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Al Muratsuchi is listed in the Progressive Voters Guide below. The Courage California Voter Guide compiles the information that allows you to make informed decisions about the races on your ballot, based on your values. Vote in every race on your ballot! It's our right and our responsibility. Please share this guide with your friends and family.

Al Muratsuchi  photo
Democrat
Al Muratsuchi


Al Muratsuchi has lived in Southern California for nearly 25 years. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2016. According to campaign materials, he is for re-election to bring good jobs and quality education to his district, as well as improve environmental protections and veteran services. 

In the Assembly, Muratsuchi has advanced legislation to keep aerospace jobs in the state, increase funding for public education, oppose oil drilling throughout California’s coastlines, and to improve the services provided to homeless and disabled veterans. Muratsuchi currently sits on the Budget Committee, Environmental Safety and Toxins Materials Committee, Natural Resources Committee, Utilities and Energy Committee, and the Veteran Affairs Committee. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served as a Torrance School Board member and as a Deputy Attorney General in the California Department of Justice.

Muratsuchi is a supporter of progressive economic policies and environmental protections. Our environmental justice allies work with him closely in advancing environmental priorities. That said, he has a clear history of casting bad votes on criminal justice reform measures. In 2019, he scored a 64 out of 100 on Courage Score, and has a lifetime score of 58, mostly due to his continued unwillingness to support progressive justice reforms. His district is somewhat purple, but his constituents have consistently voted in support of reforming our racist, broken criminal justice system. It is deeply troubling that Muratsuchi refuses to join them.

Muratsuchi is running against Angelica Scherp (D), Connie Sullivan (D), Richard Vaugh (D), Margie Hoyt (D), Stacey Golden (D), Cathy Familathe (D), Sara Deen (D), Donald Dear (D), Bobbi Buecher (D), Thomas Brewer (R), Janice Webb (R), Peter Michel (R), Martha Logan (R), Johnny Lauro (R), Williams Valladares (R), Eric Schuchman (R), Frank Scotto (R), Arthur Schaper (R). Though we disagree with Muratsuchi’s stances and votes on criminal justice reform, his local support and relationships with community leaders support progressive momentum and make him a strong choice in this race. That said, a viable progressive challenger would deserve a close look.
 

Last updated: 2020-02-29


66th Assembly District

66th Assembly District

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You are viewing content from a previous election (March 3rd, 2020). You can view information for the current election here.

State Assembly, 66th District

Member of the State Assembly

Al Muratsuchi  photo
Democrat


Al Muratsuchi has lived in Southern California for nearly 25 years. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2016. According to campaign materials, he is for re-election to bring good jobs and quality education to his district, as well as improve environmental protections and veteran services. 

In the Assembly, Muratsuchi has advanced legislation to keep aerospace jobs in the state, increase funding for public education, oppose oil drilling throughout California’s coastlines, and to improve the services provided to homeless and disabled veterans. Muratsuchi currently sits on the Budget Committee, Environmental Safety and Toxins Materials Committee, Natural Resources Committee, Utilities and Energy Committee, and the Veteran Affairs Committee. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served as a Torrance School Board member and as a Deputy Attorney General in the California Department of Justice.

Muratsuchi is a supporter of progressive economic policies and environmental protections. Our environmental justice allies work with him closely in advancing environmental priorities. That said, he has a clear history of casting bad votes on criminal justice reform measures. In 2019, he scored a 64 out of 100 on Courage Score, and has a lifetime score of 58, mostly due to his continued unwillingness to support progressive justice reforms. His district is somewhat purple, but his constituents have consistently voted in support of reforming our racist, broken criminal justice system. It is deeply troubling that Muratsuchi refuses to join them.

Muratsuchi is running against Angelica Scherp (D), Connie Sullivan (D), Richard Vaugh (D), Margie Hoyt (D), Stacey Golden (D), Cathy Familathe (D), Sara Deen (D), Donald Dear (D), Bobbi Buecher (D), Thomas Brewer (R), Janice Webb (R), Peter Michel (R), Martha Logan (R), Johnny Lauro (R), Williams Valladares (R), Eric Schuchman (R), Frank Scotto (R), Arthur Schaper (R). Though we disagree with Muratsuchi’s stances and votes on criminal justice reform, his local support and relationships with community leaders support progressive momentum and make him a strong choice in this race. That said, a viable progressive challenger would deserve a close look.
 

