investment in public transportation and infrastructure; securing tax credits and grants for affordable housing, particularly for low-income seniors; working to raise the minimum wage as well as delivering relief for businesses struggling during COVID-19; and finding affordable, accessible health care solutions. Groups as various as unions, the state chamber of commerce, environmental organizations, and professional associations endorse her re-election campaign. 

    Zenzinger is an all-around solid candidate for progressives to continue to support.

    Challenging her for the seat is Republican Lynn Gerber, who worked for a long time in Adams County public schools and is a small-business owner. But while she might boast an interest in things like access to quality health care and boosting funding for teachers, progressives need to know that Gerber doesn’t want “socialized medicine” and is an adamant supporter of school choice and the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR). She says she wants to divert budget money to roads, but she wants that money for fixing “inefficient traffic lights” to come from “liberal politicians’ spending.” It’s a lot of conflicting talk without solutions. Meanwhile, Zenzinger has experience acting on the issues and getting successful results.

    Rachel Zenzinger

    Incumbent State Sen. Rachel Zenzinger was first appointed to the District 19 seat in 2013, lost in 2014, and then returned for the win in 2016. Her original background is as an educator, but she has much experience in government and policy. She served as a council member and mayor pro tempore on the local level in Arvada and knows what kind of problems her constituents face every day. One of her main dedications is to finding bipartisan solutions — a focus that’s led to significant legislation.

    That she’s naturally concerned about education is clear: Last session, she championed a bill to expand adult education and literacy programs. But her priorities are expansive, including investment in public transportation and infrastructure; securing tax credits and grants for affordable housing, particularly for low-income seniors; working to raise the minimum wage as well as delivering relief for businesses struggling during COVID-19; and finding affordable, accessible health care solutions. Groups as various as unions, the state chamber of commerce, environmental organizations, and professional associations endorse her re-election campaign. 

    Zenzinger is an all-around solid candidate for progressives to continue to support.

    Challenging her for the seat is Republican Lynn Gerber, who worked for a long time in Adams County public schools and is a small-business owner. But while she might boast an interest in things like access to quality health care and boosting funding for teachers, progressives need to know that Gerber doesn’t want “socialized medicine” and is an adamant supporter of school choice and the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR). She says she wants to divert budget money to roads, but she wants that money for fixing “inefficient traffic lights” to come from “liberal politicians’ spending.” It’s a lot of conflicting talk without solutions. Meanwhile, Zenzinger has experience acting on the issues and getting successful results.

State Senator, District 21

  • Incumbent State Sen. Dominick Moreno is has been a public servant for the area practically since the moment he graduated from Georgetown University. He has worked for the people first on the city council, at the statehouse, and now in the state senate. One of the first things he accomplished in office was instituting a universal breakfast for low-income students, and among his top priorities is fighting for working families. He’s the vice chair of the appropriations, budget, and capitol building advisory committees and worked last session on passing laws ranging from LGBTQ issues to foster care services to health insurance affordability. This is the kind of work constituents like to see, and progressive voters should feel comfortable keeping Moreno in office to do it.

    Also vying for the seat is Martín Mendez, an Adams County Republican activist. His only full-fledged position on his website is being against vaccinations. Mendez seems to have no other ideas, which is all the more reason to reelect Moreno.

    Dominick Moreno

    Incumbent State Sen. Dominick Moreno is has been a public servant for the area practically since the moment he graduated from Georgetown University. He has worked for the people first on the city council, at the statehouse, and now in the state senate. One of the first things he accomplished in office was instituting a universal breakfast for low-income students, and among his top priorities is fighting for working families. He’s the vice chair of the appropriations, budget, and capitol building advisory committees and worked last session on passing laws ranging from LGBTQ issues to foster care services to health insurance affordability. This is the kind of work constituents like to see, and progressive voters should feel comfortable keeping Moreno in office to do it.

    Also vying for the seat is Martín Mendez, an Adams County Republican activist. His only full-fledged position on his website is being against vaccinations. Mendez seems to have no other ideas, which is all the more reason to reelect Moreno.

    Dominick Moreno

    Incumbent State Sen. Dominick Moreno is has been a public servant for the area practically since the moment he graduated from Georgetown University. He has worked for the people first on the city council, at the statehouse, and now in the state senate. One of the first things he accomplished in office was instituting a universal breakfast for low-income students, and among his top priorities is fighting for working families. He’s the vice chair of the appropriations, budget, and capitol building advisory committees and worked last session on passing laws ranging from LGBTQ issues to foster care services to health insurance affordability. This is the kind of work constituents like to see, and progressive voters should feel comfortable keeping Moreno in office to do it.

    Also vying for the seat is Martín Mendez, an Adams County Republican activist. His only full-fledged position on his website is being against vaccinations. Mendez seems to have no other ideas, which is all the more reason to reelect Moreno.

State Senator, District 23

  • Sally Boccella hopes to break a long, unbroken streak of Republican representation in District 23 because Republicans aren’t representing it well on behalf of working families. Boccella wants to go to the state senate to create more economic opportunities for everyone, help equalize broadband access for rural areas, and take action on climate change and conservation. Among all the proactive ideas she supports — from a right to affordable housing to equal pay and Medicare for All — she maintains that watching out for the little guy makes everybody more successful. Boccella is the progressive voter’s clear choice.

    Running against her is Barbara Kirkmeyer. Kirkmeyer is a Weld County commissioner and the former director of the Colorado Department of Local Affairs. During all that time, she has never tried to moderate her extreme right-wing positions. She is outspoken in opposing Colorado’s red-flag law to keep guns away from domestic abusers and vows to eliminate “taxpayer funding of abortions.” Plus, a top motto for her lately concerning businesses and schools amid COVID-19 is a hard line of “no more lockdowns.” These kinds of policies aren’t looking out for the people of District 23.

    Sally Boccella

    Sally Boccella hopes to break a long, unbroken streak of Republican representation in District 23 because Republicans aren’t representing it well on behalf of working families. Boccella wants to go to the state senate to create more economic opportunities for everyone, help equalize broadband access for rural areas, and take action on climate change and conservation. Among all the proactive ideas she supports — from a right to affordable housing to equal pay and Medicare for All — she maintains that watching out for the little guy makes everybody more successful. Boccella is the progressive voter’s clear choice.

    Running against her is Barbara Kirkmeyer. Kirkmeyer is a Weld County commissioner and the former director of the Colorado Department of Local Affairs. During all that time, she has never tried to moderate her extreme right-wing positions. She is outspoken in opposing Colorado’s red-flag law to keep guns away from domestic abusers and vows to eliminate “taxpayer funding of abortions.” Plus, a top motto for her lately concerning businesses and schools amid COVID-19 is a hard line of “no more lockdowns.” These kinds of policies aren’t looking out for the people of District 23.

    Sally Boccella

    Sally Boccella hopes to break a long, unbroken streak of Republican representation in District 23 because Republicans aren’t representing it well on behalf of working families. Boccella wants to go to the state senate to create more economic opportunities for everyone, help equalize broadband access for rural areas, and take action on climate change and conservation. Among all the proactive ideas she supports — from a right to affordable housing to equal pay and Medicare for All — she maintains that watching out for the little guy makes everybody more successful. Boccella is the progressive voter’s clear choice.

