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  • Non-Partisan

    Marisa Alcaraz

  • Endorsements: Marisa Alcaraz has the endorsement of some local groups, including UFCW 770 and ILWU Local 94. She has also received the endorsement of current Councilmembers Curren Price and Heather Hutt, and Assm. Wendy Carrillo.

     

    Electoral History: Alcaraz has not run for public office before, and is the only candidate in this race who has experience working for city government.

     

    Top Issues: Homelessness and affordable housing, police reform, renewable energy and climate protections, economic improvements, government transparency

     

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Alcaraz is a longtime City Council staffer, and has most recently served as the Environmental Policy Director and Deputy Chief of Staff to Councilmember Curren Price for ten years. During her time at City Hall, she has provided leadership on several labor and economic initiatives, including the citywide hotel worker minimum wage, Hero Pay for pandemic grocery workers, the Fair Work Week ordinance, and the pilot of LA’s Guaranteed Basic Income program. Her environmental work has included improving local healthy food access, and securing funding for parks improvements. She supports ordinance 41.18, an anti-camping law that prohibits unhoused people from sitting or sleeping on public property, and is in favor of hiring more officers to the LAPD.

     

    Other background: Alcaraz grew up in the Lake Balboa neighborhood and is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.  


    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Alcaraz’s campaign has raised $161,000 and has received donations from police and real estate interests.

    Endorsements: Marisa Alcaraz has the endorsement of some local groups, including UFCW 770 and ILWU Local 94. She has also received the endorsement of current Councilmembers Curren Price and Heather Hutt, and Assm. Wendy Carrillo.

     

    Electoral History: Alcaraz has not run for public office before, and is the only candidate in this race who has experience working for city government.

     

    Top Issues: Homelessness and affordable housing, police reform, renewable energy and climate protections, economic improvements, government transparency

     

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Alcaraz is a longtime City Council staffer, and has most recently served as the Environmental Policy Director and Deputy Chief of Staff to Councilmember Curren Price for ten years. During her time at City Hall, she has provided leadership on several labor and economic initiatives, including the citywide hotel worker minimum wage, Hero Pay for pandemic grocery workers, the Fair Work Week ordinance, and the pilot of LA’s Guaranteed Basic Income program. Her environmental work has included improving local healthy food access, and securing funding for parks improvements. She supports ordinance 41.18, an anti-camping law that prohibits unhoused people from sitting or sleeping on public property, and is in favor of hiring more officers to the LAPD.

     

    Other background: Alcaraz grew up in the Lake Balboa neighborhood and is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.  


    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Alcaraz’s campaign has raised $161,000 and has received donations from police and real estate interests.

  • Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 



    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race


    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position


    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.


     

    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 



    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race


    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position


    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.


     

    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 



    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race


    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position


    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.


     

    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 



    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race


    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position


    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.


     

No Recommendation

No Recommendation - U.S. Senate

There are 22 candidates running for California’s open U.S. Senate seat. Based on our analysis, three qualified candidates for this position have a distinct vision for the state. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.




The Race


Primary election: In October 2022, Governor Newsom appointed labor leader, political advisor, and former Emily’s List President Laphonza Butler to serve the remainder of the six-year term of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who died September 2022 after serving in the U.S. Senate since 1992. There are 22 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Rep. Barbara Lee (D), Rep. Katie Porter (D), and Rep. Adam Schiff (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.


The Candidates


Key Initiatives: Representative Barbara Lee is a longtime Congresswoman and has been a consistent progressive voice in Congress. She has been a prolific author of legislation related to ending AIDS/HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, has moved efforts to reduce poverty forward, and was the only member of Congress to vote against the authorization for the use of military force after the attacks on September 11, 2001, a controversial position at the time. In recent legislative sessions, she has authored and sponsored legislation to curtail CEO overpay, improve research and public awareness of sickle cell disease, address the national backlog of unprocessed rape kits, and improve mental health resources for students. Prior to her election to the House of Representatives, Rep. Lee worked as a social worker and founded a mental-health service organization, Community Health Alliance for Neighborhood Growth and Education, to benefit her local East Bay community. She then spent eleven years working on the staff of Rep. Ron Dellums, eventually serving as his chief of staff. After her tenure in congressional staffing, she founded a facilities-management company. A few years later, in 1990, Rep. Lee launched a successful bid for a seat in the California Assembly, where she served for six years, before she was elected to the state Senate.

Representative Katie Porter is an attorney and public servant and has been a strong advocate for consumer protection, corporate accountability, and government transparency. She has gained notoriety for her meticulous and expert style of questioning in congressional hearings, and exercises this skill during Oversight and Reform Committee sessions. Her legislative successes include bills to lower prescription drug prices, increase the fee oil and gas companies pay to drill on public lands, lower the income threshold for out-of-pocket healthcare costs, and extend mental healthcare coverage. She has also recently supported efforts to ban members of Congress and their families from trading stocks. Prior to her election to Congress, Rep. Porter spent twenty years as a consumer-protection attorney. Ahead of the housing crisis in 2008, she issued early warnings of the financial system’s predatory lending, and has a strong track record of winning cases related to financial regulation. In 2012, then California Attorney General Kamala Harris appointed Rep. Porter to oversee banks as they returned over $18 billion to cheated homeowners in the state. 

Representative Adam Schiff is an attorney and public official and has been a consistent legislator on issues of government accountability, voting access, healthcare, and voting access. He rose to prominence as the Chair of the House Intelligence Committee who led the first impeachment inquiry of the Trump Administration. He has had legislative success on bills to increase pension payments for teachers, expand labor organizing protections, secure nearly $200 million in funding to address affordable housing development and homelessness in the state, create the patient bill of rights, and limit corporate spending to influence elections. He is also the lead author of legislation to end the NRA and the gun industry’s immunity from liability, which prevented victims and their families from seeking legal recourse. Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Schiff worked as a law clerk and then as Assistant United States Attorney before being elected to California’s State Senate in 1996. He is a longtime supporter of progressive education, immigration, and environmental policies, but has cast unfavorable votes on issues pertaining to military spending and the use of military force, including a 2002 vote in favor of authorizing the use of military force against Iraq. 

Community Leadership Experience, Fundraising, and Endorsements: Rep. Lee has served in Congress since 1998, when she was elected with over 66% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection to CD-12 over a Republican challenger by 81 points. Her campaign has raised $3.3 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests. Rep. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Black Women Organized for Political Action PAC, Gen Z for Change, Feminist Majority PAC, Our Revolution, and Reproductive Freedom for All California (formerly NARAL Pro-Choice California). She has also received the endorsement of some community and elected leaders, including Dolores Huerta, State Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, California Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, Rep. Ro Khanna, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, State Senator Lola Smallwood-Cuevas, Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass, and San Francisco Mayor London Breed. 

Rep. Porter has served in Congress since 2018, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 3 points. Her campaign has raised $22 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or real estate interests. Rep. Porter has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and Women in Leadership PAC. She has also received the endorsement of many elected leaders, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Alex Lee, State Sen. Scott Wiener, Rep. Robert Garcia, and State Sen. Catherine Blakespear.

Rep. Schiff has served in Congress since 2000, when he was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 42 points. His campaign has raised $21 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, or fossil fuel interests. Rep. Schiff has the endorsement of some labor groups, including IATSE California Council, IAFF, and Amalgamated Transit Union. He has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Kamlager-Dove, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Tina McKinnor, Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur, and San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria.

Other background: Rep. Lee is from El Paso, TX, and moved to the San Fernando Valley when she was a child. She attended Mills College, where she served as president of the Black Student Union and invited Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm to speak on campus. Her interaction with Rep. Chisholm was an early inspiration for her pursuit of a career in public service. 

Rep. Porter is from Fort Dodge, IA, and now resides in Irvine, CA. Along with her legal practice, she is a longtime tenured professor of law at University of California-Irvine.

Rep. Schiff is from the Bay Area. He holds a law degree from Harvard University.


The District


State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 39 million residents.

Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 22% have no party preference. Democrats have held the Governor’s seat in the state since 2011.

District demographics: 40% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 18 points. Sen. Feinstein won her 2018 reelection against now-Los Angeles City Councilmember Kevin de León by 8 points. 


The Position


Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

No Recommendation - U.S. Senate

There are 22 candidates running for California’s open U.S. Senate seat. Based on our analysis, three qualified candidates for this position have a distinct vision for the state. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.




The Race


Primary election: In October 2022, Governor Newsom appointed labor leader, political advisor, and former Emily’s List President Laphonza Butler to serve the remainder of the six-year term of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who died September 2022 after serving in the U.S. Senate since 1992. There are 22 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Rep. Barbara Lee (D), Rep. Katie Porter (D), and Rep. Adam Schiff (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.


The Candidates


Key Initiatives: Representative Barbara Lee is a longtime Congresswoman and has been a consistent progressive voice in Congress. She has been a prolific author of legislation related to ending AIDS/HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, has moved efforts to reduce poverty forward, and was the only member of Congress to vote against the authorization for the use of military force after the attacks on September 11, 2001, a controversial position at the time. In recent legislative sessions, she has authored and sponsored legislation to curtail CEO overpay, improve research and public awareness of sickle cell disease, address the national backlog of unprocessed rape kits, and improve mental health resources for students. Prior to her election to the House of Representatives, Rep. Lee worked as a social worker and founded a mental-health service organization, Community Health Alliance for Neighborhood Growth and Education, to benefit her local East Bay community. She then spent eleven years working on the staff of Rep. Ron Dellums, eventually serving as his chief of staff. After her tenure in congressional staffing, she founded a facilities-management company. A few years later, in 1990, Rep. Lee launched a successful bid for a seat in the California Assembly, where she served for six years, before she was elected to the state Senate.

Representative Katie Porter is an attorney and public servant and has been a strong advocate for consumer protection, corporate accountability, and government transparency. She has gained notoriety for her meticulous and expert style of questioning in congressional hearings, and exercises this skill during Oversight and Reform Committee sessions. Her legislative successes include bills to lower prescription drug prices, increase the fee oil and gas companies pay to drill on public lands, lower the income threshold for out-of-pocket healthcare costs, and extend mental healthcare coverage. She has also recently supported efforts to ban members of Congress and their families from trading stocks. Prior to her election to Congress, Rep. Porter spent twenty years as a consumer-protection attorney. Ahead of the housing crisis in 2008, she issued early warnings of the financial system’s predatory lending, and has a strong track record of winning cases related to financial regulation. In 2012, then California Attorney General Kamala Harris appointed Rep. Porter to oversee banks as they returned over $18 billion to cheated homeowners in the state. 

Representative Adam Schiff is an attorney and public official and has been a consistent legislator on issues of government accountability, voting access, healthcare, and voting access. He rose to prominence as the Chair of the House Intelligence Committee who led the first impeachment inquiry of the Trump Administration. He has had legislative success on bills to increase pension payments for teachers, expand labor organizing protections, secure nearly $200 million in funding to address affordable housing development and homelessness in the state, create the patient bill of rights, and limit corporate spending to influence elections. He is also the lead author of legislation to end the NRA and the gun industry’s immunity from liability, which prevented victims and their families from seeking legal recourse. Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Schiff worked as a law clerk and then as Assistant United States Attorney before being elected to California’s State Senate in 1996. He is a longtime supporter of progressive education, immigration, and environmental policies, but has cast unfavorable votes on issues pertaining to military spending and the use of military force, including a 2002 vote in favor of authorizing the use of military force against Iraq. 

Community Leadership Experience, Fundraising, and Endorsements: Rep. Lee has served in Congress since 1998, when she was elected with over 66% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection to CD-12 over a Republican challenger by 81 points. Her campaign has raised $3.3 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests. Rep. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Black Women Organized for Political Action PAC, Gen Z for Change, Feminist Majority PAC, Our Revolution, and Reproductive Freedom for All California (formerly NARAL Pro-Choice California). She has also received the endorsement of some community and elected leaders, including Dolores Huerta, State Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, California Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, Rep. Ro Khanna, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, State Senator Lola Smallwood-Cuevas, Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass, and San Francisco Mayor London Breed. 

