• Alex Padilla

    Reelect US Senator Alex Padilla to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Sen. Alex Padilla’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of California and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Progressive endorsements: Sen. Padilla has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Giffords PAC, and many labor unions. He is also endorsed by a broad coalition of federal and local elected officials, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Karen Bass, Rep. Katie Porter, Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Rob Bonta, and many California mayors.

    Top issues: Voter protections, economic growth, police reform, immigration, environmental protections, education, consumer and worker protections, homelessness and housing, and water conservation.

    Priority bills: This year, Sen. Padilla’s priorities for California have included 50 bills about environmental and water protections, the economy, immigration, and child welfare. Of these, nearly all are currently in committee or referred to committee. In his brief time in the Senate, Sen. Padilla has signed on as a sponsor of the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and has been a strong supporter of President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda. He has also secured federal funding for housing, infrastructure, education, and employment projects in Southern California, and over $11 million for statewide health-care facilities and mental-health services.

    Committee leadership/membership: Sen. Padilla currently serves on five committees, including Judiciary, Budget, and Environment and Public Works. He serves as chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and Border Safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sen. Padilla was appointed to the Senate by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2021, which will make this his first general-election campaign for the seat. He was previously elected to serve as the California’s secretary of state in 2014, winning his 2018 reelection bid over Republican Mark Meuser by 29 points.

    Prior to his appointment, Sen. Padilla served Californians in several elected roles, including two terms each on the Los Angeles City Council, in the state Senate, and as the California secretary of state. Sen. Padilla is a longtime supporter of environmental justice, and credits his parents with introducing him to activism around this issue in the Los Angeles community where he was raised. Sen. Padilla has also been a longtime supporter of voting rights and democratic protections, which was the cornerstone of his work as secretary of state. In the Senate, he co-authored the Freedom to Vote Act, and was a strong supporter of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

    Other background: Sen. Padilla, a longtime public official, is from the San Fernando Valley. He grew up in a tough and underserved neighborhood of Los Angeles, and his public service was inspired by his community and his parents, who engaged him in the organizing process at a young age.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results to fill the last few months of the current term had ten candidates, and the results included incumbent Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 55%; Mark Meuser (R), 22%; James Bradley (R), 7%; and Jon Elist (R), 6%.

    The June 2022 results to seat the next full six-year term had 27 candidates, and the results included Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 54%; Mark Meuser (R), 15%; Cordie Williams (R), 7%; Jon Elist (R), 4%; Chuck Smith (R), 4%; James Bradley (R), 3%; and Douglas Howard Pierce (D), 2%.

    Sen. Alex Padilla and Mark Meuser will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election in both the current-term and next-term races.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sen. Padilla’s campaign has raised $10.6 million and is not funded by police interests. His problematic donors include Mortgage Bankers Association PAC, Google LLC, FedEx Corporation PAC, Edison International PAC, and Comcast Corporation. He has also received donations from defense contractors, including Employees of Northrop Grumman Corporation PAC and Lockheed Martin Employees’ PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Mark Meuser

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Meuser’s campaign has raised $495,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 331 million residents.

    Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 23% have no party preference. Democrats have held the lieutenant governor seat since 2011.

    District demographics: 39% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

    Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 24 points.
     

    The Position

    Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

    Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

    Alex Padilla

    Reelect US Senator Alex Padilla to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Sen. Alex Padilla’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of California and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Progressive endorsements: Sen. Padilla has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Giffords PAC, and many labor unions. He is also endorsed by a broad coalition of federal and local elected officials, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Karen Bass, Rep. Katie Porter, Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Rob Bonta, and many California mayors.

    Top issues: Voter protections, economic growth, police reform, immigration, environmental protections, education, consumer and worker protections, homelessness and housing, and water conservation.

    Priority bills: This year, Sen. Padilla’s priorities for California have included 50 bills about environmental and water protections, the economy, immigration, and child welfare. Of these, nearly all are currently in committee or referred to committee. In his brief time in the Senate, Sen. Padilla has signed on as a sponsor of the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and has been a strong supporter of President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda. He has also secured federal funding for housing, infrastructure, education, and employment projects in Southern California, and over $11 million for statewide health-care facilities and mental-health services.

