• Non-Partisan

    Sajid Khan

    Endorsed by Courage California
    Endorsed by Courage California
  • Sajid Khan

    Elect Sajid Khan to push Santa Clara County in the right direction.

     

    Sajid Khan

    Elect Sajid Khan to push Santa Clara County in the right direction.

     

    Sajid Khan

    Elect Sajid Khan to push Santa Clara County in the right direction.

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California

Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Zoe Lofgren

    Reelect Congressional Representative Zoe Lofgren to keep CD-18 on the right track for progress.

     

    Zoe Lofgren

    Reelect Congressional Representative Zoe Lofgren to keep CD-18 on the right track for progress.

     

    Zoe Lofgren

    Reelect Congressional Representative Zoe Lofgren to keep CD-18 on the right track for progress.

     

  • Jimmy Panetta

    Reelect Congressional Representative Jimmy Panetta to keep CD-19 on the right track for progress.

     

    Jimmy Panetta

    Reelect Congressional Representative Jimmy Panetta to keep CD-19 on the right track for progress.

     

    Jimmy Panetta

    Reelect Congressional Representative Jimmy Panetta to keep CD-19 on the right track for progress.

     

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

  • Marc Berman

    Reelect State Assemblymember Marc Berman to keep AD-23 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 23rd Assembly District includes parts of San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 14% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 9% Latino, 26% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-23 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-23 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 49 points.

     

    The Race

    Republican Assm. Jim Patterson has held the AD-23 seat since 2012. Since redistricting, Assm. Patterson is running in the newly created AD-8, which includes portions of the former AD-23. With the newly drawn AD-23 now open, there are two candidates running for the seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Marc Berman and Republican Tim Dec. Assm. Berman’s campaign has raised $467,000, and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Dec’s campaign has raised $1,000 from a single individual donor.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Berman, an attorney, is from Palo Alto. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to bring legislative reform to his constituents on issues related to education access and climate change. Assm. Berman has represented AD-24 since 2016, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Peter Ohtaki by 46 points. 

    Assm. Berman’s priorities for AD-23 this year have included 35 bills about election protections, education, and energy and pollution. Of those, 10 have been chaptered into law, 21 are in committee, and 4 have died. He currently chairs the Business and Professions Committee, and the Subcommittee on the Master Plan for Higher Education in California. He also sits on the Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation committees. He scores a Lifetime CS of 94 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Berman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to support AB 1505, which would empower local districts to evaluate charter-school applications based on economic-impact criteria. This is not surprising, considering he has previously accepted campaign donations from California Charter Schools Association Advocates for Great Public Schools. Additionally, Assemblymember Berman voted to support AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. He has also accepted campaign donations from Verizon, one of the largest telecom providers, in the past.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Berman served as an elected member of the Palo Alto City Council, supporting significant improvements to the city’s infrastructure and public safety. Prior to his public service, he was an attorney in private practice and worked with a STEM-focused nonprofit organization, Silicon Valley Education Foundation. Assm. Berman is a longtime supporter of voting rights and reform. During law school, he worked as a summer analyst with the Voting Section of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, and was an author of the Assembly bill that made California a permanent vote-by-mail state. 

    Assm. Berman’s office has been named in a workplace-harassment complaint that was made by a former staffer. The complaint alleged that a supervisor in his Los Altos office consistently made sex-based comments and advances toward female staffers, and provided preferential support to one female member of the staff. Assm. Berman made no staffing changes as a result of the complaint, and has failed to publicly work toward reforming the state legislative workplace complaint process. 

    Assm. Berman has the endorsement of some progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Berman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-23, will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district, and should also be held accountable for any failures in leadership.

    Marc Berman

    Reelect State Assemblymember Marc Berman to keep AD-23 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 23rd Assembly District includes parts of San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 14% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 9% Latino, 26% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-23 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-23 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 49 points.

