• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

  • The 2nd District covers eastern Prince William County, northern portions of Stafford County, and Quantico. The district tends to lean Democratic, however, recent elections have been narrowly won by Democratic candidates.

    Incumbent Delegate Candi Mundon King obtained her bachelor’s degree in political science from Norfolk State University, where she became a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Outside of the General Assembly, she works in the non-profit sector, making the educational system more accessible and equitable to special needs children. Mundon King and her husband, Josh King, reside in Dumfries with their three children, including a non-verbal autistic teenage daughter.

    Del. Mundon King was elected in January 2021 after a special election to replace former Delegate Jennifer Carroll Foy. During her first legislative session, Del. Mundon King supported legislation that would allow essential workers to be eligible for worker’s compensation if diagnosed with the COVID-19 virus. This same legislation would also require hazard pay and personal protective equipment to essential workers during the pandemic. She supported legislation to prevent maternal mortality by establishing a task force to collect data on maternal health outcomes.

    Del. Mundon King co-patroned the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back, “G3,” Program bill that grants free tuition at community colleges for low- and middle-income Virginians who study in certain fields. She voted for a 5% pay raise for Virginia teachers, hoping to retain quality educators and prevent high turnover, and approved funding to help schools reopen safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to require the state department of education to update its special education and related services to better accommodate students with disabilities.

    Working to make the promise of democracy real for us all, she co-patroned The Voting Rights Act of Virginia. This bill expands on the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 and prohibits discrimination at the polls. Mundon King voted for measures that make voting easier like removing some requirements on absentee and curbside voting and the requirement of a witness signature on absentee ballots in time of an emergency. She also supported the establishment of dropbox locations for voters to return their absentee ballots.

    With sex trafficking on the rise in the 2nd District, Del. Mundon King chose to focus on combating the problem by introducing a bill that would give more rights to victims of sex trafficking and requires the state to identify and better respond to crimes involving sex trafficking. In addition to this, she supported legislation that would allow victims of sex trafficking to have their records expunged as they work to rebuild their lives.

    Mundon King’s opponent is Republican candidate Gina Ciarcia. The wife of a Marine veteran, Ciarcia is centering her campaign as a proponent for school choice and opposes a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. She also does not support the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which requires the state to transition to renewable energy.

    Due to her support of public education, voting rights, and workers’ rights, Del. Candi Mundon King is the most progressive choice for the House of Delegates 2nd District.

    Candi Mundon King

    Incumbent Delegate Candi Mundon King obtained her bachelor’s degree in political science from Norfolk State University, where she became a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

  • Virginia's 13th District encompasses Prince William County and the city of Manassas Park. Voting trends for the district show that the area is highly competitive, with most elections being won by less than a 10% margin.

    Democratic incumbent Delegate Danica Roem was elected in 2017. She is the first openly transgender woman elected to the Virginia legislature and the first openly transgender person elected to any state office in the United States. Roem is originally from the Manassas area and worked as a reporter for The Gainesville Times. She attended St. Bonaventure University in New York. Roem serves on the Transportation, Communications, Technology and Innovation, and the Counties, Cities, and Towns committees.

    Before her election, Roem was uninsured for nearly three years and went without health coverage. She voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians in 2018. In 2020, Roem supported capping the price of insulin to $50 and repealing medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion access. This year, she voted to make health insurance plans with abortion coverage available on the state exchange. She also patroned legislation to remove age limits on autism-related health coverage. She continues to fight for healthcare for LGBTQ Virginians by sponsoring legislation that ensures coverage for transition-related care.

    As a reporter, Roem covered transportation and when she first ran in 2017, Roem’s priority was fixing Route 28 along with other transit issues in her district. During her time as a delegate, Roem secured funding to widen Rte. 28, expand mass transit in western Prince William County, and improve dangerous intersections in the district. She also fought to fully fund the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA), which is responsible for long-term transportation planning, and was appointed to serve on the NVTA in 2020.

    Roem also supports strengthening the state’s public education system by increasing funding and addressing inequities within the system. In 2021, she voted for a 5% pay raise for Virginia teachers. In 2019, she co-sponsored legislation aimed at eliminating Virginia’s school-to-prison pipeline. She also supported legislation that prevents students from being shamed for failure to pay school meal debt and makes it easier for families to apply for free and reduced meals.