    Committee leadership/membership: Sen. Padilla currently serves on five committees, including Judiciary, Budget, and Environment and Public Works. He serves as chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and Border Safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sen. Padilla was appointed to the Senate by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2021, which will make this his first general-election campaign for the seat. He was previously elected to serve as the California’s secretary of state in 2014, winning his 2018 reelection bid over Republican Mark Meuser by 29 points.

    Prior to his appointment, Sen. Padilla served Californians in several elected roles, including two terms each on the Los Angeles City Council, in the state Senate, and as the California secretary of state. Sen. Padilla is a longtime supporter of environmental justice, and credits his parents with introducing him to activism around this issue in the Los Angeles community where he was raised. Sen. Padilla has also been a longtime supporter of voting rights and democratic protections, which was the cornerstone of his work as secretary of state. In the Senate, he co-authored the Freedom to Vote Act, and was a strong supporter of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

    Other background: Sen. Padilla, a longtime public official, is from the San Fernando Valley. He grew up in a tough and underserved neighborhood of Los Angeles, and his public service was inspired by his community and his parents, who engaged him in the organizing process at a young age.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results to fill the last few months of the current term had ten candidates, and the results included incumbent Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 55%; Mark Meuser (R), 22%; James Bradley (R), 7%; and Jon Elist (R), 6%.

    The June 2022 results to seat the next full six-year term had 27 candidates, and the results included Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 54%; Mark Meuser (R), 15%; Cordie Williams (R), 7%; Jon Elist (R), 4%; Chuck Smith (R), 4%; James Bradley (R), 3%; and Douglas Howard Pierce (D), 2%.

    Sen. Alex Padilla and Mark Meuser will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election in both the current-term and next-term races.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sen. Padilla’s campaign has raised $10.6 million and is not funded by police interests. His problematic donors include Mortgage Bankers Association PAC, Google LLC, FedEx Corporation PAC, Edison International PAC, and Comcast Corporation. He has also received donations from defense contractors, including Employees of Northrop Grumman Corporation PAC and Lockheed Martin Employees’ PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Mark Meuser

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Meuser’s campaign has raised $495,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 331 million residents.

    Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 23% have no party preference. Democrats have held the lieutenant governor seat since 2011.

    District demographics: 39% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

    Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 24 points.
     

    The Position

    Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

    Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

    Alex Padilla

    Reelect US Senator Alex Padilla to keep California on the right track for progress.

    Sen. Alex Padilla’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of California and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse state.

    Progressive endorsements: Sen. Padilla has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Giffords PAC, and many labor unions. He is also endorsed by a broad coalition of federal and local elected officials, including Senator Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Karen Bass, Rep. Katie Porter, Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Rob Bonta, and many California mayors.

    Top issues: Voter protections, economic growth, police reform, immigration, environmental protections, education, consumer and worker protections, homelessness and housing, and water conservation.

    Priority bills: This year, Sen. Padilla’s priorities for California have included 50 bills about environmental and water protections, the economy, immigration, and child welfare. Of these, nearly all are currently in committee or referred to committee. In his brief time in the Senate, Sen. Padilla has signed on as a sponsor of the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and has been a strong supporter of President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda. He has also secured federal funding for housing, infrastructure, education, and employment projects in Southern California, and over $11 million for statewide health-care facilities and mental-health services.

    Committee leadership/membership: Sen. Padilla currently serves on five committees, including Judiciary, Budget, and Environment and Public Works. He serves as chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and Border Safety.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Sen. Padilla was appointed to the Senate by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2021, which will make this his first general-election campaign for the seat. He was previously elected to serve as the California’s secretary of state in 2014, winning his 2018 reelection bid over Republican Mark Meuser by 29 points.

    Prior to his appointment, Sen. Padilla served Californians in several elected roles, including two terms each on the Los Angeles City Council, in the state Senate, and as the California secretary of state. Sen. Padilla is a longtime supporter of environmental justice, and credits his parents with introducing him to activism around this issue in the Los Angeles community where he was raised. Sen. Padilla has also been a longtime supporter of voting rights and democratic protections, which was the cornerstone of his work as secretary of state. In the Senate, he co-authored the Freedom to Vote Act, and was a strong supporter of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

    Other background: Sen. Padilla, a longtime public official, is from the San Fernando Valley. He grew up in a tough and underserved neighborhood of Los Angeles, and his public service was inspired by his community and his parents, who engaged him in the organizing process at a young age.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results to fill the last few months of the current term had ten candidates, and the results included incumbent Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 55%; Mark Meuser (R), 22%; James Bradley (R), 7%; and Jon Elist (R), 6%.