Rep. Porter has served in Congress since 2018, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 3 points. Her campaign has raised $22 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or real estate interests. Rep. Porter has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and Women in Leadership PAC. She has also received the endorsement of many elected leaders, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Alex Lee, State Sen. Scott Wiener, Rep. Robert Garcia, and State Sen. Catherine Blakespear.

Rep. Schiff has served in Congress since 2000, when he was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 42 points. His campaign has raised $21 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, or fossil fuel interests. Rep. Schiff has the endorsement of some labor groups, including IATSE California Council, IAFF, and Amalgamated Transit Union. He has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Kamlager-Dove, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Tina McKinnor, Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur, and San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria.

Other background: Rep. Lee is from El Paso, TX, and moved to the San Fernando Valley when she was a child. She attended Mills College, where she served as president of the Black Student Union and invited Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm to speak on campus. Her interaction with Rep. Chisholm was an early inspiration for her pursuit of a career in public service. 

Rep. Porter is from Fort Dodge, IA, and now resides in Irvine, CA. Along with her legal practice, she is a longtime tenured professor of law at University of California-Irvine.

Rep. Schiff is from the Bay Area. He holds a law degree from Harvard University.


The District


State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 39 million residents.

Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 22% have no party preference. Democrats have held the Governor’s seat in the state since 2011.

District demographics: 40% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 18 points. Sen. Feinstein won her 2018 reelection against now-Los Angeles City Councilmember Kevin de León by 8 points. 


The Position


Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

City District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city district races on your ballot.

  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Nithya Raman

    Courage California endorses Councilmember Nithya Raman for re-election to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


    Nithya Raman

    Courage California endorses Councilmember Nithya Raman for re-election to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


    Nithya Raman

    Courage California endorses Councilmember Nithya Raman for re-election to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


    Nithya Raman

    Courage California endorses Councilmember Nithya Raman for re-election to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Eddie Anderson

    Elect Eddie Anderson or Reggie Jones-Sawyer to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


    Eddie Anderson

    Elect Eddie Anderson or Reggie Jones-Sawyer to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


    Eddie Anderson

    Elect Eddie Anderson or Reggie Jones-Sawyer to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


    Eddie Anderson

    Elect Eddie Anderson or Reggie Jones-Sawyer to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress. 


No Recommendation

No Rec - LA City Council, District 14

Based on our analysis, these three candidates for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.


No Rec - LA City Council, District 14

Based on our analysis, these three candidates for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.


State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

  • Henry Stern

    Re-elect State Senator Henry Stern to keep SD-27 on the right track for progress. 


    Henry Stern

    Re-elect State Senator Henry Stern to keep SD-27 on the right track for progress. 


    Henry Stern

    Re-elect State Senator Henry Stern to keep SD-27 on the right track for progress. 


    Henry Stern

    Re-elect State Senator Henry Stern to keep SD-27 on the right track for progress. 


  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Michelle Chambers

    Courage California endorses Michelle Chambers for state Senate to put SD-35 on the right track for progress. 


    Michelle Chambers

    Courage California endorses Michelle Chambers for state Senate to put SD-35 on the right track for progress. 


    Michelle Chambers

    Courage California endorses Michelle Chambers for state Senate to put SD-35 on the right track for progress. 


    Michelle Chambers

    Courage California endorses Michelle Chambers for state Senate to put SD-35 on the right track for progress. 


  • Endorsed By: Courage California

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

  • Pilar Schiavo

    Re-elect Assemblymember Pilar Schiavo to keep AD-40 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Schiavo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, Sierra Club California, and California Environmental Voters. 

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Schiavo’s priorities for AD-40 have included 24 bills about PFAS and product safety, worker benefits, homelessness and housing, and childcare. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to update standards for reporting and investigating elder abuse, establish an Affordable Housing Finance Workgroup, end the pipeline between the foster-care system and homelessness, and update the standards for providing annual sick leave to health-care workers. She scores a CS of 75 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Schiavo has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Schiavo failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation this session, including ACA13 to amend the threshold for passing ballot measures, AB600 to allow a judge to recall a sentence if there is a change to the law after sentencing, and AB12 to cap the security deposit amount a landlord can require to one month of rent.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Schiavo currently sits on 11 committees, including Emergency Management, Public Employment and Retirement, Utilities and Energy, Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management, and Water, Parks, and Wildlife. She serves as chair of the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs, and chair of the Select Committee on Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Schiavo has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with 50.2% of the vote, a margin of just 500 votes over her Republican opponent.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Schiavo was long involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. She spent 13 years with the California Nurses Association (CNA), where she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. Assm. Schiavo has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Assm. Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Pilar Schiavo (D), and Patrick Lee Gipson (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Schiavo’s campaign has raised $745,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Patrick Lee Gipson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gipson’s campaign has raised $47,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. This district was held by Republicans until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 6 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Pilar Schiavo

    Re-elect Assemblymember Pilar Schiavo to keep AD-40 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Schiavo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, Sierra Club California, and California Environmental Voters. 

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Schiavo’s priorities for AD-40 have included 24 bills about PFAS and product safety, worker benefits, homelessness and housing, and childcare. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to update standards for reporting and investigating elder abuse, establish an Affordable Housing Finance Workgroup, end the pipeline between the foster-care system and homelessness, and update the standards for providing annual sick leave to health-care workers. She scores a CS of 75 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Schiavo has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Schiavo failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation this session, including ACA13 to amend the threshold for passing ballot measures, AB600 to allow a judge to recall a sentence if there is a change to the law after sentencing, and AB12 to cap the security deposit amount a landlord can require to one month of rent.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Schiavo currently sits on 11 committees, including Emergency Management, Public Employment and Retirement, Utilities and Energy, Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management, and Water, Parks, and Wildlife. She serves as chair of the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs, and chair of the Select Committee on Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Schiavo has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with 50.2% of the vote, a margin of just 500 votes over her Republican opponent.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Schiavo was long involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. She spent 13 years with the California Nurses Association (CNA), where she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. Assm. Schiavo has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Assm. Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Pilar Schiavo (D), and Patrick Lee Gipson (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Schiavo’s campaign has raised $745,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Patrick Lee Gipson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gipson’s campaign has raised $47,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. This district was held by Republicans until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 6 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Pilar Schiavo

    Re-elect Assemblymember Pilar Schiavo to keep AD-40 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Schiavo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, Sierra Club California, and California Environmental Voters. 

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Schiavo’s priorities for AD-40 have included 24 bills about PFAS and product safety, worker benefits, homelessness and housing, and childcare. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to update standards for reporting and investigating elder abuse, establish an Affordable Housing Finance Workgroup, end the pipeline between the foster-care system and homelessness, and update the standards for providing annual sick leave to health-care workers. She scores a CS of 75 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Schiavo has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Schiavo failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation this session, including ACA13 to amend the threshold for passing ballot measures, AB600 to allow a judge to recall a sentence if there is a change to the law after sentencing, and AB12 to cap the security deposit amount a landlord can require to one month of rent.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Schiavo currently sits on 11 committees, including Emergency Management, Public Employment and Retirement, Utilities and Energy, Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management, and Water, Parks, and Wildlife. She serves as chair of the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs, and chair of the Select Committee on Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Schiavo has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with 50.2% of the vote, a margin of just 500 votes over her Republican opponent.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Schiavo was long involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. She spent 13 years with the California Nurses Association (CNA), where she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. Assm. Schiavo has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Assm. Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Pilar Schiavo (D), and Patrick Lee Gipson (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Schiavo’s campaign has raised $745,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Patrick Lee Gipson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gipson’s campaign has raised $47,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. This district was held by Republicans until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 6 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Pilar Schiavo

    Re-elect Assemblymember Pilar Schiavo to keep AD-40 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Schiavo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, Sierra Club California, and California Environmental Voters. 

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Schiavo’s priorities for AD-40 have included 24 bills about PFAS and product safety, worker benefits, homelessness and housing, and childcare. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to update standards for reporting and investigating elder abuse, establish an Affordable Housing Finance Workgroup, end the pipeline between the foster-care system and homelessness, and update the standards for providing annual sick leave to health-care workers. She scores a CS of 75 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Schiavo has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Schiavo failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation this session, including ACA13 to amend the threshold for passing ballot measures, AB600 to allow a judge to recall a sentence if there is a change to the law after sentencing, and AB12 to cap the security deposit amount a landlord can require to one month of rent.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Schiavo currently sits on 11 committees, including Emergency Management, Public Employment and Retirement, Utilities and Energy, Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management, and Water, Parks, and Wildlife. She serves as chair of the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs, and chair of the Select Committee on Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Schiavo has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with 50.2% of the vote, a margin of just 500 votes over her Republican opponent.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Schiavo was long involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. She spent 13 years with the California Nurses Association (CNA), where she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. Assm. Schiavo has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Assm. Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Pilar Schiavo (D), and Patrick Lee Gipson (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Schiavo’s campaign has raised $745,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Patrick Lee Gipson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gipson’s campaign has raised $47,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. This district was held by Republicans until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 6 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Jacqui Irwin

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jacqui Irwin has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, McDonald’s Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC. Given Assm. Irwin’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of AD-42 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Endorsements: Assm. Jacqui Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, she has been a frequent recipient of support from police and law enforcement organizations and leaders, including 2022 endorsements from Los Angeles Police Protective League, Simi Valley Police Officers Association, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association. 

    Key initiatives: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-42 have included 29 bills, including those to adjust property taxation for individuals impacted by the 2018 wildfires, retroactively expand the public employees eligible for worker’s compensation death benefits, and set new requirements for the online footprint of government agencies. Of these, nine have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She scores a CS of 48 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported a few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This session, she failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to close loopholes for no-fault just-cause evictions, protect workers against discrimination and retaliation from their employers, allow a judge to recall a sentence when laws or circumstances change, and cap the amount a landlord can request as a security deposit to a single month of rent. Assm. Irwin is a member of the California Legislative Latino Caucus and the Problem Solvers Caucus, a bipartisan and bicameral group that claims that their collaborative work allows them to take a more holistic approach to evaluating legislation. In reality, the Problem Solvers Caucus actively works with problematic industries against progressive policies.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 10 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), and Ted Nordblum (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $337,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nordblum’s campaign has raised $27,000 as of December 2023, and is primarily funded by individual donors.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until redistricting. In 2022, Assm. Jacqui Irwin won and flipped it from red to blue.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 8 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jacqui Irwin

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jacqui Irwin has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, McDonald’s Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC. Given Assm. Irwin’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of AD-42 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Endorsements: Assm. Jacqui Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, she has been a frequent recipient of support from police and law enforcement organizations and leaders, including 2022 endorsements from Los Angeles Police Protective League, Simi Valley Police Officers Association, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association. 

    Key initiatives: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-42 have included 29 bills, including those to adjust property taxation for individuals impacted by the 2018 wildfires, retroactively expand the public employees eligible for worker’s compensation death benefits, and set new requirements for the online footprint of government agencies. Of these, nine have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She scores a CS of 48 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported a few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This session, she failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to close loopholes for no-fault just-cause evictions, protect workers against discrimination and retaliation from their employers, allow a judge to recall a sentence when laws or circumstances change, and cap the amount a landlord can request as a security deposit to a single month of rent. Assm. Irwin is a member of the California Legislative Latino Caucus and the Problem Solvers Caucus, a bipartisan and bicameral group that claims that their collaborative work allows them to take a more holistic approach to evaluating legislation. In reality, the Problem Solvers Caucus actively works with problematic industries against progressive policies.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 10 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), and Ted Nordblum (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $337,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nordblum’s campaign has raised $27,000 as of December 2023, and is primarily funded by individual donors.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until redistricting. In 2022, Assm. Jacqui Irwin won and flipped it from red to blue.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 8 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jacqui Irwin

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jacqui Irwin has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, McDonald’s Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC. Given Assm. Irwin’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of AD-42 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Endorsements: Assm. Jacqui Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, she has been a frequent recipient of support from police and law enforcement organizations and leaders, including 2022 endorsements from Los Angeles Police Protective League, Simi Valley Police Officers Association, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association. 