    As a delegate, Roem advocates for government accountability, accessibility, and transparency. She has carried legislation to strengthen the Freedom of Information Act in Virginia. In 2021, she voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits discrimination at the polls, and other measures aimed at making voting more accessible in the Commonwealth. She also wants to enact reform in Virginia to eliminate conflicts of interest in the campaign finance system.

    Del. Roem is facing a challenge from Christopher Stone, a military veteran, and former Trump administration appointee. Stone opposes efforts to hold police accountable for the violence they enact on communities. He also opposes efforts to reduce Virginia’s prison population by reforming sentencing practices. He does not support laws aimed at keeping our communities safe from gun violence.

    Due to her support of affordable healthcare access, transportation funding, public education, and making our democracy stronger by increasing transparency and voting access, Del. Danica Roem is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Danica Roem

    Democratic incumbent Delegate Danica Roem was elected in 2017. She is the first openly transgender woman elected to the Virginia legislature and the first openly transgender person elected to any state office in the United States.
  • Virginia’s 31st District encompasses parts of Fauquier and Prince William counties. The district is competitive but leans Democratic with Del. Guzman receiving 53% of the vote in 2019.

    Incumbent Delegate Elizabeth Guzman is an activist, public administrator, and social worker from Peru. In 2017, she was elected as the first Hispanic female immigrant to join the General Assembly. She was invited by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to give the 2018 Spanish language response to Trump’s State of the Union address. Del. Guzman currently serves on President Joe Biden’s National Latino Leadership Council. She lives with her husband, four children, and mother in Dale City.

    A proud union member, Guzman is dedicated to supporting the rights of workers. She sponsored legislation to end Virginia’s ban on public sector collective bargaining and was chief co-patron of the bill to raise the minimum wage. She has also advocated for paid sick days, sponsoring a bill on the issue every year since taking office. In 2021, she sponsored legislation to require paid sick leave to home healthcare workers. She also supports the repeal of Virginia’s right-to-work law, which greatly undermines the power of unions.

    As an immigrant, Del. Guzman is a strong supporter of immigrant rights. She first got involved in politics in 2006 to end Prince William County’s partnership with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). She has worked to expand driving privileges to undocumented immigrants so that they can get to work, school, and worship safely and voted to grant in-state tuition to undocumented students. She also advocated for legislation to pay farmworkers a minimum wage and has prioritized outreach to Spanish-speaking communities in the district.

    Del. Guzman has worked hard to improve and fund the 31st District’s public school system. She currently serves as vice-chair of the House of Delegates Education Committee. She voted to increase teacher pay and increase the number of counselors in schools. She was named 2020’s “Legislator of the Year” by the Virginia Education Association and the Fairfax County Federation of Teachers. As a social worker, she saw firsthand the impact of the school-to-prison pipeline on Black and Brown students. She sponsored legislation to raise the age at which juveniles can be tried as adults from 14 to 16.

    Del. Guzman also understands the urgency of the climate crisis and introduced a resolution declaring climate change an emergency. A co-sponsor of the Green New Deal Virginia, she wants to transition to 100% clean energy and boost the economy by creating a workforce trained in green jobs. She has voted for bills to regulate toxins in water and to require localities to incorporate environmentally sustainable public transit in their city planning. She previously received an A+ rating from the Sierra Club for her dedication to environmental causes.

    Del. Guzman is facing a challenge from Ben Baldwin (R), a retired Marine and financial advisor from Prince William County. Baldwin opposes the right of workers to form unions and believes that Virginia should remain a right-to-work state. He also opposes efforts to hold police accountable for violence they inflict on communities.

    Due to her advocacy for working families and immigrants, the environment, and public education, Delegate Guzman is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 31st District.

    Elizabeth Guzman

    Incumbent Delegate Elizabeth Guzman is an activist, public administrator, and social worker from Peru. In 2017, she was elected as the first Hispanic female immigrant to join the General Assembly.
  • Virginia’s 40th District includes parts of Fairfax and Prince William counties. Voting trends show that this district is very competitive. Del. Dan Helmer narrowly defeated former Delegate Tim Hugo in 2019.

    Incumbent Delegate Dan Helmer was first elected in 2019. The son of an immigrant and the grandson of Holocaust survivors, Helmer graduated from West Point Military Academy in 2003. He is a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and was also deployed to South Korea. Currently a member of the Army Reserve, Helmer runs a small business where he helps veterans access healthcare. Helmer lives in Fairfax County with his wife and two sons.