    The June 2022 results to seat the next full six-year term had 27 candidates, and the results included Sen. Alex Padilla (D), 54%; Mark Meuser (R), 15%; Cordie Williams (R), 7%; Jon Elist (R), 4%; Chuck Smith (R), 4%; James Bradley (R), 3%; and Douglas Howard Pierce (D), 2%.

    Sen. Alex Padilla and Mark Meuser will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election in both the current-term and next-term races.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Sen. Padilla’s campaign has raised $10.6 million and is not funded by police interests. His problematic donors include Mortgage Bankers Association PAC, Google LLC, FedEx Corporation PAC, Edison International PAC, and Comcast Corporation. He has also received donations from defense contractors, including Employees of Northrop Grumman Corporation PAC and Lockheed Martin Employees’ PAC.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Mark Meuser

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Meuser’s campaign has raised $495,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 331 million residents.

    Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 23% have no party preference. Democrats have held the lieutenant governor seat since 2011.

    District demographics: 39% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

    Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 24 points.
     

    The Position

    Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

    Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Nikki Pérez

    Elect Nikki Pérez for City Council to put Burbank on the right track for progress.

    Nikki Pérez’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of the city council and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Nikki Pérez

    Elect Nikki Pérez for City Council to put Burbank on the right track for progress.

    Nikki Pérez’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of the city council and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Nikki Pérez

    Elect Nikki Pérez for City Council to put Burbank on the right track for progress.

    Nikki Pérez’s policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of the city council and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Rex Richardson

    Elect Vice Mayor Rex Richardson for mayor to keep Long Beach on the right track for progress.

    Rex Richardson

    Elect Vice Mayor Rex Richardson for mayor to keep Long Beach on the right track for progress.

    Rex Richardson

    Elect Vice Mayor Rex Richardson for mayor to keep Long Beach on the right track for progress.

  • Faisal Gill

    Elect Faisal Gill to put the city of Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Faisal Gill’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Los Angeles and will work effectively for the best interests of this diverse city.

    Faisal Gill

    Elect Faisal Gill to put the city of Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Faisal Gill’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Los Angeles and will work effectively for the best interests of this diverse city.

    Faisal Gill

    Elect Faisal Gill to put the city of Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Faisal Gill’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Los Angeles and will work effectively for the best interests of this diverse city.

  • Kenneth Mejia

    Elect Kenneth Mejia for LA city controller to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Kenneth Mejia

    Elect Kenneth Mejia for LA city controller to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Kenneth Mejia

    Elect Kenneth Mejia for LA city controller to put Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

  • Karen Bass

    Courage California endorses Karen Bass for LA mayor to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Karen Bass

    Courage California endorses Karen Bass for LA mayor to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Karen Bass

    Courage California endorses Karen Bass for LA mayor to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Nelly Nieblas

    Elect Nelly Nieblas to put the Montebello Unified School District on the right track for progress. 

    Nelly Nieblas

    Elect Nelly Nieblas to put the Montebello Unified School District on the right track for progress. 

    Nelly Nieblas

    Elect Nelly Nieblas to put the Montebello Unified School District on the right track for progress. 

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

  • Caroline Menjivar

    Elect Caroline Menjivar to put SD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Caroline Menjivar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of SD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Caroline Menjivar

    Elect Caroline Menjivar to put SD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Caroline Menjivar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of SD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Caroline Menjivar

    Elect Caroline Menjivar to put SD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Caroline Menjivar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of SD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Ben Allen

    Reelect State Senate Representative Ben Allen to keep SD-24 on the right track for progress.

    Ben Allen

    Reelect State Senate Representative Ben Allen to keep SD-24 on the right track for progress.

    Ben Allen

    Reelect State Senate Representative Ben Allen to keep SD-24 on the right track for progress.

  • Bob Archuleta

    Reelect State Senate Representative Archuleta to keep SD-30 on the right track for progress. 

    Bob Archuleta

    Reelect State Senate Representative Archuleta to keep SD-30 on the right track for progress. 

    Bob Archuleta

    Reelect State Senate Representative Archuleta to keep SD-30 on the right track for progress. 

  • Democrat

    Tom Umberg

  • Tom Umberg

    Reelect State Senate Representative Tom Umberg to keep SD-34 on the right track for progress.

