Support

Measure HH: Local Fire Prevention and Open Space by the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority - YES

Vote YES on Measure HH to establish a ten-year special tax of $68 per year on developed parcels within the district, in order to drive approximately $1,940,000 toward fire prevention.

Measure HH asks voters to approve a flat-rate parcel tax of $68 on developed land in the Santa Monica Mountains and Hollywood Hills, directing approximately $1,940,000 toward much-needed fire-prevention measures. This work will be carried out by the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA), which does not receive permanent ongoing funding from local or state taxes. Unimproved parcels are exempt from the tax, as are families earning at or below 50 percent of the median family income for the Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale areas. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Metro Fair Market Rents Areas are also exempt from the tax, ensuring that only those who can afford it are asked to pay.

Why voting YES on Measure HH matters:
  • While climate change and record temperatures have lengthened and strengthened fire seasons, brush clearing can reduce the ease with which fires spread.
  • In addition to improving brush-clearing efforts, the funds raised by Measure HH will be used to address water quality, park ranger safety, and the acquisition of additional land to be protected against development. 
  • Deploy additional park ranger patrols on high fire-risk days
  • Improve fire safety around Mulholland Overlooks with additional irrigation and green space
  • Additional protection efforts in the region will not only keep human habitants safe, but provide species such as mountain lions and deer with the proper amount of space they need to thrive and ensure that populations do not crash.
Top Funders
  • Unfortunately, financial disclosures in regards to Measure HH have not been filed electronically and are not publicly available. 
  • Citizens for Los Angeles Wildlife (CLAW) has been vocal in their support of Measure HH.
  • No committees were formed in opposition to Measure HH.
Misinformation

There is no prominent misinformation about Measure HH.

 

Measure RR: School Upgrades and Safety Measure -- YES

Vote YES on Measure RR to authorize $7 billion in bonds to update and modernize public schools within the LAUSD.

Measure RR asks voters in the Los Angeles Unified School District to extend the current property tax rate that was previously authorized by voters. According to the ballot text itself, the rate and the duration of the tax may vary over the term of repayment but is estimated to be approximately $21 per $100,000 of assessed property value through 2055. Measure RR is estimated to generate roughly $330 million annually. This measure requires 55 percent voter approval.

Why voting YES on Measure RR matters:
  • Measure RR will fund the desperately needed renovations for upgrading the 70 percent of Los Angeles public schools that were built over 50 years ago.
  • By funding upgrades to remove lead paint, asbestos, and water-quality hazards in these schools, Measure RR is expected to create 120,000 jobs. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, a steady source of jobs over the next ten years will give a boost to the local Los Angeles economy.
  • Measure RR is for technology and school facilities only; no funds will be allocated to employee or administrator salaries and is subject to strict oversight through annual independent performance and financial audits.
  • COVID-19 distance-learning has greatly affected children and schools unable to afford the technology required to safely and effectively distance-learn. Measure RR will ensure that all Los Angeles public students will not be left behind in this new era of learning.
Top Funders

The committee created in support of Measure RR “Yes on Measure RR - Committee for Safe, Updated, Modernized Schools” has yet to file any contributions with the Secretary of State’s office. We are unable to provide monetary information until contributions are filed.

Misinformation

There is no prominent misinformation about Measure RR.

Proposition L: The Overpaid Executive Tax - YES

Vote YES on Prop L to add a proportional surcharge to any company whose top executive’s pay is at least 100 times more than the median worker’s pay at that company. 

Proposition L asks San Franciscans to issue an ordinance imposing a general, additional gross receipts tax on businesses that pay their top executive over $2.8 million annually at a progressive rate dependent on the ratio of executive/median worker salaries. For example, if the executive pay ratio is over 100:1 but less than 200:1, then the rate will be .1% and so on until the rate is capped at .6 percent. It is estimated by the Controller’s Office that the proposition will provide an annual revenue of $60 million to $140 million, depending on economic conditions. If passed by voters, the ordinance will take effect on January 1, 2022.

Why voting YES on Prop L matters:
  • The Overpaid Executive Tax will only apply to companies that contribute to the growing inequality between the average worker and top executives, targeting companies with executives who are paid over $2.8 million each year. Small businesses will not be hurt by this tax.
  • Over the next two years, San Francisco’s Department of Public Health budget will be cut by more than $250 million after already being underfunded and understaffed for years. Prop L is the best way to pay for these services by corporations that can afford to pay their fair share.
Misinformation
  • “Prop L will make businesses leave San Francisco.” --FALSE. Companies that can afford to pay their top executive at least $2.8 million annually can afford to pay the additional gross receipts tax that contributes to public services in San Francisco. The rate is considerably small when compared to total revenues that companies are making in San Francisco.

Prop B: Department of Sanitation and Streets, Sanitation and Streets Commission, and Public Works Commission - YES

Vote YES on Prop B to create the Department of Sanitation and Streets, Sanitation and Streets Commission, and a Public Works Commission in the City and County of San Francisco.