    Key initiatives: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-42 have included 29 bills, including those to adjust property taxation for individuals impacted by the 2018 wildfires, retroactively expand the public employees eligible for worker’s compensation death benefits, and set new requirements for the online footprint of government agencies. Of these, nine have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She scores a CS of 48 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported a few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This session, she failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to close loopholes for no-fault just-cause evictions, protect workers against discrimination and retaliation from their employers, allow a judge to recall a sentence when laws or circumstances change, and cap the amount a landlord can request as a security deposit to a single month of rent. Assm. Irwin is a member of the California Legislative Latino Caucus and the Problem Solvers Caucus, a bipartisan and bicameral group that claims that their collaborative work allows them to take a more holistic approach to evaluating legislation. In reality, the Problem Solvers Caucus actively works with problematic industries against progressive policies.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 10 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), and Ted Nordblum (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $337,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nordblum’s campaign has raised $27,000 as of December 2023, and is primarily funded by individual donors.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until redistricting. In 2022, Assm. Jacqui Irwin won and flipped it from red to blue.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 8 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jacqui Irwin

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jacqui Irwin has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, McDonald’s Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC. Given Assm. Irwin’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of AD-42 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Endorsements: Assm. Jacqui Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, she has been a frequent recipient of support from police and law enforcement organizations and leaders, including 2022 endorsements from Los Angeles Police Protective League, Simi Valley Police Officers Association, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association. 

    Key initiatives: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-42 have included 29 bills, including those to adjust property taxation for individuals impacted by the 2018 wildfires, retroactively expand the public employees eligible for worker’s compensation death benefits, and set new requirements for the online footprint of government agencies. Of these, nine have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She scores a CS of 48 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported a few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This session, she failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to close loopholes for no-fault just-cause evictions, protect workers against discrimination and retaliation from their employers, allow a judge to recall a sentence when laws or circumstances change, and cap the amount a landlord can request as a security deposit to a single month of rent. Assm. Irwin is a member of the California Legislative Latino Caucus and the Problem Solvers Caucus, a bipartisan and bicameral group that claims that their collaborative work allows them to take a more holistic approach to evaluating legislation. In reality, the Problem Solvers Caucus actively works with problematic industries against progressive policies.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 10 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), and Ted Nordblum (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $337,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nordblum’s campaign has raised $27,000 as of December 2023, and is primarily funded by individual donors.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until redistricting. In 2022, Assm. Jacqui Irwin won and flipped it from red to blue.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 8 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Celeste Rodriguez

    Elect Celeste Rodriguez to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress. 



    Celeste Rodriguez’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rodriguez has received the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Legislative Women’s Caucus, Equality California, and SEIU California. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Speaker Robert Rivas, State Sen. Monique Limón, Assm. Luz Rivas, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Rodriguez narrowly won her race for San Fernando City Council in 2020 with 25% of the vote. She currently serves as mayor.

    Top issues: Economic empowerment and growth, homelessness and housing, and environmental justice.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rodriguez is a public servant and elected official, which she does to create responsive and effective public programs to support local communities. She currently serves as the head of the Community Services Section of the Los Angeles Community Investment for Families Department (CIFD), where she leads a team working on local initiatives to help alleviate poverty and financial hardship. This work includes children’s savings accounts, a local guaranteed income pilot, and stability support programs. Rodriguez has also worked for former Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City of Los Angeles on homelessness initiatives, veterans’ affairs, and economic development. She has also served as the Racial Equity Officer for CIFD and the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department. She won election to the San Fernando City Council in 2020, and has served as mayor since 2022. In her first elected role, Rodriguez has focused on initiatives to fund and implement economic development, infrastructure improvements, and affordability. 

    Other background: Rodriguez is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are six candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Celeste Rodriguez (D), Victoria Garcia (R), Walter Garcia (D), Saul Hurtado (D), Carmelina Minasova (NPP), and Felicia Novick (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $49,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 14% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 42 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Celeste Rodriguez

    Elect Celeste Rodriguez to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress. 



    Celeste Rodriguez’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rodriguez has received the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Legislative Women’s Caucus, Equality California, and SEIU California. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Speaker Robert Rivas, State Sen. Monique Limón, Assm. Luz Rivas, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Rodriguez narrowly won her race for San Fernando City Council in 2020 with 25% of the vote. She currently serves as mayor.

    Top issues: Economic empowerment and growth, homelessness and housing, and environmental justice.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rodriguez is a public servant and elected official, which she does to create responsive and effective public programs to support local communities. She currently serves as the head of the Community Services Section of the Los Angeles Community Investment for Families Department (CIFD), where she leads a team working on local initiatives to help alleviate poverty and financial hardship. This work includes children’s savings accounts, a local guaranteed income pilot, and stability support programs. Rodriguez has also worked for former Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City of Los Angeles on homelessness initiatives, veterans’ affairs, and economic development. She has also served as the Racial Equity Officer for CIFD and the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department. She won election to the San Fernando City Council in 2020, and has served as mayor since 2022. In her first elected role, Rodriguez has focused on initiatives to fund and implement economic development, infrastructure improvements, and affordability. 

    Other background: Rodriguez is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are six candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Celeste Rodriguez (D), Victoria Garcia (R), Walter Garcia (D), Saul Hurtado (D), Carmelina Minasova (NPP), and Felicia Novick (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $49,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 14% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 42 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Celeste Rodriguez

    Elect Celeste Rodriguez to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress. 



    Celeste Rodriguez’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rodriguez has received the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Legislative Women’s Caucus, Equality California, and SEIU California. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Speaker Robert Rivas, State Sen. Monique Limón, Assm. Luz Rivas, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Rodriguez narrowly won her race for San Fernando City Council in 2020 with 25% of the vote. She currently serves as mayor.

    Top issues: Economic empowerment and growth, homelessness and housing, and environmental justice.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rodriguez is a public servant and elected official, which she does to create responsive and effective public programs to support local communities. She currently serves as the head of the Community Services Section of the Los Angeles Community Investment for Families Department (CIFD), where she leads a team working on local initiatives to help alleviate poverty and financial hardship. This work includes children’s savings accounts, a local guaranteed income pilot, and stability support programs. Rodriguez has also worked for former Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City of Los Angeles on homelessness initiatives, veterans’ affairs, and economic development. She has also served as the Racial Equity Officer for CIFD and the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department. She won election to the San Fernando City Council in 2020, and has served as mayor since 2022. In her first elected role, Rodriguez has focused on initiatives to fund and implement economic development, infrastructure improvements, and affordability. 

    Other background: Rodriguez is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are six candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Celeste Rodriguez (D), Victoria Garcia (R), Walter Garcia (D), Saul Hurtado (D), Carmelina Minasova (NPP), and Felicia Novick (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $49,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 14% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 42 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Celeste Rodriguez

    Elect Celeste Rodriguez to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress. 



    Celeste Rodriguez’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rodriguez has received the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Legislative Women’s Caucus, Equality California, and SEIU California. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Speaker Robert Rivas, State Sen. Monique Limón, Assm. Luz Rivas, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Rodriguez narrowly won her race for San Fernando City Council in 2020 with 25% of the vote. She currently serves as mayor.

    Top issues: Economic empowerment and growth, homelessness and housing, and environmental justice.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rodriguez is a public servant and elected official, which she does to create responsive and effective public programs to support local communities. She currently serves as the head of the Community Services Section of the Los Angeles Community Investment for Families Department (CIFD), where she leads a team working on local initiatives to help alleviate poverty and financial hardship. This work includes children’s savings accounts, a local guaranteed income pilot, and stability support programs. Rodriguez has also worked for former Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City of Los Angeles on homelessness initiatives, veterans’ affairs, and economic development. She has also served as the Racial Equity Officer for CIFD and the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department. She won election to the San Fernando City Council in 2020, and has served as mayor since 2022. In her first elected role, Rodriguez has focused on initiatives to fund and implement economic development, infrastructure improvements, and affordability. 

    Other background: Rodriguez is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are six candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Celeste Rodriguez (D), Victoria Garcia (R), Walter Garcia (D), Saul Hurtado (D), Carmelina Minasova (NPP), and Felicia Novick (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $49,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 14% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 42 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Nick Schultz

    Elect Nick Schultz to put AD-44 on the right track for progress. 



    Nick Schultz’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schultz has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, Abundant Housing Los Angeles, California Environmental Voters, Smart Justice California, and SEIU California. He has also received the endorsement of some local leaders, including outgoing AD-44 Assm. Laura Friedman, and Burbank Vice Mayor Nikki Perez. 

    Electoral history: Schultz has run for office previously, and won his race for Burbank City Council in 2020 after earning over 15% of the vote. As of December 2023, he is serving as mayor. 

    Top issues: Climate protections, criminal justice reform, homelessness and housing affordability, economic growth, and health care for all

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schultz is a public official and a public servant, which he does to use his knowledge and leadership to support community initiatives. As a member of the Burbank City Council, he has worked to support economic development and stimulation through the challenging pandemic years, support hero pay for grocery and other essential workers, steward a pollution-reduction plan designed to lead the city to eventual carbon neutrality, and establish 1,000 new housing units within the city. Schultz is an attorney, and currently serves as deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice. As a Special Prosecutions AG, he primarily prosecutes cases of public corruption, tax evasion, human trafficking, and police misconduct. He has helped improve policy at the DOJ by assisting in the creation of a Post-Conviction Review Unit to evaluate potential wrongful convictions in the state. Long involved in local politics, Schultz currently serves as vice chair of the Democratic Party of the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Schultz lives in Burbank. He is a first-generation college student. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Nick Schultz (D), Elen Asatryan (D), Ed Han (D), Carmenita Helligar (D), Steve Pierson (D), Adam Pryor (D), and Adam Summer (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nick Schultz’s campaign has raised $290,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Elen Asatryan
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Asatryan’s campaign has raised $206,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ed Han
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Han’s campaign has raised $138,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Steve Pierson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pierson’s campaign has raised $193,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Adam Summer
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Summer’s campaign has raised $12,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 39 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 40 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Nick Schultz

    Elect Nick Schultz to put AD-44 on the right track for progress. 



    Nick Schultz’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schultz has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, Abundant Housing Los Angeles, California Environmental Voters, Smart Justice California, and SEIU California. He has also received the endorsement of some local leaders, including outgoing AD-44 Assm. Laura Friedman, and Burbank Vice Mayor Nikki Perez. 

    Electoral history: Schultz has run for office previously, and won his race for Burbank City Council in 2020 after earning over 15% of the vote. As of December 2023, he is serving as mayor. 

    Top issues: Climate protections, criminal justice reform, homelessness and housing affordability, economic growth, and health care for all

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schultz is a public official and a public servant, which he does to use his knowledge and leadership to support community initiatives. As a member of the Burbank City Council, he has worked to support economic development and stimulation through the challenging pandemic years, support hero pay for grocery and other essential workers, steward a pollution-reduction plan designed to lead the city to eventual carbon neutrality, and establish 1,000 new housing units within the city. Schultz is an attorney, and currently serves as deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice. As a Special Prosecutions AG, he primarily prosecutes cases of public corruption, tax evasion, human trafficking, and police misconduct. He has helped improve policy at the DOJ by assisting in the creation of a Post-Conviction Review Unit to evaluate potential wrongful convictions in the state. Long involved in local politics, Schultz currently serves as vice chair of the Democratic Party of the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Schultz lives in Burbank. He is a first-generation college student. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Nick Schultz (D), Elen Asatryan (D), Ed Han (D), Carmenita Helligar (D), Steve Pierson (D), Adam Pryor (D), and Adam Summer (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nick Schultz’s campaign has raised $290,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Elen Asatryan
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Asatryan’s campaign has raised $206,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ed Han
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Han’s campaign has raised $138,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Steve Pierson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pierson’s campaign has raised $193,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Adam Summer
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Summer’s campaign has raised $12,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 39 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 40 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Nick Schultz

    Elect Nick Schultz to put AD-44 on the right track for progress. 