    Running against her is Barbara Kirkmeyer. Kirkmeyer is a Weld County commissioner and the former director of the Colorado Department of Local Affairs. During all that time, she has never tried to moderate her extreme right-wing positions. She is outspoken in opposing Colorado’s red-flag law to keep guns away from domestic abusers and vows to eliminate “taxpayer funding of abortions.” Plus, a top motto for her lately concerning businesses and schools amid COVID-19 is a hard line of “no more lockdowns.” These kinds of policies aren’t looking out for the people of District 23.

State Senator, District 25

  • Democratic candidate Paula Dickerson is a teacher in Adams County with over three decades of firsthand experience not just with the educational system and its policies but interacting with working families on a daily basis. As she puts it, “Caring about children means caring about their families.”

    Dickerson’s mission in seeking the seat, she has said, is to take back the district and make the state reprioritize. A livable wage and paid family leave are absolutely necessary. Particularly as everyone is making adjustments to COVID-19 guidelines and the economy is sliding, she recognizes that working-class women — particularly Black and Brown women — are taking big hits and cannot be left behind. She flatly says the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) must be fixed in favor of a fair tax system. She wants to find a way to provide health care for all, something that’s imperative for everyday families.

    With an approach that’s at the ready to make the changes necessary for a more equitable system all around now and in the future, Dickerson is the clear choice for progressive voters to support.

    She is taking on incumbent State Sen. Kevin Priola. Priola is a longtime state politician in Adams County, having previously served as the state representative for District 56 before being elected to the state senate in 2016. Like several other Republicans this fall, he has the reputation of being a bipartisan legislator except on certain issues that really matter when it comes down to daily life. Priola is a strong supporter of TABOR and is committed to protecting human life “beginning at conception and ending at natural death.” While Priola may hold the experience card, a fresh voice like Dickerson’s that’s ready to speak up for fairer systems and rights for everyone would be a welcome change for progress.

    Paula Dickerson

    Democratic candidate Paula Dickerson is a teacher in Adams County with over three decades of firsthand experience not just with the educational system and its policies but interacting with working families on a daily basis. As she puts it, “Caring about children means caring about their families.”

    Dickerson’s mission in seeking the seat, she has said, is to take back the district and make the state reprioritize. A livable wage and paid family leave are absolutely necessary. Particularly as everyone is making adjustments to COVID-19 guidelines and the economy is sliding, she recognizes that working-class women — particularly Black and Brown women — are taking big hits and cannot be left behind. She flatly says the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) must be fixed in favor of a fair tax system. She wants to find a way to provide health care for all, something that’s imperative for everyday families.

    With an approach that’s at the ready to make the changes necessary for a more equitable system all around now and in the future, Dickerson is the clear choice for progressive voters to support.

    She is taking on incumbent State Sen. Kevin Priola. Priola is a longtime state politician in Adams County, having previously served as the state representative for District 56 before being elected to the state senate in 2016. Like several other Republicans this fall, he has the reputation of being a bipartisan legislator except on certain issues that really matter when it comes down to daily life. Priola is a strong supporter of TABOR and is committed to protecting human life “beginning at conception and ending at natural death.” While Priola may hold the experience card, a fresh voice like Dickerson’s that’s ready to speak up for fairer systems and rights for everyone would be a welcome change for progress.

    Paula Dickerson

    Democratic candidate Paula Dickerson is a teacher in Adams County with over three decades of firsthand experience not just with the educational system and its policies but interacting with working families on a daily basis. As she puts it, “Caring about children means caring about their families.”

    Dickerson’s mission in seeking the seat, she has said, is to take back the district and make the state reprioritize. A livable wage and paid family leave are absolutely necessary. Particularly as everyone is making adjustments to COVID-19 guidelines and the economy is sliding, she recognizes that working-class women — particularly Black and Brown women — are taking big hits and cannot be left behind. She flatly says the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) must be fixed in favor of a fair tax system. She wants to find a way to provide health care for all, something that’s imperative for everyday families.

    With an approach that’s at the ready to make the changes necessary for a more equitable system all around now and in the future, Dickerson is the clear choice for progressive voters to support.

    She is taking on incumbent State Sen. Kevin Priola. Priola is a longtime state politician in Adams County, having previously served as the state representative for District 56 before being elected to the state senate in 2016. Like several other Republicans this fall, he has the reputation of being a bipartisan legislator except on certain issues that really matter when it comes down to daily life. Priola is a strong supporter of TABOR and is committed to protecting human life “beginning at conception and ending at natural death.” While Priola may hold the experience card, a fresh voice like Dickerson’s that’s ready to speak up for fairer systems and rights for everyone would be a welcome change for progress.

State Senator, District 26

  • Since his appointment to the seat, State Sen. Jeff Bridges has been a legislator that District 26 — and progressives — can be proud of. His ideals are strongly rooted in boosting hard-working families, achieving health care for all, taking responsibility for climate change, and believing that “women’s issues are everyone’s issues.” But Bridges is also keenly aware that you have to reach across the aisle in order to get things done. That’s why he’s so proud of the fact that every bill he’s passed in the legislature has had bipartisan support.

    In his short time in office, Bridges has helped pass legislation to support full-day kindergarten, lower the cost of health care in the state, allow all Colorado employees to earn paid sick leave, and reinvest money in transportation without raising taxes. His accomplishments on working with fellow legislators and in several key committees are numerous, and he’s already looking ahead to what’s next. He plans to seek out things like expanded vocation and continuing education programs and funding and simplifying the tax code so that small businesses can thrive. A fully funded Colorado Water Plan is in his sights as well as increased recognition of reproductive rights.

    Bridges is ambitious but also is getting things done. Progressives should be very comfortable giving him all their support to continue doing good work.

    Taking him on is Bob Roth, a former Aurora city council member who is very active with various nonprofit organizations. His official public policy statements deal largely in generalities on fiscal responsibility, infrastructure, and education reform. But voters should be concerned about his opinions on the coronavirus and law enforcement. He has been very critical about school and business restrictions, saying everything should open back up in favor of easier logistics and economic relief. On police reform, he criticized proposed bans on Aurora police officers using chemical agents, long rifles, and armored vehicles — aimed at curbing police-protester violence — saying the move “handicapped” officers. Moreover, in an August post on his campaign’s social media, he suggests he wouldn’t have supported comprehensive sexuality education in schools, wouldn’t have prohibited conversion therapy, and wouldn’t have passed the red-flag law. This kind of candidate would derail progressive values if in office.

    Also on the ballot is Marc Solomon for the Libertarian Party. He has not made any policy statements widely known.

    Jeff Bridges

    Since his appointment to the seat, State Sen. Jeff Bridges has been a legislator that District 26 — and progressives — can be proud of. His ideals are strongly rooted in boosting hard-working families, achieving health care for all, taking responsibility for climate change, and believing that “women’s issues are everyone’s issues.” But Bridges is also keenly aware that you have to reach across the aisle in order to get things done. That’s why he’s so proud of the fact that every bill he’s passed in the legislature has had bipartisan support.

    In his short time in office, Bridges has helped pass legislation to support full-day kindergarten, lower the cost of health care in the state, allow all Colorado employees to earn paid sick leave, and reinvest money in transportation without raising taxes. His accomplishments on working with fellow legislators and in several key committees are numerous, and he’s already looking ahead to what’s next. He plans to seek out things like expanded vocation and continuing education programs and funding and simplifying the tax code so that small businesses can thrive. A fully funded Colorado Water Plan is in his sights as well as increased recognition of reproductive rights.