     

    The Race

    Republican Assm. Jim Patterson has held the AD-23 seat since 2012. Since redistricting, Assm. Patterson is running in the newly created AD-8, which includes portions of the former AD-23. With the newly drawn AD-23 now open, there are two candidates running for the seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Marc Berman and Republican Tim Dec. Assm. Berman’s campaign has raised $467,000, and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Dec’s campaign has raised $1,000 from a single individual donor.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Berman, an attorney, is from Palo Alto. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to bring legislative reform to his constituents on issues related to education access and climate change. Assm. Berman has represented AD-24 since 2016, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Peter Ohtaki by 46 points. 

    Assm. Berman’s priorities for AD-23 this year have included 35 bills about election protections, education, and energy and pollution. Of those, 10 have been chaptered into law, 21 are in committee, and 4 have died. He currently chairs the Business and Professions Committee, and the Subcommittee on the Master Plan for Higher Education in California. He also sits on the Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation committees. He scores a Lifetime CS of 94 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Berman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to support AB 1505, which would empower local districts to evaluate charter-school applications based on economic-impact criteria. This is not surprising, considering he has previously accepted campaign donations from California Charter Schools Association Advocates for Great Public Schools. Additionally, Assemblymember Berman voted to support AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. He has also accepted campaign donations from Verizon, one of the largest telecom providers, in the past.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Berman served as an elected member of the Palo Alto City Council, supporting significant improvements to the city’s infrastructure and public safety. Prior to his public service, he was an attorney in private practice and worked with a STEM-focused nonprofit organization, Silicon Valley Education Foundation. Assm. Berman is a longtime supporter of voting rights and reform. During law school, he worked as a summer analyst with the Voting Section of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, and was an author of the Assembly bill that made California a permanent vote-by-mail state. 

    Assm. Berman’s office has been named in a workplace-harassment complaint that was made by a former staffer. The complaint alleged that a supervisor in his Los Altos office consistently made sex-based comments and advances toward female staffers, and provided preferential support to one female member of the staff. Assm. Berman made no staffing changes as a result of the complaint, and has failed to publicly work toward reforming the state legislative workplace complaint process. 

    Assm. Berman has the endorsement of some progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Berman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-23, will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district, and should also be held accountable for any failures in leadership.

    Marc Berman

    Reelect State Assemblymember Marc Berman to keep AD-23 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 23rd Assembly District includes parts of San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 14% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 9% Latino, 26% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-23 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-23 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 49 points.

     

    The Race

    Republican Assm. Jim Patterson has held the AD-23 seat since 2012. Since redistricting, Assm. Patterson is running in the newly created AD-8, which includes portions of the former AD-23. With the newly drawn AD-23 now open, there are two candidates running for the seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Marc Berman and Republican Tim Dec. Assm. Berman’s campaign has raised $467,000, and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Dec’s campaign has raised $1,000 from a single individual donor.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Berman, an attorney, is from Palo Alto. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to bring legislative reform to his constituents on issues related to education access and climate change. Assm. Berman has represented AD-24 since 2016, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Peter Ohtaki by 46 points. 

    Assm. Berman’s priorities for AD-23 this year have included 35 bills about election protections, education, and energy and pollution. Of those, 10 have been chaptered into law, 21 are in committee, and 4 have died. He currently chairs the Business and Professions Committee, and the Subcommittee on the Master Plan for Higher Education in California. He also sits on the Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Transportation committees. He scores a Lifetime CS of 94 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Berman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to support AB 1505, which would empower local districts to evaluate charter-school applications based on economic-impact criteria. This is not surprising, considering he has previously accepted campaign donations from California Charter Schools Association Advocates for Great Public Schools. Additionally, Assemblymember Berman voted to support AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. He has also accepted campaign donations from Verizon, one of the largest telecom providers, in the past.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Berman served as an elected member of the Palo Alto City Council, supporting significant improvements to the city’s infrastructure and public safety. Prior to his public service, he was an attorney in private practice and worked with a STEM-focused nonprofit organization, Silicon Valley Education Foundation. Assm. Berman is a longtime supporter of voting rights and reform. During law school, he worked as a summer analyst with the Voting Section of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, and was an author of the Assembly bill that made California a permanent vote-by-mail state. 