Prop B asks voters to amend the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco to establish a Department of Sanitation and Streets, as well as a Sanitation and Streets Commission and a Public Works Commission. Within the proposed Sanitation and Streets Commission, members shall serve four-year terms and will be created no earlier than July 1, 2022. Currently, San Francisco only has the Department of Public Works, in which sanitation is sporadically implemented by the director of Public Works at whim, resulting in affluent neighborhoods being cleaned while other neighborhoods are left without sanitation. Earlier this year, the previous director of Public Works, Mohammed Nuru, was charged by the FBI with corruption and bribery. Prop B provides citizen oversight to combat further corruption and allocates employees, resources, and the city’s budget to ensure sanitation for all, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why voting YES on Prop B matters:
  • Sanitation departments are found in almost every major American city except San Francisco. The people of San Francisco need this department more than ever in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Creating and sustaining a new Department of Sanitation and Streets would only increase the City of San Francisco’s spending by less than .0005%, between $2.5 million and $6 million, according to the SF Controller’s analysis.
  • Prop B establishes a citizen oversight commission to oversee spending and requires both the Department of Sanitation and the Department of Public Works to undergo annual audits by the Controller’s Office to eliminate waste and corruption.
Supporters:
  • Leading the contributions supporting Yes on Prop B is Laborers Pacific Southwest Regional Organization Coalition Issues, followed by the Northern CA District Council of Laborers PAC and Operating Engineers Local Union No. 3 Statewide PAC. 
  • Another top funder, Recology, is an employee-owned company that shifts traditional waste management to resource recovery through sustainable recovery practices.
  • There are no committees registered in opposition to Prop B at this time.
Misinformation

There is no prominent misinformation about Proposition B. 
 

Measure U: Richmond Business Tax - YES

Vote YES on Measure U to amend the business tax system and raise an estimated $9.45 million annually.

Measure U asks Richmond voters to decide whether to transition fro

Measure X: County of Contra Costa Transactions and Use Tax Ordinance - YES

Vote YES on Measure X to issue a county-wide general .5 percent sales tax to provide 20 years of revenue for publicly provided services in Contra Costa County.

Measure X asks voters to approve a general sales tax of .5 percent to be added to sales within Contra Costa County to provide a 20-year revenue source to fund both essential community and public-provided services in a sustainable way. Exemptions for the proposed sales tax include: groceries, prescription medicines, utilities, health services, and many more listed here. Estimates predict that Measure X will bring $81 million annually to the county to help fund critical services that could face severe budget cuts with the onset of COVID-19. The County Board of Supervisors will deliberate on oversight frameworks proposed by the community by the end of 2020.

Why voting YES on Measure X matters:
  • Measure X will ensure steady revenue toward emergency services that face longer response times. For example, East Contra Costa Fire, which is responsible for over 120,000 residents, only has three fire stations, which places pressure on the neighboring Contra Costa County Fire Protection District.
  • Contra Costa’s regional hospital continues to experience staff reductions in the midst of a $70 million budget deficit, with a concerning potential of discontinuing services for thousands of people during a pandemic. Measure X will provide immediate relief for these financially depleted services.
  • Early childhood programs, mental-health services, and interpersonal violence services have all been severely affected by the budget crisis, even before the pandemic. Underfunded local nonprofits are seeing a tremendous increase in people requesting these services with the onset of COVID-19. Measure X will help meet the needs of these highly used community services. 
Top Funders
  • The top contributor fueling the campaign in support of Measure X is Service Employees International Union Local 1021. SEIU Local 1021 represents almost 60,000 employees throughout Northern California in governments, health-care programs, and nonprofit agencies.
  • No committees were formed in opposition to Measure X.
Misinformation

There is no prominent misinformation about Measure X.


 

Prop K: Affordable Housing Authorization - YES

Vote YES on Prop K to authorize the city of San Francisco the authority to develop, construct, own, acquire, and rehabilitate up to 10,000 low-income rental housing units.

Proposition K asks San Franciscans to issue an ordinance pursuant to Article 34 of the California Constitution authorizing the City of San Francisco to establish municipal social housing of up to 10,000 low-income rental housing units. Proposition K also authorizes the City of San Francisco to take any actions deemed necessary and subject to applicable laws in the process of implementing the ordinance. Although approval of Proposition K does not directly result in costs to taxpayers, Proposition I’s Real Estate Transfer Tax (if passed) would partially fund the pilot program for Proposition K. The ordinance shall go into effect 10 days after the Board of Supervisors declare the official vote count with at least 50 percent+1 votes in support of Proposition K. 

Why voting YES on Prop K matters:
  • Article 34 within California’s Constitution was narrowly passed with pressure and backing from segregationists in 1950 to block affordable housing, which has effectively excluded Black tenants from accessing and affording housing. Black San Franciscans make up only 6 percent of the city’s total population but account for 37 percent of the total people experiencing homelessness, according to San Francisco Homeless Count & Survey Comprehensive Report 2019.
  • Municipal social housing is an internationally proven solution in similarly dense cities, such as Vienna, Austria, where 62 percent of households live in some form of social housing. These tenants spend at most 25 percent of their income on rent. 

Top Funders

Contributions in support of Proposition K were spearheaded by Laksh Bhasin, a software engineer at Pinterest interested in political activism, and Dean Preston, the first Democratic Socialist to be elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in just over 40 years representing District 5.

No committees were formed in opposition to Proposition K. 

Misinformation

There is no prominent misinformation about Proposition K.


 

 

Proposition to Authorize the Renewal and Restoration of a 0.25-Mill for the Purpose of Purchasing Natural Areas in Order to Preserve Them, Paying the Costs of Operating a Land Preservation Program and Paying the Costs of Maintaining the Land Purchased

The proposal states, “Shall the limitation on taxes which may be imposed each year for all purposes on real and tangible property in Washtenaw County be increased as provided in Section 6, Article 9 of the Michigan Constitution and the Board of Commissioners be

Saginaw County Health Department New Millage Proposal

The proposal states, “For the purpose of reinforcing public health infrastructure and restoring capacity; to ensure adequate staffing, data analysis and reporting, critical technology needs, broader capacity to provide direct services, adequate facilities, reso