    Bridges is ambitious but also is getting things done. Progressives should be very comfortable giving him all their support to continue doing good work.

    Taking him on is Bob Roth, a former Aurora city council member who is very active with various nonprofit organizations. His official public policy statements deal largely in generalities on fiscal responsibility, infrastructure, and education reform. But voters should be concerned about his opinions on the coronavirus and law enforcement. He has been very critical about school and business restrictions, saying everything should open back up in favor of easier logistics and economic relief. On police reform, he criticized proposed bans on Aurora police officers using chemical agents, long rifles, and armored vehicles — aimed at curbing police-protester violence — saying the move “handicapped” officers. Moreover, in an August post on his campaign’s social media, he suggests he wouldn’t have supported comprehensive sexuality education in schools, wouldn’t have prohibited conversion therapy, and wouldn’t have passed the red-flag law. This kind of candidate would derail progressive values if in office.

    Also on the ballot is Marc Solomon for the Libertarian Party. He has not made any policy statements widely known.

    Jeff Bridges

    Since his appointment to the seat, State Sen. Jeff Bridges has been a legislator that District 26 — and progressives — can be proud of. His ideals are strongly rooted in boosting hard-working families, achieving health care for all, taking responsibility for climate change, and believing that “women’s issues are everyone’s issues.” But Bridges is also keenly aware that you have to reach across the aisle in order to get things done. That’s why he’s so proud of the fact that every bill he’s passed in the legislature has had bipartisan support.

    In his short time in office, Bridges has helped pass legislation to support full-day kindergarten, lower the cost of health care in the state, allow all Colorado employees to earn paid sick leave, and reinvest money in transportation without raising taxes. His accomplishments on working with fellow legislators and in several key committees are numerous, and he’s already looking ahead to what’s next. He plans to seek out things like expanded vocation and continuing education programs and funding and simplifying the tax code so that small businesses can thrive. A fully funded Colorado Water Plan is in his sights as well as increased recognition of reproductive rights.

    Bridges is ambitious but also is getting things done. Progressives should be very comfortable giving him all their support to continue doing good work.

    Taking him on is Bob Roth, a former Aurora city council member who is very active with various nonprofit organizations. His official public policy statements deal largely in generalities on fiscal responsibility, infrastructure, and education reform. But voters should be concerned about his opinions on the coronavirus and law enforcement. He has been very critical about school and business restrictions, saying everything should open back up in favor of easier logistics and economic relief. On police reform, he criticized proposed bans on Aurora police officers using chemical agents, long rifles, and armored vehicles — aimed at curbing police-protester violence — saying the move “handicapped” officers. Moreover, in an August post on his campaign’s social media, he suggests he wouldn’t have supported comprehensive sexuality education in schools, wouldn’t have prohibited conversion therapy, and wouldn’t have passed the red-flag law. This kind of candidate would derail progressive values if in office.

    Also on the ballot is Marc Solomon for the Libertarian Party. He has not made any policy statements widely known.

State Senator, District 27

  • Chris Kolker is a former teacher and a current financial planner and small-business owner. He previously ran in 2018 for state representative in District 38 and came very close — under 400 votes — to flipping the seat. Kolker has called Arapahoe County home since 1999 and appears to be the kind of person who knows the struggles of everyday life for working families and how the increasing cost of living is making it worse. 

    Among Kolker’s top priorities: funding for Colorado schools, instituting more gun-safety laws, improving transportation quality, and taking action on human-caused climate change. He also is a strong proponent of social justice reform, particularly as to the legislature’s recent sweeping changes to law enforcement accountability, and said it’s “long past time for us to … dismantle systemic racism.” His platform and actions already have endorsers like the Human Rights Campaign, Planned Parenthood, the Sierra Club, and several unions excited to see him in office, and quite frankly, we are too.

    Kolker is the one progressives should give their support to in this race.

    Vying for the seat on the Republican side is Suzanne Staiert. Staiert has some impressive experience: She is a former city prosecutor for Aurora, the former city attorney for Littleton, and a former deputy Secretary of State. And on issues like education and political integrity, she seems straightforward, if not practically moderate. Staiert wants to say she’s “practical, not political,” but scratch the surface a little, and you’ll find her partisanship coming through. She’s outspoken against reforming our national electoral system, which is clearly broken. She also is a strong supporter of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), which is the primary cause for a number of our budget shortfalls and one of the reasons Colorado is falling behind on education. She definitely doesn’t hit the singingly progressive notes that Kolker does, and he could do more in the office. 

    Chris Kolker

    Chris Kolker is a former teacher and a current financial planner and small-business owner. He previously ran in 2018 for state representative in District 38 and came very close — under 400 votes — to flipping the seat. Kolker has called Arapahoe County home since 1999 and appears to be the kind of person who knows the struggles of everyday life for working families and how the increasing cost of living is making it worse. 

    Among Kolker’s top priorities: funding for Colorado schools, instituting more gun-safety laws, improving transportation quality, and taking action on human-caused climate change. He also is a strong proponent of social justice reform, particularly as to the legislature’s recent sweeping changes to law enforcement accountability, and said it’s “long past time for us to … dismantle systemic racism.” His platform and actions already have endorsers like the Human Rights Campaign, Planned Parenthood, the Sierra Club, and several unions excited to see him in office, and quite frankly, we are too.

    Kolker is the one progressives should give their support to in this race.

    Vying for the seat on the Republican side is Suzanne Staiert. Staiert has some impressive experience: She is a former city prosecutor for Aurora, the former city attorney for Littleton, and a former deputy Secretary of State. And on issues like education and political integrity, she seems straightforward, if not practically moderate. Staiert wants to say she’s “practical, not political,” but scratch the surface a little, and you’ll find her partisanship coming through. She’s outspoken against reforming our national electoral system, which is clearly broken. She also is a strong supporter of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), which is the primary cause for a number of our budget shortfalls and one of the reasons Colorado is falling behind on education. She definitely doesn’t hit the singingly progressive notes that Kolker does, and he could do more in the office. 

    Chris Kolker

    Chris Kolker is a former teacher and a current financial planner and small-business owner. He previously ran in 2018 for state representative in District 38 and came very close — under 400 votes — to flipping the seat. Kolker has called Arapahoe County home since 1999 and appears to be the kind of person who knows the struggles of everyday life for working families and how the increasing cost of living is making it worse. 

    Among Kolker’s top priorities: funding for Colorado schools, instituting more gun-safety laws, improving transportation quality, and taking action on human-caused climate change. He also is a strong proponent of social justice reform, particularly as to the legislature’s recent sweeping changes to law enforcement accountability, and said it’s “long past time for us to … dismantle systemic racism.” His platform and actions already have endorsers like the Human Rights Campaign, Planned Parenthood, the Sierra Club, and several unions excited to see him in office, and quite frankly, we are too.

    Kolker is the one progressives should give their support to in this race.

