• Karen Bass

    Elect Karen Bass as mayor to push Los Angeles in the right direction. 

     

    The Position

    Los Angeles uses a mayor–city council government structure, in which the mayor is elected at large and acts as chair of the 15-member city council and as the city’s chief executive

    Karen Bass

    Elect Karen Bass as mayor to push Los Angeles in the right direction. 

     

    The Position

    Los Angeles uses a mayor–city council government structure, in which the mayor is elected at large and acts as chair of the 15-member city council and as the city’s chief executive

    Karen Bass

    Elect Karen Bass as mayor to push Los Angeles in the right direction. 

     

    The Position

    Los Angeles uses a mayor–city council government structure, in which the mayor is elected at large and acts as chair of the 15-member city council and as the city’s chief executive

  • Endorsed By: Courage California

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Pilar Schiavo

    Elect Pilar Schiavo to push AD-40 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s new 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Republicans held this district (previously AD-38) from 1973 to 2018 and have held it again since 2020. Republican registration in the district is strong, but has been trending downward. Of registered voters in this district, 34% are Democrat and 34% are Republican, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 26% Latino, 13% Asian, and 4% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 6% more Democratic than the old AD-38 was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-40 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are three candidates running for this seat, including incumbent Representative Suzette Martinez Valladares, a Republican. Schiavo’s campaign has raised more than $385,000 and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. Opponent Valladares’s campaign is funded by police, fossil fuel, and real estate money. Valladares has voted against expanding gun control and against restricting police officers from being transferred to other departments following misconduct convictions.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Pilar Schiavo, a longtime community advocate and Organizer for Healthy California Now, is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to help build the healthy communities needed after the economic fragility revealed and worsened by COVID-19. In particular, she aims to continue fighting for Medicare for all by passing AB 1400, the single-payer bill that follows the old SB 562. Schiavo has not run for office previously.

    Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good paying job. In her labor-organizing work, she served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the CNA, she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562.

    Schiavo’s last three years with the CNA involved her working as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricanes, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. Schiavo also co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Schiavo has extensive experience in organizations outside her district as well, including organizing for Healthy California Now, and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, as well as with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council.

    Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive lawmakers and groups, including State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, Assemblymember Laura Friedman, Assemblymember Isaac Bryan, AFSCME California, UNITE HERE! California, Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. Based on our analysis, Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Pilar Schiavo

    Elect Pilar Schiavo to push AD-40 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s new 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Republicans held this district (previously AD-38) from 1973 to 2018 and have held it again since 2020. Republican registration in the district is strong, but has been trending downward. Of registered voters in this district, 34% are Democrat and 34% are Republican, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 26% Latino, 13% Asian, and 4% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 6% more Democratic than the old AD-38 was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-40 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are three candidates running for this seat, including incumbent Representative Suzette Martinez Valladares, a Republican. Schiavo’s campaign has raised more than $385,000 and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. Opponent Valladares’s campaign is funded by police, fossil fuel, and real estate money. Valladares has voted against expanding gun control and against restricting police officers from being transferred to other departments following misconduct convictions.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Pilar Schiavo, a longtime community advocate and Organizer for Healthy California Now, is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to help build the healthy communities needed after the economic fragility revealed and worsened by COVID-19. In particular, she aims to continue fighting for Medicare for all by passing AB 1400, the single-payer bill that follows the old SB 562. Schiavo has not run for office previously.

    Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good paying job. In her labor-organizing work, she served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the CNA, she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562.

    Schiavo’s last three years with the CNA involved her working as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricanes, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. Schiavo also co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Schiavo has extensive experience in organizations outside her district as well, including organizing for Healthy California Now, and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, as well as with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council.

    Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive lawmakers and groups, including State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, Assemblymember Laura Friedman, Assemblymember Isaac Bryan, AFSCME California, UNITE HERE! California, Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. Based on our analysis, Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Pilar Schiavo

    Elect Pilar Schiavo to push AD-40 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s new 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Republicans held this district (previously AD-38) from 1973 to 2018 and have held it again since 2020. Republican registration in the district is strong, but has been trending downward. Of registered voters in this district, 34% are Democrat and 34% are Republican, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 26% Latino, 13% Asian, and 4% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 6% more Democratic than the old AD-38 was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-40 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are three candidates running for this seat, including incumbent Representative Suzette Martinez Valladares, a Republican. Schiavo’s campaign has raised more than $385,000 and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. Opponent Valladares’s campaign is funded by police, fossil fuel, and real estate money. Valladares has voted against expanding gun control and against restricting police officers from being transferred to other departments following misconduct convictions.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Pilar Schiavo, a longtime community advocate and Organizer for Healthy California Now, is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to help build the healthy communities needed after the economic fragility revealed and worsened by COVID-19. In particular, she aims to continue fighting for Medicare for all by passing AB 1400, the single-payer bill that follows the old SB 562. Schiavo has not run for office previously.

    Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good paying job. In her labor-organizing work, she served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the CNA, she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562.

    Schiavo’s last three years with the CNA involved her working as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricanes, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley. Schiavo also co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Schiavo has extensive experience in organizations outside her district as well, including organizing for Healthy California Now, and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, as well as with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council.

    Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive lawmakers and groups, including State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, Assemblymember Laura Friedman, Assemblymember Isaac Bryan, AFSCME California, UNITE HERE! California, Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. Based on our analysis, Schiavo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Jacqui Irwin

    Reelect State Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Republicans and Independents typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 30% are Republican and 41% are Democrat, and the demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-42 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by ten points.

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Jacqui Irwin and two Republican challengers. Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $651,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Irwin, an engineer and a public official, has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue to guide resources to and provide bipartisan leadership for the district. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Irwin represents AD-44 and won her 2020 reelection to that seat against Republican Denise Pedrow by a margin of 22 points.  

    Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-44 this year have included 47 bills about health care, technology and information security, and education. Of these, five have been chaptered into law, seven have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee.  She currently serves on five standing committees, including as chair of Revenue and Taxation. She also serves as chair of the Select Committee on Cybersecurity. Assm. Irwin scores a Lifetime CS of 47 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, she failed to vote on reductions to youth probation, a retroactive implementation of the California Racial Justice Act of 2020, and limitations on law-enforcement agencies acquiring military equipment. She also voted against several criminal-justice reform bills, including those to seal criminal records for individuals who have completed sentences, repealing loitering laws to reduce the harassment of sex workers, and removing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug crimes. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Assm. Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and California Labor Federation, and she has received the endorsement of many state and local elected officials. However, she is also endorsed and funded by many police leaders and organizations, including California Correctional Peace Officers Association, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Ventura County Deputy Sheriffs Association. She is the recipient of campaign donations from many problematic donors across industries, including Sempra Energy, PG&E Corporation, Facebook, California Real Estate PAC, and Fox Corporation. Given these associations, it is critical that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of the district and the constituents. Based on our analysis, Rep. Irwin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-41 and will govern effectively for this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Jacqui Irwin

    Reelect State Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Republicans and Independents typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 30% are Republican and 41% are Democrat, and the demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-42 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by ten points.

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Jacqui Irwin and two Republican challengers. Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $651,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Irwin, an engineer and a public official, has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue to guide resources to and provide bipartisan leadership for the district. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Irwin represents AD-44 and won her 2020 reelection to that seat against Republican Denise Pedrow by a margin of 22 points.  

    Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-44 this year have included 47 bills about health care, technology and information security, and education. Of these, five have been chaptered into law, seven have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee.  She currently serves on five standing committees, including as chair of Revenue and Taxation. She also serves as chair of the Select Committee on Cybersecurity. Assm. Irwin scores a Lifetime CS of 47 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, she failed to vote on reductions to youth probation, a retroactive implementation of the California Racial Justice Act of 2020, and limitations on law-enforcement agencies acquiring military equipment. She also voted against several criminal-justice reform bills, including those to seal criminal records for individuals who have completed sentences, repealing loitering laws to reduce the harassment of sex workers, and removing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug crimes. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Assm. Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and California Labor Federation, and she has received the endorsement of many state and local elected officials. However, she is also endorsed and funded by many police leaders and organizations, including California Correctional Peace Officers Association, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Ventura County Deputy Sheriffs Association. She is the recipient of campaign donations from many problematic donors across industries, including Sempra Energy, PG&E Corporation, Facebook, California Real Estate PAC, and Fox Corporation. Given these associations, it is critical that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of the district and the constituents. Based on our analysis, Rep. Irwin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-41 and will govern effectively for this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Jacqui Irwin

    Reelect State Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Republicans and Independents typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 30% are Republican and 41% are Democrat, and the demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-42 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by ten points.

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Jacqui Irwin and two Republican challengers. Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $651,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Irwin, an engineer and a public official, has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue to guide resources to and provide bipartisan leadership for the district. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Irwin represents AD-44 and won her 2020 reelection to that seat against Republican Denise Pedrow by a margin of 22 points.  

    Assm. Irwin’s priorities for AD-44 this year have included 47 bills about health care, technology and information security, and education. Of these, five have been chaptered into law, seven have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee.  She currently serves on five standing committees, including as chair of Revenue and Taxation. She also serves as chair of the Select Committee on Cybersecurity. Assm. Irwin scores a Lifetime CS of 47 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, she failed to vote on reductions to youth probation, a retroactive implementation of the California Racial Justice Act of 2020, and limitations on law-enforcement agencies acquiring military equipment. She also voted against several criminal-justice reform bills, including those to seal criminal records for individuals who have completed sentences, repealing loitering laws to reduce the harassment of sex workers, and removing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug crimes. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Assm. Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and California Labor Federation, and she has received the endorsement of many state and local elected officials. However, she is also endorsed and funded by many police leaders and organizations, including California Correctional Peace Officers Association, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Ventura County Deputy Sheriffs Association. She is the recipient of campaign donations from many problematic donors across industries, including Sempra Energy, PG&E Corporation, Facebook, California Real Estate PAC, and Fox Corporation. Given these associations, it is critical that voters continue to hold her accountable to ensure that her legislative efforts remain in the best interests of the district and the constituents. Based on our analysis, Rep. Irwin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-41 and will govern effectively for this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

  • Luz Rivas

    Reelect State Assemblymember Luz Rivas to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 13% are Republican and 55% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-43 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 56 points.

     

     

     

    The Race


    Democratic incumbent Assemblymember Luz Rivas is the only candidate running for this seat. Assm. Rivas’s campaign has raised $370,000 and has received significant funding from fossil fuel and corporate PAC donors.

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Rivas, an electrical engineer and nonprofit executive, is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue to build policy that provides a foundation for enhanced quality of life and economic growth for all constituents. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Rivas represented AD-39, and won her 2020 reelection against Republican Ricardo Benitez by 48 points.

    Assm. Rivas’s priorities for AD-43 this year have included 43 bills about homelessness and housing, early childhood and post-secondary education, and transportation. Of these, 17 have been chaptered into law. Notably, she authored AB 71, which seeks to establish a permanent source of funding for long-term solutions to homelessness in California through a state taxation adjustment. This bill has not yet passed the Assembly and the Senate, but is demonstrative of her innovative approach to resolving social issues. She currently serves on six standing committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources committee and chair of the Select Committee on the Non-Profit Sector. She scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rivas has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rivas spent her early career as an electrical engineer, where she developed a strong interest in early STEM education. She completed a master of education program before founding DIY Girls in 2011, which is a nonprofit organization that partners with local schools to expose girls to STEM programming. Before winning election to the Assembly in 2018, she served as Public Works Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles.

    Assm. Rivas has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. However, she has received financial support from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Edison International, Amazon, and AT&T. Despite this, based on our analysis, Assm. Rivas’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Luz Rivas

    Reelect State Assemblymember Luz Rivas to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 13% are Republican and 55% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-43 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 56 points.

     

     

     

    The Race


    Democratic incumbent Assemblymember Luz Rivas is the only candidate running for this seat. Assm. Rivas’s campaign has raised $370,000 and has received significant funding from fossil fuel and corporate PAC donors.

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Rivas, an electrical engineer and nonprofit executive, is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue to build policy that provides a foundation for enhanced quality of life and economic growth for all constituents. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Rivas represented AD-39, and won her 2020 reelection against Republican Ricardo Benitez by 48 points.

    Assm. Rivas’s priorities for AD-43 this year have included 43 bills about homelessness and housing, early childhood and post-secondary education, and transportation. Of these, 17 have been chaptered into law. Notably, she authored AB 71, which seeks to establish a permanent source of funding for long-term solutions to homelessness in California through a state taxation adjustment. This bill has not yet passed the Assembly and the Senate, but is demonstrative of her innovative approach to resolving social issues. She currently serves on six standing committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources committee and chair of the Select Committee on the Non-Profit Sector. She scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rivas has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rivas spent her early career as an electrical engineer, where she developed a strong interest in early STEM education. She completed a master of education program before founding DIY Girls in 2011, which is a nonprofit organization that partners with local schools to expose girls to STEM programming. Before winning election to the Assembly in 2018, she served as Public Works Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles.

    Assm. Rivas has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. However, she has received financial support from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Edison International, Amazon, and AT&T. Despite this, based on our analysis, Assm. Rivas’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Luz Rivas

    Reelect State Assemblymember Luz Rivas to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 13% are Republican and 55% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-43 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 56 points.

     

     

     

    The Race


    Democratic incumbent Assemblymember Luz Rivas is the only candidate running for this seat. Assm. Rivas’s campaign has raised $370,000 and has received significant funding from fossil fuel and corporate PAC donors.

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Rivas, an electrical engineer and nonprofit executive, is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue to build policy that provides a foundation for enhanced quality of life and economic growth for all constituents. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Rivas represented AD-39, and won her 2020 reelection against Republican Ricardo Benitez by 48 points.

    Assm. Rivas’s priorities for AD-43 this year have included 43 bills about homelessness and housing, early childhood and post-secondary education, and transportation. Of these, 17 have been chaptered into law. Notably, she authored AB 71, which seeks to establish a permanent source of funding for long-term solutions to homelessness in California through a state taxation adjustment. This bill has not yet passed the Assembly and the Senate, but is demonstrative of her innovative approach to resolving social issues. She currently serves on six standing committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources committee and chair of the Select Committee on the Non-Profit Sector. She scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rivas has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rivas spent her early career as an electrical engineer, where she developed a strong interest in early STEM education. She completed a master of education program before founding DIY Girls in 2011, which is a nonprofit organization that partners with local schools to expose girls to STEM programming. Before winning election to the Assembly in 2018, she served as Public Works Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles.

    Assm. Rivas has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. However, she has received financial support from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Edison International, Amazon, and AT&T. Despite this, based on our analysis, Assm. Rivas’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Laura Friedman

    Reelect State Assemblymember Friedman to keep AD-44 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 21% are Republican and 47% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 23% Latino, 17% Asian, and 2% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-44 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 37 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 44 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Friedman is running unopposed for this seat. Friedman’s campaign has raised more than $700,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, or fossil fuel money.

     

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Friedman, a past Glendale City Councilmember and mayor of Glendale, is a non-native Angeleno. According to campaign materials, Assm. Friedman is running for reelection to continue fighting to raise the minimum wage and protect the environment, as well as advocate for universal health care, pro-choice legislation, and affordable housing. Assm. Friedman won her 2020 reelection against a Republican challenger by 39 points.

    Assm. Friedman’s priorities for her district this year have included sponsoring and co-sponsoring seven bills about consumer safety, protecting the environment, and reproductive rights, of which two have successfully passed the Assembly. Five have passed the Senate and been signed into law. She currently chairs the Assembly Transportation and Natural Resources Committees. Friedman scores 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Friedman worked as a film and television executive and a producer. Building on years of community service, she was elected to the Glendale City Council in 2009, served as mayor from 2011–2012, and was reelected in 2013. She is a longtime supporter of environmental conservancy.