    Assm. Berman’s office has been named in a workplace-harassment complaint that was made by a former staffer. The complaint alleged that a supervisor in his Los Altos office consistently made sex-based comments and advances toward female staffers, and provided preferential support to one female member of the staff. Assm. Berman made no staffing changes as a result of the complaint, and has failed to publicly work toward reforming the state legislative workplace complaint process. 

    Assm. Berman has the endorsement of some progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Berman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-23, will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district, and should also be held accountable for any failures in leadership.

  • Alex Lee

    Reelect State Assemblymember Alex Lee to keep AD-24 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 24th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats have held this district since 2012. Of the registered voters in this district, 50% are Democrat and 15% are Republican, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 16% Latino, 54% Asian, and 4% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-25 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 41 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Assm. Alex Lee is running for reelection to this seat, which he won in 2020. He is being challenged by a former assemblymember, Democrat Kansen Chu, a current at-large member of the Berryessa Union School District Board of School Trustees who held this seat from 2014 to 2020. Lee’s campaign has raised more than $450,000 and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. While Chu received a Courage Score of 100 in 2021, Chu’s campaign is funded by police, corporate, and insurance money.

    In 2020, Chu abstained from voting on a measure that allows voters to decide whether the state’s ban on affirmative action should be repealed.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Assm. Lee, a past legislative policy advisor in the California State Senate and Assembly, has called the South Bay home for all his life. According to campaign materials, Assm. Lee is running for reelection to continue to challenge entrenched special interests and to combat the housing affordability crisis. Assm. Lee won his 2020 election against a Republican challenger by 49 points, even as he was outspent 15 to one.

    Assm. Lee’s priorities for his current AD-25 district this year have included eight bills protecting consumers and residents; seven of them have successfully passed the Assembly. Six have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently serves on the Public Safety, Transportation, and Education Committees. He scores a 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Lee has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. Most notably, on his first day in office, Lee introduced AB 20, the Clean Money Act, which will eliminate corporate special-interest money in elections. He has sponsored legislation in favor of environmental protection and cosponsored legislation in furtherance of consumer protection, rent stabilization, and limiting police militarization.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Lee interned at the district office of former Congressman Mike Honda and several California legislators. He is a longtime champion of public safety, education, housing, and seniors.

    Assm. Lee has received the endorsement of a number of elected officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, State Assemblymember Ash Kalra, State Senator Scott Weiner, and the API and LGBTQ+ Legislative Caucuses. He also has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, such as Sunrise Silicon Valley, South Bay Progressive Alliance, and East Bay for Everyone. Based on our analysis, Assm. Lee’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-24 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Alex Lee

    Reelect State Assemblymember Alex Lee to keep AD-24 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 24th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats have held this district since 2012. Of the registered voters in this district, 50% are Democrat and 15% are Republican, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 16% Latino, 54% Asian, and 4% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-25 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 41 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Assm. Alex Lee is running for reelection to this seat, which he won in 2020. He is being challenged by a former assemblymember, Democrat Kansen Chu, a current at-large member of the Berryessa Union School District Board of School Trustees who held this seat from 2014 to 2020. Lee’s campaign has raised more than $450,000 and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. While Chu received a Courage Score of 100 in 2021, Chu’s campaign is funded by police, corporate, and insurance money.

    In 2020, Chu abstained from voting on a measure that allows voters to decide whether the state’s ban on affirmative action should be repealed.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Assm. Lee, a past legislative policy advisor in the California State Senate and Assembly, has called the South Bay home for all his life. According to campaign materials, Assm. Lee is running for reelection to continue to challenge entrenched special interests and to combat the housing affordability crisis. Assm. Lee won his 2020 election against a Republican challenger by 49 points, even as he was outspent 15 to one.