    Vying for the seat on the Republican side is Suzanne Staiert. Staiert has some impressive experience: She is a former city prosecutor for Aurora, the former city attorney for Littleton, and a former deputy Secretary of State. And on issues like education and political integrity, she seems straightforward, if not practically moderate. Staiert wants to say she’s “practical, not political,” but scratch the surface a little, and you’ll find her partisanship coming through. She’s outspoken against reforming our national electoral system, which is clearly broken. She also is a strong supporter of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), which is the primary cause for a number of our budget shortfalls and one of the reasons Colorado is falling behind on education. She definitely doesn’t hit the singingly progressive notes that Kolker does, and he could do more in the office. 

State Senator, District 28

  • Janet Buckner, a current state representative, has long served the people of Aurora and the surrounding area — and now there's a good opportunity to send her to the state senate. Buckner knows what it’s like to have a working family just trying to get by, which is exactly why she sponsored bills in the legislature to help working women get paid what they are owed. She works hard to help keep insurance companies honest, and, as a former educator, she advocates for educators to be paid what they're worth and for students to be set up for success. Buckner has already shown us that she knows who sent her to the legislature, and progressive voters should support her to keep up the good work.

    Karl Stecher is a retired neurosurgeon running for District 28. He only recently espoused any policy positions — one of which is a common Republican preoccupation these days of simply reelecting Donald Trump. Among his other very short statements of interest are helping home-based businesses, backing free choice for schools, and keeping “law and order.” Voters can’t get behind a short-sighted campaign like this.

    Janet Buckner

    Janet Buckner, a current state representative, has long served the people of Aurora and the surrounding area — and now there's a good opportunity to send her to the state senate. Buckner knows what it’s like to have a working family just trying to get by, which is exactly why she sponsored bills in the legislature to help working women get paid what they are owed. She works hard to help keep insurance companies honest, and, as a former educator, she advocates for educators to be paid what they're worth and for students to be set up for success. Buckner has already shown us that she knows who sent her to the legislature, and progressive voters should support her to keep up the good work.

    Karl Stecher is a retired neurosurgeon running for District 28. He only recently espoused any policy positions — one of which is a common Republican preoccupation these days of simply reelecting Donald Trump. Among his other very short statements of interest are helping home-based businesses, backing free choice for schools, and keeping “law and order.” Voters can’t get behind a short-sighted campaign like this.

    Janet Buckner

    Janet Buckner, a current state representative, has long served the people of Aurora and the surrounding area — and now there's a good opportunity to send her to the state senate. Buckner knows what it’s like to have a working family just trying to get by, which is exactly why she sponsored bills in the legislature to help working women get paid what they are owed. She works hard to help keep insurance companies honest, and, as a former educator, she advocates for educators to be paid what they're worth and for students to be set up for success. Buckner has already shown us that she knows who sent her to the legislature, and progressive voters should support her to keep up the good work.

    Karl Stecher is a retired neurosurgeon running for District 28. He only recently espoused any policy positions — one of which is a common Republican preoccupation these days of simply reelecting Donald Trump. Among his other very short statements of interest are helping home-based businesses, backing free choice for schools, and keeping “law and order.” Voters can’t get behind a short-sighted campaign like this.

State Senator, District 29

  • Longtime legislator and incumbent State Sen. Rhonda Fields is practically a force of nature with her fierceness in taking on controversial issues on behalf of “the voiceless and vulnerable.” The current assistant majority leader of the state senate has a number of wins under her belt in education (public school funding, reducing truancy, and expanding early childhood education), criminal justice reform (the recent law enforcement accountability bill, peace officer standards, and victims’ rights), conservation, youth protection, health care, women’s rights, veteran issues, homelessness, and more.

    If it’s not obvious by now, we strongly recommend reelecting Fields.

    Making an attempt to challenge her for the seat is perennial Libertarian candidate Michele Poague. She brags about creating “the original Tea Party” and accuses Democrats of wanting “special treatment” of minority groups. This kind of political philosophy basically speaks for itself.

    Rhonda Fields

    Longtime legislator and incumbent State Sen. Rhonda Fields is practically a force of nature with her fierceness in taking on controversial issues on behalf of “the voiceless and vulnerable.” The current assistant majority leader of the state senate has a number of wins under her belt in education (public school funding, reducing truancy, and expanding early childhood education), criminal justice reform (the recent law enforcement accountability bill, peace officer standards, and victims’ rights), conservation, youth protection, health care, women’s rights, veteran issues, homelessness, and more.

    If it’s not obvious by now, we strongly recommend reelecting Fields.

    Making an attempt to challenge her for the seat is perennial Libertarian candidate Michele Poague. She brags about creating “the original Tea Party” and accuses Democrats of wanting “special treatment” of minority groups. This kind of political philosophy basically speaks for itself.

    Rhonda Fields

    Longtime legislator and incumbent State Sen. Rhonda Fields is practically a force of nature with her fierceness in taking on controversial issues on behalf of “the voiceless and vulnerable.” The current assistant majority leader of the state senate has a number of wins under her belt in education (public school funding, reducing truancy, and expanding early childhood education), criminal justice reform (the recent law enforcement accountability bill, peace officer standards, and victims’ rights), conservation, youth protection, health care, women’s rights, veteran issues, homelessness, and more.

    If it’s not obvious by now, we strongly recommend reelecting Fields.

    Making an attempt to challenge her for the seat is perennial Libertarian candidate Michele Poague. She brags about creating “the original Tea Party” and accuses Democrats of wanting “special treatment” of minority groups. This kind of political philosophy basically speaks for itself.

State Senator, District 31

  • Incumbent State Sen. Chris Hansen is an environmental engineer with a stunning resume working on environmental issues all over the world. Those experiences have given him the motivation to work hard on behalf of District 31. And not only does he work to fight climate change, but he’s also doing things for average working families, like ending the stranglehold of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), fighting against the NRA to keep guns out of dangerous people’s hands, and reinvesting in our public education system. Voters can easily applaud Hansen’s efforts, and reelecting him is a plain yes for progressives.

    On the Republican side for this seat is Doug Townsend. Townsend, an accountant, seems to have one answer for every issue: Let’s ignore it. From the environment (“If the U.S. can’t [reduce emissions], then the State of Colorado certainly cannot do so by itself”) to gun safety regulations (“If you want to protect yourself with a gun, that is your decision”) to civil rights (“Is a government response required or are … cultural forces sufficient to address the needs on their own?”), Townsend just hopes somebody else fixes it themselves. This line of thinking absolutely cannot ever be put into office.

    Chris Hansen

    Incumbent State Sen. Chris Hansen is an environmental engineer with a stunning resume working on environmental issues all over the world. Those experiences have given him the motivation to work hard on behalf of District 31. And not only does he work to fight climate change, but he’s also doing things for average working families, like ending the stranglehold of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), fighting against the NRA to keep guns out of dangerous people’s hands, and reinvesting in our public education system. Voters can easily applaud Hansen’s efforts, and reelecting him is a plain yes for progressives.

    On the Republican side for this seat is Doug Townsend. Townsend, an accountant, seems to have one answer for every issue: Let’s ignore it. From the environment (“If the U.S. can’t [reduce emissions], then the State of Colorado certainly cannot do so by itself”) to gun safety regulations (“If you want to protect yourself with a gun, that is your decision”) to civil rights (“Is a government response required or are … cultural forces sufficient to address the needs on their own?”), Townsend just hopes somebody else fixes it themselves. This line of thinking absolutely cannot ever be put into office.