    Assm. Friedman has the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers and groups, including Senator Lena Gonzalez, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and NARAL Pro-Choice California. Based on our analysis, Assm. Friedman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Laura Friedman

    Reelect State Assemblymember Friedman to keep AD-44 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 21% are Republican and 47% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 23% Latino, 17% Asian, and 2% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-44 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 37 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 44 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Friedman is running unopposed for this seat. Friedman’s campaign has raised more than $700,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, or fossil fuel money.

     

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Friedman, a past Glendale City Councilmember and mayor of Glendale, is a non-native Angeleno. According to campaign materials, Assm. Friedman is running for reelection to continue fighting to raise the minimum wage and protect the environment, as well as advocate for universal health care, pro-choice legislation, and affordable housing. Assm. Friedman won her 2020 reelection against a Republican challenger by 39 points.

    Assm. Friedman’s priorities for her district this year have included sponsoring and co-sponsoring seven bills about consumer safety, protecting the environment, and reproductive rights, of which two have successfully passed the Assembly. Five have passed the Senate and been signed into law. She currently chairs the Assembly Transportation and Natural Resources Committees. Friedman scores 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Friedman worked as a film and television executive and a producer. Building on years of community service, she was elected to the Glendale City Council in 2009, served as mayor from 2011–2012, and was reelected in 2013. She is a longtime supporter of environmental conservancy.

    Assm. Friedman has the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers and groups, including Senator Lena Gonzalez, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and NARAL Pro-Choice California. Based on our analysis, Assm. Friedman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Laura Friedman

    Reelect State Assemblymember Friedman to keep AD-44 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 21% are Republican and 47% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 23% Latino, 17% Asian, and 2% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-44 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 37 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 44 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Friedman is running unopposed for this seat. Friedman’s campaign has raised more than $700,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, or fossil fuel money.

     

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Friedman, a past Glendale City Councilmember and mayor of Glendale, is a non-native Angeleno. According to campaign materials, Assm. Friedman is running for reelection to continue fighting to raise the minimum wage and protect the environment, as well as advocate for universal health care, pro-choice legislation, and affordable housing. Assm. Friedman won her 2020 reelection against a Republican challenger by 39 points.

    Assm. Friedman’s priorities for her district this year have included sponsoring and co-sponsoring seven bills about consumer safety, protecting the environment, and reproductive rights, of which two have successfully passed the Assembly. Five have passed the Senate and been signed into law. She currently chairs the Assembly Transportation and Natural Resources Committees. Friedman scores 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Friedman worked as a film and television executive and a producer. Building on years of community service, she was elected to the Glendale City Council in 2009, served as mayor from 2011–2012, and was reelected in 2013. She is a longtime supporter of environmental conservancy.

    Assm. Friedman has the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers and groups, including Senator Lena Gonzalez, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and NARAL Pro-Choice California. Based on our analysis, Assm. Friedman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Rick Chavez Zbur

    Elect Rick Chavez Zbur to push AD-51 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 12% are Republican and 58% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Rick Chavez Zbur and Democrat Louis Abramson. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $856,000, and has received donations from real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests. Abramson’s campaign has raised $125,000, and is entirely funded by individual donors. 

     

    Our Endorsement

    Rick Chavez Zbur, a longtime civil rights leader and environmental advocate, is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to bring equitable leadership and bold change to the issues of homelessness, economic recovery, and civil rights in the district. Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin. 

    Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to work that would more directly benefit social service access for underserved populations. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. 

    Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur is a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles. Chavez Zbur also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom. Based on our analysis, Chavez Zbur’s track record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Elect Rick Chavez Zbur to push AD-51 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 12% are Republican and 58% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Rick Chavez Zbur and Democrat Louis Abramson. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $856,000, and has received donations from real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests. Abramson’s campaign has raised $125,000, and is entirely funded by individual donors. 

     

    Our Endorsement

    Rick Chavez Zbur, a longtime civil rights leader and environmental advocate, is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to bring equitable leadership and bold change to the issues of homelessness, economic recovery, and civil rights in the district. Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin. 

    Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to work that would more directly benefit social service access for underserved populations. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. 

    Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur is a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles. Chavez Zbur also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom. Based on our analysis, Chavez Zbur’s track record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Elect Rick Chavez Zbur to push AD-51 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 12% are Republican and 58% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Rick Chavez Zbur and Democrat Louis Abramson. Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $856,000, and has received donations from real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests. Abramson’s campaign has raised $125,000, and is entirely funded by individual donors. 

     

    Our Endorsement

    Rick Chavez Zbur, a longtime civil rights leader and environmental advocate, is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to bring equitable leadership and bold change to the issues of homelessness, economic recovery, and civil rights in the district. Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin. 

    Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to work that would more directly benefit social service access for underserved populations. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. 

    Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur is a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles. Chavez Zbur also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom. Based on our analysis, Chavez Zbur’s track record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Wendy Carrillo

    Reelect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-52 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 10% are Republican and 62% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-52 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 70 points.

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Wendy Carrillo, Democrat Mia Livas Porter, and Republican Gia D’Amato. Assm. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $400,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Porter’s campaign has raised $107,000, and is funded primarily by individual donors. D’Amato’s campaign has raised insignificant funds during this election cycle. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Wendy Carrillo, a journalist and an organizer, was born in El Salvador and grew up in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue her work to advance equity and opportunity for her constituents. Assm. Carrillo currently represents AD-51, and ran unopposed for her seat during the 2020 election cycle. 

    Assm. Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year have included 46 bills about child welfare, education, environmental protections, and mental-health care. Of these, eight have been chaptered into law, eight have died, and the rest are currently in committee. She currently sits on five committees, including Budget, Appropriations, Health, Housing and Community Development, and Utilities and Energy. She serves as chair of the Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration, and as chair of the select committee on Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. Assm. Carrillo was also elected by her colleagues to serve as a vice chair of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus during the most recent legislative session. She scores a Lifetime CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage Score All-Star this year for her continued efforts toward progressive change, including recent bills regarding environmental protections and criminal-justice reform. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Carrillo spent 12 years working in broadcast journalism. She established a start-up social news media company focused on human rights, and supported communications efforts for the SEIU United Long Term Care Workers. Before pursuing her own elected office, she also served as a communications deputy with the Los Angeles City Council. Assm. Carrillo is a first-generation American, and came to the United States as a child when her family fled a civil war in El Salvador. She is a longtime supporter of immigration reform, human rights, and fair pay. 

    Assm. Carrillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Wendy Carrillo

    Reelect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-52 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 10% are Republican and 62% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-52 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 70 points.

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Wendy Carrillo, Democrat Mia Livas Porter, and Republican Gia D’Amato. Assm. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $400,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Porter’s campaign has raised $107,000, and is funded primarily by individual donors. D’Amato’s campaign has raised insignificant funds during this election cycle. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Wendy Carrillo, a journalist and an organizer, was born in El Salvador and grew up in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue her work to advance equity and opportunity for her constituents. Assm. Carrillo currently represents AD-51, and ran unopposed for her seat during the 2020 election cycle. 

    Assm. Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year have included 46 bills about child welfare, education, environmental protections, and mental-health care. Of these, eight have been chaptered into law, eight have died, and the rest are currently in committee. She currently sits on five committees, including Budget, Appropriations, Health, Housing and Community Development, and Utilities and Energy. She serves as chair of the Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration, and as chair of the select committee on Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. Assm. Carrillo was also elected by her colleagues to serve as a vice chair of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus during the most recent legislative session. She scores a Lifetime CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage Score All-Star this year for her continued efforts toward progressive change, including recent bills regarding environmental protections and criminal-justice reform. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Carrillo spent 12 years working in broadcast journalism. She established a start-up social news media company focused on human rights, and supported communications efforts for the SEIU United Long Term Care Workers. Before pursuing her own elected office, she also served as a communications deputy with the Los Angeles City Council. Assm. Carrillo is a first-generation American, and came to the United States as a child when her family fled a civil war in El Salvador. She is a longtime supporter of immigration reform, human rights, and fair pay. 