Last updated: 2020-02-29


Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

33rd Congressional District

Member of the House of Representatives

Ted Lieu photo
Democrat

Builds Power
Builds Progress
Builds Representation


Rep. Ted Lieu is from Taiwan and immigrated to the United States at age three and currently resides in Torrance, CA. He is the incumbent, having served in Congress since 2015. According to campaign materials, Rep. Lieu is running to keep his seat because he is the leader that best reflects the needs of the people in his district. 

In Congress, Rep. Lieu has been a voice and advocate for marginalized communities. He was an initial author of legislation to ban so-called “gay conversion therapy” and has been leading the fight to end the unjust system of money bail. He currently sits on the House Committee on the Judiciary and the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, as well as four subcommittees. Prior to Rep. Lieu’s election to Congress, he served in the Torrance City Council, State Assembly, and State Senate. 

Rep. Lieu is running against Liz Barris (B), Albert Maxwell Goldberg (D), James P. Bradley (R), Sarah Sun Liew (R), and Kenneth Wright (NPP). Rep. Lieu is the best progressive choice because of his track record of advancing progressive policies and his commitment to being a leader that reflects the needs of the people. 

According to our analysis, Rep. Lieu is the strongest choice for progressive leadership in office.
 

Last updated: 2020-02-28


43rd Congressional District

Member of the House of Representatives

Maxine Waters photo
Democrat

Builds Power
Builds Progress
Builds Representation



Representative Maxine Waters is from St. Louis, MO, and moved to Los Angeles in 1961. She is the incumbent, having served in Congress since 1991. According to campaign materials, she is running for re-election to continue to advocate for the needs of her district and to hold those in power accountable.

In Congress, Rep. Waters has secured $10 billion in Section 108 loan guarantees, spurred economic and infrastructure development, and played a pivotal role in establishing the “Youth Fair Chance” program, which provides unemployed youth with skills training for well paying jobs. Rep. Waters currently serves as Chair of the House Financial Services Committee, where she leads the fight to hold financial institutions accountable for predatory behavior. Prior to being elected to Congress, she served in the State Assembly.

Rep. Waters is being challenged by Omar Navarro (R), and Joe Collins III (R). Rep. Waters is the best progressive choice because of her grassroots philosophy of listening to the people she serves and fighting on their behalf.

According to our analysis, Rep. Waters is the strongest choice for progressive leadership in office.
 

Last updated: 2020-02-28


Los Angeles County

Los Angeles District Attorney

George Gascón photo
Non-Partisan



George Gascón, a Cuban immigrant and longtime LAPD police officer, is known as a groundbreaking progressive leader in criminal justice reform in the country. Gascón is running for District Attorney in Los Angeles because he believes the way the criminal justice system operates in Los Angeles must change.

George Gascón moved back to L.A. to run for District Attorney because of his passion for the city, leaving his role as District Attorney in San Francisco, where he was appointed district attorney in 2011 and was re-elected twice. As SF District Attorney, Gascón led a slate of progressive reforms including lowering incarceration rates, expunging more than 9,000 marijuana convictions dating back to 1975, and launching a first-of-its-kind website that provides data on prosecutions, caseloads, and trial outcomes in order to increase accountability and transparency in the criminal justice system.

Gascón started his career as a beat cop in Los Angeles. His trajectory took him to the top of the LAPD, where as Assistant Chief, he oversaw operations the more than 9,000 officers in the LAPD. Throughout his career, Gascón has demonstrated the ability to think in new ways about seemingly intractable problems in criminal justice, and to create meaningful change in the culture and operations of police departments including the LAPD, the Mesa Police Department, and the SFPD. In 2011, then-California Attorney General Gavin Newsom tapped Gascón to be San Francisco District Attorney where he has become known as a visionary in criminal justice reform.

Gascón is challenging incumbent Jackie Lacey, who has consistently resisted public pressure to hold police accountable for the more than 550 people who have been killed by police in Los Angeles County since her election in 2013. Other candidates include public defender, Rachel A. Rossi. Gascón is the strongest progressive choice for district attorney because of his visionary leadership and outstanding track record in criminal justice reform, as well as his experience and demonstrated ability to adapt.