    Chris Hansen

    Incumbent State Sen. Chris Hansen is an environmental engineer with a stunning resume working on environmental issues all over the world. Those experiences have given him the motivation to work hard on behalf of District 31. And not only does he work to fight climate change, but he’s also doing things for average working families, like ending the stranglehold of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), fighting against the NRA to keep guns out of dangerous people’s hands, and reinvesting in our public education system. Voters can easily applaud Hansen’s efforts, and reelecting him is a plain yes for progressives.

    On the Republican side for this seat is Doug Townsend. Townsend, an accountant, seems to have one answer for every issue: Let’s ignore it. From the environment (“If the U.S. can’t [reduce emissions], then the State of Colorado certainly cannot do so by itself”) to gun safety regulations (“If you want to protect yourself with a gun, that is your decision”) to civil rights (“Is a government response required or are … cultural forces sufficient to address the needs on their own?”), Townsend just hopes somebody else fixes it themselves. This line of thinking absolutely cannot ever be put into office.

State Senator, District 33

  • James Coleman, who has served as District 7’s state representative since 2017 and is majority co-whip, is a Denverite through and through who says that from childhood, he was instilled with a responsibility to look out for the most vulnerable. He’s running for the senate seat as a way of expanding his service.

    Working families have long been his top priority. He’s been fighting hard against the rising cost of living in Colorado, an economy that doesn’t work for everyone, and jobs that don’t pay a livable wage. He believes schools need to be better equipped for kids to succeed and that our criminal justice system is fracturing the community. His commitment and loyalty to the people make him the clear choice for voters.

    On the ballot for the Unity Party is Jerry Burton. To date, his campaign platform says it’s summed up in three words — “equality for all” — and that’s pretty much it. There’s no reason not to vote for Coleman.

    James Coleman

    James Coleman, who has served as District 7’s state representative since 2017 and is majority co-whip, is a Denverite through and through who says that from childhood, he was instilled with a responsibility to look out for the most vulnerable. He’s running for the senate seat as a way of expanding his service.

    Working families have long been his top priority. He’s been fighting hard against the rising cost of living in Colorado, an economy that doesn’t work for everyone, and jobs that don’t pay a livable wage. He believes schools need to be better equipped for kids to succeed and that our criminal justice system is fracturing the community. His commitment and loyalty to the people make him the clear choice for voters.

    On the ballot for the Unity Party is Jerry Burton. To date, his campaign platform says it’s summed up in three words — “equality for all” — and that’s pretty much it. There’s no reason not to vote for Coleman.

    James Coleman

    James Coleman, who has served as District 7’s state representative since 2017 and is majority co-whip, is a Denverite through and through who says that from childhood, he was instilled with a responsibility to look out for the most vulnerable. He’s running for the senate seat as a way of expanding his service.

    Working families have long been his top priority. He’s been fighting hard against the rising cost of living in Colorado, an economy that doesn’t work for everyone, and jobs that don’t pay a livable wage. He believes schools need to be better equipped for kids to succeed and that our criminal justice system is fracturing the community. His commitment and loyalty to the people make him the clear choice for voters.

    On the ballot for the Unity Party is Jerry Burton. To date, his campaign platform says it’s summed up in three words — “equality for all” — and that’s pretty much it. There’s no reason not to vote for Coleman.

State Senator, District 35

  • Carlos López is someone who knows southern Colorado well. He was born and raised in Trinidad, started his college education at Trinidad State Junior College, and has served Trinidad on its city council. He knows what this community wants and needs. He’s not interested in playing politics as he’s more interested in the specifics about education funding in the state and the decrease in rural education funding. López is here to help out working folks in southern Colorado, and we recommend electing him to the state senate.

    Cleave Simpson is on the Republican side of this race. He’s a rancher and engineer from Alamosa, and his campaign statements cast a wide net of generalities, mostly on agriculture and land management and a call for rural and urban areas to “unite.” But he hasn’t made any other opinions on issues that affect daily life widely known. It’s hard to support a one-note candidate.

    Carlos López

    Carlos López is someone who knows southern Colorado well. He was born and raised in Trinidad, started his college education at Trinidad State Junior College, and has served Trinidad on its city council. He knows what this community wants and needs. He’s not interested in playing politics as he’s more interested in the specifics about education funding in the state and the decrease in rural education funding. López is here to help out working folks in southern Colorado, and we recommend electing him to the state senate.

    Cleave Simpson is on the Republican side of this race. He’s a rancher and engineer from Alamosa, and his campaign statements cast a wide net of generalities, mostly on agriculture and land management and a call for rural and urban areas to “unite.” But he hasn’t made any other opinions on issues that affect daily life widely known. It’s hard to support a one-note candidate.

    Carlos López

    Carlos López is someone who knows southern Colorado well. He was born and raised in Trinidad, started his college education at Trinidad State Junior College, and has served Trinidad on its city council. He knows what this community wants and needs. He’s not interested in playing politics as he’s more interested in the specifics about education funding in the state and the decrease in rural education funding. López is here to help out working folks in southern Colorado, and we recommend electing him to the state senate.

    Cleave Simpson is on the Republican side of this race. He’s a rancher and engineer from Alamosa, and his campaign statements cast a wide net of generalities, mostly on agriculture and land management and a call for rural and urban areas to “unite.” But he hasn’t made any other opinions on issues that affect daily life widely known. It’s hard to support a one-note candidate.

State House

State Representative, District 1

  • Incumbent State Rep. Susan Lontine, who has served southwest Denver in the Statehouse since 2015, is an enthusiastic and tireless advocate for progressive values. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable health care, fighting to defend women’s reproductive health, advocating for more funding for public schools, and protecting Colorado’s environment.

    As the chair of the House Health and Insurance Committee, Lontine has spent a lot of time working on issues related to health care access, affordability, and patient safety. Some of her legislation that has been signed into law include bills to increase hospital transparency and accountability, to remove barriers on telehealth access, and to expand dental coverage for pregnant patients.

    Perhaps her biggest legislative achievements are passing a bill that prohibited Colorado law enforcement from holding undocumented immigrants solely on the basis of a request from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement as well one that requires school districts that teach sex education to teach about consent and what it means to be in a healthy relationship.

    Progressives clearly can and should support Lontine.

    She is being challenged by Republican candidate and avid conspiracy-theory enthusiast Samantha Koch. Koch regularly espouses coronavirus conspiracy theories including implying that Bill Gates is plotting to use a vaccine to implant tracking devices and that COVID-19 has been overblown by Democrats and public health experts to exert control over people’s lives and defeat President Donald Trump in the election. She also embraces anti-mask views and believes that hydroxychloroquine is a known cure for COVID-19.

    Koch’s theories aren’t limited to coronavirus: She has promoted numerous QAnon-linked theories, the debunked theory that Wayfair is literally selling children, and the urban myth that “antifa and professional anarchists” leave pallets of bricks for protesters to throw during marches. Koch also helps run a Facebook group supporting a driver who struck a Denver protester with her car. Progressive voters should avoid Koch on the ballot and probably in the community as well.

    Susan Lontine

    Incumbent State Rep. Susan Lontine, who has served southwest Denver in the Statehouse since 2015, is an enthusiastic and tireless advocate for progressive values.