    Tom Umberg

    Reelect State Senate Representative Tom Umberg to keep SD-34 on the right track for progress.

    Tom Umberg

    Reelect State Senate Representative Tom Umberg to keep SD-34 on the right track for progress.

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

No Recommendation

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 34th

The two Republican incumbent candidates running have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

Endorsements: Assm. Tom Lackey has no progressive endorsements. He has endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the California Organization of Highway Patrolmen and the California Police Chiefs Association. Assm. Thurston Smith has no progressive endorsements. He has endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Employees' Benefit Association and the Riverside Sheriff's Association (RSA).

Key initiatives: Assm. Lackey has successfully gotten legislation passed to help rural areas by creating a voluntary tax fund to fund resource centers who contract with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline as a member of the assembly. He scores a Lifetime CS of 4 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

Assm. Smith has successfully gotten legislation passed to increase penalties for unlicensed cultivation of cannabis and to incentivize compliance with state law as a member of the Assembly. He scores a CS of 0 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Lackey has served in Assembly District 36 seat since 2014, when he was elected with 60% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a challenger by 10 points. Prior to his election to the assembly, Assm. Lackey was a Palmdale Elementary School Board trustee and later, city councilmember. He has been a longtime supporter of “marijuana safety.”

Assm. Smith has served in Assembly District 33 since 2020, when he was elected with 55% of the vote. Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Smith was a businessman who owned a concrete company and later served on the Hesperia City Council. He has been a longtime supporter of law-enforcement efforts on crime.

Other background: Assm. Lackey is from Brown.

Assm. Smith is from Hesperia.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Smith (R), 31%; Lackey (R), 30%; and Rita Ramirez (D), 27%. Lackey and Smith will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Lackey’s campaign has raised $521,942 and is funded by fossil fuel money, police money, corporate PACs, and real estate money.

Assm. Smith’s campaign has raised $428,266 and is funded by fossil fuel money, police money, corporate PACs, and real estate money.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 34th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Kern Counties.

Voter registration: 32% Democrat, 39% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. This is a new district consisting of the Republican parts of AD33 and AD36. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-34 is 7% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 28% Latino, 4% Asian, and 9% Black.

Recent election results: AD-34 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 11 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 24 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 34th

The two Republican incumbent candidates running have distinct visions for the district. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

Endorsements: Assm. Tom Lackey has no progressive endorsements. He has endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the California Organization of Highway Patrolmen and the California Police Chiefs Association. Assm. Thurston Smith has no progressive endorsements. He has endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Employees' Benefit Association and the Riverside Sheriff's Association (RSA).

Key initiatives: Assm. Lackey has successfully gotten legislation passed to help rural areas by creating a voluntary tax fund to fund resource centers who contract with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline as a member of the assembly. He scores a Lifetime CS of 4 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

Assm. Smith has successfully gotten legislation passed to increase penalties for unlicensed cultivation of cannabis and to incentivize compliance with state law as a member of the Assembly. He scores a CS of 0 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Lackey has served in Assembly District 36 seat since 2014, when he was elected with 60% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a challenger by 10 points. Prior to his election to the assembly, Assm. Lackey was a Palmdale Elementary School Board trustee and later, city councilmember. He has been a longtime supporter of “marijuana safety.”

Assm. Smith has served in Assembly District 33 since 2020, when he was elected with 55% of the vote. Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Smith was a businessman who owned a concrete company and later served on the Hesperia City Council. He has been a longtime supporter of law-enforcement efforts on crime.

Other background: Assm. Lackey is from Brown.

Assm. Smith is from Hesperia.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Smith (R), 31%; Lackey (R), 30%; and Rita Ramirez (D), 27%. Lackey and Smith will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Lackey’s campaign has raised $521,942 and is funded by fossil fuel money, police money, corporate PACs, and real estate money.

Assm. Smith’s campaign has raised $428,266 and is funded by fossil fuel money, police money, corporate PACs, and real estate money.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 34th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Kern Counties.

Voter registration: 32% Democrat, 39% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. This is a new district consisting of the Republican parts of AD33 and AD36. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-34 is 7% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 28% Latino, 4% Asian, and 9% Black.

Recent election results: AD-34 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 11 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 24 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Juan Carrillo

    Elect Juan Carrillo for State Assembly to put AD-39 on the right track for progress.

    Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-39 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Carillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including the California Teachers’ Association, High Desert Progressive Democrats, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Equality California, SEIU CA. He is also endorsed by elected officials and leaders, including civil rights leader Dolores Huerta, State Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assemblymember Robert Rivas.

    Electoral history: Carrillo ran for city council of Palmdale and won a seat against ten other candidates.

    Top issues: Protecting against COVID-19, fighting for worker equity, and housing.

    Priority bills: As a city councilmember, he has been a strong supporter of bills to promote greater equity in the community in housing and health care.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Carrillo is a city councilmember, which he does because he wants to make college and housing a reality. He has accomplished a plan for $5,000 rental assistance aid in the city and has been a longtime supporter of expanding access to health care.

    Other background: Carrillo, a former city planner, is from Guadalajara Jalisco, Mexico. He attended an ESL program when he was 15.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Juan Carrillo (D), 30%; Paul Marsh (R), 38.1%; and Andrea Rosenthal (D), 21.7%. Carrillo and Marsh will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Carrillo’s campaign has raised $381,519 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Paul Marsh

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Marsh’s campaign has raised $3,500 in two contributions.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 47.4% Democrat, 21.7% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. No incumbent resided within this new district, which is a safe Democratic district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-39 is 13% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 50.3% Latino, 3.5% Asian, and 17% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-39 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 9.8 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 21.22 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Juan Carrillo

    Elect Juan Carrillo for State Assembly to put AD-39 on the right track for progress.

    Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-39 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Carillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including the California Teachers’ Association, High Desert Progressive Democrats, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Equality California, SEIU CA. He is also endorsed by elected officials and leaders, including civil rights leader Dolores Huerta, State Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assemblymember Robert Rivas.

    Electoral history: Carrillo ran for city council of Palmdale and won a seat against ten other candidates.

    Top issues: Protecting against COVID-19, fighting for worker equity, and housing.

    Priority bills: As a city councilmember, he has been a strong supporter of bills to promote greater equity in the community in housing and health care.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Carrillo is a city councilmember, which he does because he wants to make college and housing a reality. He has accomplished a plan for $5,000 rental assistance aid in the city and has been a longtime supporter of expanding access to health care.

    Other background: Carrillo, a former city planner, is from Guadalajara Jalisco, Mexico. He attended an ESL program when he was 15.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Juan Carrillo (D), 30%; Paul Marsh (R), 38.1%; and Andrea Rosenthal (D), 21.7%. Carrillo and Marsh will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Carrillo’s campaign has raised $381,519 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Paul Marsh

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Marsh’s campaign has raised $3,500 in two contributions.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 47.4% Democrat, 21.7% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. No incumbent resided within this new district, which is a safe Democratic district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-39 is 13% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 50.3% Latino, 3.5% Asian, and 17% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-39 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 9.8 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 21.22 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Juan Carrillo

    Elect Juan Carrillo for State Assembly to put AD-39 on the right track for progress.

    Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-39 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Carillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including the California Teachers’ Association, High Desert Progressive Democrats, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Equality California, SEIU CA. He is also endorsed by elected officials and leaders, including civil rights leader Dolores Huerta, State Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assemblymember Robert Rivas.

    Electoral history: Carrillo ran for city council of Palmdale and won a seat against ten other candidates.

    Top issues: Protecting against COVID-19, fighting for worker equity, and housing.

    Priority bills: As a city councilmember, he has been a strong supporter of bills to promote greater equity in the community in housing and health care.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Carrillo is a city councilmember, which he does because he wants to make college and housing a reality. He has accomplished a plan for $5,000 rental assistance aid in the city and has been a longtime supporter of expanding access to health care.

    Other background: Carrillo, a former city planner, is from Guadalajara Jalisco, Mexico. He attended an ESL program when he was 15.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Juan Carrillo (D), 30%; Paul Marsh (R), 38.1%; and Andrea Rosenthal (D), 21.7%. Carrillo and Marsh will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Carrillo’s campaign has raised $381,519 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Paul Marsh

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Marsh’s campaign has raised $3,500 in two contributions.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 47.4% Democrat, 21.7% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. No incumbent resided within this new district, which is a safe Democratic district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-39 is 13% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 50.3% Latino, 3.5% Asian, and 17% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-39 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 9.8 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 21.22 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Pilar Schiavo