According to our analysis, Gascón is the strongest choice for progressive leadership in office.
 

Last updated: 2020-02-29


Los Angeles County Superior Court

Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #42

Linda L. Sun photo


Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Linda L. Sun currently serves as Supervising Deputy Attorney General for the California Department of Justice. She began her career as Deputy Attorney General in the Licensing Section of the Attorney General’s Office, California Department of Justice. In her current role, she oversees significant caseloads addressing potential abuses of consumer trust. 

She received her undergraduate degree in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her law degree from Southwestern University.

Last updated: 2020-02-20




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: WELL QUALIFIED

Robert “Bob” Villa is a Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney currently working in the Special Trials department. Villa has spent over 30 years in the district attorney’s office. 
In 2016 he was recognized by Justice for Homicide Victims as a “Prosecutors of the Year” for “exemplary work in the pursuit of justice on behalf of murder victims.” 

He received his undergraduate degree from the University Of California Irvine and a Juris Doctorate from Western State University of Law. 

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #72

Steve Morgan photo


Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: WELL QUALIFIED

Steve Morgan currently serves as a Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney, a Lt. Colonel in the Army JAG Corps, and is a law professor.

Morgan received his undergraduate degree from Messiah College in Pennsylvania and went on to complete a dual J.D./MBA at the University of Hawai'i. Upon graduation from the program, Morgan was commissioned as a First Lieutenant in the Army JAG Corps. He was also an adjunct professor at The John Marshall School of Law in Chicago and currently teaches at the Abraham Lincoln University School of Law in Los Angeles.  
 

Last updated: 2020-02-28




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Robert F. Jacobs is the founder of the immigration and criminal defense law firm of Robert F. Jacobs & Associates, PLC. 

Jacobs is a Certified Specialist in Immigration and Nationality Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. He was named 2019 Attorney of the Year by the local Southeast District Bar Association (SEDBA). He is also a member of the American Society of Legal Advocates (ASLA), a “nationwide organization of elite lawyers in practice today.” 

Jacobs received his undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin – La Crosse and earned his law degree from Marquette University Law School. 

Last updated: 2020-02-28




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: NOT QUALIFIED

Myanna Dellinger is a professor of law focused on international law and climate change. She is an Associate Law Professor, University of South Dakota School of Law.

Dellinger was born in Denmark and has lived in southern California for over 20 years. She received her J.D. from the University of Oregon School of Law. She contributes often to law journals and outlets, and hosts the podcasts "The Global Energy and Environmental Law Podcast" and "Dellinger on the Law." 

She signed an open letter to Congress opposing strategic lawsuit against public participation (SLAPP) laws in 2015. SLAPP laws are intended to intimidate or deter objections to public discourse with the threat of massive legal lawsuits that would exhaust the resources of individuals or organizations. Before teaching at the University of South Dakota, she was an associate professor at Western State University College of Law.

Last updated: 2020-02-28


Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #76

Emily Cole photo


Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Emily Cole has spent 13 years as a Deputy District Attorney for Los Angeles County. She was born and raised in Los Angeles County and received her undergraduate degree at San Francisco State University and her law degree from Golden Gate University. 

Cole currently specializes in the prosecution of sex crimes and domestic violence and has tried high profile cases, including the prosecution of Dino Guglielmelli, a wealthy businessman that tired to hire a hitman to kill his wife. She also led the prosecution of Shehada Issa in 2017, who was found guilty of murdering his wife and son and was sentenced to life in prison. 

This is an open seat, and Cole is running against one challenger: “Judge” Mike Cummins, who is a retired judge and attorney. Cummins has been rated as NOT QUALIFIED by the Los Angeles County Bar Association. Cummins has run unsuccessfully for numerous offices, including San Luis Obispo County District Attorney in 2018. 

According to our analysis, Cole represents the best choice for judge in this race.

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #80



Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

David Berger has been a Deputy District Attorney for the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office for over 20 years. In 2009, he served for nine months as part of a transition team in the City Attorney’s office before leaving to return again to the District Attorney’s office.  