    Susan Lontine

    Incumbent State Rep. Susan Lontine, who has served southwest Denver in the Statehouse since 2015, is an enthusiastic and tireless advocate for progressive values.

State Representative, District 2

  • Incumbent State Rep. Alec Garnett has represented central Denver’s District 2 since 2015 and is running for reelection. Serving as the House majority leader since 2019, Garnett has played a large role in decision-making and setting priorities during the last two extremely productive legislative sessions. Under his leadership, the legislature enacted the most sweeping reforms to oil and gas laws in the last 60 years, put Colorado on a path to reduce carbon emissions by 90% by 2050, established universal free full-day kindergarten for all Colorado families, created paid sick leave for all Colorado workers, repealed the state’s death penalty, and much more.

    Garnett has focused specifically on working with his colleagues to improve the lives of middle-class families across Colorado, help more high school and college graduates find stable employment, and provide the best education possible for Colorado’s kids.

    A strong advocate for stricter gun laws, Garnett co-sponsored the 2019 Extreme Risk Protection Order Bill, otherwise known as the Red Flag bill, that gave law enforcement an important tool to keep our community safe, but Garnett understands there is more work that needs to be done on this issue.

    Garnett believes accessible government is one of the most important things in a democracy and always strives to make it as easy as possible for his constituents to get in touch with him. He also holds town hall meetings constantly and is a regular presence at every in-district event you can think of. Garnett is a hard-working representative and an effective leader who is passionate about making Colorado a better place to live, work, and raise a family. He is definitely the progressive voter’s best choice in this race.

    Running against Garnett is Republican Victoria Partridge. Partridge, who has worked as a flight attendant for 16 years, is a proud supporter of Donald Trump. She has asserted one-party Democrat rule has not worked out for Colorado and that we need to have more Republicans in elected offices throughout the state. Her platform says that she promotes using the free market to bring down the cost of housing and making sure Coloradans have a choice when it comes to health care — clearly issues that most Coloradans care a lot about — but on The Steffan Tubbs Show, Partridge lamented that under Democrat rule “homeless people have more of a say” than she does. Keeping Garnett in office over this point of view is a must for Denver voters.

    Alec Garnett

    Incumbent State Rep. Alec Garnett has represented central Denver’s District 2 since 2015 and is running for reelection.

    Alec Garnett

    Incumbent State Rep. Alec Garnett has represented central Denver’s District 2 since 2015 and is running for reelection.

State Representative, District 3

State Representative, District 5

  • Incumbent State Rep. Alex Valdez is running for what would be his second term representing District 5. He is a self-described “environmental warrior” who started a grassroots residential solar company several years ago that is now one of Colorado’s largest. In his first term, Valdez has already passed legislation focused on boosting renewable energy use, establishing more public protections from toxic air emissions, and increasing the number of electric vehicle charging stations in Colorado.

    The environment is not the only issue Valdez champions. He’s committed to an inclusive Colorado and currently serves as the chair of the LGBTQ Caucus. He was instrumental in passing a bill for easier, prescription-free access to life-saving HIV prevention medications. Valdez also carried a bill that prohibits people convicted of animal cruelty from owning an animal. His other top priorities include universal access to affordable health care, housing affordability, and an education system that prepares students for the jobs of tomorrow and pays teachers a fair wage.

    Valdez is clearly the candidate for progressive voters.

    He faces Republican Jonathan Woodley, a sergeant in the Colorado Army National Guard who ran unsuccessfully for the Denver City Council in 2019. He has a typical pro-Trump platform — evident on his campaign website with pledges for the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), school choice, the Second Amendment, to ban abortion, and “law and order.” Woodley’s social media posts have downplayed the threat of COVID-19, and he opposes mask mandates. Also on his campaign Facebook page, he posted support for counter-boycotting the NBA — which skipped games recently in protest of continued police violence against Black Americans. It is imperative Woodley not be elected to office.

    Also running for this seat is Unity Party candidate Joe Richardson, who runs a mail-order business and served for two years as a Downtown Denver Ambassador for the Business Improvement District. He does not have a campaign website or a social media presence.

    Alex Valdez

    Incumbent State Rep. Alex Valdez is running for what would be his second term representing District 5. He is a self-described “environmental warrior” who started a grassroots residential solar company several years ago that is now one of Colorado’s largest.

    Alex Valdez

    Incumbent State Rep. Alex Valdez is running for what would be his second term representing District 5. He is a self-described “environmental warrior” who started a grassroots residential solar company several years ago that is now one of Colorado’s largest.

State Representative, District 6

State Representative, District 9

State Representative, District 11

State Representative, District 12

State Representative, District 13

  • Judy Amabile, a businessperson and committed progressive activist, is running to succeed term-limited Speaker of the House K.C. Becker as the District 13 representative.

    Amabile wants to bring the voice of “the progressive business owner” to the legislature and “foundational change” to a system that for too long has been fixed in favor of the wealthy. Her platform focuses on three main issues: acting boldly on climate change, improving the lives of working people “at the bottom of the economic ladder,” and increasing access to mental health resources to address the rise in homelessness, substance use disorders, incarceration, and suicide. She has ambitious policy ideas like putting a price on carbon emissions to incentivize businesses to cut them, raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour, transitioning to a single-payer health care system, equalizing internet access, fairness in banking, instituting balanced executive pay, and more.

    Electing Amabile will definitely advance the progressive causes in Colorado.

    On the Republican side for this seat is Kevin Sipple, a co-founder of Eldorado Natural Spring Water. He has a long history of public service and leans on a traditional party platform — he supports right-to-work laws that make it harder for people to form unions, defends the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), and is against abortion rights from “conception to natural death.” Sipple has concerning stances on gun policy and COVID-19. He has advocated for arming school staff, and on the virus, he has strongly criticized health measures and calls on people to “stand up” to the “tyrants.”

    Libertarian Jed Gilman is also on the ballot. He gained attention in May for his own “tyranny” commentary on Tri-County Health Department COVID-19 restrictions where he praised a restaurant for defying public health orders and staying open. His stances on other issues, outlined in a July video interview on Facebook, are as expected for the Libertarian Party.

    Judy Amabile

    Judy Amabile, a businessperson and committed progressive activist, is running to succeed term-limited Speaker of the House K.C. Becker as the District 13 representative.

    Judy Amabile

    Judy Amabile, a businessperson and committed progressive activist, is running to succeed term-limited Speaker of the House K.C. Becker as the District 13 representative.

State Representative, District 16

  • Stephanie Vigil is running for District 16 representative to “fight for a solid foundation on which all Coloradans can thrive,” saying there’s no reason the state, with one of the strongest economies in the country, cannot ensure every individual and family has a roof over their heads, access to essential utilities, necessary medical care, and a livable wage.

    Vigil strongly supports building a multimodal, fully integrated transit infrastructure system to allow Coloradans enough choices to get where they need to go with or without a privately owned vehicle. She believes establishing a Front Range passenger rail system that connects the state’s urban centers would help get cars off the road, reduce pollution, and go a long way in building up the rest of our economy and improving our quality of life. Other priorities include restorative and rehabilitative criminal justice reform and fully funding our public schools. She vows to fight for full reproductive freedom and leveling the power imbalance between property owners and tenants.