    As the husband of a public school teacher, Helmer wants to increase funding for Virginia’s education system. He supports raising teacher salaries to prevent turnover, reducing classroom size, allocating more resources to our educators and students to better set them up for success. In 2021, he voted for providing additional resources to students and parents in kindergarten through third grade who are struggling with reading. He also supported giving additional funding to Virginia schools so that they can reopen safely during the pandemic.

    Helmer believes that climate change is the greatest threat that Virginians are facing and wants to guarantee access to clean water and air. He understands that Virginians need to reduce their carbon footprint and find more sustainable energy sources. He believes that part of doing this involves an immediate stop to the construction of new pipelines and fracking. Helmer was a chief co-patron of the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits Virginia to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

    Helmer is an advocate for reproductive rights, believing that Virginians should have the right to decide when and whether to become a parent. The delegate has supported legislation that would provide access to reproductive healthcare that includes cancer screenings, birth control, and safe and legal abortions. In 2020, he voted to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion care providers. He supported making abortion coverage available on the state health insurance exchange in 2021.

    Helmer supports making the promise of democracy real for us all by ensuring that our elections are free and accessible. He voted for same-day voter registration and making absentee voting easier by providing for prepaid postage on ballots, eliminating the need for a witness signature, and establishing no-excuse absentee voting in the Commonwealth. Helmer also supported extending early voting and the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits voter discrimination at the polls.

    Delegate Helmer is being challenged by Republican candidate Harold Pyon, a retired Army veteran. Pyon wants to use taxpayer money to support private education, supports the construction of pipelines carrying fracked gas, and wants to make it hard for Virginia workers to form unions by keeping its right-to-work laws in place.

    Due to his support of public education, abortion access, the environment, and voting access, Delegate Dan Helmer is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Dan Helmer

    Incumbent Delegate Dan Helmer was first elected in 2019. The son of an immigrant and the grandson of Holocaust survivors, Helmer graduated from West Point Military Academy in 2003. He is a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and was also deployed to South Korea.

  • The 50th District includes part of Prince William County and the city of Manassas. The district is competitive but leans Democratic. Del. Carter received 53% of the vote in 2019 and Senator Tim Kaine received 62% of the vote in 2018.

    Michelle Maldonado is a former attorney and small business owner. She was born in Massachusetts and raised by teachers who instilled in her the importance of education, equity, and hard work. She received her undergraduate degree at Barnard College at Columbia University and her law degree from The George Washington University School of Law. She has lived in Virginia for the past 28 years with her husband, a U.S. Air Force veteran, and her son.

    One of Maldonado’s first priorities if elected will be addressing the climate crisis. She supports the Virginia Clean Economy Act and sees it as a great start for investing in green infrastructure and jobs. She wants to ensure Virginia’s infrastructure is resilient to the weather challenges that climate change brings. She believes that creating green-collar jobs in the fields of renewable energy, electric vehicles, and recycled materials will be great for the environment and workers. She prioritizes funding affordable public transit as well as smart and sustainable land development as additional tools to combat the climate crisis.

    As a small business owner and working mother, Maldonado prioritizes policies to uplift Virginia families. She supports living wages for all workers so that people can live with dignity. She believes that paid family and medical leave, and high-quality, affordable childcare options for parents help keep people out of poverty. Maldonado also advocates for equal pay for women and minorities and will fight for policies to prevent workplace discrimination. She also supports boosting funding for affordable housing in Virginia.

    Maldonado supports educational policies that will uplift both teachers and students. She supports increasing teacher salaries and advocates for the collective bargaining rights of teachers and other public employees. She supports updates to school infrastructure, including new ventilation systems to provide clean air during the return to in-person teaching during the pandemic. She is in favor of free community colleges and public trade schools, as well as affordable public colleges and universities, so that individuals have access to higher education without having to go into debt.

    Maldonado wants to ensure all Virginians can participate in our fair and free elections She opposes any effort to create deliberate barriers to voting access. She recognizes that early and mail-in voting were crucial to keeping voters safe and healthy during the 2020 election. She knows that many restrictions to voting access unfairly target minorities and is dedicated to ensuring people of color have equal access to participating in our elections.