Berger is a District Attorney's Office Alternative Sentencing Designee as part of the county’s Community Collaborative Courts. He previously ran for judge in 2018. 

Berger was born in London and moved to the U.S. in 1989. He received his law degrees from the University of London and Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. 

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Nick C. Rini photo


Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Nick C. Rini has been a Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney for 35 years. He briefly practiced civil law before joining the DA’s office in 1984. 

Rini received his law degree from the University of San Diego School of Law.

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Klint McKay photo


Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: WELL QUALIFIED

McKay currently is an administrative law judge in the California Department of Social Services. He hears Affordable Care Act appeals for the Department of Social Services. 

Prior to his role as an administrative law judge, from 2006-2014 he served in the Health Quality Enforcement section of the California Attorney General’s office. 

He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan, his MBA from the University of California at Berkeley, Haas School of Business, and his law degree at Wayne State University. 

In 2018, McKay pulled papers to run against newly appointed Los Angeles Superior Court judge, Kristin S. Escalante, but withdrew from the race.

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #97



Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Sherry L. Powell is a Deputy District Attorney for Los Angeles County. Her website states she has predominately prosecuted “crimes of violence, including murder, child molestation, rape, and domestic violence.” 

In 2014 she prosecuted Steve DeSisto, co-owner of a popular deli, for sexually assaulting a woman in a case that gained local attention. Powell received her law degree from the University of California Los Angeles School of Law. 

Last updated: 2020-02-29




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: WELL QUALIFIED

Timothy D. Reuben is the founder, Managing Principal, and CEO of the firm Reuben Raucher & Blum. The firm advertises services for civil litigation, insurance law, employment law, family law as well as appeals. Reuben contributes regularly to his firm's blog on a variety of legal issues. 

Reuben received his undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard University

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #129



Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Kenneth M. Fuller is a Los Angeles County Deputy D.A, Commissioner on the City of Fullerton Traffic and Circulation Commission, and a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve. Fuller joined the DA’s office in 2006 and has worked in the VIP SpecialVictim's Unit, Hardcore Gang Division, and Environmental Crimes Divisions. 

Fuller also volunteers as a teacher as part of the LADA Project LEAD program. Fuller received his undergraduate degree from University of Southern California and his law degree from USC’s Gould School of Law. Fuller ran unsuccessfully for judge in 2018.

Last updated: 2020-02-23




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Mark MacCarley is the Managing Attorney/Consultant at MacCarley & Rosen, PLC and a retired U.S. Army General. He resides in Glendale, where he was raised and serves on the Civil Service Commission. 

In 2016, MacCarley ran unsuccessfully as a Republican in the primary for State Assembly’s District 43. He ran in 2017 for Glendale City Council and lost. 

MacCarley received his MBA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and his law degree from Loyola Law School. 
 

Last updated: 2020-02-20




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: QUALIFIED

Bruce A. Moss is a private practitioner specializing in family law and is a volunteer Temporary Judge for the Los Angeles County Superior Court.

Moss received his Bachelor's Degree from the University of Southern California and his law degree from San Fernando Valley College of Law.

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Los Angeles County, Judge of the Superior Court, Position #162



Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: WELL QUALIFIED

Scott Andrew Yang is a Deputy District Attorney in Los Angeles County. He now works in the sex crimes division and was previously part of the juvenile crime department. Before joining the DA’s office, Yang was in private practice working on civil law matters. 

Yang’s family fled Vietnam in 1979 and spent two years as refugees before settling in Michigan. In 1984, they moved to Los Angeles. Yang received his undergraduate degree from UCLA and his law degree from Southwestern University School of Law. 

Last updated: 2020-02-20




Los Angeles County Bar Association ranking: WELL QUALIFIED

David D. Diamond is a criminal law attorney in Los Angeles County and has a Certified Legal Specialty in Criminal Law from the State Bar of California. 

He received his undergraduate degree from Michigan State University and his law degree law at Southwestern Law School. He also ran for judge in 2018. 