    Nick Schultz’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schultz has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, Abundant Housing Los Angeles, California Environmental Voters, Smart Justice California, and SEIU California. He has also received the endorsement of some local leaders, including outgoing AD-44 Assm. Laura Friedman, and Burbank Vice Mayor Nikki Perez. 

    Electoral history: Schultz has run for office previously, and won his race for Burbank City Council in 2020 after earning over 15% of the vote. As of December 2023, he is serving as mayor. 

    Top issues: Climate protections, criminal justice reform, homelessness and housing affordability, economic growth, and health care for all

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schultz is a public official and a public servant, which he does to use his knowledge and leadership to support community initiatives. As a member of the Burbank City Council, he has worked to support economic development and stimulation through the challenging pandemic years, support hero pay for grocery and other essential workers, steward a pollution-reduction plan designed to lead the city to eventual carbon neutrality, and establish 1,000 new housing units within the city. Schultz is an attorney, and currently serves as deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice. As a Special Prosecutions AG, he primarily prosecutes cases of public corruption, tax evasion, human trafficking, and police misconduct. He has helped improve policy at the DOJ by assisting in the creation of a Post-Conviction Review Unit to evaluate potential wrongful convictions in the state. Long involved in local politics, Schultz currently serves as vice chair of the Democratic Party of the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Schultz lives in Burbank. He is a first-generation college student. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Nick Schultz (D), Elen Asatryan (D), Ed Han (D), Carmenita Helligar (D), Steve Pierson (D), Adam Pryor (D), and Adam Summer (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nick Schultz’s campaign has raised $290,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Elen Asatryan
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Asatryan’s campaign has raised $206,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ed Han
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Han’s campaign has raised $138,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Steve Pierson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pierson’s campaign has raised $193,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Adam Summer
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Summer’s campaign has raised $12,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 39 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 40 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Nick Schultz

    Elect Nick Schultz to put AD-44 on the right track for progress. 



    Nick Schultz’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schultz has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, Abundant Housing Los Angeles, California Environmental Voters, Smart Justice California, and SEIU California. He has also received the endorsement of some local leaders, including outgoing AD-44 Assm. Laura Friedman, and Burbank Vice Mayor Nikki Perez. 

    Electoral history: Schultz has run for office previously, and won his race for Burbank City Council in 2020 after earning over 15% of the vote. As of December 2023, he is serving as mayor. 

    Top issues: Climate protections, criminal justice reform, homelessness and housing affordability, economic growth, and health care for all

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schultz is a public official and a public servant, which he does to use his knowledge and leadership to support community initiatives. As a member of the Burbank City Council, he has worked to support economic development and stimulation through the challenging pandemic years, support hero pay for grocery and other essential workers, steward a pollution-reduction plan designed to lead the city to eventual carbon neutrality, and establish 1,000 new housing units within the city. Schultz is an attorney, and currently serves as deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice. As a Special Prosecutions AG, he primarily prosecutes cases of public corruption, tax evasion, human trafficking, and police misconduct. He has helped improve policy at the DOJ by assisting in the creation of a Post-Conviction Review Unit to evaluate potential wrongful convictions in the state. Long involved in local politics, Schultz currently serves as vice chair of the Democratic Party of the San Fernando Valley. 

    Other background: Schultz lives in Burbank. He is a first-generation college student. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Nick Schultz (D), Elen Asatryan (D), Ed Han (D), Carmenita Helligar (D), Steve Pierson (D), Adam Pryor (D), and Adam Summer (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nick Schultz’s campaign has raised $290,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Elen Asatryan
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Asatryan’s campaign has raised $206,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ed Han
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Han’s campaign has raised $138,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Steve Pierson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pierson’s campaign has raised $193,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Adam Summer
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Summer’s campaign has raised $12,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 39 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 40 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Jesse Gabriel

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jesse Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and California Environmental Voters. He has also received problematic endorsements during past campaigns, including from California Correctional Peace Officers Association.

    Top issues: Police officer training, green economy infrastructure, justice reform, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 32 bills about electric vehicle infrastructure, consumer protections, criminal justice reform, and firearm safety. Of these, ten have been successfully chaptered into law, three have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to expedite housing services for homeless veterans, extend the outdoor dining options that were permitted during the early days of the pandemic, regulate company carbon offsets, and ban dangerous food additives. He scores a CS of 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has failed to cast a vote on several significant pieces of legislation, including bills to create overdose-prevention programs in select counties, protect homeowners from pandemic-related foreclosures, ban facial-recognition software from police body cameras, and prevent children under 12 from being tried in juvenile court. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently sits on ten committees, including Appropriations, Banking & Finance, Higher Education, and Housing and Community Development. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Budget, and as chair of the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley. Assm. Gabriel is also a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and co-chair of the California Legislative Jewish Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he won a special election with over 65% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, an attorney, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Jesse Gabriel (D), and Tracey Schroeder (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $447,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Schroeder’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 32 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jesse Gabriel

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jesse Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and California Environmental Voters. He has also received problematic endorsements during past campaigns, including from California Correctional Peace Officers Association.

    Top issues: Police officer training, green economy infrastructure, justice reform, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 32 bills about electric vehicle infrastructure, consumer protections, criminal justice reform, and firearm safety. Of these, ten have been successfully chaptered into law, three have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to expedite housing services for homeless veterans, extend the outdoor dining options that were permitted during the early days of the pandemic, regulate company carbon offsets, and ban dangerous food additives. He scores a CS of 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has failed to cast a vote on several significant pieces of legislation, including bills to create overdose-prevention programs in select counties, protect homeowners from pandemic-related foreclosures, ban facial-recognition software from police body cameras, and prevent children under 12 from being tried in juvenile court. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently sits on ten committees, including Appropriations, Banking & Finance, Higher Education, and Housing and Community Development. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Budget, and as chair of the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley. Assm. Gabriel is also a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and co-chair of the California Legislative Jewish Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he won a special election with over 65% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, an attorney, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Jesse Gabriel (D), and Tracey Schroeder (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $447,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Schroeder’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 32 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jesse Gabriel

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jesse Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and California Environmental Voters. He has also received problematic endorsements during past campaigns, including from California Correctional Peace Officers Association.

    Top issues: Police officer training, green economy infrastructure, justice reform, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 32 bills about electric vehicle infrastructure, consumer protections, criminal justice reform, and firearm safety. Of these, ten have been successfully chaptered into law, three have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to expedite housing services for homeless veterans, extend the outdoor dining options that were permitted during the early days of the pandemic, regulate company carbon offsets, and ban dangerous food additives. He scores a CS of 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has failed to cast a vote on several significant pieces of legislation, including bills to create overdose-prevention programs in select counties, protect homeowners from pandemic-related foreclosures, ban facial-recognition software from police body cameras, and prevent children under 12 from being tried in juvenile court. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently sits on ten committees, including Appropriations, Banking & Finance, Higher Education, and Housing and Community Development. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Budget, and as chair of the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley. Assm. Gabriel is also a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and co-chair of the California Legislative Jewish Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he won a special election with over 65% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, an attorney, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Jesse Gabriel (D), and Tracey Schroeder (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $447,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Schroeder’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 32 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jesse Gabriel

    Re-elect Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Jesse Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and California Environmental Voters. He has also received problematic endorsements during past campaigns, including from California Correctional Peace Officers Association.

    Top issues: Police officer training, green economy infrastructure, justice reform, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 32 bills about electric vehicle infrastructure, consumer protections, criminal justice reform, and firearm safety. Of these, ten have been successfully chaptered into law, three have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to expedite housing services for homeless veterans, extend the outdoor dining options that were permitted during the early days of the pandemic, regulate company carbon offsets, and ban dangerous food additives. He scores a CS of 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has failed to cast a vote on several significant pieces of legislation, including bills to create overdose-prevention programs in select counties, protect homeowners from pandemic-related foreclosures, ban facial-recognition software from police body cameras, and prevent children under 12 from being tried in juvenile court. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently sits on ten committees, including Appropriations, Banking & Finance, Higher Education, and Housing and Community Development. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Budget, and as chair of the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley. Assm. Gabriel is also a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and co-chair of the California Legislative Jewish Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he won a special election with over 65% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, an attorney, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Jesse Gabriel (D), and Tracey Schroeder (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $447,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Schroeder’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 32 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Rick Chavez Zbur

    Re-elect Assemblymember Rick Chavez Zbur to keep AD-51 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Sierra Club California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, transportation infrastructure, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Chavez Zbur’s priorities for AD-51 have included 12 bills about housing, transportation, sustainability, education, and social services. Of these, four have been successfully chaptered into law, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve housing security for individuals who are disabled, protect bargaining rights for individuals who are temporarily employed in a unionized workforce, and provide infrastructure and resources to develop offshore wind projects near the California coast. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Chavez Zbur has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and authored AB14, a critical workers’ rights bill. He has been designated as a Courage All-Star for his legislative work this session. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Chavez Zbur currently sits on 14 committees, including Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, Natural Resources, Public Safety, and Revenue and Taxation. He is a Democratic alternate on the Standing Committee on Rules, and serves as chair of the Select Committee on Retail Theft. He is a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, the California Legislative Latino Caucus, and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Chavez Zbur has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. 

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Chavez Zbur was an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community have benefitted him as their elected representative. Assm. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense, Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer. 

    Other background: Assm. Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. He has worked to maintain a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his advocacy work.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Chavez Zbur (D), Stephen Hohil (NPP). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $419,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Stephen Hohil
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hohil’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Re-elect Assemblymember Rick Chavez Zbur to keep AD-51 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Sierra Club California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, transportation infrastructure, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Chavez Zbur’s priorities for AD-51 have included 12 bills about housing, transportation, sustainability, education, and social services. Of these, four have been successfully chaptered into law, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve housing security for individuals who are disabled, protect bargaining rights for individuals who are temporarily employed in a unionized workforce, and provide infrastructure and resources to develop offshore wind projects near the California coast. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Chavez Zbur has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and authored AB14, a critical workers’ rights bill. He has been designated as a Courage All-Star for his legislative work this session. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Chavez Zbur currently sits on 14 committees, including Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, Natural Resources, Public Safety, and Revenue and Taxation. He is a Democratic alternate on the Standing Committee on Rules, and serves as chair of the Select Committee on Retail Theft. He is a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, the California Legislative Latino Caucus, and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Chavez Zbur has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. 

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Chavez Zbur was an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community have benefitted him as their elected representative. Assm. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense, Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer. 

    Other background: Assm. Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. He has worked to maintain a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his advocacy work.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Chavez Zbur (D), Stephen Hohil (NPP). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $419,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Stephen Hohil
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hohil’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Re-elect Assemblymember Rick Chavez Zbur to keep AD-51 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Sierra Club California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, transportation infrastructure, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Chavez Zbur’s priorities for AD-51 have included 12 bills about housing, transportation, sustainability, education, and social services. Of these, four have been successfully chaptered into law, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve housing security for individuals who are disabled, protect bargaining rights for individuals who are temporarily employed in a unionized workforce, and provide infrastructure and resources to develop offshore wind projects near the California coast. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Chavez Zbur has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and authored AB14, a critical workers’ rights bill. He has been designated as a Courage All-Star for his legislative work this session. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Chavez Zbur currently sits on 14 committees, including Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, Natural Resources, Public Safety, and Revenue and Taxation. He is a Democratic alternate on the Standing Committee on Rules, and serves as chair of the Select Committee on Retail Theft. He is a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, the California Legislative Latino Caucus, and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Chavez Zbur has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. 

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Chavez Zbur was an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community have benefitted him as their elected representative. Assm. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense, Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer. 