    Maldonado is running against Dr. Steve Pleickhardt (R), a dentist. Pleickhardt opposes the Virginia Clean Economy Act and the Virginia Green New Deal. He supports policies that will create barriers to voting. He also doesn’t believe that the rich and wealthy corporations that have benefitted from our community should have to pay their fair share in taxes.

    Due to her support for working families, the environment, voting rights, and criminal justice reform, Michelle Maldonado is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 50th District.

    Michelle Maldonado

    Michelle Maldonado is a former attorney and small business owner. She was born in Massachusetts and raised by teachers who instilled in her the importance of education, equity, and hard work.
  • The 51st District includes part of Prince William County. A competitive district, Del. Ayala flipped the seat in 2017 with 53% of the vote.

    A Prince William County native, Briana Sewell was raised by parents who were each United States Air Force members for over 20 years. She attended Prince William County Public Schools, and then received her bachelor’s degree in public policy from the College of William and Mary and a Master of Public Administration from American University. She has since worked providing constituent services for Congressman Gerry Connolly. She also helped found the Virginia Campaign for a Family Friendly Economy, which advocates for paid family and medical leave for working families.

    Due to her experience advocating for paid family and medical leave, Sewell supports policies that uplift Virginia’s families and economy. She worked to ensure federal employees receive 12 weeks of paid medical and family leave and other workers have access to sufficient leave and benefits. She also knows a well-funded education system is crucial to a strong economy. She will work to ensure school resources are equally distributed and every student has access to well-funded, quality education. She supports policies to lower the cost of college and fund other job training and vocational programs.

    Sewell particularly understands how women play a critical role in the economy. A strong advocate for fair pay and anti-discrimination laws in the workplace, she will work to lower the cost of childcare to ensure parents can afford to stay in the workforce. She will also advocate for childcare providers, who are often women and women of color. She knows that economic and reproductive rights are inherently tied together and will fight for people to have access to abortion, so they can choose when and whether to become parents.

    Sewell knows that paid family and medical leave must also go hand-in-hand with affordable and accessible healthcare coverage. She will work to further expand Medicaid and protect people with pre-existing conditions, She supports efforts to regulate prescription drug companies and reduce prescription costs. The pandemic has further revealed racial and socioeconomic biases in healthcare coverage, and Sewell will work to ensure there are no barriers to necessary healthcare.

    Sewell has advocated for the environment her entire career. While working in Congressman Connolly’s office, she tried to reduce pollutants in the district by shutting down the coal ash pond nearby. She believes that investing in green infrastructure will create high-paying jobs in the Commonwealth and will ensure that every citizen has access to clean water and air. She will work to fund green public transit options to limit emissions and traffic congestion.

    Sewell is running against Republican Tim Cox, a member of the U.S. Navy Reserve who lives in Woodbridge. Cox was born in Texas and raised in Brazil before joining the military. Cox opposes access to abortion. He is against a federally mandated minimum wage and inclusive policies that are welcoming of our LGBTQ neighbors.

    Due to her advocacy for Virginia working families, women’s rights, affordable healthcare, and the environment, Briana Sewell is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 51st District.

    Briana Sewell

    A Prince William County native, Briana Sewell was raised by parents who were each United States Air Force members for over 20 years.
  • The 52nd District includes part of Prince William County. The district is strongly Democratic. Del. Torian has won with more than 60% of the vote in every election since 2011.

    Incumbent Delegate Luke Torian has represented the 52nd District in the Virginia House of Delegates since 2010 and currently serves as chair of the House Appropriations Committee. Del. Torian earned his undergraduate degree from Winston-Salem State University and received graduate degrees from the School of Theology at Virginia Union University and Howard University School of Divinity. Since 1995, he has served as Pastor of First Mount Zion Baptist Church in Dumfries. He lives in Woodbridge with his wife and daughter.

    Del. Torian has done critical work to reform criminal justice in Virginia. He wrote and helped pass the 2020 Community Policing Act, which enforces the collection and release of police data. The increased transparency has helped reveal and address racial biases in the police force. He also voted to abolish the death penalty. He voted in favor of a bill to introduce automatic expungement of certain criminal records in the Commonwealth. This policy will help people with misdemeanor convictions on their record have access to education, housing, and jobs.