    Assm. Lee’s priorities for his current AD-25 district this year have included eight bills protecting consumers and residents; seven of them have successfully passed the Assembly. Six have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently serves on the Public Safety, Transportation, and Education Committees. He scores a 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Lee has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. Most notably, on his first day in office, Lee introduced AB 20, the Clean Money Act, which will eliminate corporate special-interest money in elections. He has sponsored legislation in favor of environmental protection and cosponsored legislation in furtherance of consumer protection, rent stabilization, and limiting police militarization.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Lee interned at the district office of former Congressman Mike Honda and several California legislators. He is a longtime champion of public safety, education, housing, and seniors.

    Assm. Lee has received the endorsement of a number of elected officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, State Assemblymember Ash Kalra, State Senator Scott Weiner, and the API and LGBTQ+ Legislative Caucuses. He also has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, such as Sunrise Silicon Valley, South Bay Progressive Alliance, and East Bay for Everyone. Based on our analysis, Assm. Lee’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-24 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Alex Lee

    Reelect State Assemblymember Alex Lee to keep AD-24 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 24th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats have held this district since 2012. Of the registered voters in this district, 50% are Democrat and 15% are Republican, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 16% Latino, 54% Asian, and 4% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-25 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 41 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Assm. Alex Lee is running for reelection to this seat, which he won in 2020. He is being challenged by a former assemblymember, Democrat Kansen Chu, a current at-large member of the Berryessa Union School District Board of School Trustees who held this seat from 2014 to 2020. Lee’s campaign has raised more than $450,000 and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. While Chu received a Courage Score of 100 in 2021, Chu’s campaign is funded by police, corporate, and insurance money.

    In 2020, Chu abstained from voting on a measure that allows voters to decide whether the state’s ban on affirmative action should be repealed.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Assm. Lee, a past legislative policy advisor in the California State Senate and Assembly, has called the South Bay home for all his life. According to campaign materials, Assm. Lee is running for reelection to continue to challenge entrenched special interests and to combat the housing affordability crisis. Assm. Lee won his 2020 election against a Republican challenger by 49 points, even as he was outspent 15 to one.

    Assm. Lee’s priorities for his current AD-25 district this year have included eight bills protecting consumers and residents; seven of them have successfully passed the Assembly. Six have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently serves on the Public Safety, Transportation, and Education Committees. He scores a 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Lee has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. Most notably, on his first day in office, Lee introduced AB 20, the Clean Money Act, which will eliminate corporate special-interest money in elections. He has sponsored legislation in favor of environmental protection and cosponsored legislation in furtherance of consumer protection, rent stabilization, and limiting police militarization.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Lee interned at the district office of former Congressman Mike Honda and several California legislators. He is a longtime champion of public safety, education, housing, and seniors.

    Assm. Lee has received the endorsement of a number of elected officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, State Assemblymember Ash Kalra, State Senator Scott Weiner, and the API and LGBTQ+ Legislative Caucuses. He also has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, such as Sunrise Silicon Valley, South Bay Progressive Alliance, and East Bay for Everyone. Based on our analysis, Assm. Lee’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-24 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Ash Kalra

    Reelect State Assemblymember Ash Kalra to keep AD-25 on the right track for progress.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

    The District


    California’s 25th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Clara County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 16% are Republican and 51% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 34% Latino, 38% Asian, and 4% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-25 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-25 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 48 points.

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Ash Kalra and Republican Ted Stroll. Assm. Kalra’s campaign has raised $196,000, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel donations. Stroll’s campaign is self-funded and has recorded a single donation of $5,000.

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Kalra, a law professor and former public defender, is a longtime resident of San Jose. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to create policy solutions in health care, environmental protections, and transportation. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Kalra represented the 27th Assembly district and was reelected to that seat in 2020 against Republican challenger G. Burt Lancaster by a margin of 52 points.

    Assm. Kalra’s priorities for AD-25 this year have included 47 bills about deforestation and environmental protections, health care, labor policy, and education reforms. Of these, eight have been formally chaptered into law. He currently serves as chair of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and sits on five Assembly committees. He scores a Lifetime 100 score on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our analysis, Assm. Kalra authored six progressive bills in 2021, more than any other legislator, and supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Kalra served two terms as a member of the San Jose City Council, and was the first Indian-American elected to the body. Before entering public service, he spent 11 years as a Santa Clara County Public Defender, and taught law courses at Lincoln Law School. He is a longtime supporter of public safety, and improving local economic and transportation development for the betterment of his San Jose community.