    Assm. Carrillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Wendy Carrillo

    Reelect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-52 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 10% are Republican and 62% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-52 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-52 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 70 points.

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Wendy Carrillo, Democrat Mia Livas Porter, and Republican Gia D’Amato. Assm. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $400,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Porter’s campaign has raised $107,000, and is funded primarily by individual donors. D’Amato’s campaign has raised insignificant funds during this election cycle. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Wendy Carrillo, a journalist and an organizer, was born in El Salvador and grew up in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue her work to advance equity and opportunity for her constituents. Assm. Carrillo currently represents AD-51, and ran unopposed for her seat during the 2020 election cycle. 

    Assm. Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year have included 46 bills about child welfare, education, environmental protections, and mental-health care. Of these, eight have been chaptered into law, eight have died, and the rest are currently in committee. She currently sits on five committees, including Budget, Appropriations, Health, Housing and Community Development, and Utilities and Energy. She serves as chair of the Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration, and as chair of the select committee on Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. Assm. Carrillo was also elected by her colleagues to serve as a vice chair of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus during the most recent legislative session. She scores a Lifetime CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. She has been designated as a Courage Score All-Star this year for her continued efforts toward progressive change, including recent bills regarding environmental protections and criminal-justice reform. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Carrillo spent 12 years working in broadcast journalism. She established a start-up social news media company focused on human rights, and supported communications efforts for the SEIU United Long Term Care Workers. Before pursuing her own elected office, she also served as a communications deputy with the Los Angeles City Council. Assm. Carrillo is a first-generation American, and came to the United States as a child when her family fled a civil war in El Salvador. She is a longtime supporter of immigration reform, human rights, and fair pay. 

    Assm. Carrillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district. Based on our analysis, Assm. Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Miguel Santiago

    Reelect State Assemblymember Miguel Santiago to keep AD-54 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 10% are Republican and 58% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-54 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 66 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Incumbent Assemblymember Santiago is running unchallenged. Santiago’s campaign has raised over $886,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel or real estate interests, but he has received donations from police and corporate groups.

     

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Santiago, first elected to represent the district in November 2014, is from Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Assm. Santiago is running for reelection to continue expanding access to higher education and education, and he is fighting for immigrant rights. Assm. Santiago won his 2020 reelection against a Democratic challenger by 25.8 points.

    Assm. Santiago’s priorities for AD-54 this year have included seven bills about health care, labor, and criminal justice, of which four have successfully passed the Assembly. Three have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently holds leadership roles on two committees: the Assembly Communications and Conveyance and Assembly Select Committee on Los Angeles County Homelessness. He scores 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Santiago has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Santiago was involved in community organizing, and worked on expanding affordable health care and housing. He is a longtime supporter of education, just immigration policies, and economic development.

    Assm. Santiago has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district and statewide, including Los Angeles Federation of Labor, California Environmental Voters, Planned Parenthood, and Our Revolution. Based on our analysis, Assm. Santago’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-54 and will continue to govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Miguel Santiago

    Reelect State Assemblymember Miguel Santiago to keep AD-54 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 10% are Republican and 58% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-54 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 66 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Incumbent Assemblymember Santiago is running unchallenged. Santiago’s campaign has raised over $886,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel or real estate interests, but he has received donations from police and corporate groups.

     

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Santiago, first elected to represent the district in November 2014, is from Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Assm. Santiago is running for reelection to continue expanding access to higher education and education, and he is fighting for immigrant rights. Assm. Santiago won his 2020 reelection against a Democratic challenger by 25.8 points.

    Assm. Santiago’s priorities for AD-54 this year have included seven bills about health care, labor, and criminal justice, of which four have successfully passed the Assembly. Three have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently holds leadership roles on two committees: the Assembly Communications and Conveyance and Assembly Select Committee on Los Angeles County Homelessness. He scores 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Santiago has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Santiago was involved in community organizing, and worked on expanding affordable health care and housing. He is a longtime supporter of education, just immigration policies, and economic development.

    Assm. Santiago has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district and statewide, including Los Angeles Federation of Labor, California Environmental Voters, Planned Parenthood, and Our Revolution. Based on our analysis, Assm. Santago’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-54 and will continue to govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Miguel Santiago

    Reelect State Assemblymember Miguel Santiago to keep AD-54 on the right track for progress.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 10% are Republican and 58% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-54 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 66 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Incumbent Assemblymember Santiago is running unchallenged. Santiago’s campaign has raised over $886,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel or real estate interests, but he has received donations from police and corporate groups.

     

     

     

     

    The Recommendation


    Assm. Santiago, first elected to represent the district in November 2014, is from Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Assm. Santiago is running for reelection to continue expanding access to higher education and education, and he is fighting for immigrant rights. Assm. Santiago won his 2020 reelection against a Democratic challenger by 25.8 points.

    Assm. Santiago’s priorities for AD-54 this year have included seven bills about health care, labor, and criminal justice, of which four have successfully passed the Assembly. Three have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently holds leadership roles on two committees: the Assembly Communications and Conveyance and Assembly Select Committee on Los Angeles County Homelessness. He scores 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Santiago has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Santiago was involved in community organizing, and worked on expanding affordable health care and housing. He is a longtime supporter of education, just immigration policies, and economic development.

    Assm. Santiago has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district and statewide, including Los Angeles Federation of Labor, California Environmental Voters, Planned Parenthood, and Our Revolution. Based on our analysis, Assm. Santago’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-54 and will continue to govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Isaac Bryan

    Reelect State Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 8% are Republican and 65% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, the advantage that Democrats held during the 2020 general election cycle is unchanged. The most recent election results show that AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 73 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Isaac Bryan and Republican Keith Cascio. Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $475,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. Cascio’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Isaac Bryan, a policy analyst and an organizer, lives in Jefferson Park. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to use his lived experience and knowledge of coalition-building to bring intersectional change to his constituent communities. Assm. Bryan currently represents AD-54, a seat he won outright in a special primary election held in May 2021. In that race, he received over 50% of the vote against four Democratic opponents.

    Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-54 this year have included 24 bills about housing, child welfare, climate change, and criminal justice. Of these, two have been chaptered into law and one has died, and the remaining bills are in committee. Assm. Bryan currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Governmental Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety, and serves as the chair of the Elections Committee. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote this year. He received an Honorable Mention distinction from Courage Score this year for his commitment to progressive leadership. 

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California League of Conservation Voters, and ACCE Action. He has also received the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers, including Congresswoman Karen Bass, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and LA City Councilmember Nithya Raman. Based on our analysis, Assm. Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Isaac Bryan

    Reelect State Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 8% are Republican and 65% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, the advantage that Democrats held during the 2020 general election cycle is unchanged. The most recent election results show that AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 73 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Isaac Bryan and Republican Keith Cascio. Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $475,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. Cascio’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Isaac Bryan, a policy analyst and an organizer, lives in Jefferson Park. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to use his lived experience and knowledge of coalition-building to bring intersectional change to his constituent communities. Assm. Bryan currently represents AD-54, a seat he won outright in a special primary election held in May 2021. In that race, he received over 50% of the vote against four Democratic opponents.

    Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-54 this year have included 24 bills about housing, child welfare, climate change, and criminal justice. Of these, two have been chaptered into law and one has died, and the remaining bills are in committee. Assm. Bryan currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Governmental Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety, and serves as the chair of the Elections Committee. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote this year. He received an Honorable Mention distinction from Courage Score this year for his commitment to progressive leadership. 