Last updated: 2020-02-20


Los Angeles County Ballot Measures

Measure FD

VOTE YES

Vote YES on Measure FD, LA County Fire District Parcel Tax

Measure FD would add a parcel tax of 6 cents per square foot on residential and commercial buildings in the unincorporated areas of LA County as well as in the 58 cities that contract with the county for fire protection and emergency services. (This does not include the city of Los Angeles, but does include many of the smaller cities in and around the city limits.) The parcel tax would cap out at 100,000 square feet and the money would be used to by the Los Angeles County Fire Department to hire more firefighters and paramedics and upgrade its equipment.

In a region famed for being prone to natural disasters, fires are among the most frequent large-scale crises we face. Climate change is making matters worse. All over the state, fire departments are being stretched by the increasing frequency with which they’re dispatched to battle major fires, and, as we learned in 2018, this means reinforcements and resources from elsewhere are not always available when they’re needed. LA County’s fire department also operates paramedic services, which are concurrently seeing an increase in demand. Both of these functions are vital to protecting the health and property of LA County’s citizens and worth funding. 

LA County’s fire department is funded entirely via property taxes -  it doesn’t receive any money from the county’s general fund. Because of this unique funding scheme they periodically have had to go to voters to pass parcel taxes for additional funding. The last time they did this, however, was over twenty years ago in 1997. Though the department has been late in getting their overtime report to voters, meaning they have not done everything they could have to document the need for this tax, it’s still worth voting YES. Too much rides on the fire department’s ability to provide quick, efficient service.

This measure requires a two-thirds vote to pass and the resulting tax would only apply in areas where the L.A. County Fire Department does its work. 

Vote YES on Measure FD.
 



County Measure R

VOTE YES

Vote Yes On Measure R

This proposition would authorize the Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission in Los Angeles to develop a Comprehensive Public Safety Reinvestment Plan, the goal of which would be to reduce incarceration, ease jail overcrowding, reduce recidivism -- in particular among mentally ill and chronically unhoused populations -- and mandate that alternatives to incarceration for vulnerable populations be studied and prioritized over the building of new jails. That’s already a mouthful, but it would also give the commission a greater ability to investigate police misconduct by giving them the power to subpoena testimony and evidence. 

The effort to get this on the ballot was organized by a grassroots organization called Reform L.A. Jails, led by Patrisse Cullors of Black Lives Matter, and it’s supported by the ACLU, Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles, Dignity and Power Now, Community Coalition, White People 4 Black Lives and Real Justice PAC. Tackling a culture that permits widespread police brutality, endangers the lives of people of color, and prioritizes incarceration over assistance is vitally important, and we get a chance to help do that by voting YES on Measure R. 

We strongly recommend a YES vote on Measure R.



Statewide Ballot Measures

Proposition 13

VOTE YES

Vote YES On Prop 13, School and College Facilities Bond

This proposition would provide $9 billion for desperately needed renovations to public preschools and grade schools throughout the state, and $6 billion for construction to community colleges, the Cal State system, and the UC system. This will allow the state of California to use tax revenue to pay for improvements that local communities cannot afford. 

The funding would come from bonds the state would pay back over 35 years, totaling an estimated $26 billion, which includes $15 billion in principal and $11 billion in interest. This investment is well worth the costs. It takes money, after all, to ensure that students -- especially those in districts that can’t afford major capital improvement projects -- do not have to learn in dangerous environments. 

The vast majority of Democrats in the state legislature support it, as does Gov. Newsom, and the only major opposition is a group called the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association. This is the group famous for destroying California’s school funding system in 1978 through another proposition, ironically one that was also dubbed Prop 13. The group spends most of its time lobbying to reduce tax rates. It has never shown any interest in supporting California’s children, at least if that means wealthy individuals or giant corporations would pay their fair share in taxes.

Critics of the measure have pointed out that the ballot measure’s language includes a provision that frees new multi-family developments around subway stops and bus stations from school impact fees. This provision will make it easier for developers to build apartment buildings within a half-mile of public transit but could also drive up the cost of new housing and take funds away from school districts across the state. Despite this provision, the measure is still supported by most education groups in the state, who believe the overall funding allocation to schools outweighs the impact of reduced funding to school districts located near transit hubs. 2020’s Prop 13 is worth the investment since it means children will soon be able to attend school in buildings that are retrofitted to withstand earthquakes and no longer have lead in their water. 

We strongly recommend a YES vote on Prop 13.