    If elected, Vigil would bring a necessary perspective to the Capitol that is too often not present when our laws are being made. She is clearly the top candidate to support in this race.

    Running against her is Andres Pico, a current city council and utilities board member in Colorado Springs. Pico is a staunch pro-Trump Republican who is opposed to abortion rights, skeptical of climate change, and is “a life member of the NRA and a defender of the Second Amendment.” Pico has fought for years against the closure of the Martin Drake Power Plant, the last coal-fired plant in a downtown urban area in Colorado, even though it releases over a million tons of toxic air pollution per year, on the basis that it’s “cost-effective.” He has tried to ban refugees from Middle Eastern countries from moving to Colorado Springs, and he is well known to promote disinformation on social media, particularly accusing Democrats of “gun running,” “sex trafficking,” and “spying on political opponents.” He must not be elected to a state office lest Colorado policies actually move backward.

    Libertarian John Hjersman is also on the ballot for a third time, having run for this seat in 2016 and 2018. He has served on the party’s state board of directors and has a classic Libertarian platform. He thinks the government’s COVID-19 response is a violation of freedoms and questions the scientific consensus on climate change.

    Stephanie Vigil

    Stephanie Vigil is running for District 16 representative to “fight for a solid foundation on which all Coloradans can thrive,” saying there’s no reason the state, with one of the strongest economies in the country, cannot ensure every individual and family has a roof over their

    Stephanie Vigil

    Stephanie Vigil is running for District 16 representative to “fight for a solid foundation on which all Coloradans can thrive,” saying there’s no reason the state, with one of the strongest economies in the country, cannot ensure every individual and family has a roof over their

State Representative, District 17

  • Incumbent State Rep. Tony Exum, who was first elected to the seat in 2012 after a 35-year career as a firefighter, has been a champion of Colorado working families. As the coronavirus has wreaked havoc on communities, Exum introduced and passed a housing assistance bill that bridged using federal CARES Act funds for eviction defense and development grants.

    Exum believes in high-quality, affordable health care for all and stands ready to take on ways to make health care dollars go further. Another of his priorities has been education. He was part of the sponsoring group behind Breakfast After the Bell, which provides access to nutritional meals for students in schools. This session, he worked on bills to provide emergency assistance to students in state universities and help children in foster care obtain their driver’s licenses. Exum has also focused on investment in renewable energy and protecting public lands, earning him a 100% lifetime score from Conservation Colorado.

    Exum is the clear choice in the upcoming election.

    Two challengers also have eyes on the seat: Rob Blancken and Susan Quilleash-Nelson. Blancken is a retired water treatment specialist with Colorado Springs Utilities. On his campaign website are the usual Republican positions, but what’s overtly missing is his far-right-wing extremist philosophy. In 2016, Blancken was photographed at the Republican state convention running for national delegate wearing a sign describing himself as a Tea Party member. Blancken has also protested gun violence vigils with other gun rights activists, once even trying to get near the lectern of a vigil with a protest sign. Despite a long history of conservative activism, Blancken suddenly stopped talking about his previously held extreme anti-immigration and anti-gun-safety views. Progressive voters beware.

    Libertarian candidate Quilleash-Nelson is a substitute teacher in Colorado Springs. She has previously run for District 17 and ran for the state senate as well. But in all those campaigns and all that time, Quilleash-Nelson has seemingly made no policy statements, public positions on the issues, or even had a website or social media profile to inform people on her candidacy. In a 2012 candidate survey, however, she failed to address a question on the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) while publicly endorsing forcing undocumented graduates of Colorado schools to pay out-of-state tuition for Colorado universities. This is not the kind of representation progressives want in the Statehouse.

    Tony Exum

    Incumbent State Rep. Tony Exum, who was first elected to the seat in 2012 after a 35-year career as a firefighter, has been a champion of Colorado working families.

    Tony Exum

    Incumbent State Rep. Tony Exum, who was first elected to the seat in 2012 after a 35-year career as a firefighter, has been a champion of Colorado working families.

State Representative, District 18

  • Incumbent State Rep. Marc Snyder has served District 18 since 2019, having come to the seat after a 12-year tenure as mayor of Manitou Springs. He also has a legal practice in estate law, primarily helping adults and children with disabilities.

    In addition to an interest in legislation aimed at protecting vulnerable citizens, Snyder has supported environmental protections, including sponsoring a bill for the legislature to detail the net impact that future legislation would have on greenhouse gas emissions. He has boosted efforts to connect Coloradans with vital housing, health, and education resources via 211 and the Department of Local Affairs as well as those aimed at bolstering small businesses with Energize Colorado grants. Among his other aims are to help the state better manage its natural resources and increasing transparency costs for health care services to reduce cost as a barrier to access to care.

    Synder is the most qualified candidate and should get the progressive vote in this race.

    He faces challengers Republican George Rapko and Libertarian Nathan Foutch. Rapko is a veteran living in Colorado Springs. In the numerous opportunities he has had to campaign and tell people about what he wants to do if elected, his almost singular position is that he wants to get more Republicans into office. And that’s when he even feels like speaking up; he ignores the majority of requests to expand on his single idea. Rapko offers no unique positions and seems only to be seeking office to be in power.

    Foutch is a Colorado Springs resident and has been connected to right-wing militia and vigilante groups. He has said the government has no business making public health decisions to protect people from the coronavirus. Voters should avoid both Rapko and Foutch at all costs and reelect Snyder to another term in the Colorado House.

    Marc Snyder

    Incumbent State Rep. Marc Snyder has served District 18 since 2019, having come to the seat after a 12-year tenure as mayor of Manitou Springs. He also has a legal practice in estate law, primarily helping adults and children with disabilities.

    Marc Snyder

    Incumbent State Rep. Marc Snyder has served District 18 since 2019, having come to the seat after a 12-year tenure as mayor of Manitou Springs. He also has a legal practice in estate law, primarily helping adults and children with disabilities.

State Representative, District 22

  • A small-business owner and the wife of a retired police officer, Mary Parker will work with Republicans and Democrats to help our families and small businesses recover. Her push for bipartisanship combined with progressive stances on certain points give her a good shot at resonating with Jefferson County voters and flipping this seat this election cycle.

    Before co-owning a small business, Parker was a manager with Hewlett-Packard for two decades. She spent several years as a court-appointed special advocate and a certified parent educator—roles where she worked to improve situations for abused and neglected children and to help guide parents who want to reestablish custody.

    Key to Parker’s political approach has been to seek a more bipartisan environment. She advocated in The Denver Post for more bipartisanship and choosing what’s best for the people over party politics. This is perhaps most apparent in the balance of being a strong proponent of sensible gun laws while also supporting responsible gun ownership. To this end, she is a member of Gifford’s Colorado Gun Owners for Safety and has noted that the liberties granted by the Constitution must still be exercised for the common good. She has the support of the notable organizations Everytown for Gun Safety/Moms Demand Action and Colorado Ceasefire.

    Among the other positions she has taken publicly are accountability for local law enforcement, increased access to mental health resources, abortion rights, renewable energy and funding for open spaces, Medicaid expansion, and increasing the minimum wage.

    In competitive District 22, Parker is the best candidate to bring progressive values and policy to the legislature.