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California League of Conservation Voters, and ACCE Action. He has also received the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers, including Congresswoman Karen Bass, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and LA City Councilmember Nithya Raman. Based on our analysis, Assm. Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Isaac Bryan

    Reelect State Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 8% are Republican and 65% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, the advantage that Democrats held during the 2020 general election cycle is unchanged. The most recent election results show that AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 73 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Isaac Bryan and Republican Keith Cascio. Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $475,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, police, or real estate money. Cascio’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Isaac Bryan, a policy analyst and an organizer, lives in Jefferson Park. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to use his lived experience and knowledge of coalition-building to bring intersectional change to his constituent communities. Assm. Bryan currently represents AD-54, a seat he won outright in a special primary election held in May 2021. In that race, he received over 50% of the vote against four Democratic opponents.

    Assm. Bryan’s priorities for AD-54 this year have included 24 bills about housing, child welfare, climate change, and criminal justice. Of these, two have been chaptered into law and one has died, and the remaining bills are in committee. Assm. Bryan currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Governmental Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety, and serves as the chair of the Elections Committee. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote this year. He received an Honorable Mention distinction from Courage Score this year for his commitment to progressive leadership. 

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county. 

    Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California League of Conservation Voters, and ACCE Action. He has also received the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers, including Congresswoman Karen Bass, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and LA City Councilmember Nithya Raman. Based on our analysis, Assm. Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Reggie Jones-Sawyer

    Reelect State Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-57 moving toward progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 6% are Republican and 64% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-57 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 77 points.

     

    The Race

    There is one candidate running for this seat, Democratic Incumbent Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $499,434 and is not funded by the real estate industry. He has accepted donations from corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, and the police.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Reginald Jones-Sawyer, a labor organizer and public servant, is from Little Rock, AR, and now lives in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Assm. Jones-Sawyer is running for reelection to continue championing forward-thinking policies that put working families first. Assm. Jones-Sawyer won his 2020 reelection against a Democratic challenger by 15 points. 

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-57 this year have included 39 bills about justice reform, increasing quality and funding for education, and supporting tenants and housing, of which 17 have successfully passed the Assembly. Eight have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently chairs the Assembly Public Safety Committee, and sits on the Agriculture, Budget, Governmental Organization, and Labor and Employment Committees. He scores a perfect 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. 

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Jones-Sawyer served as a labor organizer and vice president of his chapter of SEIU, as well as for the City of Los Angeles as a director of Asset Management and assistant deputy mayor. He is a longtime supporter of criminal-justice reform and youth advocacy. He secured tens of millions of dollars in the state budget for the Youth Reinvestment Fund, which aims to fund trauma-informed interventions and alternatives to incarceration and arrest for vulnerable young people. He also helped secure $100 million in grant funding aimed at recidivism reduction. During his tenure in the Assembly, Jones-Sawyer founded and now chairs the California Progressive Caucus. He has also sponsored and passed legislation increasing age and education requirements for law enforcement, limiting exploitation of arrested individuals by bail licensees, expanding job protections in the event of layoffs for classified school district employees, and increasing access to financial aid for college students. 

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California League of Conservation Voters, Equality California, Everytown for Gun Safety, Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, Abundant Housing LA, and labor unions like SEIU, the California Labor Federation, California Nurses Association, UFCW, NUHW, and UFW. Based on our analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Reggie Jones-Sawyer

    Reelect State Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-57 moving toward progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 6% are Republican and 64% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-57 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 77 points.

     

    The Race

    There is one candidate running for this seat, Democratic Incumbent Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $499,434 and is not funded by the real estate industry. He has accepted donations from corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, and the police.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Reginald Jones-Sawyer, a labor organizer and public servant, is from Little Rock, AR, and now lives in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Assm. Jones-Sawyer is running for reelection to continue championing forward-thinking policies that put working families first. Assm. Jones-Sawyer won his 2020 reelection against a Democratic challenger by 15 points. 

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-57 this year have included 39 bills about justice reform, increasing quality and funding for education, and supporting tenants and housing, of which 17 have successfully passed the Assembly. Eight have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently chairs the Assembly Public Safety Committee, and sits on the Agriculture, Budget, Governmental Organization, and Labor and Employment Committees. He scores a perfect 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. 

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Jones-Sawyer served as a labor organizer and vice president of his chapter of SEIU, as well as for the City of Los Angeles as a director of Asset Management and assistant deputy mayor. He is a longtime supporter of criminal-justice reform and youth advocacy. He secured tens of millions of dollars in the state budget for the Youth Reinvestment Fund, which aims to fund trauma-informed interventions and alternatives to incarceration and arrest for vulnerable young people. He also helped secure $100 million in grant funding aimed at recidivism reduction. During his tenure in the Assembly, Jones-Sawyer founded and now chairs the California Progressive Caucus. He has also sponsored and passed legislation increasing age and education requirements for law enforcement, limiting exploitation of arrested individuals by bail licensees, expanding job protections in the event of layoffs for classified school district employees, and increasing access to financial aid for college students. 

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California League of Conservation Voters, Equality California, Everytown for Gun Safety, Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, Abundant Housing LA, and labor unions like SEIU, the California Labor Federation, California Nurses Association, UFCW, NUHW, and UFW. Based on our analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Reggie Jones-Sawyer

    Reelect State Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-57 moving toward progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 6% are Republican and 64% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-57 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-57 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 73 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 77 points.

     

    The Race

    There is one candidate running for this seat, Democratic Incumbent Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $499,434 and is not funded by the real estate industry. He has accepted donations from corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, and the police.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Reginald Jones-Sawyer, a labor organizer and public servant, is from Little Rock, AR, and now lives in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Assm. Jones-Sawyer is running for reelection to continue championing forward-thinking policies that put working families first. Assm. Jones-Sawyer won his 2020 reelection against a Democratic challenger by 15 points. 

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-57 this year have included 39 bills about justice reform, increasing quality and funding for education, and supporting tenants and housing, of which 17 have successfully passed the Assembly. Eight have passed the Senate and been signed into law. He currently chairs the Assembly Public Safety Committee, and sits on the Agriculture, Budget, Governmental Organization, and Labor and Employment Committees. He scores a perfect 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. 

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Jones-Sawyer served as a labor organizer and vice president of his chapter of SEIU, as well as for the City of Los Angeles as a director of Asset Management and assistant deputy mayor. He is a longtime supporter of criminal-justice reform and youth advocacy. He secured tens of millions of dollars in the state budget for the Youth Reinvestment Fund, which aims to fund trauma-informed interventions and alternatives to incarceration and arrest for vulnerable young people. He also helped secure $100 million in grant funding aimed at recidivism reduction. During his tenure in the Assembly, Jones-Sawyer founded and now chairs the California Progressive Caucus. He has also sponsored and passed legislation increasing age and education requirements for law enforcement, limiting exploitation of arrested individuals by bail licensees, expanding job protections in the event of layoffs for classified school district employees, and increasing access to financial aid for college students. 

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California League of Conservation Voters, Equality California, Everytown for Gun Safety, Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, Abundant Housing LA, and labor unions like SEIU, the California Labor Federation, California Nurses Association, UFCW, NUHW, and UFW. Based on our analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Tina McKinnor

    Elect Tina McKinnor to push AD-62 and AD-61 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s current 62nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. After the 2021 redistricting process, 88% of AD-62 is now in the newly drawn AD-61 district. There are two elections on the June 7 ballot: a special election runoff to fill the vacant seat for the current AD-62 district through November 2022, and a primary election in the newly drawn AD-61 district for the 2022–2024 term.

    California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 9% are Republican and 63% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-62 is 3% more Democratic than AD-62 was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-62 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 67 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Assemblymember Autumn Burke announced her resignation in February after representing AD-62 since 2014. Assm. Burke’s resignation leaves this seat open through the end of the term in November 2022. A special election was held on April 5 with two candidates, Democrats Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles, advancing to a runoff special election to be held on June 7. Pullen-Miles received 37% of the vote, and McKinnor received 35% of the vote. The winner of the June special election vote will serve the remainder of the term through November 2022.