    Assm. Kalra has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Kalra’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-25 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

    Ash Kalra

    Reelect State Assemblymember Ash Kalra to keep AD-25 on the right track for progress.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

    The District


    California’s 25th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Clara County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 16% are Republican and 51% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 34% Latino, 38% Asian, and 4% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-25 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-25 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 48 points.

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Ash Kalra and Republican Ted Stroll. Assm. Kalra’s campaign has raised $196,000, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel donations. Stroll’s campaign is self-funded and has recorded a single donation of $5,000.

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Kalra, a law professor and former public defender, is a longtime resident of San Jose. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to create policy solutions in health care, environmental protections, and transportation. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Kalra represented the 27th Assembly district and was reelected to that seat in 2020 against Republican challenger G. Burt Lancaster by a margin of 52 points.

    Assm. Kalra’s priorities for AD-25 this year have included 47 bills about deforestation and environmental protections, health care, labor policy, and education reforms. Of these, eight have been formally chaptered into law. He currently serves as chair of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and sits on five Assembly committees. He scores a Lifetime 100 score on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our analysis, Assm. Kalra authored six progressive bills in 2021, more than any other legislator, and supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Kalra served two terms as a member of the San Jose City Council, and was the first Indian-American elected to the body. Before entering public service, he spent 11 years as a Santa Clara County Public Defender, and taught law courses at Lincoln Law School. He is a longtime supporter of public safety, and improving local economic and transportation development for the betterment of his San Jose community.

    Assm. Kalra has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Kalra’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-25 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

    Ash Kalra

    Reelect State Assemblymember Ash Kalra to keep AD-25 on the right track for progress.

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

    The District


    California’s 25th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Clara County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 16% are Republican and 51% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 34% Latino, 38% Asian, and 4% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-25 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-25 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 48 points.

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Ash Kalra and Republican Ted Stroll. Assm. Kalra’s campaign has raised $196,000, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel donations. Stroll’s campaign is self-funded and has recorded a single donation of $5,000.

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Kalra, a law professor and former public defender, is a longtime resident of San Jose. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to create policy solutions in health care, environmental protections, and transportation. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Kalra represented the 27th Assembly district and was reelected to that seat in 2020 against Republican challenger G. Burt Lancaster by a margin of 52 points.

    Assm. Kalra’s priorities for AD-25 this year have included 47 bills about deforestation and environmental protections, health care, labor policy, and education reforms. Of these, eight have been formally chaptered into law. He currently serves as chair of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and sits on five Assembly committees. He scores a Lifetime 100 score on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our analysis, Assm. Kalra authored six progressive bills in 2021, more than any other legislator, and supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Kalra served two terms as a member of the San Jose City Council, and was the first Indian-American elected to the body. Before entering public service, he spent 11 years as a Santa Clara County Public Defender, and taught law courses at Lincoln Law School. He is a longtime supporter of public safety, and improving local economic and transportation development for the betterment of his San Jose community.

    Assm. Kalra has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Kalra’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-25 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

  • Elect Gail Pellerin to push AD-28 in the right direction.

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District


    California’s 28th Assembly District includes parts of Monterey, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 18% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 6% Asian, and 3% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-29 is 33% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-289 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 42 points.

     

    The Race


    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Pellerin and Republican opponent Liz Lawler. Pellerin’s campaign has not yet filed fundraising receipts for this campaign.

     

    The Recommendation


    Pellerin, former Santa Cruz county clerk, is from Sacramento and has lived in Santa Cruz for almost 30 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to focus on affordable housing, health-care access, climate change, and mental-health services.