    Other background: Assm. Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. He has worked to maintain a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his advocacy work.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Chavez Zbur (D), Stephen Hohil (NPP). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $419,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Stephen Hohil
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hohil’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Re-elect Assemblymember Rick Chavez Zbur to keep AD-51 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Sierra Club California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, transportation infrastructure, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Chavez Zbur’s priorities for AD-51 have included 12 bills about housing, transportation, sustainability, education, and social services. Of these, four have been successfully chaptered into law, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve housing security for individuals who are disabled, protect bargaining rights for individuals who are temporarily employed in a unionized workforce, and provide infrastructure and resources to develop offshore wind projects near the California coast. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Chavez Zbur has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and authored AB14, a critical workers’ rights bill. He has been designated as a Courage All-Star for his legislative work this session. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Chavez Zbur currently sits on 14 committees, including Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, Natural Resources, Public Safety, and Revenue and Taxation. He is a Democratic alternate on the Standing Committee on Rules, and serves as chair of the Select Committee on Retail Theft. He is a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, the California Legislative Latino Caucus, and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Chavez Zbur has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. 

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Chavez Zbur was an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community have benefitted him as their elected representative. Assm. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense, Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer. 

    Other background: Assm. Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. He has worked to maintain a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his advocacy work.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Chavez Zbur (D), Stephen Hohil (NPP). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $419,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Stephen Hohil
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hohil’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Jessica Caloza

    Elect Jessica Caloza for State Assembly to put AD-52 on the right track for progress. 



    Caloza’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Caloza has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All CA, Equality California, Abundant Housing LA, Housing Action Coalition, YIMBY Action, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Federation of Teachers, AFSCME, and United Healthcare Workers West. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta and Reggie Jones-Sawyer.  

    Electoral history: Caloza has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, clean air and water, public education, and affordable housing and housing protections.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Caloza is a longtime political staffer, which she does to expand economic opportunity, gender equity, and public safety. She currently serves as deputy chief of staff to California Attorney General Rob Bonta. She has previously served as Los Angeles Public Works Commissioner, supporting the delivery of city services, like infrastructure improvement and housing development to LA residents, and as a policy analyst in President Obama’s Department of Education. She has been a longtime supporter of efforts to increase representation for the Filipino-American and Asian-American communities. She was a delegate in the Filipino Youth Leadership Program, and served on the board of organizations like KAYA: Filipino Americans for Progress and the Leadership Council of the Center for Asian Americans United for Self Empowerment.

    Other background: Caloza is from the Philippines. She earned a bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego. She is a first-generation immigrant, and the first Filipina-American to serve on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 10 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Jessica Caloza (D), Ari Ruiz (D), David Giron (D), Carlos Leon (D), and Franky Carrillo. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Caloza’s campaign has raised $324,600 and is not funded by the police. She has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Ari Ruiz, David Giron, Carlos Leon, and Franky Carillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ruiz’s campaign has raised $118,062 and is funded by the fossil fuel industry and the real estate industry. Giron’s campaign has raised $127,484. Leon’s campaign has raised $55,989 and is funded by the police. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $266,00, but he has donated $250,000 of those funds himself.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 67 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jessica Caloza

    Elect Jessica Caloza for State Assembly to put AD-52 on the right track for progress. 



    Caloza’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Caloza has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All CA, Equality California, Abundant Housing LA, Housing Action Coalition, YIMBY Action, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Federation of Teachers, AFSCME, and United Healthcare Workers West. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta and Reggie Jones-Sawyer.  

    Electoral history: Caloza has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, clean air and water, public education, and affordable housing and housing protections.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Caloza is a longtime political staffer, which she does to expand economic opportunity, gender equity, and public safety. She currently serves as deputy chief of staff to California Attorney General Rob Bonta. She has previously served as Los Angeles Public Works Commissioner, supporting the delivery of city services, like infrastructure improvement and housing development to LA residents, and as a policy analyst in President Obama’s Department of Education. She has been a longtime supporter of efforts to increase representation for the Filipino-American and Asian-American communities. She was a delegate in the Filipino Youth Leadership Program, and served on the board of organizations like KAYA: Filipino Americans for Progress and the Leadership Council of the Center for Asian Americans United for Self Empowerment.

    Other background: Caloza is from the Philippines. She earned a bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego. She is a first-generation immigrant, and the first Filipina-American to serve on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 10 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Jessica Caloza (D), Ari Ruiz (D), David Giron (D), Carlos Leon (D), and Franky Carrillo. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Caloza’s campaign has raised $324,600 and is not funded by the police. She has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Ari Ruiz, David Giron, Carlos Leon, and Franky Carillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ruiz’s campaign has raised $118,062 and is funded by the fossil fuel industry and the real estate industry. Giron’s campaign has raised $127,484. Leon’s campaign has raised $55,989 and is funded by the police. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $266,00, but he has donated $250,000 of those funds himself.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 67 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jessica Caloza

    Elect Jessica Caloza for State Assembly to put AD-52 on the right track for progress. 



    Caloza’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Caloza has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All CA, Equality California, Abundant Housing LA, Housing Action Coalition, YIMBY Action, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Federation of Teachers, AFSCME, and United Healthcare Workers West. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta and Reggie Jones-Sawyer.  

    Electoral history: Caloza has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, clean air and water, public education, and affordable housing and housing protections.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Caloza is a longtime political staffer, which she does to expand economic opportunity, gender equity, and public safety. She currently serves as deputy chief of staff to California Attorney General Rob Bonta. She has previously served as Los Angeles Public Works Commissioner, supporting the delivery of city services, like infrastructure improvement and housing development to LA residents, and as a policy analyst in President Obama’s Department of Education. She has been a longtime supporter of efforts to increase representation for the Filipino-American and Asian-American communities. She was a delegate in the Filipino Youth Leadership Program, and served on the board of organizations like KAYA: Filipino Americans for Progress and the Leadership Council of the Center for Asian Americans United for Self Empowerment.

    Other background: Caloza is from the Philippines. She earned a bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego. She is a first-generation immigrant, and the first Filipina-American to serve on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 10 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Jessica Caloza (D), Ari Ruiz (D), David Giron (D), Carlos Leon (D), and Franky Carrillo. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Caloza’s campaign has raised $324,600 and is not funded by the police. She has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Ari Ruiz, David Giron, Carlos Leon, and Franky Carillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ruiz’s campaign has raised $118,062 and is funded by the fossil fuel industry and the real estate industry. Giron’s campaign has raised $127,484. Leon’s campaign has raised $55,989 and is funded by the police. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $266,00, but he has donated $250,000 of those funds himself.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 67 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Jessica Caloza

    Elect Jessica Caloza for State Assembly to put AD-52 on the right track for progress. 



    Caloza’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Caloza has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All CA, Equality California, Abundant Housing LA, Housing Action Coalition, YIMBY Action, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Federation of Teachers, AFSCME, and United Healthcare Workers West. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta and Reggie Jones-Sawyer.  

    Electoral history: Caloza has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, clean air and water, public education, and affordable housing and housing protections.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Caloza is a longtime political staffer, which she does to expand economic opportunity, gender equity, and public safety. She currently serves as deputy chief of staff to California Attorney General Rob Bonta. She has previously served as Los Angeles Public Works Commissioner, supporting the delivery of city services, like infrastructure improvement and housing development to LA residents, and as a policy analyst in President Obama’s Department of Education. She has been a longtime supporter of efforts to increase representation for the Filipino-American and Asian-American communities. She was a delegate in the Filipino Youth Leadership Program, and served on the board of organizations like KAYA: Filipino Americans for Progress and the Leadership Council of the Center for Asian Americans United for Self Empowerment.

    Other background: Caloza is from the Philippines. She earned a bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego. She is a first-generation immigrant, and the first Filipina-American to serve on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 10 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Jessica Caloza (D), Ari Ruiz (D), David Giron (D), Carlos Leon (D), and Franky Carrillo. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Caloza’s campaign has raised $324,600 and is not funded by the police. She has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Ari Ruiz, David Giron, Carlos Leon, and Franky Carillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ruiz’s campaign has raised $118,062 and is funded by the fossil fuel industry and the real estate industry. Giron’s campaign has raised $127,484. Leon’s campaign has raised $55,989 and is funded by the police. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $266,00, but he has donated $250,000 of those funds himself.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 67 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Mark Gonzalez

    Elect Mark Gonzalez to put AD-54 on the right track for progress. 



    Gonzalez’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Gonzalez has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All, and Abundant Housing LA, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, California Faculty Association, California Federation of Teachers, IATSE, and National Union of Healthcare Workers. He has also been endorsed by elected officials like Gavin Newsom, Reps. Adam Schiff and Maxine Waters, and Attorney General Rob Bonta.

    Electoral history: Gonzalez has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, economic justice, health care, civil rights, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mark Gonzalez is a longtime political organizer who previously worked on several Democratic presidential campaigns, and currently serves as district director for Assemblymember Miguel Santiago, the incumbent in AD-54. He does this to utilize his own experiences and struggles to guide policymaking. He chairs the Los Angeles County Democratic Party and has been a longtime supporter of voting access, spearheading a series of voter-registration drives for new citizens. He organized around reproductive rights in 2022, helping to pass a constitutional amendment in California protecting abortion access, and organized in 2023 to raise the minimum wage for health-care workers.

    Other background: Gonzalez is from Los Angeles. He earned his BA from California State University Northridge.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Mark Gonzalez (D), Elaine Alaniz (R), and John Yi (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $584,149 and is not funded by the police. He has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat John Yi and Republican Elaine Alaniz
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yi’s campaign has raised $60,550. As of January 2024, Alaniz has not filed any donation receipts for the current election cycle.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 58 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Mark Gonzalez

    Elect Mark Gonzalez to put AD-54 on the right track for progress. 



    Gonzalez’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Gonzalez has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All, and Abundant Housing LA, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, California Faculty Association, California Federation of Teachers, IATSE, and National Union of Healthcare Workers. He has also been endorsed by elected officials like Gavin Newsom, Reps. Adam Schiff and Maxine Waters, and Attorney General Rob Bonta.

    Electoral history: Gonzalez has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, economic justice, health care, civil rights, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mark Gonzalez is a longtime political organizer who previously worked on several Democratic presidential campaigns, and currently serves as district director for Assemblymember Miguel Santiago, the incumbent in AD-54. He does this to utilize his own experiences and struggles to guide policymaking. He chairs the Los Angeles County Democratic Party and has been a longtime supporter of voting access, spearheading a series of voter-registration drives for new citizens. He organized around reproductive rights in 2022, helping to pass a constitutional amendment in California protecting abortion access, and organized in 2023 to raise the minimum wage for health-care workers.

    Other background: Gonzalez is from Los Angeles. He earned his BA from California State University Northridge.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Mark Gonzalez (D), Elaine Alaniz (R), and John Yi (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $584,149 and is not funded by the police. He has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat John Yi and Republican Elaine Alaniz
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yi’s campaign has raised $60,550. As of January 2024, Alaniz has not filed any donation receipts for the current election cycle.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 58 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Mark Gonzalez

    Elect Mark Gonzalez to put AD-54 on the right track for progress. 



    Gonzalez’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Gonzalez has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All, and Abundant Housing LA, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, California Faculty Association, California Federation of Teachers, IATSE, and National Union of Healthcare Workers. He has also been endorsed by elected officials like Gavin Newsom, Reps. Adam Schiff and Maxine Waters, and Attorney General Rob Bonta.

    Electoral history: Gonzalez has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, economic justice, health care, civil rights, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mark Gonzalez is a longtime political organizer who previously worked on several Democratic presidential campaigns, and currently serves as district director for Assemblymember Miguel Santiago, the incumbent in AD-54. He does this to utilize his own experiences and struggles to guide policymaking. He chairs the Los Angeles County Democratic Party and has been a longtime supporter of voting access, spearheading a series of voter-registration drives for new citizens. He organized around reproductive rights in 2022, helping to pass a constitutional amendment in California protecting abortion access, and organized in 2023 to raise the minimum wage for health-care workers.

    Other background: Gonzalez is from Los Angeles. He earned his BA from California State University Northridge.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Mark Gonzalez (D), Elaine Alaniz (R), and John Yi (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $584,149 and is not funded by the police. He has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat John Yi and Republican Elaine Alaniz
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yi’s campaign has raised $60,550. As of January 2024, Alaniz has not filed any donation receipts for the current election cycle.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 58 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Mark Gonzalez

    Elect Mark Gonzalez to put AD-54 on the right track for progress. 