    The primary election for the 2022–2024 cycle will also appear on the June 7 ballot, with the newly redrawn district represented as AD-61. There are five candidates running in this race, including Democrats Georgette Gomez, David Alvarez, Angie Reyes English, and Nico Ruderman, and Republican James Arlandus Spencer. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $228,000, and has not received donations from corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, or real estate organizations. Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $163,000, and has received donations from real estate and fossil fuel organizations. He is endorsed by former Assemblymember Burke. Reyes English has raised $69,000, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel money. Ruderman has raised $135,000, and is funded primarily by individual donors.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Tina McKinnor, a community organizer and activist, has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to infuse legislation with her decades-long commitment to transformative justice. McKinnor worked as a legislative staffer in Sacramento for five years, but has not run for office previously.

    McKinnor is the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. Previously, McKinnor was the operational director for the California Democratic Party, and served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. She has also served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and from groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Tina McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, including Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Black Women for Wellness Action Project. She also has the endorsement of many local elected officials, including Los Angeles Councilmember Mike Bonin, Assemblymember Reggie Jones Sawyer, State Senator Scott Wiener, and Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell. Based on our analysis, McKinnor’s track record of serving her community and listening to people most affected across issues demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-62 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Tina McKinnor

    Elect Tina McKinnor to push AD-62 and AD-61 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s current 62nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. After the 2021 redistricting process, 88% of AD-62 is now in the newly drawn AD-61 district. There are two elections on the June 7 ballot: a special election runoff to fill the vacant seat for the current AD-62 district through November 2022, and a primary election in the newly drawn AD-61 district for the 2022–2024 term.

    California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 9% are Republican and 63% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-62 is 3% more Democratic than AD-62 was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-62 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 67 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Assemblymember Autumn Burke announced her resignation in February after representing AD-62 since 2014. Assm. Burke’s resignation leaves this seat open through the end of the term in November 2022. A special election was held on April 5 with two candidates, Democrats Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles, advancing to a runoff special election to be held on June 7. Pullen-Miles received 37% of the vote, and McKinnor received 35% of the vote. The winner of the June special election vote will serve the remainder of the term through November 2022.

    The primary election for the 2022–2024 cycle will also appear on the June 7 ballot, with the newly redrawn district represented as AD-61. There are five candidates running in this race, including Democrats Georgette Gomez, David Alvarez, Angie Reyes English, and Nico Ruderman, and Republican James Arlandus Spencer. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $228,000, and has not received donations from corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, or real estate organizations. Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $163,000, and has received donations from real estate and fossil fuel organizations. He is endorsed by former Assemblymember Burke. Reyes English has raised $69,000, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel money. Ruderman has raised $135,000, and is funded primarily by individual donors.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Tina McKinnor, a community organizer and activist, has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to infuse legislation with her decades-long commitment to transformative justice. McKinnor worked as a legislative staffer in Sacramento for five years, but has not run for office previously.

    McKinnor is the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. Previously, McKinnor was the operational director for the California Democratic Party, and served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. She has also served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and from groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Tina McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, including Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Black Women for Wellness Action Project. She also has the endorsement of many local elected officials, including Los Angeles Councilmember Mike Bonin, Assemblymember Reggie Jones Sawyer, State Senator Scott Wiener, and Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell. Based on our analysis, McKinnor’s track record of serving her community and listening to people most affected across issues demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-62 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Tina McKinnor

    Elect Tina McKinnor to push AD-62 and AD-61 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s current 62nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. After the 2021 redistricting process, 88% of AD-62 is now in the newly drawn AD-61 district. There are two elections on the June 7 ballot: a special election runoff to fill the vacant seat for the current AD-62 district through November 2022, and a primary election in the newly drawn AD-61 district for the 2022–2024 term.

    California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 9% are Republican and 63% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-62 is 3% more Democratic than AD-62 was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-62 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 67 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    Assemblymember Autumn Burke announced her resignation in February after representing AD-62 since 2014. Assm. Burke’s resignation leaves this seat open through the end of the term in November 2022. A special election was held on April 5 with two candidates, Democrats Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles, advancing to a runoff special election to be held on June 7. Pullen-Miles received 37% of the vote, and McKinnor received 35% of the vote. The winner of the June special election vote will serve the remainder of the term through November 2022.

    The primary election for the 2022–2024 cycle will also appear on the June 7 ballot, with the newly redrawn district represented as AD-61. There are five candidates running in this race, including Democrats Georgette Gomez, David Alvarez, Angie Reyes English, and Nico Ruderman, and Republican James Arlandus Spencer. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $228,000, and has not received donations from corporate PAC, police, fossil fuel, or real estate organizations. Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $163,000, and has received donations from real estate and fossil fuel organizations. He is endorsed by former Assemblymember Burke. Reyes English has raised $69,000, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel money. Ruderman has raised $135,000, and is funded primarily by individual donors.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Tina McKinnor, a community organizer and activist, has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to infuse legislation with her decades-long commitment to transformative justice. McKinnor worked as a legislative staffer in Sacramento for five years, but has not run for office previously.

    McKinnor is the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. Previously, McKinnor was the operational director for the California Democratic Party, and served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. She has also served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and from groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Tina McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, including Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Black Women for Wellness Action Project. She also has the endorsement of many local elected officials, including Los Angeles Councilmember Mike Bonin, Assemblymember Reggie Jones Sawyer, State Senator Scott Wiener, and Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell. Based on our analysis, McKinnor’s track record of serving her community and listening to people most affected across issues demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-62 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Fatima Iqbal-Zubair

    Elect Fatima Iqbal-Zubair to push AD-65 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 9% are Republican and 62% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-65 is 3% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-65 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 65 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 63 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Iqbal-Zubair and incumbent Representative Mike Gipson. Iqbal-Zubair’s campaign has raised over $214,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Her campaign funding consists almost entirely of individual contributions. Gipson’s campaign has raised over $850,000 and is funded by police groups, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel money.

     

    Our Endorsement

    Iqbal-Zubair, a community advocate and teacher, immigrated from Dubai and moved to the United States to eventually teach in Watts. According to campaign materials, she is running for election because she sees the struggles faced by her students and the district and because she believes in a government that works for all, not just a select few. Iqbal-Zubair ran for this same office previously and lost that race against incumbent Gipson by 35 points. 

    Iqbal-Zubair is a chemistry and environmental sciences teacher, a role in which she cultivates a strong relationship with her students and builds community. She founded an award-winning FIRST Robotics team and served as director of the Department of Science. Iqbal-Zubair became an advocate for the environment when she and her students studied air pollution from local refineries, water pollution from contaminated pipes, and soil contamination in gardens, play areas, and their own football field. She is active in local organizations, such as the Watts Rising Leadership Council. After performing well in the 2020 elections, she was appointed to the executive board of the California Democratic Party. If elected, Iqbal-Zubair will prioritize equitable education, clean air and water, affordable housing, and universal health care for all.

    Iqbal-Zubair has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Communities for a Better Environment Action, California Progressive Alliance, Courage to Change, Democratic Socialists of America-Los Angeles, Ground Game LA, Daybreak PAC, Health Care for All LA, and Project Super Bloom PAC. Based on our analysis, Iqbal-Zubair’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-65 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair

    Elect Fatima Iqbal-Zubair to push AD-65 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 9% are Republican and 62% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-65 is 3% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-65 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 65 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 63 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Iqbal-Zubair and incumbent Representative Mike Gipson. Iqbal-Zubair’s campaign has raised over $214,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Her campaign funding consists almost entirely of individual contributions. Gipson’s campaign has raised over $850,000 and is funded by police groups, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel money.