    The incumbent she aims to defeat is State Rep. Colin Larson, who is also a local business owner in District 22. His campaign website lays out a fairly general conservative platform. He proudly claims his opposition to the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) since its introduction and expanding health coverage in the state. He thinks the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) is “perhaps the best check on the growth of government enacted by any state.” Larson is a “champion for defending our Second Amendment rights” and thinks that red-flag laws, which allow law enforcement to temporarily remove weapons from people experiencing crisis, are “bad legislation.” These are the same kind of ideas Republicans and conservatives have trotted out again and again.

    Also running is Margot Herzl, a former music teacher and office administrator in Jefferson County. She is a longtime Libertarian activist in the county and a first-time candidate. Her only overtly stated policy positions are supporting TABOR, term limits for public officials, and opposition to the national popular vote. There is no mention of any views on the myriad other important issues facing the country today, and that kind of limited platform isn’t one that has earned our support.

    Mary Parker

    A small-business owner and the wife of a retired police officer, Mary Parker will work with Republicans and Democrats to help our families and small businesses recover.

    Mary Parker

    A small-business owner and the wife of a retired police officer, Mary Parker will work with Republicans and Democrats to help our families and small businesses recover.

State Representative, District 23

  • Incumbent State Rep. Chris Kennedy has served House District 23 since first being elected in 2016. He is a former architectural engineer who left that field to pursue “solving public policy problems instead.” This past session, Kennedy was elected by his colleagues to serve as assistant majority leader of the Democratic Caucus. In his time in office, he has proven to be a communicative representative who has his finger on the pulse of an impressively wide array of issues.

    Kennedy’s top priorities at the end of this year were drawn to immediate needs: police accountability legislation and coronavirus relief measures for both families and small businesses. He has also been vocal in refuting the Trump administration’s false attacks on Colorado’s vaunted vote-by-mail system, emphasizing how accessible and secure our experiences have been. His yearlong efforts have ranged from health insurance transparency and insurance reform to renters’ rights laws and investment in affordable housing. Kennedy has also been a leader in the battle against the opioid epidemic and for lowering insurance premiums and rates across the state. In his public messaging, he has consistently backed doing more to support mental health access, housing assistance, abortion rights, and a number of approaches to battle climate change, such as carbon pollution limits, infrastructure for electric vehicles, and steps toward 100% renewable energy.

    The clear progressive choice in this race is Kennedy.

    Challenging him for the seat are Fred Clifford and Doug Anderson. Clifford is a machinist and Republican activist. Like a lot of other Republican candidates on the ballot this year, Clifford has publicly offered up no ideas of what he wants to do in the legislature. But he does want you to know that he likes the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), which is killing the state’s ability to fund education and transportation like it should. He also doesn’t like red-flag laws, which help protect communities by keeping guns away from violent criminals and domestic abusers. Voters should reject Clifford and his handful of bad ideas.

    Anderson, who is a former Lakewood city council member and a Libertarian, is also on the ballot. He has not commented on his positions to the press or on social media, so all we can say is that he’s supportive of the Libertarian Party of Colorado’s idea to privatize public education in the state. A progressive voter should instead support Kennedy’s experience and proven record.

    Chris Kennedy

    Incumbent State Rep. Chris Kennedy has served House District 23 since first being elected in 2016.

    Chris Kennedy

    Incumbent State Rep. Chris Kennedy has served House District 23 since first being elected in 2016.

State Representative, District 24

State Representative, District 25

  • Incumbent State Rep. Lisa Cutter is running for reelection in District 25. She’s held the seat since 2019; before that, she owned her own small business, a public relations and communications consulting firm. Cutter has an eye toward environmental legislation, mental health and education services, and a more transparent government. Cutter is a vocal advocate for bipartisanship and working with anyone who will put politics aside to do what’s best for Colorado. Among her legislative accomplishments is the Moving Colorado to Zero Waste bill, which was converted into a study committee she chairs. She also co-sponsored a mandate for schools to now include behavioral-health-related absences as excused.

    Cutter is active in community engagement both online and off and believes in encouraging civil discourse among her constituents with pandemic-conscious events like “Virtual Community Coffees” and virtual town halls. Her stances span a wide range of issues — from holding that reproductive care is fundamental for women and families to asserting we must address environmental racism and injustice to promoting the voices of those facing LGBTQ discrimination.

    With her solid track record, Cutter is the clear candidate of choice in District 25.

    She faces Republican Donald Rosier, a civil engineer and former Jefferson County commissioner. Rosier seems to have some bona fides for the Statehouse, but he isn’t acknowledging the present we’re facing with the pandemic. One of the few things he has talked about is supporting “economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic,” but he makes no mention of what that means specifically. He doesn’t speak to education, public health, or any number of economic issues related to the pandemic. Cutter, by contrast, has a long list of COVID-19 resources for everything from government updates to ways for small-business owners and unemployed workers to find financial help and how students and their families can access emergency food programs. Stick with the proven leader, Cutter.

    Lisa Cutter

    Incumbent State Rep. Lisa Cutter is running for reelection in District 25. She’s held the seat since 2019; before that, she owned her own small business, a public relations and communications consulting firm.

    Lisa Cutter

    Incumbent State Rep. Lisa Cutter is running for reelection in District 25. She’s held the seat since 2019; before that, she owned her own small business, a public relations and communications consulting firm.

State Representative, District 26

State Representative, District 27

  • Incumbent State Rep. Brianna Titone took office in 2019 and has brought her scientific background in technology and geology to public policy. As a scientist, Titone will listen to the facts and data when it comes to COVID-19.

    As the first openly transgender woman to be elected to office in the state, she has fought tirelessly against anti-LGBTQ bills and ending discriminatory, draconian policies against marginalized groups. She’s notable for equity concerns on things like improved transportation infrastructure and access, equity in per-pupil public school funding, and advancing technology access for all with increased broadband. And with her background in the sciences, it’s no surprise she’s sponsored climate action bills to reduce pollution, to protect water quality, and to boost energy efficiency.

    Titone’s policies and record combined make her an unequivocal progressive choice.

    Challenging her for the seat are Vicki Pyne and Cory Schaeffer. Pyne is an Arvada small-business owner, and this is her third time running to represent District 27. Her website has an issues page, but she seems to hold only one unrelated to the pandemic: that she “understands” about health care. It’s her pandemic stances that are concerning, though. Her push is to allow businesses to open without public health restrictions and to force schools to do the same. Her social media page is full of many anti-science ideas about the coronavirus, especially her endorsement of Fox News’ Tucker Carlson saying that there’s no proof the lockdowns protected people and “probably” caused more deaths based on no real information. This limited foresight and dismissal of reality are not what anyone wants for representation.

    The other person on the ballot, Schaeffer, has little online presence apart from his name being listed among the Libertarian Party of Colorado’s slate of candidates. What Schaeffer wants to do or what he believes in is a blank, other than his assumed agreement with the Libertarian Party platform. That’s not what Colorado needs. We recommend that the people of House District 27 reelect Titone.

    Brianna Titone

    Incumbent State Rep. Brianna Titone took office in 2019 and has brought her scientific background in technology and geology to public policy. As a scientist, Titone will listen to the facts and data when it comes to COVID-19.

    Brianna Titone

    Incumbent State Rep. Brianna Titone took office in 2019 and has brought her scientific background in technology and geology to public policy. As a scientist, Titone will listen to the facts and data when it comes to COVID-19.