    Gonzalez’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Gonzalez has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, Reproductive Freedom for All, and Abundant Housing LA, as well as labor unions like SEIU, California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, California Faculty Association, California Federation of Teachers, IATSE, and National Union of Healthcare Workers. He has also been endorsed by elected officials like Gavin Newsom, Reps. Adam Schiff and Maxine Waters, and Attorney General Rob Bonta.

    Electoral history: Gonzalez has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Reproductive rights, economic justice, health care, civil rights, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mark Gonzalez is a longtime political organizer who previously worked on several Democratic presidential campaigns, and currently serves as district director for Assemblymember Miguel Santiago, the incumbent in AD-54. He does this to utilize his own experiences and struggles to guide policymaking. He chairs the Los Angeles County Democratic Party and has been a longtime supporter of voting access, spearheading a series of voter-registration drives for new citizens. He organized around reproductive rights in 2022, helping to pass a constitutional amendment in California protecting abortion access, and organized in 2023 to raise the minimum wage for health-care workers.

    Other background: Gonzalez is from Los Angeles. He earned his BA from California State University Northridge.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Mark Gonzalez (D), Elaine Alaniz (R), and John Yi (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $584,149 and is not funded by the police. He has accepted donations from the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat John Yi and Republican Elaine Alaniz
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yi’s campaign has raised $60,550. As of January 2024, Alaniz has not filed any donation receipts for the current election cycle.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 59% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 58 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Isaac Bryan

    Re-elect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, AFSCME California, Sierra Club California, and Equality California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, workforce development programs, child welfare and social services, election security, and incarceration and justice reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-55 have included 28 bills about election protections and redistricting, housing, workforce development, and criminal justice reform. Of these, seven have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to increase post-incarceration access to restorative justice programs, update meeting and vote requirements for presidential electors, amend the standards for state redistricting every 10 years, and expand the use of College Access Tax Credit Funds to support student transfers to HBCU institutions. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and has earned the Courage All-Star designation for his legislative work. He was the author of two critical pieces of progressive legislation this session: AB421 to clarify the ballot language for statewide referendum, and ACA4 to restore voting rights to individuals incarcerated in prisons. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on 12 committees, including Appropriations, Government Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, and as chair of the Select Committee on Poverty and Economic Inclusion. Assm. Bryan is Treasurer of the California Legislative Black Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and previously as the Assembly Majority Leader.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Bryan has served in the Assembly since May 2021, when he won a special election for the AD-54 seat. After redistricting, he won a full term in the general election for AD-55 with 84% of the vote.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health issues. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), and Keith Cascio (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $432,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Cascio
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Cascio’s campaign has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 66% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 66 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Isaac Bryan

    Re-elect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, AFSCME California, Sierra Club California, and Equality California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, workforce development programs, child welfare and social services, election security, and incarceration and justice reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-55 have included 28 bills about election protections and redistricting, housing, workforce development, and criminal justice reform. Of these, seven have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to increase post-incarceration access to restorative justice programs, update meeting and vote requirements for presidential electors, amend the standards for state redistricting every 10 years, and expand the use of College Access Tax Credit Funds to support student transfers to HBCU institutions. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and has earned the Courage All-Star designation for his legislative work. He was the author of two critical pieces of progressive legislation this session: AB421 to clarify the ballot language for statewide referendum, and ACA4 to restore voting rights to individuals incarcerated in prisons. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on 12 committees, including Appropriations, Government Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, and as chair of the Select Committee on Poverty and Economic Inclusion. Assm. Bryan is Treasurer of the California Legislative Black Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and previously as the Assembly Majority Leader.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Bryan has served in the Assembly since May 2021, when he won a special election for the AD-54 seat. After redistricting, he won a full term in the general election for AD-55 with 84% of the vote.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health issues. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), and Keith Cascio (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $432,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Cascio
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Cascio’s campaign has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 66% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 66 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Isaac Bryan

    Re-elect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, AFSCME California, Sierra Club California, and Equality California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, workforce development programs, child welfare and social services, election security, and incarceration and justice reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-55 have included 28 bills about election protections and redistricting, housing, workforce development, and criminal justice reform. Of these, seven have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to increase post-incarceration access to restorative justice programs, update meeting and vote requirements for presidential electors, amend the standards for state redistricting every 10 years, and expand the use of College Access Tax Credit Funds to support student transfers to HBCU institutions. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and has earned the Courage All-Star designation for his legislative work. He was the author of two critical pieces of progressive legislation this session: AB421 to clarify the ballot language for statewide referendum, and ACA4 to restore voting rights to individuals incarcerated in prisons. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on 12 committees, including Appropriations, Government Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, and as chair of the Select Committee on Poverty and Economic Inclusion. Assm. Bryan is Treasurer of the California Legislative Black Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and previously as the Assembly Majority Leader.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Bryan has served in the Assembly since May 2021, when he won a special election for the AD-54 seat. After redistricting, he won a full term in the general election for AD-55 with 84% of the vote.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health issues. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), and Keith Cascio (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $432,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Cascio
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Cascio’s campaign has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 66% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 66 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Isaac Bryan

    Re-elect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, AFSCME California, Sierra Club California, and Equality California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, workforce development programs, child welfare and social services, election security, and incarceration and justice reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-55 have included 28 bills about election protections and redistricting, housing, workforce development, and criminal justice reform. Of these, seven have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to increase post-incarceration access to restorative justice programs, update meeting and vote requirements for presidential electors, amend the standards for state redistricting every 10 years, and expand the use of College Access Tax Credit Funds to support student transfers to HBCU institutions. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote, and has earned the Courage All-Star designation for his legislative work. He was the author of two critical pieces of progressive legislation this session: AB421 to clarify the ballot language for statewide referendum, and ACA4 to restore voting rights to individuals incarcerated in prisons. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on 12 committees, including Appropriations, Government Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, and as chair of the Select Committee on Poverty and Economic Inclusion. Assm. Bryan is Treasurer of the California Legislative Black Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and previously as the Assembly Majority Leader.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Bryan has served in the Assembly since May 2021, when he won a special election for the AD-54 seat. After redistricting, he won a full term in the general election for AD-55 with 84% of the vote.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health issues. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park. 


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), and Keith Cascio (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $432,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Cascio
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Cascio’s campaign has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 66% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 66 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Sade Elhawary

    Courage California endorses Sade Elhawary for State Assembly to put AD-57 on the right track for progress. 



    Elhawary’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Elhawary has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Planned Parenthood, Smart Justice California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, California Environmental Voters, California Democratic Renters Council, Equality California, and California Working Families Party, as well as labor unions like AFSCME, California Labor Federation, California Federation of Teachers, California Nurses Association, and SEIU. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Mayor Karen Bass, LA County Supervisors Holly Mitchell and Hilda Solis, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta, Akilah Weber, and more. 

    Electoral history: Elhawary has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Housing, education, youth workforce development, community safety, healthcare, reproductive rights, protecting immigrants, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sade Elhawary is a community organizer and an educator, which she does because hopes to dismantle systems of oppression and improve outcomes for women and youth of color. In her current role at Community Coalition, she focuses on youth and community engagement, and helped build the Center for Community Organizing. Elhawary helped organize and pass the School Climate Bill of Rights to reduce racial profiling in Los Angeles schools, as well as the CRISES Act, which provided for community teams to respond to non-violent emergencies rather than police. She also served as Youth Engagement Campaign Manager on Karen Bass’ mayoral campaign. As a Black Latina, Elhawary is committed to creating lasting Black and Brown solidarity. 

    Other background: Elhawary is from Los Angeles. She is the third generation of her family to live in this district, and raised a foster daughter from the district. Elhawary earned her BA from UCLA and a master’s in education from Harvard, and was a history teacher and college counselor to high school students. She helped launch the Nelson Mandela School for Social Justice in Brooklyn, New York. 

     

    The Race


    Primary election: There are 5 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Sade Elhawary (D), Efren Martinez (D), Greg Akili (D), and Dulce Vasquez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Elhawary’s campaign has raised $354,133 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Efren Martinez, Greg Akili, and Dulce Vasquez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $326,621 and is funded by corporate PACs and the real estate industry. He has also accepted more than $25,000 from police lobbying groups and the fossil fuel industry respectively. Vasquez’s campaign has raised $166,199. Akili has raised $68,710.

     

    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 7% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 69 points.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


     

    Sade Elhawary

    Courage California endorses Sade Elhawary for State Assembly to put AD-57 on the right track for progress. 



    Elhawary’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Elhawary has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Planned Parenthood, Smart Justice California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, California Environmental Voters, California Democratic Renters Council, Equality California, and California Working Families Party, as well as labor unions like AFSCME, California Labor Federation, California Federation of Teachers, California Nurses Association, and SEIU. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Mayor Karen Bass, LA County Supervisors Holly Mitchell and Hilda Solis, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta, Akilah Weber, and more. 

    Electoral history: Elhawary has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Housing, education, youth workforce development, community safety, healthcare, reproductive rights, protecting immigrants, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sade Elhawary is a community organizer and an educator, which she does because hopes to dismantle systems of oppression and improve outcomes for women and youth of color. In her current role at Community Coalition, she focuses on youth and community engagement, and helped build the Center for Community Organizing. Elhawary helped organize and pass the School Climate Bill of Rights to reduce racial profiling in Los Angeles schools, as well as the CRISES Act, which provided for community teams to respond to non-violent emergencies rather than police. She also served as Youth Engagement Campaign Manager on Karen Bass’ mayoral campaign. As a Black Latina, Elhawary is committed to creating lasting Black and Brown solidarity. 

    Other background: Elhawary is from Los Angeles. She is the third generation of her family to live in this district, and raised a foster daughter from the district. Elhawary earned her BA from UCLA and a master’s in education from Harvard, and was a history teacher and college counselor to high school students. She helped launch the Nelson Mandela School for Social Justice in Brooklyn, New York. 

     

    The Race


    Primary election: There are 5 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Sade Elhawary (D), Efren Martinez (D), Greg Akili (D), and Dulce Vasquez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Elhawary’s campaign has raised $354,133 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Efren Martinez, Greg Akili, and Dulce Vasquez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $326,621 and is funded by corporate PACs and the real estate industry. He has also accepted more than $25,000 from police lobbying groups and the fossil fuel industry respectively. Vasquez’s campaign has raised $166,199. Akili has raised $68,710.

     

    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 7% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 69 points.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


     

    Sade Elhawary

    Courage California endorses Sade Elhawary for State Assembly to put AD-57 on the right track for progress. 



    Elhawary’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Elhawary has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Planned Parenthood, Smart Justice California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, California Environmental Voters, California Democratic Renters Council, Equality California, and California Working Families Party, as well as labor unions like AFSCME, California Labor Federation, California Federation of Teachers, California Nurses Association, and SEIU. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Mayor Karen Bass, LA County Supervisors Holly Mitchell and Hilda Solis, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta, Akilah Weber, and more. 

    Electoral history: Elhawary has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Housing, education, youth workforce development, community safety, healthcare, reproductive rights, protecting immigrants, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sade Elhawary is a community organizer and an educator, which she does because hopes to dismantle systems of oppression and improve outcomes for women and youth of color. In her current role at Community Coalition, she focuses on youth and community engagement, and helped build the Center for Community Organizing. Elhawary helped organize and pass the School Climate Bill of Rights to reduce racial profiling in Los Angeles schools, as well as the CRISES Act, which provided for community teams to respond to non-violent emergencies rather than police. She also served as Youth Engagement Campaign Manager on Karen Bass’ mayoral campaign. As a Black Latina, Elhawary is committed to creating lasting Black and Brown solidarity. 

    Other background: Elhawary is from Los Angeles. She is the third generation of her family to live in this district, and raised a foster daughter from the district. Elhawary earned her BA from UCLA and a master’s in education from Harvard, and was a history teacher and college counselor to high school students. She helped launch the Nelson Mandela School for Social Justice in Brooklyn, New York. 

     

    The Race


    Primary election: There are 5 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Sade Elhawary (D), Efren Martinez (D), Greg Akili (D), and Dulce Vasquez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Elhawary’s campaign has raised $354,133 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Efren Martinez, Greg Akili, and Dulce Vasquez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $326,621 and is funded by corporate PACs and the real estate industry. He has also accepted more than $25,000 from police lobbying groups and the fossil fuel industry respectively. Vasquez’s campaign has raised $166,199. Akili has raised $68,710.

     

    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 7% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 69 points.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


     

    Sade Elhawary

    Courage California endorses Sade Elhawary for State Assembly to put AD-57 on the right track for progress. 



    Elhawary’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Elhawary has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Planned Parenthood, Smart Justice California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, California Environmental Voters, California Democratic Renters Council, Equality California, and California Working Families Party, as well as labor unions like AFSCME, California Labor Federation, California Federation of Teachers, California Nurses Association, and SEIU. She has also been endorsed by elected officials like Mayor Karen Bass, LA County Supervisors Holly Mitchell and Hilda Solis, and Assemblymembers Mia Bonta, Akilah Weber, and more. 

    Electoral history: Elhawary has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Housing, education, youth workforce development, community safety, healthcare, reproductive rights, protecting immigrants, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sade Elhawary is a community organizer and an educator, which she does because hopes to dismantle systems of oppression and improve outcomes for women and youth of color. In her current role at Community Coalition, she focuses on youth and community engagement, and helped build the Center for Community Organizing. Elhawary helped organize and pass the School Climate Bill of Rights to reduce racial profiling in Los Angeles schools, as well as the CRISES Act, which provided for community teams to respond to non-violent emergencies rather than police. She also served as Youth Engagement Campaign Manager on Karen Bass’ mayoral campaign. As a Black Latina, Elhawary is committed to creating lasting Black and Brown solidarity. 

    Other background: Elhawary is from Los Angeles. She is the third generation of her family to live in this district, and raised a foster daughter from the district. Elhawary earned her BA from UCLA and a master’s in education from Harvard, and was a history teacher and college counselor to high school students. She helped launch the Nelson Mandela School for Social Justice in Brooklyn, New York. 

     

    The Race


    Primary election: There are 5 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Sade Elhawary (D), Efren Martinez (D), Greg Akili (D), and Dulce Vasquez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Elhawary’s campaign has raised $354,133 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrats Efren Martinez, Greg Akili, and Dulce Vasquez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $326,621 and is funded by corporate PACs and the real estate industry. He has also accepted more than $25,000 from police lobbying groups and the fossil fuel industry respectively. Vasquez’s campaign has raised $166,199. Akili has raised $68,710.

     

    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 7% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 69 points.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Tina McKinnor

    Re-elect Assemblymember Tina McKinnor to keep AD-61 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. 

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for AD-61 have included 27 bills about social services, housing, aging and disability resources, and collective bargaining. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to allow some legislative staff members to unionize, make it easier for individuals released from incarceration to obtain a state-issued ID, extend the window for a family to be reunited in family court by 6 months, and remove old laws that promote segregation and discrimination in housing. She scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. McKinnor has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage All-Star this session, and is the author of two criminal justice reform bills evaluated for our scorecard, AB1028 and AB1310.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on 16 committees, including Business and Professions, Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, and Governmental Organization. She serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Public Employment and Retirement, Select Committees on 2028 Olympic & Paralympic Games, and Select Committee on Restorative Justice. Assm. McKinnor is also secretary of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since June 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement. In the 2022 general election, she won her re-election against a Democratic challenger by 28 points.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She did this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. Assm. McKinnor founded the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, non-profits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. Assm. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change. 

    Other background: Assm. McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 30 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Tina McKinnor (D) and Alfonso Hernandez (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $605,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Alfonso Hernandez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hernandez’s campaign has not filed any campaign finance receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 60 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Tina McKinnor

    Re-elect Assemblymember Tina McKinnor to keep AD-61 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. 

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for AD-61 have included 27 bills about social services, housing, aging and disability resources, and collective bargaining. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to allow some legislative staff members to unionize, make it easier for individuals released from incarceration to obtain a state-issued ID, extend the window for a family to be reunited in family court by 6 months, and remove old laws that promote segregation and discrimination in housing. She scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. McKinnor has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage All-Star this session, and is the author of two criminal justice reform bills evaluated for our scorecard, AB1028 and AB1310.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on 16 committees, including Business and Professions, Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, and Governmental Organization. She serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Public Employment and Retirement, Select Committees on 2028 Olympic & Paralympic Games, and Select Committee on Restorative Justice. Assm. McKinnor is also secretary of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since June 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement. In the 2022 general election, she won her re-election against a Democratic challenger by 28 points.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She did this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. Assm. McKinnor founded the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, non-profits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. Assm. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change. 

    Other background: Assm. McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 30 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Tina McKinnor (D) and Alfonso Hernandez (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $605,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Alfonso Hernandez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hernandez’s campaign has not filed any campaign finance receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 60 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Tina McKinnor

    Re-elect Assemblymember Tina McKinnor to keep AD-61 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. 

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for AD-61 have included 27 bills about social services, housing, aging and disability resources, and collective bargaining. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to allow some legislative staff members to unionize, make it easier for individuals released from incarceration to obtain a state-issued ID, extend the window for a family to be reunited in family court by 6 months, and remove old laws that promote segregation and discrimination in housing. She scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. McKinnor has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage All-Star this session, and is the author of two criminal justice reform bills evaluated for our scorecard, AB1028 and AB1310.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on 16 committees, including Business and Professions, Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, and Governmental Organization. She serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Public Employment and Retirement, Select Committees on 2028 Olympic & Paralympic Games, and Select Committee on Restorative Justice. Assm. McKinnor is also secretary of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since June 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement. In the 2022 general election, she won her re-election against a Democratic challenger by 28 points.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She did this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. Assm. McKinnor founded the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, non-profits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. Assm. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change. 

    Other background: Assm. McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 30 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Tina McKinnor (D) and Alfonso Hernandez (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $605,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Alfonso Hernandez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hernandez’s campaign has not filed any campaign finance receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 60 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Tina McKinnor

    Re-elect Assemblymember Tina McKinnor to keep AD-61 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. 

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for AD-61 have included 27 bills about social services, housing, aging and disability resources, and collective bargaining. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, four have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation to allow some legislative staff members to unionize, make it easier for individuals released from incarceration to obtain a state-issued ID, extend the window for a family to be reunited in family court by 6 months, and remove old laws that promote segregation and discrimination in housing. She scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. McKinnor has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage All-Star this session, and is the author of two criminal justice reform bills evaluated for our scorecard, AB1028 and AB1310.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on 16 committees, including Business and Professions, Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, and Governmental Organization. She serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Public Employment and Retirement, Select Committees on 2028 Olympic & Paralympic Games, and Select Committee on Restorative Justice. Assm. McKinnor is also secretary of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since June 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement. In the 2022 general election, she won her re-election against a Democratic challenger by 28 points.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She did this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. Assm. McKinnor founded the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, non-profits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. Assm. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change. 

    Other background: Assm. McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 30 years.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Tina McKinnor (D) and Alfonso Hernandez (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $605,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Alfonso Hernandez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Hernandez’s campaign has not filed any campaign finance receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 60 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Mike Gipson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Mike Gipson to keep AD-65 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Gipson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-65. While he has received funding support from problematic interests and has not supported some significant legislation that made it to a vote, our analysis shows that he will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district if he is subject to increased community accountability.  

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gipson has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Public education, public safety, universal health care, homelessness and housing, green energy programs, reproductive justice, and transportation infrastructure.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gipson’s priorities for AD-65 have included 30 bills about career and technical education, taxation and public funds, education, and health care. Of these, 11 have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to provide foster children and homeless youth with priority access to intersession academic programs, amend the consequences for violating traffic laws, require that anyone using a 3-D printer to create a firearm be a state-licensed firearm manufacturer, and clarify housing law to allow property held by a non-profit public benefit corporation be exempt from taxation. He scores a CS of 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gipson has failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation, including bills to establish safe injection sites, increase greenhouse gas accountability for corporations, and guarantee that 90% of bail premiums be returned when charges are dismissed. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gipson currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation. He is also the chair of the Select Committees on Police Reform, and Parts & Goods Movement. Assm. Gipson is a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, and served as Assembly Democratic Caucus Chair until 2023. He is chair of Council of State Governments West, a non-profit organization that serves western state legislatures. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gipson has served in the Assembly since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Democratic challenger by 24 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gipson was a member of the Carson City Council for a decade, and served as the mayor pro tempore. He spent his early career as a police officer in the Maywood Police Department, which was ultimately disbanded after failed efforts at reform. While Assm. Gipson has had success in securing budget allocations to benefit youth services, education expansion, and mental health resources in his district, he also has concerning connections to police, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC donors. These affiliations raise questions about some of his legislative choices, including voting against environmental bills like SB100 and AB1328, which required a statewide transition to carbon energy, and addressed the environmental impact of oil wells, respectively. He has also withheld support for SB731, which aimed to make it more difficult for police officers found guilty of misconduct to be hired by another state law-enforcement agency, and for bills that sought to expand due process protections and provide counsel to minors during interrogation. 

    Other background: Assm. Gipson is from Los Angeles and is a longtime resident of Carson. He was raised by working parents and credits their determination with inspiring his interest in public service.


    The Race


    Primary election: Assm. Mike Gipsonn (D) is running unopposed in the March 5 primary.  

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised $524,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, and real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-65 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 60 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Mike Gipson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Mike Gipson to keep AD-65 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Gipson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-65. While he has received funding support from problematic interests and has not supported some significant legislation that made it to a vote, our analysis shows that he will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district if he is subject to increased community accountability.  

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gipson has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Public education, public safety, universal health care, homelessness and housing, green energy programs, reproductive justice, and transportation infrastructure.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gipson’s priorities for AD-65 have included 30 bills about career and technical education, taxation and public funds, education, and health care. Of these, 11 have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to provide foster children and homeless youth with priority access to intersession academic programs, amend the consequences for violating traffic laws, require that anyone using a 3-D printer to create a firearm be a state-licensed firearm manufacturer, and clarify housing law to allow property held by a non-profit public benefit corporation be exempt from taxation. He scores a CS of 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gipson has failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation, including bills to establish safe injection sites, increase greenhouse gas accountability for corporations, and guarantee that 90% of bail premiums be returned when charges are dismissed. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gipson currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation. He is also the chair of the Select Committees on Police Reform, and Parts & Goods Movement. Assm. Gipson is a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, and served as Assembly Democratic Caucus Chair until 2023. He is chair of Council of State Governments West, a non-profit organization that serves western state legislatures. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gipson has served in the Assembly since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Democratic challenger by 24 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gipson was a member of the Carson City Council for a decade, and served as the mayor pro tempore. He spent his early career as a police officer in the Maywood Police Department, which was ultimately disbanded after failed efforts at reform. While Assm. Gipson has had success in securing budget allocations to benefit youth services, education expansion, and mental health resources in his district, he also has concerning connections to police, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC donors. These affiliations raise questions about some of his legislative choices, including voting against environmental bills like SB100 and AB1328, which required a statewide transition to carbon energy, and addressed the environmental impact of oil wells, respectively. He has also withheld support for SB731, which aimed to make it more difficult for police officers found guilty of misconduct to be hired by another state law-enforcement agency, and for bills that sought to expand due process protections and provide counsel to minors during interrogation. 

    Other background: Assm. Gipson is from Los Angeles and is a longtime resident of Carson. He was raised by working parents and credits their determination with inspiring his interest in public service.


    The Race


    Primary election: Assm. Mike Gipsonn (D) is running unopposed in the March 5 primary.  

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised $524,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, and real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-65 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 60 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Mike Gipson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Mike Gipson to keep AD-65 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Gipson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-65. While he has received funding support from problematic interests and has not supported some significant legislation that made it to a vote, our analysis shows that he will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district if he is subject to increased community accountability.  

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gipson has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Public education, public safety, universal health care, homelessness and housing, green energy programs, reproductive justice, and transportation infrastructure.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gipson’s priorities for AD-65 have included 30 bills about career and technical education, taxation and public funds, education, and health care. Of these, 11 have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to provide foster children and homeless youth with priority access to intersession academic programs, amend the consequences for violating traffic laws, require that anyone using a 3-D printer to create a firearm be a state-licensed firearm manufacturer, and clarify housing law to allow property held by a non-profit public benefit corporation be exempt from taxation. He scores a CS of 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gipson has failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation, including bills to establish safe injection sites, increase greenhouse gas accountability for corporations, and guarantee that 90% of bail premiums be returned when charges are dismissed. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gipson currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation. He is also the chair of the Select Committees on Police Reform, and Parts & Goods Movement. Assm. Gipson is a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, and served as Assembly Democratic Caucus Chair until 2023. He is chair of Council of State Governments West, a non-profit organization that serves western state legislatures. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gipson has served in the Assembly since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Democratic challenger by 24 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gipson was a member of the Carson City Council for a decade, and served as the mayor pro tempore. He spent his early career as a police officer in the Maywood Police Department, which was ultimately disbanded after failed efforts at reform. While Assm. Gipson has had success in securing budget allocations to benefit youth services, education expansion, and mental health resources in his district, he also has concerning connections to police, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC donors. These affiliations raise questions about some of his legislative choices, including voting against environmental bills like SB100 and AB1328, which required a statewide transition to carbon energy, and addressed the environmental impact of oil wells, respectively. He has also withheld support for SB731, which aimed to make it more difficult for police officers found guilty of misconduct to be hired by another state law-enforcement agency, and for bills that sought to expand due process protections and provide counsel to minors during interrogation. 

    Other background: Assm. Gipson is from Los Angeles and is a longtime resident of Carson. He was raised by working parents and credits their determination with inspiring his interest in public service.


    The Race


    Primary election: Assm. Mike Gipsonn (D) is running unopposed in the March 5 primary.  

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised $524,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, and real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-65 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 60 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Mike Gipson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Mike Gipson to keep AD-65 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Gipson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-65. While he has received funding support from problematic interests and has not supported some significant legislation that made it to a vote, our analysis shows that he will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district if he is subject to increased community accountability.  

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gipson has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, AFSCME California, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Public education, public safety, universal health care, homelessness and housing, green energy programs, reproductive justice, and transportation infrastructure.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gipson’s priorities for AD-65 have included 30 bills about career and technical education, taxation and public funds, education, and health care. Of these, 11 have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to provide foster children and homeless youth with priority access to intersession academic programs, amend the consequences for violating traffic laws, require that anyone using a 3-D printer to create a firearm be a state-licensed firearm manufacturer, and clarify housing law to allow property held by a non-profit public benefit corporation be exempt from taxation. He scores a CS of 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gipson has failed to cast a vote on several important pieces of legislation, including bills to establish safe injection sites, increase greenhouse gas accountability for corporations, and guarantee that 90% of bail premiums be returned when charges are dismissed. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gipson currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation. He is also the chair of the Select Committees on Police Reform, and Parts & Goods Movement. Assm. Gipson is a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, and served as Assembly Democratic Caucus Chair until 2023. He is chair of Council of State Governments West, a non-profit organization that serves western state legislatures. 

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gipson has served in the Assembly since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Democratic challenger by 24 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gipson was a member of the Carson City Council for a decade, and served as the mayor pro tempore. He spent his early career as a police officer in the Maywood Police Department, which was ultimately disbanded after failed efforts at reform. While Assm. Gipson has had success in securing budget allocations to benefit youth services, education expansion, and mental health resources in his district, he also has concerning connections to police, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC donors. These affiliations raise questions about some of his legislative choices, including voting against environmental bills like SB100 and AB1328, which required a statewide transition to carbon energy, and addressed the environmental impact of oil wells, respectively. He has also withheld support for SB731, which aimed to make it more difficult for police officers found guilty of misconduct to be hired by another state law-enforcement agency, and for bills that sought to expand due process protections and provide counsel to minors during interrogation. 

    Other background: Assm. Gipson is from Los Angeles and is a longtime resident of Carson. He was raised by working parents and credits their determination with inspiring his interest in public service.


    The Race


    Primary election: Assm. Mike Gipsonn (D) is running unopposed in the March 5 primary.  

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised $524,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, and real estate interests.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-65 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 60 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 54 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


  • Al Muratsuchi

    Re-elect Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Al Muratsuchi has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Calpine Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, and Edison International. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of AD-66 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California Environmental Voters, SEIU California, and Equality California. He has also received problematic endorsements from several police organizations, including Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen.

    Top issues: Public utilities, environmental and climate protections, education and workforce development, military and veterans, and homelessness and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 have included 29 bills about environmental protection, education, and homelessness. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit the sale of baby food that does not comply with toxic element label guidelines, require the creation of a public awareness campaign to market teaching careers in the state, and improve air quality around some wastewater treatment facilities. He scores a CS of 80 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Muratsuchi has failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to authorize a judge to recall a sentence in response to changes in the law, increase fairness by not allowing an incarcerated person’s demographics to be considered in decisions about parole, and block other states from being able to access digital data for patients seeking abortion or gender-affirming care in California. He has also voted down two important criminal justice reform bills, AB1310 and AB1306, evaluated for our scorecard. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Muratsuchi currently sits on 15 committees, including Budget, Military & Veterans Affairs, Natural Resources, and Utilities & Energy. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Education, and the Select Committee on Aerospace. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the problematic local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. Assm. Muratsuchi is a member of the California AAPI Legislative Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 20 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also partnered with police to construct criminal-justice bills.

    Other background: Assm. Al Muratsuchi is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Al Muratsuchi (D) and George Barks (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $163,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican George Barks
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Barks’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 14 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Al Muratsuchi

    Re-elect Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Al Muratsuchi has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Calpine Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, and Edison International. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of AD-66 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California Environmental Voters, SEIU California, and Equality California. He has also received problematic endorsements from several police organizations, including Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen.

    Top issues: Public utilities, environmental and climate protections, education and workforce development, military and veterans, and homelessness and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 have included 29 bills about environmental protection, education, and homelessness. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit the sale of baby food that does not comply with toxic element label guidelines, require the creation of a public awareness campaign to market teaching careers in the state, and improve air quality around some wastewater treatment facilities. He scores a CS of 80 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Muratsuchi has failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to authorize a judge to recall a sentence in response to changes in the law, increase fairness by not allowing an incarcerated person’s demographics to be considered in decisions about parole, and block other states from being able to access digital data for patients seeking abortion or gender-affirming care in California. He has also voted down two important criminal justice reform bills, AB1310 and AB1306, evaluated for our scorecard. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Muratsuchi currently sits on 15 committees, including Budget, Military & Veterans Affairs, Natural Resources, and Utilities & Energy. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Education, and the Select Committee on Aerospace. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the problematic local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. Assm. Muratsuchi is a member of the California AAPI Legislative Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 20 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also partnered with police to construct criminal-justice bills.

    Other background: Assm. Al Muratsuchi is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Al Muratsuchi (D) and George Barks (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $163,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican George Barks
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Barks’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 14 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Al Muratsuchi

    Re-elect Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Al Muratsuchi has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Calpine Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, and Edison International. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of AD-66 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California Environmental Voters, SEIU California, and Equality California. He has also received problematic endorsements from several police organizations, including Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen.

    Top issues: Public utilities, environmental and climate protections, education and workforce development, military and veterans, and homelessness and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 have included 29 bills about environmental protection, education, and homelessness. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit the sale of baby food that does not comply with toxic element label guidelines, require the creation of a public awareness campaign to market teaching careers in the state, and improve air quality around some wastewater treatment facilities. He scores a CS of 80 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Muratsuchi has failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to authorize a judge to recall a sentence in response to changes in the law, increase fairness by not allowing an incarcerated person’s demographics to be considered in decisions about parole, and block other states from being able to access digital data for patients seeking abortion or gender-affirming care in California. He has also voted down two important criminal justice reform bills, AB1310 and AB1306, evaluated for our scorecard. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Muratsuchi currently sits on 15 committees, including Budget, Military & Veterans Affairs, Natural Resources, and Utilities & Energy. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Education, and the Select Committee on Aerospace. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the problematic local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. Assm. Muratsuchi is a member of the California AAPI Legislative Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 20 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also partnered with police to construct criminal-justice bills.

    Other background: Assm. Al Muratsuchi is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Al Muratsuchi (D) and George Barks (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $163,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican George Barks
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Barks’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 14 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


    Al Muratsuchi

    Re-elect Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 



    Assm. Al Muratsuchi has been a frequent recipient of donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Calpine Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, and Edison International. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of AD-66 constituents instead of wealthy special interests. 

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California Environmental Voters, SEIU California, and Equality California. He has also received problematic endorsements from several police organizations, including Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and California Association of Highway Patrolmen.

    Top issues: Public utilities, environmental and climate protections, education and workforce development, military and veterans, and homelessness and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 have included 29 bills about environmental protection, education, and homelessness. Of these, six have been successfully chaptered into law, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit the sale of baby food that does not comply with toxic element label guidelines, require the creation of a public awareness campaign to market teaching careers in the state, and improve air quality around some wastewater treatment facilities. He scores a CS of 80 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Muratsuchi has failed to cast a vote on several critical pieces of legislation, including bills to authorize a judge to recall a sentence in response to changes in the law, increase fairness by not allowing an incarcerated person’s demographics to be considered in decisions about parole, and block other states from being able to access digital data for patients seeking abortion or gender-affirming care in California. He has also voted down two important criminal justice reform bills, AB1310 and AB1306, evaluated for our scorecard. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Muratsuchi currently sits on 15 committees, including Budget, Military & Veterans Affairs, Natural Resources, and Utilities & Energy. He serves as chair of the Standing Committee on Education, and the Select Committee on Aerospace. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the problematic local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. Assm. Muratsuchi is a member of the California AAPI Legislative Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. In 2022, he won his re-election against a Republican challenger by 20 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also partnered with police to construct criminal-justice bills.

    Other background: Assm. Al Muratsuchi is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County.


    The Race


    Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Al Muratsuchi (D) and George Barks (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $163,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican George Barks
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Barks’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.


    The District


    Counties in district: California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 14 points.


    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.


Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Judy Chu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress. 


    Judy Chu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress. 


    Judy Chu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress. 


    Judy Chu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress. 


  • Luz Rivas

    Elect Luz Rivas for Congress to keep CD-29 on the right track for progress.


    Luz Rivas

    Elect Luz Rivas for Congress to keep CD-29 on the right track for progress.


    Luz Rivas

    Elect Luz Rivas for Congress to keep CD-29 on the right track for progress.


    Luz Rivas

    Elect Luz Rivas for Congress to keep CD-29 on the right track for progress.


  • Laura Friedman

    Elect Assm. Laura Friedman for Congress to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.


    Laura Friedman

    Elect Assm. Laura Friedman for Congress to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.


    Laura Friedman

    Elect Assm. Laura Friedman for Congress to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.


    Laura Friedman

    Elect Assm. Laura Friedman for Congress to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.


  • Brad Sherman

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Brad Sherman to keep CD-32 on the right track for progress. 


    Brad Sherman

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Brad Sherman to keep CD-32 on the right track for progress. 


    Brad Sherman

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Brad Sherman to keep CD-32 on the right track for progress. 


    Brad Sherman

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Brad Sherman to keep CD-32 on the right track for progress. 


No Recommendation

CD34 - No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, two Democratic candidates for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.


CD34 - No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, two Democratic candidates for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.


  • Ted Lieu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CD-36 on the right track for progress. 


    Ted Lieu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CD-36 on the right track for progress. 


    Ted Lieu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CD-36 on the right track for progress. 


    Ted Lieu

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CD-36 on the right track for progress.