     

    Our Endorsement

    Iqbal-Zubair, a community advocate and teacher, immigrated from Dubai and moved to the United States to eventually teach in Watts. According to campaign materials, she is running for election because she sees the struggles faced by her students and the district and because she believes in a government that works for all, not just a select few. Iqbal-Zubair ran for this same office previously and lost that race against incumbent Gipson by 35 points. 

    Iqbal-Zubair is a chemistry and environmental sciences teacher, a role in which she cultivates a strong relationship with her students and builds community. She founded an award-winning FIRST Robotics team and served as director of the Department of Science. Iqbal-Zubair became an advocate for the environment when she and her students studied air pollution from local refineries, water pollution from contaminated pipes, and soil contamination in gardens, play areas, and their own football field. She is active in local organizations, such as the Watts Rising Leadership Council. After performing well in the 2020 elections, she was appointed to the executive board of the California Democratic Party. If elected, Iqbal-Zubair will prioritize equitable education, clean air and water, affordable housing, and universal health care for all.

    Iqbal-Zubair has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Communities for a Better Environment Action, California Progressive Alliance, Courage to Change, Democratic Socialists of America-Los Angeles, Ground Game LA, Daybreak PAC, Health Care for All LA, and Project Super Bloom PAC. Based on our analysis, Iqbal-Zubair’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-65 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair

    Elect Fatima Iqbal-Zubair to push AD-65 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 9% are Republican and 62% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-65 is 3% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-65 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 65 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 63 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Iqbal-Zubair and incumbent Representative Mike Gipson. Iqbal-Zubair’s campaign has raised over $214,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Her campaign funding consists almost entirely of individual contributions. Gipson’s campaign has raised over $850,000 and is funded by police groups, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel money.

     

    Our Endorsement

    Iqbal-Zubair, a community advocate and teacher, immigrated from Dubai and moved to the United States to eventually teach in Watts. According to campaign materials, she is running for election because she sees the struggles faced by her students and the district and because she believes in a government that works for all, not just a select few. Iqbal-Zubair ran for this same office previously and lost that race against incumbent Gipson by 35 points. 

    Iqbal-Zubair is a chemistry and environmental sciences teacher, a role in which she cultivates a strong relationship with her students and builds community. She founded an award-winning FIRST Robotics team and served as director of the Department of Science. Iqbal-Zubair became an advocate for the environment when she and her students studied air pollution from local refineries, water pollution from contaminated pipes, and soil contamination in gardens, play areas, and their own football field. She is active in local organizations, such as the Watts Rising Leadership Council. After performing well in the 2020 elections, she was appointed to the executive board of the California Democratic Party. If elected, Iqbal-Zubair will prioritize equitable education, clean air and water, affordable housing, and universal health care for all.

    Iqbal-Zubair has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Communities for a Better Environment Action, California Progressive Alliance, Courage to Change, Democratic Socialists of America-Los Angeles, Ground Game LA, Daybreak PAC, Health Care for All LA, and Project Super Bloom PAC. Based on our analysis, Iqbal-Zubair’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-65 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Al Muratsuchi

    Reelect State Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 27% are Republican and 44% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-66 is equally as Democratic as it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 17 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Al Muratsuchi and Republican challenger George Barks. Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $305,000, and has received donations from police, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests. Barks’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Al Muratsuchi, a former deputy attorney general, is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to bring increased funding and resources to education, economic, and environmental initiatives. Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. 

    Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 this year have included 46 bills about education, pollution, and climate protections. Of these, one has been chaptered into law, one was vetoed, ten have died, and the rest are currently in committee. He currently serves on six standing committees, including Budget, Natural Resources, and Utilities and Energy. He serves as chair of the select committee on Aerospace, and as chair of the joint committee on Climate Change Policies. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. He scores a Lifetime CS of 61 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, he has primarily opposed or failed to vote on bills related to criminal-justice reform. He voted against protecting individuals eligible for prison release from being transferred to immigration detention, limiting disruptions to rehabilitative programs in prisons, and sealing the records of individuals who have fulfilled their sentence.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also leveraged his experience as a prosecutor to partner with police to construct bills to strengthen criminal justice in the state.

    Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups. However, he has received donations from a variety of problematic funders, including AT&T Services, PG&E Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of constituents instead of donors.  Based on our analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a leader for the constituents of AD-66 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Al Muratsuchi

    Reelect State Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 27% are Republican and 44% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-66 is equally as Democratic as it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 17 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Al Muratsuchi and Republican challenger George Barks. Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $305,000, and has received donations from police, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests. Barks’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Al Muratsuchi, a former deputy attorney general, is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to bring increased funding and resources to education, economic, and environmental initiatives. Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. 

    Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 this year have included 46 bills about education, pollution, and climate protections. Of these, one has been chaptered into law, one was vetoed, ten have died, and the rest are currently in committee. He currently serves on six standing committees, including Budget, Natural Resources, and Utilities and Energy. He serves as chair of the select committee on Aerospace, and as chair of the joint committee on Climate Change Policies. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. He scores a Lifetime CS of 61 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, he has primarily opposed or failed to vote on bills related to criminal-justice reform. He voted against protecting individuals eligible for prison release from being transferred to immigration detention, limiting disruptions to rehabilitative programs in prisons, and sealing the records of individuals who have fulfilled their sentence.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also leveraged his experience as a prosecutor to partner with police to construct bills to strengthen criminal justice in the state.

    Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups. However, he has received donations from a variety of problematic funders, including AT&T Services, PG&E Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of constituents instead of donors.  Based on our analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a leader for the constituents of AD-66 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Al Muratsuchi

    Reelect State Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi to keep AD-66 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 66th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 27% are Republican and 44% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 19% Latino, 22% Asian, and 5% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-66 is equally as Democratic as it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-66 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 28 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 17 points.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Representative Al Muratsuchi and Republican challenger George Barks. Assm. Muratsuchi’s campaign has raised $305,000, and has received donations from police, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests. Barks’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State.

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Al Muratsuchi, a former deputy attorney general, is a longtime resident of the South Bay of Los Angeles County. According to campaign materials, he is running for reelection to continue to bring increased funding and resources to education, economic, and environmental initiatives. Assm. Muratsuchi was originally elected to the Assembly in 2012, but lost his 2014 reelection bid to Republican David Hadley by a narrow margin. He regained his seat in the 2016 election, and won his 2020 reelection against Republican Arthur Schaper by 26 points. 

    Assm. Muratsuchi’s priorities for AD-66 this year have included 46 bills about education, pollution, and climate protections. Of these, one has been chaptered into law, one was vetoed, ten have died, and the rest are currently in committee. He currently serves on six standing committees, including Budget, Natural Resources, and Utilities and Energy. He serves as chair of the select committee on Aerospace, and as chair of the joint committee on Climate Change Policies. In his role with the Select Committee on Aerospace, he has supported the local growth and success of SpaceX, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, and Northrop Grumman, a defense contractor. He scores a Lifetime CS of 61 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, he has primarily opposed or failed to vote on bills related to criminal-justice reform. He voted against protecting individuals eligible for prison release from being transferred to immigration detention, limiting disruptions to rehabilitative programs in prisons, and sealing the records of individuals who have fulfilled their sentence.  

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Muratsuchi served as a deputy district attorney with the California Department of Justice. A longtime supporter of education reform, he served on the Torrance School Board, and has authored legislation to increase funding for the K–12 system, and to support career technical education. He was recognized as Legislator of the Year in 2019 by the California School Boards Association for his efforts to improve the education landscape for students and families. Assm. Muratsuchi has also leveraged his experience as a prosecutor to partner with police to construct bills to strengthen criminal justice in the state.

    Assm. Muratsuchi has the endorsement of some progressive groups. However, he has received donations from a variety of problematic funders, including AT&T Services, PG&E Corporation, Los Angeles Police Protective League PAC, and California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC. Given Assm. Muratsuchi’s connection to these groups, it is important that voters continue to hold him accountable to ensure that his legislative efforts remain in the best interest of constituents instead of donors.  Based on our analysis, Assm. Muratsuchi’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a leader for the constituents of AD-66 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Judy Chu

    Reelect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress.