    In 2021, Torian carried legislation creating the VirginiaSaves retirement program, which establishes a state-facilitated retirement plan for those who do not receive one through their employers. This program helps decrease the racial and economic disparities in building long-term wealth and saving for the future. Torian also supported workers’ rights by voting to allow collective bargaining for public workers He also voted to raise the minimum wage and increase the salaries of teachers, social workers, and other public employees.

    Torian is also working to address the affordable housing crisis in the district. In 2021, he sponsored legislation to protect the rights of people living in manufactured home parks and slow down the foreclosure process, ensuring fewer Virginians lose their homes. He also voted to strengthen the rights of tenants to prevent evictions and to protect their health during emergencies like the pandemic.

    Del. Torian has also worked to make healthcare more affordable and accessible. In 2018, he voted to expand Medicaid, which resulted in 500,000 Virginians having access to health coverage. He successfully passed a bill ending "surprise billing" by healthcare providers to increase transparency in the medical billing process and ensure Virginians are protected from predatory practices by insurance companies. He also voted in favor of ensuring abortions are covered by health insurance companies in the state exchange.

    Torian is facing a challenge from Republican Maria Martin, an ESL teacher, author, and Bolivian immigrant. She supports funneling money away from the public education system by using taxpayer money to pay for private schools. She also opposes abortion access. Martin is against making the rich and wealthy corporations pay their fair share in taxes.

    Due to his support of criminal justice reform, working families, affordable housing, and health care, Delegate Torian is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 52nd District.

    Luke Torian

    Incumbent Delegate Luke Torian has represented the 52nd District in the Virginia House of Delegates since 2010 and currently serves as chair of the House Appropriations Committee. Del.

  • Virginia’s 87th District includes parts of Prince William and Loudoun counties. Voter trends show that the district leans Democratic. Delegate Subramanyam was able to win his last election with 62% of the votes.

    Incumbent Delegate Suhas Subramanyam has represented the 87th District since 2020. He is the first Indian and Hindu American elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates. Delegate Subramanyam obtained his bachelor’s degree from Tulane University, as well as a law degree from Northwestern University School of Law. Subramanyam has worked in both the public and private sectors, including serving as a technology policy advisor to President Obama. Subramanyam and his wife currently reside in Ashburn with their daughter.

    Subramanyam supports policies that boost Virginia working families. He voted to raise the minimum wage in 2020. Subramanyam is committed to providing Virginians with affordable housing and supported legislation that protects tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic. He supports paid family and medical leave for Virginia workers and policies that will make the cost of childcare affordable. He also voted for the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which grants basic labor protections to domestic workers and provides that they are paid a minimum wage.

    Subramanyam understands the urgency of the climate crisis and has worked to support legislation that would reduce the impact of climate change and help reduce utility prices for Virginians. In 2020, the delegate introduced a bill that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the Commonwealth. Subramanyam also voted in favor of the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050. In 2021, he received an endorsement from the Virginia League of Conservation Voters and an A from the Virginia Sierra Club on its legislative scorecard.

    Subramanyam supports criminal justice reform and wants to find solutions to racial disparities in Virginia’s criminal justice system. He sponsored legislation to improve the Virginia bail process and supported the automatic expungement of criminal records. He supports directing resources from police budgets to support more crime prevention. In 2021, Subramanyam voted in favor of marijuana legislation and abolishing the death penalty in the Commonwealth. He also supported the constitutional amendment to restore voting rights to returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    As a member of the House Education Committee, he works to advance legislation that will better the Virginia public education system. He voted for a 5% pay raise for teachers in 2021 and additional funding so that schools can reopen safely during the pandemic. Subramanyam wants to ensure that students have access to quality broadband services. The delegate previously submitted legislation that would diversify teaching staff by collecting public data on a teacher's language proficiencies and racial demographics. He hopes to bridge the achievement gap by fully funding public schools and repairing their failing infrastructure.

    Subramanyam is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Gregory Moulthrop, a small business owner. Moulthrop is against government efforts to keep our communities safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. He supports using taxpayer money to fund private schools and creating deliberate barriers to prevent participation in our fair and free elections.

    Due to his support of criminal justice reform, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Subramanyam is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Suhas Subramanyam

    Incumbent Delegate Suhas Subramanyam has represented the 87th District since 2020. He is the first Indian and Hindu American elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates.