• Alex Padilla

    Reelect US Senator Alex Padilla to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Sen. Alex Padilla’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of California and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Progressive endorsements: Sen. Padilla has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Giffords PAC, and many labor unions. He is also endorsed by a broad coalition of federal and local elected officials, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Karen Bass, Rep. Katie Porter, Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Rob Bonta, and many California mayors.

    Top issues: Voter protections, economic growth, police reform, immigration, environmental protections, education, consumer and worker protections, homelessness and housing, and water conservation.

    Priority bills: This year, Sen. Padilla’s priorities for California have included 50 bills about environmental and water protections, the economy, immigration, and child welfare. Of these, nearly all are currently in committee or referred to committee. In his brief time in the Senate, Sen. Padilla has signed on as a sponsor of the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and has been a strong supporter of President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda. He has also secured federal funding for housing, infrastructure, education, and employment projects in Southern California, and over $11 million for statewide health-care facilities and mental-health services.

    Committee leadership/membership: Sen. Padilla currently serves on five committees, including Judiciary, Budget, and Environment and Public Works. He serves as chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and Border Safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sen. Padilla was appointed to the Senate by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2021, which will make this his first general-election campaign for the seat. He was previously elected to serve as the California’s secretary of state in 2014, winning his 2018 reelection bid over Republican Mark Meuser by 29 points.

    Prior to his appointment, Sen. Padilla served Californians in several elected roles, including two terms each on the Los Angeles City Council, in the state Senate, and as the California secretary of state. Sen. Padilla is a longtime supporter of environmental justice, and credits his parents with introducing him to activism around this issue in the Los Angeles community where he was raised. Sen. Padilla has also been a longtime supporter of voting rights and democratic protections, which was the cornerstone of his work as secretary of state. In the Senate, he co-authored the Freedom to Vote Act, and was a strong supporter of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

    Other background: Sen. Padilla, a longtime public official, is from the San Fernando Valley. He grew up in a tough and underserved neighborhood of Los Angeles, and his public service was inspired by his community and his parents, who engaged him in the organizing process at a young age.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results to fill the last few months of the current term had ten candidates, and the results included incumbent Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 55%; Mark Meuser (R), 22%; James Bradley (R), 7%; and Jon Elist (R), 6%.

    The June 2022 results to seat the next full six-year term had 27 candidates, and the results included Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 54%; Mark Meuser (R), 15%; Cordie Williams (R), 7%; Jon Elist (R), 4%; Chuck Smith (R), 4%; James Bradley (R), 3%; and Douglas Howard Pierce (D), 2%.

    Sen. Alex Padilla and Mark Meuser will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election in both the current-term and next-term races.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sen. Padilla’s campaign has raised $10.6 million and is not funded by police interests. His problematic donors include Mortgage Bankers Association PAC, Google LLC, FedEx Corporation PAC, Edison International PAC, and Comcast Corporation. He has also received donations from defense contractors, including Employees of Northrop Grumman Corporation PAC and Lockheed Martin Employees’ PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Mark Meuser

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Meuser’s campaign has raised $495,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 331 million residents.

    Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 23% have no party preference. Democrats have held the lieutenant governor seat since 2011.

    District demographics: 39% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

    Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 24 points.
     

    The Position

    Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

    Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

    Alex Padilla

    Reelect US Senator Alex Padilla to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Sen. Alex Padilla’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of California and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Progressive endorsements: Sen. Padilla has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Giffords PAC, and many labor unions. He is also endorsed by a broad coalition of federal and local elected officials, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Karen Bass, Rep. Katie Porter, Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Rob Bonta, and many California mayors.

    Top issues: Voter protections, economic growth, police reform, immigration, environmental protections, education, consumer and worker protections, homelessness and housing, and water conservation.

    Priority bills: This year, Sen. Padilla’s priorities for California have included 50 bills about environmental and water protections, the economy, immigration, and child welfare. Of these, nearly all are currently in committee or referred to committee. In his brief time in the Senate, Sen. Padilla has signed on as a sponsor of the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and has been a strong supporter of President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda. He has also secured federal funding for housing, infrastructure, education, and employment projects in Southern California, and over $11 million for statewide health-care facilities and mental-health services.

    Committee leadership/membership: Sen. Padilla currently serves on five committees, including Judiciary, Budget, and Environment and Public Works. He serves as chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and Border Safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sen. Padilla was appointed to the Senate by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2021, which will make this his first general-election campaign for the seat. He was previously elected to serve as the California’s secretary of state in 2014, winning his 2018 reelection bid over Republican Mark Meuser by 29 points.

    Prior to his appointment, Sen. Padilla served Californians in several elected roles, including two terms each on the Los Angeles City Council, in the state Senate, and as the California secretary of state. Sen. Padilla is a longtime supporter of environmental justice, and credits his parents with introducing him to activism around this issue in the Los Angeles community where he was raised. Sen. Padilla has also been a longtime supporter of voting rights and democratic protections, which was the cornerstone of his work as secretary of state. In the Senate, he co-authored the Freedom to Vote Act, and was a strong supporter of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

    Other background: Sen. Padilla, a longtime public official, is from the San Fernando Valley. He grew up in a tough and underserved neighborhood of Los Angeles, and his public service was inspired by his community and his parents, who engaged him in the organizing process at a young age.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results to fill the last few months of the current term had ten candidates, and the results included incumbent Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 55%; Mark Meuser (R), 22%; James Bradley (R), 7%; and Jon Elist (R), 6%.

    The June 2022 results to seat the next full six-year term had 27 candidates, and the results included Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 54%; Mark Meuser (R), 15%; Cordie Williams (R), 7%; Jon Elist (R), 4%; Chuck Smith (R), 4%; James Bradley (R), 3%; and Douglas Howard Pierce (D), 2%.

    Sen. Alex Padilla and Mark Meuser will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election in both the current-term and next-term races.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sen. Padilla’s campaign has raised $10.6 million and is not funded by police interests. His problematic donors include Mortgage Bankers Association PAC, Google LLC, FedEx Corporation PAC, Edison International PAC, and Comcast Corporation. He has also received donations from defense contractors, including Employees of Northrop Grumman Corporation PAC and Lockheed Martin Employees’ PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Mark Meuser

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Meuser’s campaign has raised $495,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 331 million residents.

    Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 23% have no party preference. Democrats have held the lieutenant governor seat since 2011.

    District demographics: 39% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

    Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 24 points.
     

    The Position

    Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

    Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

    Alex Padilla

    Reelect US Senator Alex Padilla to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Sen. Alex Padilla’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of California and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Progressive endorsements: Sen. Padilla has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Giffords PAC, and many labor unions. He is also endorsed by a broad coalition of federal and local elected officials, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Karen Bass, Rep. Katie Porter, Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Rob Bonta, and many California mayors.

    Top issues: Voter protections, economic growth, police reform, immigration, environmental protections, education, consumer and worker protections, homelessness and housing, and water conservation.

    Priority bills: This year, Sen. Padilla’s priorities for California have included 50 bills about environmental and water protections, the economy, immigration, and child welfare. Of these, nearly all are currently in committee or referred to committee. In his brief time in the Senate, Sen. Padilla has signed on as a sponsor of the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and has been a strong supporter of President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda. He has also secured federal funding for housing, infrastructure, education, and employment projects in Southern California, and over $11 million for statewide health-care facilities and mental-health services.

    Committee leadership/membership: Sen. Padilla currently serves on five committees, including Judiciary, Budget, and Environment and Public Works. He serves as chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and Border Safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sen. Padilla was appointed to the Senate by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2021, which will make this his first general-election campaign for the seat. He was previously elected to serve as the California’s secretary of state in 2014, winning his 2018 reelection bid over Republican Mark Meuser by 29 points.

    Prior to his appointment, Sen. Padilla served Californians in several elected roles, including two terms each on the Los Angeles City Council, in the state Senate, and as the California secretary of state. Sen. Padilla is a longtime supporter of environmental justice, and credits his parents with introducing him to activism around this issue in the Los Angeles community where he was raised. Sen. Padilla has also been a longtime supporter of voting rights and democratic protections, which was the cornerstone of his work as secretary of state. In the Senate, he co-authored the Freedom to Vote Act, and was a strong supporter of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

    Other background: Sen. Padilla, a longtime public official, is from the San Fernando Valley. He grew up in a tough and underserved neighborhood of Los Angeles, and his public service was inspired by his community and his parents, who engaged him in the organizing process at a young age.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results to fill the last few months of the current term had ten candidates, and the results included incumbent Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 55%; Mark Meuser (R), 22%; James Bradley (R), 7%; and Jon Elist (R), 6%.

    The June 2022 results to seat the next full six-year term had 27 candidates, and the results included Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 54%; Mark Meuser (R), 15%; Cordie Williams (R), 7%; Jon Elist (R), 4%; Chuck Smith (R), 4%; James Bradley (R), 3%; and Douglas Howard Pierce (D), 2%.

    Sen. Alex Padilla and Mark Meuser will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election in both the current-term and next-term races.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sen. Padilla’s campaign has raised $10.6 million and is not funded by police interests. His problematic donors include Mortgage Bankers Association PAC, Google LLC, FedEx Corporation PAC, Edison International PAC, and Comcast Corporation. He has also received donations from defense contractors, including Employees of Northrop Grumman Corporation PAC and Lockheed Martin Employees’ PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Mark Meuser

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Meuser’s campaign has raised $495,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 331 million residents.

    Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 23% have no party preference. Democrats have held the lieutenant governor seat since 2011.

    District demographics: 39% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

    Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 24 points.
     

    The Position

    Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

    Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Linda Sanchez

    Reelect Congressional Representative Linda Sanchez to keep CD-38 on the right track for progress.

    Linda Sanchez

    Reelect Congressional Representative Linda Sanchez to keep CD-38 on the right track for progress.

    Linda Sanchez

    Reelect Congressional Representative Linda Sanchez to keep CD-38 on the right track for progress.

  • Lou Correa

    Reelect Congressional Representative Lou Correa to keep CD-46 on the right track for progress.

    Lou Correa

    Reelect Congressional Representative Lou Correa to keep CD-46 on the right track for progress.

    Lou Correa

    Reelect Congressional Representative Lou Correa to keep CD-46 on the right track for progress.

  • Katie Porter

    Reelect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CD-47 on the right track for progress.

    Katie Porter

    Reelect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CD-47 on the right track for progress.

    Katie Porter

    Reelect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CD-47 on the right track for progress.

  • Mike Levin

    Reelect Congressional Representative Mike Levin to keep CD-49 on the right track for progress.

    Mike Levin

    Reelect Congressional Representative Mike Levin to keep CD-49 on the right track for progress.

    Mike Levin

    Reelect Congressional Representative Mike Levin to keep CD-49 on the right track for progress.

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

No Recommendation

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 59th

This is a safe Republican incumbent with an Independent challenger. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

Progressive endorsements: Assm. Phillip Chen does not have the endorsement of any progressive groups. He has received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including a 92% NRA rating.

Leon Sit has no campaign website.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Chen has served in this seat since 2016, when he was elected with over 57.73% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a challenger by 9 points.

Prior to his election to the assembly, Assm. Chen was a member of the Walnut Valley Unified Schoolboard.

Other background: Assm. Chen is from Anaheim.

Sit is an engineering student at UCLA.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chen (R), 99%; Leon Sit (I), 1%; and David Naranjo (L), 0%. Both Sit and Naranjo were write-in candidates. Chen and Sit will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Chen’s campaign has raised $863,003.53 and is funded by police money, corporate PACs, real estate money, and fossil fuel money.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 59th Assembly District includes parts of Orange and San Bernardino Counties.

Voter registration: 32.5% Democrat, 39.5% Republican, and 22.4% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2016. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-59 is 14% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 22.6% Latino, 19.6% Asian, and 2.3% Black.

Recent election results: AD-59 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 7.46 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 15.88 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 59th

This is a safe Republican incumbent with an Independent challenger. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

Progressive endorsements: Assm. Phillip Chen does not have the endorsement of any progressive groups. He has received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including a 92% NRA rating.

Leon Sit has no campaign website.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Chen has served in this seat since 2016, when he was elected with over 57.73% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a challenger by 9 points.

Prior to his election to the assembly, Assm. Chen was a member of the Walnut Valley Unified Schoolboard.

Other background: Assm. Chen is from Anaheim.

Sit is an engineering student at UCLA.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chen (R), 99%; Leon Sit (I), 1%; and David Naranjo (L), 0%. Both Sit and Naranjo were write-in candidates. Chen and Sit will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Chen’s campaign has raised $863,003.53 and is funded by police money, corporate PACs, real estate money, and fossil fuel money.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 59th Assembly District includes parts of Orange and San Bernardino Counties.

Voter registration: 32.5% Democrat, 39.5% Republican, and 22.4% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2016. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-59 is 14% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 22.6% Latino, 19.6% Asian, and 2.3% Black.

Recent election results: AD-59 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 7.46 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 15.88 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Blanca Pacheco

    Elect Blanca Pacheco for State Assembly to keep AD-64 on the right track for progress.

    Blanca Pacheco’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-64. While she has the support from many problematic special interests, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subjected to community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Blanca Pacheco has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, Equality California, and NARAL Pro-Choice California. She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

    Top Issues: Middle-class jobs, public schools, infrastructure, housing and homelessness, climate change, clean air and water, health care, immigration, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Pacheco is the first-ever Latina mayor of Downey. She was first elected to the Downey City Council in 2016 and became mayor in 2020. She previously served as president of the League of California Cities, Los Angeles Division. Prior to serving in local office, Pacheco worked as an attorney and provided pro bono services to legal organizations. She has been a longtime supporter of modernizing infrastructure and programs that fight climate change.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Raul Ortiz Jr. (R), 33%; Blanca Pacheco (D), 23%; and Elizabeth Alcantar (D), 18%. Ortiz and Pacheco will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Pacheco’s campaign has raised $604,000 and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Raul Ortiz Jr.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ortiz’s campaign has not yet filed its campaign finances.
     

    The District

    California’s 64th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 17% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 65% Latino, 10% Asian, and 3% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-64 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Blanca Pacheco

    Elect Blanca Pacheco for State Assembly to keep AD-64 on the right track for progress.

    Blanca Pacheco’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-64. While she has the support from many problematic special interests, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subjected to community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Blanca Pacheco has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, Equality California, and NARAL Pro-Choice California. She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

    Top Issues: Middle-class jobs, public schools, infrastructure, housing and homelessness, climate change, clean air and water, health care, immigration, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Pacheco is the first-ever Latina mayor of Downey. She was first elected to the Downey City Council in 2016 and became mayor in 2020. She previously served as president of the League of California Cities, Los Angeles Division. Prior to serving in local office, Pacheco worked as an attorney and provided pro bono services to legal organizations. She has been a longtime supporter of modernizing infrastructure and programs that fight climate change.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Raul Ortiz Jr. (R), 33%; Blanca Pacheco (D), 23%; and Elizabeth Alcantar (D), 18%. Ortiz and Pacheco will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Pacheco’s campaign has raised $604,000 and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Raul Ortiz Jr.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ortiz’s campaign has not yet filed its campaign finances.
     

    The District

    California’s 64th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 17% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 65% Latino, 10% Asian, and 3% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-64 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Blanca Pacheco

    Elect Blanca Pacheco for State Assembly to keep AD-64 on the right track for progress.

    Blanca Pacheco’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-64. While she has the support from many problematic special interests, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subjected to community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Blanca Pacheco has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, Equality California, and NARAL Pro-Choice California. She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

    Top Issues: Middle-class jobs, public schools, infrastructure, housing and homelessness, climate change, clean air and water, health care, immigration, and equality.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Pacheco is the first-ever Latina mayor of Downey. She was first elected to the Downey City Council in 2016 and became mayor in 2020. She previously served as president of the League of California Cities, Los Angeles Division. Prior to serving in local office, Pacheco worked as an attorney and provided pro bono services to legal organizations. She has been a longtime supporter of modernizing infrastructure and programs that fight climate change.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Raul Ortiz Jr. (R), 33%; Blanca Pacheco (D), 23%; and Elizabeth Alcantar (D), 18%. Ortiz and Pacheco will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Pacheco’s campaign has raised $604,000 and is funded by police, corporate PAC, real estate, and fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Raul Ortiz Jr.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ortiz’s campaign has not yet filed its campaign finances.
     

    The District

    California’s 64th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 17% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 65% Latino, 10% Asian, and 3% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-64 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Sharon Quirk-Silva

    Reelect Assemblymember Sharon Quirk Silva to keep AD-67 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for the constituents of AD-67. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the Assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Quirk-Silva has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, California Legislative Women’s Caucus, and Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernardino Counties. She has also received the endorsement of many state and local leaders, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Secretary of State Shirley Weber, Congressmember Karen Bass, and Assemblymember Isaac Bryan. However, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including California Association of Highway Patrolmen and Peace Officers Research Association of California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, taxation, education, health care, and public works.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Quirk-Silva’s priorities for her current district, AD-65, have included 50 bills about housing, education, and taxation. Of these, 13 have been chaptered into law, 12 have died, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation that aims to improve housing fire safety standards, fund special-education initiatives, develop affordable housing, create more public restrooms, and support early-intervention mental-health care programs. However, she scores a Lifetime CS of 36 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Quirk-Silva has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote this term. She has failed to vote for several bills that would provide criminal-justice reforms, including reducing sentence enhancements, creating paths to rehabilitation for drug crimes, expunging or sealing records for individuals who have completed their sentences, and repealing a law that allows for the harassment and profiling of sex workers. She has also voted against legislation that supports a public banking option, mandates in-store recycling and plastic bag reuse programs, supports the establishment of industry wage standards for fast-food workers, and regulates the acquisition of military equipment for law-enforcement agencies.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Quirk-Silva currently sits on four committees, including Education, Governmental Organization, and Housing and Community Development. She serves as chair of the Committee on Communications and Conveyance and the Select Committee on Orange County Homelessness and Mental Health Services.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Quirk-Silva began her service in the Assembly in 2012, when she defeated a Republican incumbent with over 52% of the vote. She lost her reelection bid in 2014, but returned to the assembly in 2016. In 2020, she won her reelection against Republican challenger Cynthia Thacker by 16 points.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Quirk-Silva was a member of the Fullerton City Council and served two terms as mayor. Along with her public service, she had a 30-year career as a teacher, and has been a longtime supporter of education initiatives. She credits her time in the classroom as being the foundation of her collaborative approach to legislating, and her interest in listening to concerns and finding solutions.

    Other background: Assm. Quirk-Silva is a lifelong resident of Fullerton.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva (D), 48%; Soo Yoo (R), 39%; Param Brar (D), 7%; and Sou Moua (R), 6%. Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva and Soo Yoo will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Quirk-Silva’s campaign has raised $921,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Her problematic donors include Sempra Energy, Comcast Financial Agency Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and Anaheim Police Association PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Soo Yoo

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yoo’s campaign has raised $233,000 and is funded by real estate interests.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 67th Assembly District includes parts of Orange and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-67 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 30% Latino, 32% Asian, and 5% Black

    Recent election results: AD-67 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 20 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 14 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Sharon Quirk-Silva

    Reelect Assemblymember Sharon Quirk Silva to keep AD-67 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for the constituents of AD-67. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the Assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Quirk-Silva has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, California Legislative Women’s Caucus, and Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernardino Counties. She has also received the endorsement of many state and local leaders, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Secretary of State Shirley Weber, Congressmember Karen Bass, and Assemblymember Isaac Bryan. However, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including California Association of Highway Patrolmen and Peace Officers Research Association of California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, taxation, education, health care, and public works.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Quirk-Silva’s priorities for her current district, AD-65, have included 50 bills about housing, education, and taxation. Of these, 13 have been chaptered into law, 12 have died, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation that aims to improve housing fire safety standards, fund special-education initiatives, develop affordable housing, create more public restrooms, and support early-intervention mental-health care programs. However, she scores a Lifetime CS of 36 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Quirk-Silva has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote this term. She has failed to vote for several bills that would provide criminal-justice reforms, including reducing sentence enhancements, creating paths to rehabilitation for drug crimes, expunging or sealing records for individuals who have completed their sentences, and repealing a law that allows for the harassment and profiling of sex workers. She has also voted against legislation that supports a public banking option, mandates in-store recycling and plastic bag reuse programs, supports the establishment of industry wage standards for fast-food workers, and regulates the acquisition of military equipment for law-enforcement agencies.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Quirk-Silva currently sits on four committees, including Education, Governmental Organization, and Housing and Community Development. She serves as chair of the Committee on Communications and Conveyance and the Select Committee on Orange County Homelessness and Mental Health Services.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Quirk-Silva began her service in the Assembly in 2012, when she defeated a Republican incumbent with over 52% of the vote. She lost her reelection bid in 2014, but returned to the assembly in 2016. In 2020, she won her reelection against Republican challenger Cynthia Thacker by 16 points.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Quirk-Silva was a member of the Fullerton City Council and served two terms as mayor. Along with her public service, she had a 30-year career as a teacher, and has been a longtime supporter of education initiatives. She credits her time in the classroom as being the foundation of her collaborative approach to legislating, and her interest in listening to concerns and finding solutions.

    Other background: Assm. Quirk-Silva is a lifelong resident of Fullerton.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva (D), 48%; Soo Yoo (R), 39%; Param Brar (D), 7%; and Sou Moua (R), 6%. Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva and Soo Yoo will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Quirk-Silva’s campaign has raised $921,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Her problematic donors include Sempra Energy, Comcast Financial Agency Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and Anaheim Police Association PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Soo Yoo

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yoo’s campaign has raised $233,000 and is funded by real estate interests.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 67th Assembly District includes parts of Orange and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-67 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 30% Latino, 32% Asian, and 5% Black

    Recent election results: AD-67 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 20 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 14 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Sharon Quirk-Silva

    Reelect Assemblymember Sharon Quirk Silva to keep AD-67 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for the constituents of AD-67. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the Assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Quirk-Silva has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, California Legislative Women’s Caucus, and Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernardino Counties. She has also received the endorsement of many state and local leaders, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Secretary of State Shirley Weber, Congressmember Karen Bass, and Assemblymember Isaac Bryan. However, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including California Association of Highway Patrolmen and Peace Officers Research Association of California.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, taxation, education, health care, and public works.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Quirk-Silva’s priorities for her current district, AD-65, have included 50 bills about housing, education, and taxation. Of these, 13 have been chaptered into law, 12 have died, and the rest remain in committee. She has sponsored and passed legislation that aims to improve housing fire safety standards, fund special-education initiatives, develop affordable housing, create more public restrooms, and support early-intervention mental-health care programs. However, she scores a Lifetime CS of 36 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Quirk-Silva has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote this term. She has failed to vote for several bills that would provide criminal-justice reforms, including reducing sentence enhancements, creating paths to rehabilitation for drug crimes, expunging or sealing records for individuals who have completed their sentences, and repealing a law that allows for the harassment and profiling of sex workers. She has also voted against legislation that supports a public banking option, mandates in-store recycling and plastic bag reuse programs, supports the establishment of industry wage standards for fast-food workers, and regulates the acquisition of military equipment for law-enforcement agencies.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Quirk-Silva currently sits on four committees, including Education, Governmental Organization, and Housing and Community Development. She serves as chair of the Committee on Communications and Conveyance and the Select Committee on Orange County Homelessness and Mental Health Services.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Quirk-Silva began her service in the Assembly in 2012, when she defeated a Republican incumbent with over 52% of the vote. She lost her reelection bid in 2014, but returned to the assembly in 2016. In 2020, she won her reelection against Republican challenger Cynthia Thacker by 16 points.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Quirk-Silva was a member of the Fullerton City Council and served two terms as mayor. Along with her public service, she had a 30-year career as a teacher, and has been a longtime supporter of education initiatives. She credits her time in the classroom as being the foundation of her collaborative approach to legislating, and her interest in listening to concerns and finding solutions.

    Other background: Assm. Quirk-Silva is a lifelong resident of Fullerton.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva (D), 48%; Soo Yoo (R), 39%; Param Brar (D), 7%; and Sou Moua (R), 6%. Assm. Sharon Quirk-Silva and Soo Yoo will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Quirk-Silva’s campaign has raised $921,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. Her problematic donors include Sempra Energy, Comcast Financial Agency Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and Anaheim Police Association PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Soo Yoo

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Yoo’s campaign has raised $233,000 and is funded by real estate interests.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 67th Assembly District includes parts of Orange and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-67 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 30% Latino, 32% Asian, and 5% Black

    Recent election results: AD-67 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 20 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 14 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Avelino Valencia

    Elect Avelino Valencia for State Assembly to keep AD-68 on the right track for progress.

    Avelino Valencia’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-68 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if held accountable by constituents.

    Progressive endorsements: Avelino Valencia has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Orange County Labor Federation and Equality California. Mike Tardif has the endorsement of problematic stakeholders, including Californians For Life.

    Top issues: Education, homelessness, environment, jobs, and traffic reduction.

    Key initiatives: Valencia has made access to mental-health services and COVID-19 vaccinations easier as an Anaheim City Council member. He has led a small-business assistance program.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Valencia has served in his city council seat since 2020, when he was elected with 51% of the vote. He is district director for Assemblymember Tom Daly, who scores an all-time score of 32 out of 100 and is in our Hall of Shame on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Assm. Daly has sided with big corporations for a long time over workers, the environment, and tenants, and Valencia is receiving support from the same problematic stakeholders.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Avelino Valencia (D), 48.3%; Mike Tardif (R), 23.5%; and Bulmaro Vincente (D), 15%. Valencia and Tardif will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Valencia’s campaign has raised $515,716 and is funded by fossil fuel money, corporate PACs, police money, and real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Mike Tardif

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Tardif’s campaign has raised $6,000 and looks to be mostly self-funded.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 68th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 21% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-68 is 10% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 56% Latino, 12% Asian, and 2% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-68 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 31 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Avelino Valencia

    Elect Avelino Valencia for State Assembly to keep AD-68 on the right track for progress.

    Avelino Valencia’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-68 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if held accountable by constituents.

    Progressive endorsements: Avelino Valencia has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Orange County Labor Federation and Equality California. Mike Tardif has the endorsement of problematic stakeholders, including Californians For Life.

    Top issues: Education, homelessness, environment, jobs, and traffic reduction.

    Key initiatives: Valencia has made access to mental-health services and COVID-19 vaccinations easier as an Anaheim City Council member. He has led a small-business assistance program.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Valencia has served in his city council seat since 2020, when he was elected with 51% of the vote. He is district director for Assemblymember Tom Daly, who scores an all-time score of 32 out of 100 and is in our Hall of Shame on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Assm. Daly has sided with big corporations for a long time over workers, the environment, and tenants, and Valencia is receiving support from the same problematic stakeholders.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Avelino Valencia (D), 48.3%; Mike Tardif (R), 23.5%; and Bulmaro Vincente (D), 15%. Valencia and Tardif will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Valencia’s campaign has raised $515,716 and is funded by fossil fuel money, corporate PACs, police money, and real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Mike Tardif

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Tardif’s campaign has raised $6,000 and looks to be mostly self-funded.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 68th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 21% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-68 is 10% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 56% Latino, 12% Asian, and 2% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-68 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 31 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Avelino Valencia

    Elect Avelino Valencia for State Assembly to keep AD-68 on the right track for progress.

    Avelino Valencia’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-68 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if held accountable by constituents.

    Progressive endorsements: Avelino Valencia has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Orange County Labor Federation and Equality California. Mike Tardif has the endorsement of problematic stakeholders, including Californians For Life.

    Top issues: Education, homelessness, environment, jobs, and traffic reduction.

    Key initiatives: Valencia has made access to mental-health services and COVID-19 vaccinations easier as an Anaheim City Council member. He has led a small-business assistance program.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Valencia has served in his city council seat since 2020, when he was elected with 51% of the vote. He is district director for Assemblymember Tom Daly, who scores an all-time score of 32 out of 100 and is in our Hall of Shame on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Assm. Daly has sided with big corporations for a long time over workers, the environment, and tenants, and Valencia is receiving support from the same problematic stakeholders.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Avelino Valencia (D), 48.3%; Mike Tardif (R), 23.5%; and Bulmaro Vincente (D), 15%. Valencia and Tardif will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Valencia’s campaign has raised $515,716 and is funded by fossil fuel money, corporate PACs, police money, and real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Mike Tardif

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Tardif’s campaign has raised $6,000 and looks to be mostly self-funded.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 68th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 21% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-68 is 10% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 56% Latino, 12% Asian, and 2% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-68 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 31 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

    Elect Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen for State Assembly to put AD-70 on the right track for progress.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-70 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Nguyen has the endorsement of many of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Women in Leadership, California Association of Professional Scientists, and Equality California, and labor unions, like NUHW, United Domestic Workers, Orange County Labor Federation, and Unite Here Local 11. She is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials, including State Treasurer Fiona Ma, Congressman Lou Correa, Assemblymember Chris Ward, and Orange County Supervisor Katrina Foley. She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the Garden Grove Police Officers Association.

    Electoral history: Nguyen has run for office previously, and won her race for Garden Grove City Council. She lost her first race for State Assembly against a Republican incumbent by 8 points in a more Republican district.

    Top issues: Nguyen’s top issues include effectively responding to COVID-19, increasing the quality of health care, and more investment in schools.

    Priority bills: As city councilmember and mayor pro tempore of Garden Grove, Nguyen has supported direct COVID-19 relief for renters and small businesses, as well as funding for nonprofits providing direct assistance in the district.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen is a cancer scientist, and ran for city council because she was frustrated by the lack of outreach and communication from the council to the local community, especially Vietnamese residents. She is a longtime community activist in the Vietnamese and Asian American communities, serving on the board and leadership teams of several Asian American interest organizations, including the Lunar New Year TET Festival and the Vietnamese Young Marines.

    Other background: Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen is from Saigon, Vietnam, and has lived in Garden Grove, CA, since 1995. She earned a bachelor’s of science degree from UC Irvine, and a master’s degree from CSU Dominguez Hills.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen (D), 40%; Tri Ta (R), 21%; Ted Bui (R), 14%; Kimberly Ho (R), 14%; Emily Hibard (R), 7%; and Jason Gray (R), 5%. Diedre Nguyen and Tri Ta will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nguyen’s campaign has raised $404,840 and is not funded by the fossil fuel industry. She has accepted donations from corporate PACs, the real estate industry, and police unions.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Tri Ta

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ta’s campaign has raised $418,810. She is funded by the real estate industry and the police, and has not committed to refusing fossil fuel or corporate PAC money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 70th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 37% Democrat, 33% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-70 is 3% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 40% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-70 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by less than 1 point and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 2 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

    Elect Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen for State Assembly to put AD-70 on the right track for progress.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-70 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Nguyen has the endorsement of many of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Women in Leadership, California Association of Professional Scientists, and Equality California, and labor unions, like NUHW, United Domestic Workers, Orange County Labor Federation, and Unite Here Local 11. She is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials, including State Treasurer Fiona Ma, Congressman Lou Correa, Assemblymember Chris Ward, and Orange County Supervisor Katrina Foley. She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the Garden Grove Police Officers Association.

    Electoral history: Nguyen has run for office previously, and won her race for Garden Grove City Council. She lost her first race for State Assembly against a Republican incumbent by 8 points in a more Republican district.

    Top issues: Nguyen’s top issues include effectively responding to COVID-19, increasing the quality of health care, and more investment in schools.

    Priority bills: As city councilmember and mayor pro tempore of Garden Grove, Nguyen has supported direct COVID-19 relief for renters and small businesses, as well as funding for nonprofits providing direct assistance in the district.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen is a cancer scientist, and ran for city council because she was frustrated by the lack of outreach and communication from the council to the local community, especially Vietnamese residents. She is a longtime community activist in the Vietnamese and Asian American communities, serving on the board and leadership teams of several Asian American interest organizations, including the Lunar New Year TET Festival and the Vietnamese Young Marines.

    Other background: Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen is from Saigon, Vietnam, and has lived in Garden Grove, CA, since 1995. She earned a bachelor’s of science degree from UC Irvine, and a master’s degree from CSU Dominguez Hills.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen (D), 40%; Tri Ta (R), 21%; Ted Bui (R), 14%; Kimberly Ho (R), 14%; Emily Hibard (R), 7%; and Jason Gray (R), 5%. Diedre Nguyen and Tri Ta will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nguyen’s campaign has raised $404,840 and is not funded by the fossil fuel industry. She has accepted donations from corporate PACs, the real estate industry, and police unions.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Tri Ta

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ta’s campaign has raised $418,810. She is funded by the real estate industry and the police, and has not committed to refusing fossil fuel or corporate PAC money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 70th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 37% Democrat, 33% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-70 is 3% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 40% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-70 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by less than 1 point and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 2 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

    Elect Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen for State Assembly to put AD-70 on the right track for progress.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-70 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Nguyen has the endorsement of many of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Women in Leadership, California Association of Professional Scientists, and Equality California, and labor unions, like NUHW, United Domestic Workers, Orange County Labor Federation, and Unite Here Local 11. She is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials, including State Treasurer Fiona Ma, Congressman Lou Correa, Assemblymember Chris Ward, and Orange County Supervisor Katrina Foley. She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the Garden Grove Police Officers Association.

    Electoral history: Nguyen has run for office previously, and won her race for Garden Grove City Council. She lost her first race for State Assembly against a Republican incumbent by 8 points in a more Republican district.

    Top issues: Nguyen’s top issues include effectively responding to COVID-19, increasing the quality of health care, and more investment in schools.

    Priority bills: As city councilmember and mayor pro tempore of Garden Grove, Nguyen has supported direct COVID-19 relief for renters and small businesses, as well as funding for nonprofits providing direct assistance in the district.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen is a cancer scientist, and ran for city council because she was frustrated by the lack of outreach and communication from the council to the local community, especially Vietnamese residents. She is a longtime community activist in the Vietnamese and Asian American communities, serving on the board and leadership teams of several Asian American interest organizations, including the Lunar New Year TET Festival and the Vietnamese Young Marines.

    Other background: Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen is from Saigon, Vietnam, and has lived in Garden Grove, CA, since 1995. She earned a bachelor’s of science degree from UC Irvine, and a master’s degree from CSU Dominguez Hills.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen (D), 40%; Tri Ta (R), 21%; Ted Bui (R), 14%; Kimberly Ho (R), 14%; Emily Hibard (R), 7%; and Jason Gray (R), 5%. Diedre Nguyen and Tri Ta will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Nguyen’s campaign has raised $404,840 and is not funded by the fossil fuel industry. She has accepted donations from corporate PACs, the real estate industry, and police unions.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Tri Ta

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Ta’s campaign has raised $418,810. She is funded by the real estate industry and the police, and has not committed to refusing fossil fuel or corporate PAC money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 70th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 37% Democrat, 33% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-70 is 3% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 40% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-70 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by less than 1 point and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 2 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

No Recommendation

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 71st

Based on our analysis, the two Republican candidates for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

Progressive endorsements: Matt Rahn does not have any endorsements from progressive groups. He has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Rep. Darrell Issa, Rep. Ken Calvert, Association of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs, and California Coalition of Law Enforcement Associations.

Kate Sanchez does not have any endorsements from progressive groups. She has received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes, and Rep. Young Kim.

Key initiatives: Rahn is Mayor of Temecula. He has funded police and homeless outreach programs.

Sanchez is a small-business owner who formerly worked for the chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, former Congressmember Ed Royce.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rahn (R), 53%; and Sanchez (R), 47%.They will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rahn’s campaign has raised $324,020 and is funded by police money, real estate money, and corporate PACs.

Sanchez’s campaign has raised $58,738 and is funded primarily by individual donors.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 71st Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and Orange Counties.

Voter registration: 30% Democrat, 41% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2012.
District demographics: 20% Latino, 11% Asian, and 4% Black.

Recent election results: AD-71 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 8 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 20 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 71st

Based on our analysis, the two Republican candidates for this position have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

Progressive endorsements: Matt Rahn does not have any endorsements from progressive groups. He has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Rep. Darrell Issa, Rep. Ken Calvert, Association of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs, and California Coalition of Law Enforcement Associations.

Kate Sanchez does not have any endorsements from progressive groups. She has received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes, and Rep. Young Kim.

Key initiatives: Rahn is Mayor of Temecula. He has funded police and homeless outreach programs.

Sanchez is a small-business owner who formerly worked for the chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, former Congressmember Ed Royce.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rahn (R), 53%; and Sanchez (R), 47%.They will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rahn’s campaign has raised $324,020 and is funded by police money, real estate money, and corporate PACs.

Sanchez’s campaign has raised $58,738 and is funded primarily by individual donors.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 71st Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and Orange Counties.

Voter registration: 30% Democrat, 41% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since at least 2012.
District demographics: 20% Latino, 11% Asian, and 4% Black.

Recent election results: AD-71 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 8 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 20 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Judie Mancuso

    Elect Judie Mancuso for State Assembly to put AD-72 on the right track for progress.

    Judie Mancuso’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a champion for the constituents of AD-72 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Mancuso has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Women in Leadership, Asian Americans in Action, the Sierra Club, and Moms Demand Action. She is also endorsed by many federal, state, and local elected officials, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Rep. Katie Porter, State Senator Dave Min, and Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris.

    Top issues: Climate change, housing crisis, and public safety.

    Priority bills: As a lobbyist for animal rights, she has been a strong supporter of bills to ban animal testing, drilling, and puppy mills, as well as animal population control bills like mandatory spaying, neutering, and microchipping. She also sponsored legislation that requires prisons and hospitals to offer plant-based meal options.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mancuso is the founder of Social Compassion in Legislation, a nonprofit focused on advancing animal welfare. In this role, she has lobbied for 60 animal rights bills, and passed more than 20 of those. She has successfully lobbied to ban animal testing in California and to strengthen protections for animals locked in hot cars. She has served as a member of the California Veterinary Medical Board, and is currently vice chair of the Laguna Beach Environmental Sustainability Committee.

    Other background: Judie Mancuso is from St. Louis and now lives in Laguna Beach.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Judie Mancuso (D), 43.3%; Diane Dixon (R), 42.7%; and Benjamin Yu (R), 14%. Judie Mancuso and Diane Dixon will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Judie Mancuso’s campaign has raised $163,901, mainly from individual donors. She is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Diane Dixon

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Dixon’s campaign has raised $419,350 and is funded by the police and by corporate PACs, including more than $20,000 from the insurance industry. She has also accepted more than $20,000 in donations from the fossil fuel industry, and nearly $50,000 from the real estate industry.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 72nd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 33% Democrat, 39% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2018. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-72 is 6% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 13% Latino, 13% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-72 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 2 points and John H. Cox for governor in 2018 by 7 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Judie Mancuso

    Elect Judie Mancuso for State Assembly to put AD-72 on the right track for progress.

    Judie Mancuso’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a champion for the constituents of AD-72 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Mancuso has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Women in Leadership, Asian Americans in Action, the Sierra Club, and Moms Demand Action. She is also endorsed by many federal, state, and local elected officials, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Rep. Katie Porter, State Senator Dave Min, and Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris.

    Top issues: Climate change, housing crisis, and public safety.

    Priority bills: As a lobbyist for animal rights, she has been a strong supporter of bills to ban animal testing, drilling, and puppy mills, as well as animal population control bills like mandatory spaying, neutering, and microchipping. She also sponsored legislation that requires prisons and hospitals to offer plant-based meal options.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mancuso is the founder of Social Compassion in Legislation, a nonprofit focused on advancing animal welfare. In this role, she has lobbied for 60 animal rights bills, and passed more than 20 of those. She has successfully lobbied to ban animal testing in California and to strengthen protections for animals locked in hot cars. She has served as a member of the California Veterinary Medical Board, and is currently vice chair of the Laguna Beach Environmental Sustainability Committee.

    Other background: Judie Mancuso is from St. Louis and now lives in Laguna Beach.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Judie Mancuso (D), 43.3%; Diane Dixon (R), 42.7%; and Benjamin Yu (R), 14%. Judie Mancuso and Diane Dixon will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Judie Mancuso’s campaign has raised $163,901, mainly from individual donors. She is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Diane Dixon

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Dixon’s campaign has raised $419,350 and is funded by the police and by corporate PACs, including more than $20,000 from the insurance industry. She has also accepted more than $20,000 in donations from the fossil fuel industry, and nearly $50,000 from the real estate industry.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 72nd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 33% Democrat, 39% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2018. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-72 is 6% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 13% Latino, 13% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-72 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 2 points and John H. Cox for governor in 2018 by 7 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Judie Mancuso

    Elect Judie Mancuso for State Assembly to put AD-72 on the right track for progress.

    Judie Mancuso’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a champion for the constituents of AD-72 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Mancuso has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, California Environmental Voters, Women in Leadership, Asian Americans in Action, the Sierra Club, and Moms Demand Action. She is also endorsed by many federal, state, and local elected officials, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Rep. Katie Porter, State Senator Dave Min, and Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris.

    Top issues: Climate change, housing crisis, and public safety.

    Priority bills: As a lobbyist for animal rights, she has been a strong supporter of bills to ban animal testing, drilling, and puppy mills, as well as animal population control bills like mandatory spaying, neutering, and microchipping. She also sponsored legislation that requires prisons and hospitals to offer plant-based meal options.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mancuso is the founder of Social Compassion in Legislation, a nonprofit focused on advancing animal welfare. In this role, she has lobbied for 60 animal rights bills, and passed more than 20 of those. She has successfully lobbied to ban animal testing in California and to strengthen protections for animals locked in hot cars. She has served as a member of the California Veterinary Medical Board, and is currently vice chair of the Laguna Beach Environmental Sustainability Committee.

    Other background: Judie Mancuso is from St. Louis and now lives in Laguna Beach.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Judie Mancuso (D), 43.3%; Diane Dixon (R), 42.7%; and Benjamin Yu (R), 14%. Judie Mancuso and Diane Dixon will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Judie Mancuso’s campaign has raised $163,901, mainly from individual donors. She is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Diane Dixon

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Dixon’s campaign has raised $419,350 and is funded by the police and by corporate PACs, including more than $20,000 from the insurance industry. She has also accepted more than $20,000 in donations from the fossil fuel industry, and nearly $50,000 from the real estate industry.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 72nd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 33% Democrat, 39% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2018. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-72 is 6% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 13% Latino, 13% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-72 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 2 points and John H. Cox for governor in 2018 by 7 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Cottie Petrie-Norris

    Reelect Cottie Petrie-Norris to keep AD-73 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Petrie-Norris’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for the constituents of AD-73. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subjected to increased community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Petrie-Norris has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including AFSCME California, California Teachers Association, and California Women’s List.

    Top issues: Education, wildfire prevention, and gun safety.

    Priority bills: As the current assemblymember for AD74, she has been a strong supporter of bills to combat domestic violence and protect coastal environmental infrastructure. She scores a CS of 31 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Petrie-Norris has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Petrie-Norris has not supported making the California Racial Justice Act of 2020 retroactive, limiting disruption in rehabilitative prison programs, and some other important bills.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Petrie-Norris defeated the Republican incumbent to win this seat by 5 points in 2018 and was reelected over a Republican in 2020 by one point. She has expanded preschool enrollment and has been a longtime supporter of preparing for wildfires.

    Other background: Assm. Petrie-Norris, previously a business team leader at Fortune 500 companies and startups, is from San Diego.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Petrie-Norris (D), 56%; and Steven S. Choi (R), 44%. Petrie-Norris and Choi, both Assembly incumbents drawn into this new district in 2021, will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Petrie-Norris’ campaign has raised $1,288,054 and has some problematic funders, like Amazon, and real estate money, as well as the Huntington Beach Police Officers’ Association.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Incumbent Steven S. Choi

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Choi’s campaign has raised $289,264 and is funded by Amazon, the CA Republican Party, corporate PACs, California Bankers Assn State PAC, and Southern California Edison among others.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 73rd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 28% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-73 is 12% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 17% Latino, 28% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-73 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 18 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Cottie Petrie-Norris

    Reelect Cottie Petrie-Norris to keep AD-73 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Petrie-Norris’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for the constituents of AD-73. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subjected to increased community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Petrie-Norris has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including AFSCME California, California Teachers Association, and California Women’s List.

    Top issues: Education, wildfire prevention, and gun safety.

    Priority bills: As the current assemblymember for AD74, she has been a strong supporter of bills to combat domestic violence and protect coastal environmental infrastructure. She scores a CS of 31 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Petrie-Norris has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Petrie-Norris has not supported making the California Racial Justice Act of 2020 retroactive, limiting disruption in rehabilitative prison programs, and some other important bills.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Petrie-Norris defeated the Republican incumbent to win this seat by 5 points in 2018 and was reelected over a Republican in 2020 by one point. She has expanded preschool enrollment and has been a longtime supporter of preparing for wildfires.

    Other background: Assm. Petrie-Norris, previously a business team leader at Fortune 500 companies and startups, is from San Diego.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Petrie-Norris (D), 56%; and Steven S. Choi (R), 44%. Petrie-Norris and Choi, both Assembly incumbents drawn into this new district in 2021, will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Petrie-Norris’ campaign has raised $1,288,054 and has some problematic funders, like Amazon, and real estate money, as well as the Huntington Beach Police Officers’ Association.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Incumbent Steven S. Choi

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Choi’s campaign has raised $289,264 and is funded by Amazon, the CA Republican Party, corporate PACs, California Bankers Assn State PAC, and Southern California Edison among others.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 73rd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 28% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-73 is 12% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 17% Latino, 28% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-73 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 18 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Cottie Petrie-Norris

    Reelect Cottie Petrie-Norris to keep AD-73 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Petrie-Norris’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for the constituents of AD-73. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subjected to increased community accountability.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Petrie-Norris has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including AFSCME California, California Teachers Association, and California Women’s List.

    Top issues: Education, wildfire prevention, and gun safety.

    Priority bills: As the current assemblymember for AD74, she has been a strong supporter of bills to combat domestic violence and protect coastal environmental infrastructure. She scores a CS of 31 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Petrie-Norris has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Petrie-Norris has not supported making the California Racial Justice Act of 2020 retroactive, limiting disruption in rehabilitative prison programs, and some other important bills.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Petrie-Norris defeated the Republican incumbent to win this seat by 5 points in 2018 and was reelected over a Republican in 2020 by one point. She has expanded preschool enrollment and has been a longtime supporter of preparing for wildfires.

    Other background: Assm. Petrie-Norris, previously a business team leader at Fortune 500 companies and startups, is from San Diego.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Petrie-Norris (D), 56%; and Steven S. Choi (R), 44%. Petrie-Norris and Choi, both Assembly incumbents drawn into this new district in 2021, will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Petrie-Norris’ campaign has raised $1,288,054 and has some problematic funders, like Amazon, and real estate money, as well as the Huntington Beach Police Officers’ Association.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Incumbent Steven S. Choi

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Choi’s campaign has raised $289,264 and is funded by Amazon, the CA Republican Party, corporate PACs, California Bankers Assn State PAC, and Southern California Edison among others.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 73rd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 28% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-73 is 12% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 17% Latino, 28% Asian, and 2% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-73 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 18 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Chris Duncan

    Elect Chris Duncan to put AD-74 on the right track for progress.

    Chris Duncan’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-74 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Duncan has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Equality California, and SEIU California.

    Electoral history: Duncan ran for State Assembly in AD-73 in 2020 and did not advance past the primary.

    Top issues: Education, public safety, housing and homelessness, environment, reproductive health, and gun safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Duncan is mayor pro tempore of San Clemente and a Homeland Security lawyer with experience in national security, which he does because he says he is invested in keeping communities safe and training officers. He has been a strong supporter of bills to train border officials.

    Other background: Duncan is from San Clemente. He is a former special assistant US attorney.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chris Duncan (D), 46%; and Laurie Davies (R), 54%. Duncan and Davies will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Duncan’s campaign has raised $287,275 and is not funded by police, corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, or real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Laurie Davies

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Davies’s campaign has raised $587,798 and is funded by police money, corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, and real estate money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 74th Assembly District includes parts of San Diego and Orange Counties.

    Voter registration: 35% Democrat, 35% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. This is a new district that was more Republican-leaning before redistricting. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-74 is 9% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 24% Latino, 7% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-74 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 0.15 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 4 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Chris Duncan

    Elect Chris Duncan to put AD-74 on the right track for progress.

    Chris Duncan’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-74 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Duncan has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Equality California, and SEIU California.

    Electoral history: Duncan ran for State Assembly in AD-73 in 2020 and did not advance past the primary.

    Top issues: Education, public safety, housing and homelessness, environment, reproductive health, and gun safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Duncan is mayor pro tempore of San Clemente and a Homeland Security lawyer with experience in national security, which he does because he says he is invested in keeping communities safe and training officers. He has been a strong supporter of bills to train border officials.

    Other background: Duncan is from San Clemente. He is a former special assistant US attorney.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chris Duncan (D), 46%; and Laurie Davies (R), 54%. Duncan and Davies will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Duncan’s campaign has raised $287,275 and is not funded by police, corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, or real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Laurie Davies

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Davies’s campaign has raised $587,798 and is funded by police money, corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, and real estate money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 74th Assembly District includes parts of San Diego and Orange Counties.

    Voter registration: 35% Democrat, 35% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. This is a new district that was more Republican-leaning before redistricting. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-74 is 9% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 24% Latino, 7% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-74 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 0.15 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 4 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Chris Duncan

    Elect Chris Duncan to put AD-74 on the right track for progress.

    Chris Duncan’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-74 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Duncan has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Equality California, and SEIU California.

    Electoral history: Duncan ran for State Assembly in AD-73 in 2020 and did not advance past the primary.

    Top issues: Education, public safety, housing and homelessness, environment, reproductive health, and gun safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Duncan is mayor pro tempore of San Clemente and a Homeland Security lawyer with experience in national security, which he does because he says he is invested in keeping communities safe and training officers. He has been a strong supporter of bills to train border officials.

    Other background: Duncan is from San Clemente. He is a former special assistant US attorney.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chris Duncan (D), 46%; and Laurie Davies (R), 54%. Duncan and Davies will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Duncan’s campaign has raised $287,275 and is not funded by police, corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, or real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Laurie Davies

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Davies’s campaign has raised $587,798 and is funded by police money, corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, and real estate money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 74th Assembly District includes parts of San Diego and Orange Counties.

    Voter registration: 35% Democrat, 35% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. This is a new district that was more Republican-leaning before redistricting. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-74 is 9% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 24% Latino, 7% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-74 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 0.15 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 4 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

  • Bob Archuleta

    Reelect State Senate Representative Archuleta to keep SD-30 on the right track for progress. 

    Bob Archuleta

    Reelect State Senate Representative Archuleta to keep SD-30 on the right track for progress. 

    Bob Archuleta

    Reelect State Senate Representative Archuleta to keep SD-30 on the right track for progress. 

No Recommendation

  • Democrat

    Tom Umberg

  • Tom Umberg

    Reelect State Senate Representative Tom Umberg to keep SD-34 on the right track for progress.

    Tom Umberg

    Reelect State Senate Representative Tom Umberg to keep SD-34 on the right track for progress.

    Tom Umberg

    Reelect State Senate Representative Tom Umberg to keep SD-34 on the right track for progress.

  • Fiona Ma

    Reelect Treasurer Fiona Ma to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Fiona Ma’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for Californians and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Fiona Ma

    Reelect Treasurer Fiona Ma to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Fiona Ma’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for Californians and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Fiona Ma

    Reelect Treasurer Fiona Ma to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Fiona Ma’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a champion for Californians and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

County District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county-districted races on your ballot.

  • Vicente Sarmiento

    Elect Mayor Vicente Sarmiento for Board of Supervisors to put Orange County on the right track for progress.

    Mayor Vicente Sarmiento’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Orange County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Mayor Sarmiento has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Feel the Bern Orange County, Planned Parenthood Community Action Fund of Orange and San Bernardino Counties, and many local union organizations. He has also received the endorsement of many leaders, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Senator Alex Padilla, OC Supervisor Katrina Foley, and a diverse group of local elected officials.

    Electoral history: Mayor Sarmiento has served in the Santa Ana City Council since 2008. He was reelected in 2016 with over 55% of the vote. In 2020, he won his bid for mayor of Santa Ana with 33% of the vote in a nonpartisan race.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, public land preservation and development, economic growth, public health, and transparent and accountable government.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mayor Vicente currently serves as mayor of Santa Ana, which he does to bring experienced leadership to the issues facing his local community. During his time on the city council, he has supported a local initiative to convert an unused firehouse into space for a youth-police community program, invested a portion of federal COVID-19 relief funds in infrastructure projects, provided stimulus payments to low-income residents, and made progress in requiring public registration for local lobbyists. He also supported the establishment of the first rent-stabilization ordinance in the county, and established a civilian response team for individuals experiencing a mental-health crisis. Mayor Sarmiento also currently serves as director of the Orange County Transportation Authority, and has served in leadership roles with the Orange County Water District Board of Directors, Transportation Corridor Agency, and Orange County Fire Authority.

    Other background: Mayor Sarmiento is a lifelong resident of Orange County. He was educated in local public schools, and owns a law practice in Santa Ana with his wife.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Mayor Vicente Sarmiento, 35%; Kim Bernice Nguyen, 22%; Cecelia Iglesias, 17%; Jon Dumitru, 17%; and Juan Villegas, 9%. Mayor Vicente Sarmiento and Kim Bernice Nguyen will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Mayor Sarmiento’s campaign has raised $173,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Kim Bernice Nguyen
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nguyen’s campaign has raised $53,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.
     

    The District

    County: Orange County is California’s third most populous county. District 2 is home to 650,000 people and includes the communities of Santa Ana, Anaheim, Orange, Tustin, and East Garden Grove.

    Governance structure: Orange County’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 3.1 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Orange County has an elected Board of Supervisors representing five unique districts, and six additional elected government positions, including an assessor, a clerk-recorder, a district attorney, and a sheriff.
     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person Board of Supervisors. A Board of Supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

    Vicente Sarmiento

    Elect Mayor Vicente Sarmiento for Board of Supervisors to put Orange County on the right track for progress.

    Mayor Vicente Sarmiento’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Orange County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Mayor Sarmiento has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Feel the Bern Orange County, Planned Parenthood Community Action Fund of Orange and San Bernardino Counties, and many local union organizations. He has also received the endorsement of many leaders, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Senator Alex Padilla, OC Supervisor Katrina Foley, and a diverse group of local elected officials.

    Electoral history: Mayor Sarmiento has served in the Santa Ana City Council since 2008. He was reelected in 2016 with over 55% of the vote. In 2020, he won his bid for mayor of Santa Ana with 33% of the vote in a nonpartisan race.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, public land preservation and development, economic growth, public health, and transparent and accountable government.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mayor Vicente currently serves as mayor of Santa Ana, which he does to bring experienced leadership to the issues facing his local community. During his time on the city council, he has supported a local initiative to convert an unused firehouse into space for a youth-police community program, invested a portion of federal COVID-19 relief funds in infrastructure projects, provided stimulus payments to low-income residents, and made progress in requiring public registration for local lobbyists. He also supported the establishment of the first rent-stabilization ordinance in the county, and established a civilian response team for individuals experiencing a mental-health crisis. Mayor Sarmiento also currently serves as director of the Orange County Transportation Authority, and has served in leadership roles with the Orange County Water District Board of Directors, Transportation Corridor Agency, and Orange County Fire Authority.

    Other background: Mayor Sarmiento is a lifelong resident of Orange County. He was educated in local public schools, and owns a law practice in Santa Ana with his wife.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Mayor Vicente Sarmiento, 35%; Kim Bernice Nguyen, 22%; Cecelia Iglesias, 17%; Jon Dumitru, 17%; and Juan Villegas, 9%. Mayor Vicente Sarmiento and Kim Bernice Nguyen will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Mayor Sarmiento’s campaign has raised $173,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Kim Bernice Nguyen
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nguyen’s campaign has raised $53,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.
     

    The District

    County: Orange County is California’s third most populous county. District 2 is home to 650,000 people and includes the communities of Santa Ana, Anaheim, Orange, Tustin, and East Garden Grove.

    Governance structure: Orange County’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 3.1 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Orange County has an elected Board of Supervisors representing five unique districts, and six additional elected government positions, including an assessor, a clerk-recorder, a district attorney, and a sheriff.
     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person Board of Supervisors. A Board of Supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

    Vicente Sarmiento

    Elect Mayor Vicente Sarmiento for Board of Supervisors to put Orange County on the right track for progress.

    Mayor Vicente Sarmiento’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Orange County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Mayor Sarmiento has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Feel the Bern Orange County, Planned Parenthood Community Action Fund of Orange and San Bernardino Counties, and many local union organizations. He has also received the endorsement of many leaders, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Senator Alex Padilla, OC Supervisor Katrina Foley, and a diverse group of local elected officials.

    Electoral history: Mayor Sarmiento has served in the Santa Ana City Council since 2008. He was reelected in 2016 with over 55% of the vote. In 2020, he won his bid for mayor of Santa Ana with 33% of the vote in a nonpartisan race.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, public land preservation and development, economic growth, public health, and transparent and accountable government.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Mayor Vicente currently serves as mayor of Santa Ana, which he does to bring experienced leadership to the issues facing his local community. During his time on the city council, he has supported a local initiative to convert an unused firehouse into space for a youth-police community program, invested a portion of federal COVID-19 relief funds in infrastructure projects, provided stimulus payments to low-income residents, and made progress in requiring public registration for local lobbyists. He also supported the establishment of the first rent-stabilization ordinance in the county, and established a civilian response team for individuals experiencing a mental-health crisis. Mayor Sarmiento also currently serves as director of the Orange County Transportation Authority, and has served in leadership roles with the Orange County Water District Board of Directors, Transportation Corridor Agency, and Orange County Fire Authority.

    Other background: Mayor Sarmiento is a lifelong resident of Orange County. He was educated in local public schools, and owns a law practice in Santa Ana with his wife.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Mayor Vicente Sarmiento, 35%; Kim Bernice Nguyen, 22%; Cecelia Iglesias, 17%; Jon Dumitru, 17%; and Juan Villegas, 9%. Mayor Vicente Sarmiento and Kim Bernice Nguyen will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Mayor Sarmiento’s campaign has raised $173,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Kim Bernice Nguyen
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nguyen’s campaign has raised $53,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.
     

    The District

    County: Orange County is California’s third most populous county. District 2 is home to 650,000 people and includes the communities of Santa Ana, Anaheim, Orange, Tustin, and East Garden Grove.

    Governance structure: Orange County’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 3.1 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Orange County has an elected Board of Supervisors representing five unique districts, and six additional elected government positions, including an assessor, a clerk-recorder, a district attorney, and a sheriff.
     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person Board of Supervisors. A Board of Supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

  • Courage Score: https://couragescore.org
  • Katrina Foley

    Reelect Supervisor Katrina Foley as Orange County Supervisor to keep Orange County on the right track for progress.

    Supervisor Katrina Foley’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of Orange County’s 5th district and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Sup. Foley is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including Orange County Labor Federation, Orange County League of Conservation Voters, and Planned Parenthood. She has also received the endorsement of many local elected officials, including Rep. Katie Porter, State Senator Dave Min, Costa Mesa Mayor John Stephens, and all members of the Laguna Beach City Council.

    Top issues: Economic recovery and growth, public safety, environmental protections, coastal conservation, homelessness and housing, and health care.

    Key initiatives: Sup. Foley successfully advocated for local development, climate action, and reducing homelessness and underemployment during her first year on the board. She has supported low carbon-transit options, preserving coastal open space, economic relief for small businesses affected by local construction projects, and paid emergency sick leave for county employees affected by COVID-19. Sup. Foley has also been actively working on Project Homekey, which aims to convert an old hotel into affordable housing units, and on providing job fairs and additional housing resources to veterans.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sup. Foley has served in this seat since 2021, when she won a special election with over 44% of the vote. She also ran in the 2020 primary for State Senate District 37, but did not qualify for the general election ballot after earning only 25% of the vote.

    Prior to her election to the Board of Supervisors, Sup. Foley was a member of the Costa Mesa City Council, and was the first person to be directly elected to serve as mayor of Costa Mesa. She also served as a Newport Mesa School Board trustee. She has been a committed and engaged member of the local community throughout her time in Orange County, serving on the boards of the Girl Scouts of Orange County, the Toll Corridor Association, Orange County Head Start, and the Coast Community College Measure M Oversight Committee. Sup. Foley is an attorney by training.

    Other background: Sup. Foley is a longtime resident of Costa Mesa.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Sup. Katrina Foley, 42%; Patricia Bates, 22%; Diane Harkey, 19%; and Kevin Muldoon, 18%. Sup. Katrina Foley and Patricia Bates will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sup. Foley’s campaign has raised $353,000 and has received problematic donations from police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Patricia Bates
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Bates’s campaign has raised $442,000 and is funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests.
     

    The District

    County: Orange County is California’s third most populous county. District 5 is home to 650,000 people and includes the communities of Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Newport Beach, and San Clemente.

    Governance structure: Orange County’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 3.1 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Orange County has an elected board of supervisors representing five unique districts, and six additional elected government positions, including an assessor, a clerk-recorder, a district attorney, and a sheriff.
     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person Board of Supervisors. A Board of Supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

    Katrina Foley

    Reelect Supervisor Katrina Foley as Orange County Supervisor to keep Orange County on the right track for progress.

    Supervisor Katrina Foley’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of Orange County’s 5th district and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Sup. Foley is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including Orange County Labor Federation, Orange County League of Conservation Voters, and Planned Parenthood. She has also received the endorsement of many local elected officials, including Rep. Katie Porter, State Senator Dave Min, Costa Mesa Mayor John Stephens, and all members of the Laguna Beach City Council.

    Top issues: Economic recovery and growth, public safety, environmental protections, coastal conservation, homelessness and housing, and health care.

    Key initiatives: Sup. Foley successfully advocated for local development, climate action, and reducing homelessness and underemployment during her first year on the board. She has supported low carbon-transit options, preserving coastal open space, economic relief for small businesses affected by local construction projects, and paid emergency sick leave for county employees affected by COVID-19. Sup. Foley has also been actively working on Project Homekey, which aims to convert an old hotel into affordable housing units, and on providing job fairs and additional housing resources to veterans.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sup. Foley has served in this seat since 2021, when she won a special election with over 44% of the vote. She also ran in the 2020 primary for State Senate District 37, but did not qualify for the general election ballot after earning only 25% of the vote.

    Prior to her election to the Board of Supervisors, Sup. Foley was a member of the Costa Mesa City Council, and was the first person to be directly elected to serve as mayor of Costa Mesa. She also served as a Newport Mesa School Board trustee. She has been a committed and engaged member of the local community throughout her time in Orange County, serving on the boards of the Girl Scouts of Orange County, the Toll Corridor Association, Orange County Head Start, and the Coast Community College Measure M Oversight Committee. Sup. Foley is an attorney by training.

    Other background: Sup. Foley is a longtime resident of Costa Mesa.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Sup. Katrina Foley, 42%; Patricia Bates, 22%; Diane Harkey, 19%; and Kevin Muldoon, 18%. Sup. Katrina Foley and Patricia Bates will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sup. Foley’s campaign has raised $353,000 and has received problematic donations from police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Patricia Bates
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Bates’s campaign has raised $442,000 and is funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests.
     

    The District

    County: Orange County is California’s third most populous county. District 5 is home to 650,000 people and includes the communities of Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Newport Beach, and San Clemente.

    Governance structure: Orange County’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 3.1 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Orange County has an elected board of supervisors representing five unique districts, and six additional elected government positions, including an assessor, a clerk-recorder, a district attorney, and a sheriff.
     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person Board of Supervisors. A Board of Supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

    Katrina Foley

    Reelect Supervisor Katrina Foley as Orange County Supervisor to keep Orange County on the right track for progress.

    Supervisor Katrina Foley’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of Orange County’s 5th district and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Sup. Foley is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including Orange County Labor Federation, Orange County League of Conservation Voters, and Planned Parenthood. She has also received the endorsement of many local elected officials, including Rep. Katie Porter, State Senator Dave Min, Costa Mesa Mayor John Stephens, and all members of the Laguna Beach City Council.

    Top issues: Economic recovery and growth, public safety, environmental protections, coastal conservation, homelessness and housing, and health care.

    Key initiatives: Sup. Foley successfully advocated for local development, climate action, and reducing homelessness and underemployment during her first year on the board. She has supported low carbon-transit options, preserving coastal open space, economic relief for small businesses affected by local construction projects, and paid emergency sick leave for county employees affected by COVID-19. Sup. Foley has also been actively working on Project Homekey, which aims to convert an old hotel into affordable housing units, and on providing job fairs and additional housing resources to veterans.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sup. Foley has served in this seat since 2021, when she won a special election with over 44% of the vote. She also ran in the 2020 primary for State Senate District 37, but did not qualify for the general election ballot after earning only 25% of the vote.

    Prior to her election to the Board of Supervisors, Sup. Foley was a member of the Costa Mesa City Council, and was the first person to be directly elected to serve as mayor of Costa Mesa. She also served as a Newport Mesa School Board trustee. She has been a committed and engaged member of the local community throughout her time in Orange County, serving on the boards of the Girl Scouts of Orange County, the Toll Corridor Association, Orange County Head Start, and the Coast Community College Measure M Oversight Committee. Sup. Foley is an attorney by training.

    Other background: Sup. Foley is a longtime resident of Costa Mesa.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Sup. Katrina Foley, 42%; Patricia Bates, 22%; Diane Harkey, 19%; and Kevin Muldoon, 18%. Sup. Katrina Foley and Patricia Bates will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sup. Foley’s campaign has raised $353,000 and has received problematic donations from police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Patricia Bates
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Bates’s campaign has raised $442,000 and is funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests.
     

    The District

    County: Orange County is California’s third most populous county. District 5 is home to 650,000 people and includes the communities of Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Newport Beach, and San Clemente.

    Governance structure: Orange County’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 3.1 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Orange County has an elected board of supervisors representing five unique districts, and six additional elected government positions, including an assessor, a clerk-recorder, a district attorney, and a sheriff.
     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person Board of Supervisors. A Board of Supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

  • Courage Score: https://couragescore.org
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Prop 1

  • Vote YES on Proposition 1 to enshrine abortion rights into the California State Constitution.


    After the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in June 2022, the California State Legislature moved quickly to place Proposition 1 on the ballot. Although there is a right to privacy in the California State Constitution that has been historically interpreted to cover the right to choose to have an abortion, that right is not explicitly written into the State Constitution. Proposition 1 would amend the State Constitution to enshrine the right to reproductive freedom, including the right to choose to have an abortion and the right to choose or refuse contraception.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 1 matters:

    The California state legislature and governorship are currently controlled by Democrats. However, should that change, the reproductive freedom protections currently in place may be threatened. Enshrining the rights to abortion and contraceptives is a critical step Californians can take now to ensure that reproductive freedom remains a right in California, regardless of which party is in power. In order to remove such a protection from the State Constitution, Republicans would need to place another measure on the ballot, whether through the legislature or by citizen referendum, and convince California voters to vote for it.
    The Supremacy Clause of the federal Constitution usually gives federal law precedence over state statutes and constitutions. Although Prop. 1 would probably not be enough to stop a national ban, the courts would first have to strike down the constitutional language.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 1:

    Yes on Prop 1: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 1 are Planned Parenthood Advocacy Project Los Angeles County, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, and M. Quinn Delaney, a wealthy liberal philanthropist and co-founder of the Akonadi Foundation. As of August 1, the Yes on Prop 1 committee has raised $355,112 and spent $79,000 since Jan. 1, 2022. The California Democratic Party has also endorsed Proposition 1.

    No on Prop 1: The recently formed No on Proposition 1 committee has raised $134,798 since August 1, and data has yet to be made available on how the committee has spent its funds. In addition, the California Republican Party came out in opposition to the ballot measure. The California Catholic Conference has also come out in opposition to Proposition 1, with the Archbishop of San Francisco stating that “the California bishops have made defeating Prop. 1 our number one priority for this year.”
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 1 includes:

    The California Catholic Conference claims that Prop. 1 would “over-ride current law” to allow for “taxpayer-funded” abortion care. Prop. 1 simply makes explicit the current, common interpretation of the California State Constitution that already allows for abortion care and state assistance for those seeking to receive such health care. Also, because these rights already exist in California, the proposition would have no direct fiscal effect, meaning it would not create increased costs to taxpayers.

    Vote YES on Proposition 1 to enshrine abortion rights into the California State Constitution.


    After the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in June 2022, the California State Legislature moved quickly to place Proposition 1 on the ballot. Although there is a right to privacy in the California State Constitution that has been historically interpreted to cover the right to choose to have an abortion, that right is not explicitly written into the State Constitution. Proposition 1 would amend the State Constitution to enshrine the right to reproductive freedom, including the right to choose to have an abortion and the right to choose or refuse contraception.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 1 matters:

    The California state legislature and governorship are currently controlled by Democrats. However, should that change, the reproductive freedom protections currently in place may be threatened. Enshrining the rights to abortion and contraceptives is a critical step Californians can take now to ensure that reproductive freedom remains a right in California, regardless of which party is in power. In order to remove such a protection from the State Constitution, Republicans would need to place another measure on the ballot, whether through the legislature or by citizen referendum, and convince California voters to vote for it.
    The Supremacy Clause of the federal Constitution usually gives federal law precedence over state statutes and constitutions. Although Prop. 1 would probably not be enough to stop a national ban, the courts would first have to strike down the constitutional language.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 1:

    Yes on Prop 1: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 1 are Planned Parenthood Advocacy Project Los Angeles County, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, and M. Quinn Delaney, a wealthy liberal philanthropist and co-founder of the Akonadi Foundation. As of August 1, the Yes on Prop 1 committee has raised $355,112 and spent $79,000 since Jan. 1, 2022. The California Democratic Party has also endorsed Proposition 1.

    No on Prop 1: The recently formed No on Proposition 1 committee has raised $134,798 since August 1, and data has yet to be made available on how the committee has spent its funds. In addition, the California Republican Party came out in opposition to the ballot measure. The California Catholic Conference has also come out in opposition to Proposition 1, with the Archbishop of San Francisco stating that “the California bishops have made defeating Prop. 1 our number one priority for this year.”
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 1 includes:

    The California Catholic Conference claims that Prop. 1 would “over-ride current law” to allow for “taxpayer-funded” abortion care. Prop. 1 simply makes explicit the current, common interpretation of the California State Constitution that already allows for abortion care and state assistance for those seeking to receive such health care. Also, because these rights already exist in California, the proposition would have no direct fiscal effect, meaning it would not create increased costs to taxpayers.
  • Endorsed By Courage California
  • No Position

    Vote on Proposition 26

  • Proposition 26 would legalize in-person sports betting at tribal casinos and specific horse tracks.


    California state law currently limits some types of gambling. Prop. 26 would legalize in-person sports betting at tribal casinos and specific privately owned horse tracks. The measure would also require that racetracks pay into a new California Sports Wagering Fund to fund annual state spending on K–12 schools and community colleges, as well as contribute to gambling addiction and mental-health programs, sports betting regulation enforcement costs, and the state’s General Fund.

    After funds from the California Sports Wagering Fund are used for annual minimum required education spending, 70 percent of the remaining funds would be required to go toward the state’s General Fund, 15 percent for gambling addiction and mental-health programs and grants, and the last 15 percent for sports betting and gambling enforcement costs. While the actual fiscal impact of Prop. 26 remains uncertain, state analysts estimate that increases in state revenues from Prop. 26 could reach tens of millions of dollars annually, and enforcement costs are expected to be in the low millions of dollars annually.

    A YES vote on Proposition 26 means:

    If Proposition 26 is approved by voters, tribal casinos could offer in-person sports betting, roulette, and dice games through tribal agreements with the state. Four horse racetracks would be able to offer in-person sports betting; the revenue would pay into a new fund that would go toward public school spending, mental-health programs, sports betting regulation enforcement costs, and the California State General Fund.
     

    A NO vote on Proposition 26 means:

    If Proposition 26 fails, no changes would be made to the enforcement of current state gambling and betting laws.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 26:

    Yes on Prop 26: The top funders of the ballot measure committee simultaneously supporting Proposition 26 and opposing Proposition 27 are the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, the Pechanga Band of Indians, and the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation. As of August 1, the Yes on 26, No on 27 ballot measure committee has raised $60 million and spent $31 million since Jan. 1, 2022. The coalition supporting the ballot measure includes thirty-one tribes and tribal organizations, such as the California Nations Indian Gaming Association. Other organizations supporting Prop. 26 include the Dolores Huerta Community Foundation, Peace Officers Research Association of California, and the American Indian Chamber of Commerce.

    No on Prop 26: The top funders of the ballot measure committee opposing Proposition 26 are the non-tribal cardrooms and cardroom operators at California Commerce Club, Hawaiian Gardens Casino, and Knighted Ventures. As of August 1, the No on 26 committee has raised $17 million and spent $2 million since Jan. 1, 2022. In addition, organizations including the California Republican Party, the Los Angeles County Business Federation, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) California also oppose Prop. 26.

    Proposition 26 and Proposition 27:

    Prop. 26 focuses on in-person betting, while Prop. 27 focuses on online betting. If both Props. 26 and 27 pass, they will likely both go into effect, as neither ballot measure technically conflicts with the other. The authors of Prop. 27 explicitly wrote into the measure that “Proposition 27 does not conflict with Proposition 26,” but whether the courts will find that both measures can operate simultaneously remains to be seen. If the courts find that they don't conflict, the two measures will both take full effect. If the courts find that the two measures do conflict with each other, whichever measure receives the most votes in the election will be the one that goes into effect. Opponents of each measure may leverage the issue of potential conflict and voter support in court to defeat one of the measures post-election, should they both be approved by voters.

    So far, the ballot measure committees involved in the Props. 26 and 27 contests have in total raised $218 million and spent $65 million, making the two measures among the most expensive ballot measure contests on record.

    Proposition 26 would legalize in-person sports betting at tribal casinos and specific horse tracks.


    California state law currently limits some types of gambling. Prop. 26 would legalize in-person sports betting at tribal casinos and specific privately owned horse tracks. The measure would also require that racetracks pay into a new California Sports Wagering Fund to fund annual state spending on K–12 schools and community colleges, as well as contribute to gambling addiction and mental-health programs, sports betting regulation enforcement costs, and the state’s General Fund.

    After funds from the California Sports Wagering Fund are used for annual minimum required education spending, 70 percent of the remaining funds would be required to go toward the state’s General Fund, 15 percent for gambling addiction and mental-health programs and grants, and the last 15 percent for sports betting and gambling enforcement costs. While the actual fiscal impact of Prop. 26 remains uncertain, state analysts estimate that increases in state revenues from Prop. 26 could reach tens of millions of dollars annually, and enforcement costs are expected to be in the low millions of dollars annually.

    A YES vote on Proposition 26 means:

    If Proposition 26 is approved by voters, tribal casinos could offer in-person sports betting, roulette, and dice games through tribal agreements with the state. Four horse racetracks would be able to offer in-person sports betting; the revenue would pay into a new fund that would go toward public school spending, mental-health programs, sports betting regulation enforcement costs, and the California State General Fund.
     

    A NO vote on Proposition 26 means:

    If Proposition 26 fails, no changes would be made to the enforcement of current state gambling and betting laws.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 26:

    Yes on Prop 26: The top funders of the ballot measure committee simultaneously supporting Proposition 26 and opposing Proposition 27 are the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, the Pechanga Band of Indians, and the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation. As of August 1, the Yes on 26, No on 27 ballot measure committee has raised $60 million and spent $31 million since Jan. 1, 2022. The coalition supporting the ballot measure includes thirty-one tribes and tribal organizations, such as the California Nations Indian Gaming Association. Other organizations supporting Prop. 26 include the Dolores Huerta Community Foundation, Peace Officers Research Association of California, and the American Indian Chamber of Commerce.

    No on Prop 26: The top funders of the ballot measure committee opposing Proposition 26 are the non-tribal cardrooms and cardroom operators at California Commerce Club, Hawaiian Gardens Casino, and Knighted Ventures. As of August 1, the No on 26 committee has raised $17 million and spent $2 million since Jan. 1, 2022. In addition, organizations including the California Republican Party, the Los Angeles County Business Federation, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) California also oppose Prop. 26.

    Proposition 26 and Proposition 27:

    Prop. 26 focuses on in-person betting, while Prop. 27 focuses on online betting. If both Props. 26 and 27 pass, they will likely both go into effect, as neither ballot measure technically conflicts with the other. The authors of Prop. 27 explicitly wrote into the measure that “Proposition 27 does not conflict with Proposition 26,” but whether the courts will find that both measures can operate simultaneously remains to be seen. If the courts find that they don't conflict, the two measures will both take full effect. If the courts find that the two measures do conflict with each other, whichever measure receives the most votes in the election will be the one that goes into effect. Opponents of each measure may leverage the issue of potential conflict and voter support in court to defeat one of the measures post-election, should they both be approved by voters.

    So far, the ballot measure committees involved in the Props. 26 and 27 contests have in total raised $218 million and spent $65 million, making the two measures among the most expensive ballot measure contests on record.
  • VOTE NO

    Vote NO on Proposition 27

  • Vote NO on Proposition 27 to prevent the legalization of online sports betting through large online betting platforms and certified tribes.


    California state law currently limits some types of gambling. Proposition 27 would allow Californians to engage in online sports betting through large online betting companies and certified tribes.

    Prop. 27 would require those offering online sports betting to pay 10 percent of the bets into a new fund that will go first toward paying for regulatory costs, then toward homelessness and gambling addiction programs, then towards tribes. Analysis from the Legislative Analyst's Office estimates that potential revenues for the state from Prop. 27 will likely not exceed $500 million and some will go towards regulatory costs. Those offering online betting would retain 90 percent of the profits, which are estimated to be in the billions.
     

    Why voting NO on Proposition 27 matters:

    A vast majority of the profits generated through Prop. 27 would leave the state of California and benefit large, wealthy corporations. Only a fraction of the bets would be paid to the state. Online gambling remains difficult to regulate, and Prop. 27 is not likely to mitigate the issue of unregulated online sports betting. The measure would make gambling accessible to anyone with a device that connects to the internet, including those who may be more susceptible to developing gambling addictions such as young people.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 27:

    Yes on Prop 27: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 27 are online betting companies FanDuel, DraftKings, and Penn Interactive Ventures, all three of which are based on the east coast of the U.S. Although the Yes on 27 committee has not reported raising funds this year so far, the committee received $100 million in 2021. As of August 1, the Yes on 27 committee has spent $23 million.

    No on Prop 27: The top funders of the main ballot measure committee opposing Proposition 27 are the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians, and Pala Casino Spa Resort. On August 1, the committee reported having raised $41 million and spent $32 million since Jan. 1, 2022. There is also a ballot measure committee that is simultaneously supporting Prop. 26 and opposing Prop. 27, which is funded primarily by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, the Pechanga Band of Indians, and the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation. As of August 1, the Yes on 26, No on 27 ballot measure committee has raised $60 million and spent $31 million since Jan. 1, 2022.

    Both the California Democratic Party and the California Republican Party oppose Prop. 27.

    So far, the ballot measure committees involved in the Props. 26 and 27 contests have in total raised $218 million and spent $65 million, making the two measures among the most expensive ballot measure contests on record.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 27 includes:


    The proponents of Prop. 27 claim it will provide “hundreds of millions of dollars every year to fund mental health treatment and solutions to homelessness and addiction.” However, while state analysis of the measure’s potential effects estimates that it may produce up to $500 million in revenue, that revenue is first dedicated to covering regulatory and enforcement costs.

    The proponents of Prop. 27 describe their coalition of supporters as primarily including “housing and mental health experts, tribes, and citizens.” Two tribes are currently listed as supporters of Prop. 27: Big Valley Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians and the Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians. For comparison purposes, the list of Prop. 26 supporters includes thirty-one tribes and tribal organizations.
     

    Proposition 27 and Proposition 26:


    Prop. 26 focuses on in-person betting, while Prop. 27 focuses on online betting. If both Props. 26 and 27 pass, they will likely both go into effect, as neither ballot measure technically conflicts with the other. The authors of Prop. 27 explicitly wrote into the measure that “Proposition 27 does not conflict with Proposition 26,” but whether the courts will find that both measures can operate simultaneously remains to be seen. If the courts find that they don't conflict, the two measures will both take full effect. If the courts find that the two measures do conflict with each other, whichever measure receives the most votes in the election will be the one that goes into effect. Opponents of each measure may leverage the issue of potential conflict and voter support in court to defeat one of the measures post-election, should they both be approved by voters.

    Vote NO on Proposition 27 to prevent the legalization of online sports betting through large online betting platforms and certified tribes.


    California state law currently limits some types of gambling. Proposition 27 would allow Californians to engage in online sports betting through large online betting companies and certified tribes.

    Prop. 27 would require those offering online sports betting to pay 10 percent of the bets into a new fund that will go first toward paying for regulatory costs, then toward homelessness and gambling addiction programs, then towards tribes. Analysis from the Legislative Analyst's Office estimates that potential revenues for the state from Prop. 27 will likely not exceed $500 million and some will go towards regulatory costs. Those offering online betting would retain 90 percent of the profits, which are estimated to be in the billions.
     

    Why voting NO on Proposition 27 matters:

    A vast majority of the profits generated through Prop. 27 would leave the state of California and benefit large, wealthy corporations. Only a fraction of the bets would be paid to the state. Online gambling remains difficult to regulate, and Prop. 27 is not likely to mitigate the issue of unregulated online sports betting. The measure would make gambling accessible to anyone with a device that connects to the internet, including those who may be more susceptible to developing gambling addictions such as young people.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 27:

    Yes on Prop 27: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 27 are online betting companies FanDuel, DraftKings, and Penn Interactive Ventures, all three of which are based on the east coast of the U.S. Although the Yes on 27 committee has not reported raising funds this year so far, the committee received $100 million in 2021. As of August 1, the Yes on 27 committee has spent $23 million.

    No on Prop 27: The top funders of the main ballot measure committee opposing Proposition 27 are the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians, and Pala Casino Spa Resort. On August 1, the committee reported having raised $41 million and spent $32 million since Jan. 1, 2022. There is also a ballot measure committee that is simultaneously supporting Prop. 26 and opposing Prop. 27, which is funded primarily by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, the Pechanga Band of Indians, and the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation. As of August 1, the Yes on 26, No on 27 ballot measure committee has raised $60 million and spent $31 million since Jan. 1, 2022.

    Both the California Democratic Party and the California Republican Party oppose Prop. 27.

    So far, the ballot measure committees involved in the Props. 26 and 27 contests have in total raised $218 million and spent $65 million, making the two measures among the most expensive ballot measure contests on record.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 27 includes:


    The proponents of Prop. 27 claim it will provide “hundreds of millions of dollars every year to fund mental health treatment and solutions to homelessness and addiction.” However, while state analysis of the measure’s potential effects estimates that it may produce up to $500 million in revenue, that revenue is first dedicated to covering regulatory and enforcement costs.

    The proponents of Prop. 27 describe their coalition of supporters as primarily including “housing and mental health experts, tribes, and citizens.” Two tribes are currently listed as supporters of Prop. 27: Big Valley Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians and the Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians. For comparison purposes, the list of Prop. 26 supporters includes thirty-one tribes and tribal organizations.
     

    Proposition 27 and Proposition 26:


    Prop. 26 focuses on in-person betting, while Prop. 27 focuses on online betting. If both Props. 26 and 27 pass, they will likely both go into effect, as neither ballot measure technically conflicts with the other. The authors of Prop. 27 explicitly wrote into the measure that “Proposition 27 does not conflict with Proposition 26,” but whether the courts will find that both measures can operate simultaneously remains to be seen. If the courts find that they don't conflict, the two measures will both take full effect. If the courts find that the two measures do conflict with each other, whichever measure receives the most votes in the election will be the one that goes into effect. Opponents of each measure may leverage the issue of potential conflict and voter support in court to defeat one of the measures post-election, should they both be approved by voters.
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Proposition 28

  • Vote YES on Proposition 28 to provide additional funding to arts education in public schools.


    California’s PK-12 public school students are disproportionately from low-income households, and the availability of quality arts education remains highly variable across school sites and districts. Proposition 28 would require the state to set aside about $1 billion of its existing annual revenue for arts education, particularly for hiring new arts-education staff in school districts with large shares of low-income students.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 28 matters:

    California has over 6 million public school students, and about 60 percent of them are from low-income households. While students in wealthier areas are more likely to enjoy extensive arts programs, students in lower-income neighborhoods are much less likely to have access to quality arts education. Guaranteeing an ongoing source of funding for arts education in California’s public schools is crucial to helping to close this gap in access to quality arts education.

    Since the state’s arts-education requirements are much looser than requirements for other disciplines, such as math or language arts education, all arts education is funded based on the discretion of local school governing boards. Whether a school has arts education programming, whether the district hires arts educators and what those programs look like are ultimately up to who sits on school boards, which currently face intense scrutiny and attention from Republican and other conservative groups.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 28:

    Yes on Prop 28: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 28 are former Los Angeles Unified School District superintendent Austin Beutner, Fender Musical Instruments, and the California Teachers Association. As of August 1, the Yes on 28 committee has raised $7 million and spent $8 million since Jan. 1, 2022, although the committee also started the year with additional funds raised during the previous reporting period. Numerous notable artists have also come out in support of the measure, including Al Yankovich, Christina Aguilera, Dr. Dre, Jason Momoa, will.i.am, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

    No on Prop 28: There are not funders or endorsements in opposition of Proposition 28.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 28 includes:

    Proposition 28 does not require that a new tax be levied. Instead, it directs the state to set aside a portion of existing annual revenue to fund arts education in public schools.

    Vote YES on Proposition 28 to provide additional funding to arts education in public schools.


    California’s PK-12 public school students are disproportionately from low-income households, and the availability of quality arts education remains highly variable across school sites and districts. Proposition 28 would require the state to set aside about $1 billion of its existing annual revenue for arts education, particularly for hiring new arts-education staff in school districts with large shares of low-income students.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 28 matters:

    California has over 6 million public school students, and about 60 percent of them are from low-income households. While students in wealthier areas are more likely to enjoy extensive arts programs, students in lower-income neighborhoods are much less likely to have access to quality arts education. Guaranteeing an ongoing source of funding for arts education in California’s public schools is crucial to helping to close this gap in access to quality arts education.

    Since the state’s arts-education requirements are much looser than requirements for other disciplines, such as math or language arts education, all arts education is funded based on the discretion of local school governing boards. Whether a school has arts education programming, whether the district hires arts educators and what those programs look like are ultimately up to who sits on school boards, which currently face intense scrutiny and attention from Republican and other conservative groups.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 28:

    Yes on Prop 28: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 28 are former Los Angeles Unified School District superintendent Austin Beutner, Fender Musical Instruments, and the California Teachers Association. As of August 1, the Yes on 28 committee has raised $7 million and spent $8 million since Jan. 1, 2022, although the committee also started the year with additional funds raised during the previous reporting period. Numerous notable artists have also come out in support of the measure, including Al Yankovich, Christina Aguilera, Dr. Dre, Jason Momoa, will.i.am, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

    No on Prop 28: There are not funders or endorsements in opposition of Proposition 28.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 28 includes:

    Proposition 28 does not require that a new tax be levied. Instead, it directs the state to set aside a portion of existing annual revenue to fund arts education in public schools.
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Proposition 29

  • Vote YES on Proposition 29 would help ensure that patients receive safe treatment in dialysis clinics under the care of a trained clinician.



    California’s dialysis treatment industry makes billions in revenue each year, yet a lack of onsite staffing requirements leaves patients vulnerable to complications during the treatment process. Proposition 29 would require each dialysis clinic to have at least one physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner onsite at the clinic during the hours that patients are treated. This proposition has appeared on the ballot twice before and was rejected by voters both times after dialysis clinics poured millions of dollars into defeating the measures.
     

    A YES vote on Proposition 29 means:


    Dialysis clinics would be required to have a physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner onsite during hours of treatment.
     

    A NO vote on Proposition 29 means:


    No changes would be made to current regulations regarding dialysis clinic staffing.
     

    More information:

    Proposition 29 requires each dialysis clinic to have, at its expense, at least one physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant onsite during all the hours that patients receive treatments at that clinic.
    Prop. 29 would require clinics to secure state approval before closing or reducing services, ensuring that patients do not abruptly lose access to treatment. The measure would also require that a clinic disclose information about physicians who own at least 5% of the clinic. There are about 650 dialysis clinics in California, and a vast majority of them are owned or operated by DaVita Inc. and Fresenius Medical Care, who enjoy about $3.5 billion annually in revenue from them. Prop. 29 would increase transparency and accountability in an industry that is dominated by these two large, wealthy corporations.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 29:


    Yes on Prop 29: The measure was placed on the ballot by Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare West. As of August 1, the primary ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 29, also sponsored by SEIU-UHW, has raised $7 million and has spent $7 million since Jan. 1, 2022. In addition, a separate SEIU-UHW committee supporting Prop. 29 has raised and spent $7 million since Jan. 1, 2022. Nota