     

    Judy Chu

    Reelect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress.

     

    Judy Chu

    Reelect Congressional Representative Judy Chu to keep CD-28 on the right track for progress.

     

  • Adam Schiff

    Reelect Congressional Representative Adam Schiff to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.

     

    Adam Schiff

    Reelect Congressional Representative Adam Schiff to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.

     

    Adam Schiff

    Reelect Congressional Representative Adam Schiff to keep CD-30 on the right track for progress.

     

  • Ted Lieu

    Reelect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CA-36 on the right track for progress.

     

    Ted Lieu

    Reelect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CA-36 on the right track for progress.

     

    Ted Lieu

    Reelect Congressional Representative Ted Lieu to keep CA-36 on the right track for progress.

     

  • Maxine Waters

    Reelect Congressional Representative Maxine Waters to keep CA-43 on the right track for progress.

     

    Maxine Waters

    Reelect Congressional Representative Maxine Waters to keep CA-43 on the right track for progress.

     

    Maxine Waters

    Reelect Congressional Representative Maxine Waters to keep CA-43 on the right track for progress.

     

No Recommendation

LA County Sheriff -- No rec

Based on our analysis, four of the challengers for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the challenger who best aligns with your values in this race.

 

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county-districted races on your ballot.

  • Henry Stern

    Elect Henry Stern to push Los Angeles County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    Los Angeles is California’s most populous county. Los Angeles County’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 10 million people and manages an estimated budget of $36.2 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Los Angeles County is governed by a five-member board of supervisors, a county assessor, a district attorney, and a sheriff. District 3 includes the areas of Universal City, West Los Angeles, Santa Monica Mountains North Area, Westhills, Franklin Canyon, and Malibu Coastal Zone. 

     

    The Race

    There are six candidates running for this seat, including State Senator Henry Stern, State Senator Robert Hertzberg, West Hollywood City Councilmember Lindsey Horvath, Craig Brill, Jeffi Girgenti, and Roxanne Beckford Hoge. Sen. Stern’s campaign has raised $60,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. Sen. Hertzberg’s campaign has raised over $150,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. Horvath’s campaign has raised over $40,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. The campaigns for Brill, Girgenti, and Hoge have raised insignificant funds. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Henry Stern, an attorney and a state senator, was raised in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Sen. Stern is running for election to bring his state government experience to the real-time crises of homelessness and public safety facing Los Angeles County residents. In 2016, Sen. Stern won his first election for State Senate District 27 by 12 points over Republican Steve Fazio. 

    Sen. Stern started his career as a high school teacher and a juvenile-justice investigator, which inspired him to pursue his law degree at UC-Berkeley. He served as an attorney on Capitol Hill before pursuing civil rights and environmental law back in California. He is a longtime supporter of environmental protections, and has received annual recognition from Sierra Club and California Environmental Justice Alliance for his work in the legislature. 

    As a legislator, Sen. Stern’s priorities for SD-27 this year have included 46 bills about environmental protections, homelessness and housing, and education. Of these, one has been chaptered into law, ten have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee. He currently serves on four committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources and Water Committee, and chair of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management. He scores a Lifetime CS of 81 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Sen. Stern has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to vote to codify California’s carbon neutrality goal.

    Henry Stern is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including LA League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, and United Teachers of Los Angeles. He is also endorsed by many local elected officials, including State Senator Maria Elena Durazo and State Senator Connie Leyva. Based on our analysis, Stern’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of Los Angeles County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Henry Stern

    Elect Henry Stern to push Los Angeles County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    Los Angeles is California’s most populous county. Los Angeles County’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 10 million people and manages an estimated budget of $36.2 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Los Angeles County is governed by a five-member board of supervisors, a county assessor, a district attorney, and a sheriff. District 3 includes the areas of Universal City, West Los Angeles, Santa Monica Mountains North Area, Westhills, Franklin Canyon, and Malibu Coastal Zone. 

     

    The Race

    There are six candidates running for this seat, including State Senator Henry Stern, State Senator Robert Hertzberg, West Hollywood City Councilmember Lindsey Horvath, Craig Brill, Jeffi Girgenti, and Roxanne Beckford Hoge. Sen. Stern’s campaign has raised $60,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. Sen. Hertzberg’s campaign has raised over $150,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. Horvath’s campaign has raised over $40,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. The campaigns for Brill, Girgenti, and Hoge have raised insignificant funds. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Henry Stern, an attorney and a state senator, was raised in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Sen. Stern is running for election to bring his state government experience to the real-time crises of homelessness and public safety facing Los Angeles County residents. In 2016, Sen. Stern won his first election for State Senate District 27 by 12 points over Republican Steve Fazio. 

    Sen. Stern started his career as a high school teacher and a juvenile-justice investigator, which inspired him to pursue his law degree at UC-Berkeley. He served as an attorney on Capitol Hill before pursuing civil rights and environmental law back in California. He is a longtime supporter of environmental protections, and has received annual recognition from Sierra Club and California Environmental Justice Alliance for his work in the legislature. 

    As a legislator, Sen. Stern’s priorities for SD-27 this year have included 46 bills about environmental protections, homelessness and housing, and education. Of these, one has been chaptered into law, ten have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee. He currently serves on four committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources and Water Committee, and chair of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management. He scores a Lifetime CS of 81 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Sen. Stern has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to vote to codify California’s carbon neutrality goal.

    Henry Stern is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including LA League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, and United Teachers of Los Angeles. He is also endorsed by many local elected officials, including State Senator Maria Elena Durazo and State Senator Connie Leyva. Based on our analysis, Stern’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of Los Angeles County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Henry Stern

    Elect Henry Stern to push Los Angeles County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    Los Angeles is California’s most populous county. Los Angeles County’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 10 million people and manages an estimated budget of $36.2 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Los Angeles County is governed by a five-member board of supervisors, a county assessor, a district attorney, and a sheriff. District 3 includes the areas of Universal City, West Los Angeles, Santa Monica Mountains North Area, Westhills, Franklin Canyon, and Malibu Coastal Zone. 

     

    The Race

    There are six candidates running for this seat, including State Senator Henry Stern, State Senator Robert Hertzberg, West Hollywood City Councilmember Lindsey Horvath, Craig Brill, Jeffi Girgenti, and Roxanne Beckford Hoge. Sen. Stern’s campaign has raised $60,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. Sen. Hertzberg’s campaign has raised over $150,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. Horvath’s campaign has raised over $40,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, police, or corporate PAC interests. The campaigns for Brill, Girgenti, and Hoge have raised insignificant funds. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Henry Stern, an attorney and a state senator, was raised in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Sen. Stern is running for election to bring his state government experience to the real-time crises of homelessness and public safety facing Los Angeles County residents. In 2016, Sen. Stern won his first election for State Senate District 27 by 12 points over Republican Steve Fazio. 

    Sen. Stern started his career as a high school teacher and a juvenile-justice investigator, which inspired him to pursue his law degree at UC-Berkeley. He served as an attorney on Capitol Hill before pursuing civil rights and environmental law back in California. He is a longtime supporter of environmental protections, and has received annual recognition from Sierra Club and California Environmental Justice Alliance for his work in the legislature. 

    As a legislator, Sen. Stern’s priorities for SD-27 this year have included 46 bills about environmental protections, homelessness and housing, and education. Of these, one has been chaptered into law, ten have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee. He currently serves on four committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources and Water Committee, and chair of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management. He scores a Lifetime CS of 81 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Sen. Stern has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to vote to codify California’s carbon neutrality goal.

    Henry Stern is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including LA League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, and United Teachers of Los Angeles. He is also endorsed by many local elected officials, including State Senator Maria Elena Durazo and State Senator Connie Leyva. Based on our analysis, Stern’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of Los Angeles County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Courage Score: https://couragescore.org