    Pellerin, a former journalist, has worked in public service for more than 35 years. She served as a legislative staffer in Sacramento and later as elections manager under then County Clerk Richard Bedal, and went on to win reelection four times. She has also worked on election issues in other roles, including with the California Democratic Party on its voter-protection committee. She has been active in women-serving organizations like Girls Inc. and Women’s Educational Success at Cabrillo College. Pellerin led the creation of the Cabrillo College Local Government Fellows program, which provides scholarships, paid internships, and mentorship opportunities to encourage students to get involved in local government.

    Pellerin has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Equality California, and Planned Parenthood Advocates Mar Monte. She has also received the endorsement of several elected leaders, including current AD-28 Assemblymember Mark Stone, U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Assemblymember Anthony Rendon, State Senator John Laird, and Assemblymember Robert Rivas. Based on our analysis, Pellerin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-28 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Last updated: 2022-05-14

    Gail Pellerin

    Elect Gail Pellerin to push AD-28 in the right direction.

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District


    California’s 28th Assembly District includes parts of Monterey, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 18% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 6% Asian, and 3% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-29 is 33% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-289 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 42 points.

     

    The Race


    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Pellerin and Republican opponent Liz Lawler. Pellerin’s campaign has not yet filed fundraising receipts for this campaign.

     

    The Recommendation


    Pellerin, former Santa Cruz county clerk, is from Sacramento and has lived in Santa Cruz for almost 30 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to focus on affordable housing, health-care access, climate change, and mental-health services.

    Pellerin, a former journalist, has worked in public service for more than 35 years. She served as a legislative staffer in Sacramento and later as elections manager under then County Clerk Richard Bedal, and went on to win reelection four times. She has also worked on election issues in other roles, including with the California Democratic Party on its voter-protection committee. She has been active in women-serving organizations like Girls Inc. and Women’s Educational Success at Cabrillo College. Pellerin led the creation of the Cabrillo College Local Government Fellows program, which provides scholarships, paid internships, and mentorship opportunities to encourage students to get involved in local government.

    Pellerin has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Equality California, and Planned Parenthood Advocates Mar Monte. She has also received the endorsement of several elected leaders, including current AD-28 Assemblymember Mark Stone, U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Assemblymember Anthony Rendon, State Senator John Laird, and Assemblymember Robert Rivas. Based on our analysis, Pellerin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-28 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Gail Pellerin

    Elect Gail Pellerin to push AD-28 in the right direction.

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District


    California’s 28th Assembly District includes parts of Monterey, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 18% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 6% Asian, and 3% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-29 is 33% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-289 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 42 points.

     

    The Race


    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Pellerin and Republican opponent Liz Lawler. Pellerin’s campaign has not yet filed fundraising receipts for this campaign.

     

    The Recommendation


    Pellerin, former Santa Cruz county clerk, is from Sacramento and has lived in Santa Cruz for almost 30 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to focus on affordable housing, health-care access, climate change, and mental-health services.

    Pellerin, a former journalist, has worked in public service for more than 35 years. She served as a legislative staffer in Sacramento and later as elections manager under then County Clerk Richard Bedal, and went on to win reelection four times. She has also worked on election issues in other roles, including with the California Democratic Party on its voter-protection committee. She has been active in women-serving organizations like Girls Inc. and Women’s Educational Success at Cabrillo College. Pellerin led the creation of the Cabrillo College Local Government Fellows program, which provides scholarships, paid internships, and mentorship opportunities to encourage students to get involved in local government.

    Pellerin has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Equality California, and Planned Parenthood Advocates Mar Monte. She has also received the endorsement of several elected leaders, including current AD-28 Assemblymember Mark Stone, U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Assemblymember Anthony Rendon, State Senator John Laird, and Assemblymember Robert Rivas. Based on our analysis, Pellerin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-28 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

Voting has changed in Santa Clara County this year. The Voter’s Choice Act was enacted in the county to make voting more convenient. Changes include an expanded period of in-person early voting, every registered voter in the county will receive a vote-by-mail ballot, and every registered voter in the county is able to vote in-person at any Vote Center in their county. Have questions about the changes to voting in Santa Clara County? Find out how to vote in Santa Clara County.