    Courage California endorses Pilar Schiavo for State Assembly to put AD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Pilar Schiavo’s policy positions and organizing experience demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including AFSCME California, UNITE HERE!, California Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. She has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, Board of Equalization member Malia Cohen, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Schiavo has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: Schiavo has long been involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the California Nurses Association (CNA), she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good-paying job. She also has extensive experience in organizations outside her district, including organizing for Healthy California Now and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. Schiavo co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Other background: Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares (R), 47%; Pilar Schiavo (D), 34%; and Annie Cho (D), 19%. Pilar Schiavo and Suzette Martinez Valladares will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Shiavo’s campaign has raised $754,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Martinez Valladares’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. Her problematic donors include Chevron Policy Government and Public Affairs, California Real Estate PAC, California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC, and AT&T Services Inc.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Republicans held this district until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 8% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Pilar Schiavo

    Courage California endorses Pilar Schiavo for State Assembly to put AD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Pilar Schiavo’s policy positions and organizing experience demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including AFSCME California, UNITE HERE!, California Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. She has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, Board of Equalization member Malia Cohen, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Schiavo has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: Schiavo has long been involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the California Nurses Association (CNA), she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good-paying job. She also has extensive experience in organizations outside her district, including organizing for Healthy California Now and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. Schiavo co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Other background: Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares (R), 47%; Pilar Schiavo (D), 34%; and Annie Cho (D), 19%. Pilar Schiavo and Suzette Martinez Valladares will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Shiavo’s campaign has raised $754,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Martinez Valladares’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. Her problematic donors include Chevron Policy Government and Public Affairs, California Real Estate PAC, California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC, and AT&T Services Inc.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Republicans held this district until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 8% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Pilar Schiavo

    Courage California endorses Pilar Schiavo for State Assembly to put AD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Pilar Schiavo’s policy positions and organizing experience demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including AFSCME California, UNITE HERE!, California Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. She has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, Board of Equalization member Malia Cohen, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Schiavo has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: Schiavo has long been involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the California Nurses Association (CNA), she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good-paying job. She also has extensive experience in organizations outside her district, including organizing for Healthy California Now and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. Schiavo co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Other background: Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares (R), 47%; Pilar Schiavo (D), 34%; and Annie Cho (D), 19%. Pilar Schiavo and Suzette Martinez Valladares will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Shiavo’s campaign has raised $754,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Martinez Valladares’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. Her problematic donors include Chevron Policy Government and Public Affairs, California Real Estate PAC, California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC, and AT&T Services Inc.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Republicans held this district until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 8% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Chris Holden

    Reelect Assemblymember Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Holden’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Holden has the endorsement of some labor unions, including SEIU CA and California Labor Federation.

    Top issues: Transportation, health care, and prison reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Holden’s priorities for AD-41 have included 43 bills about health care and health-care facilities, prison confinement, and victims’ compensation. Of these, 26 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored legislation on safer drinking water, the reporting of excessive-force violations, and other bills. He scores a Lifetime CS of 94 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Holden currently sits on four standing committees, including chairing the Appropriations Committee, as well as co-chairing the Select Committee on Corporate Board and California Workplace Diversity and chairing the Select Committee on Regional Transportation Solutions.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Holden has served in this assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with 58% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 31 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Holden was a mayor and city council member in Pasadena. Assm. Holden has been a longtime supporter of efforts to fight wildfires and foster environmental justice.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chris Holden (D), 96.7%; and Michael McMahon (R), 3.3%. McMahon was a write-in. Holden and McMahon will compete in the November 8 run-off election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Holden’s campaign has raised $1,000,275 and has some problematic funders, like California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, California Real Estate PAC, and some other corporate PACs.

    Opponent: Michael McMahon

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: The McMahon campaign has not filed any fundraising disclosures with the secretary of state’s office for this race.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 41st Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 28% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-41 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 26% Latino, 13% Asian, and 8% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-41 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 33 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 17 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Chris Holden

    Reelect Assemblymember Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Holden’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Holden has the endorsement of some labor unions, including SEIU CA and California Labor Federation.

    Top issues: Transportation, health care, and prison reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Holden’s priorities for AD-41 have included 43 bills about health care and health-care facilities, prison confinement, and victims’ compensation. Of these, 26 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored legislation on safer drinking water, the reporting of excessive-force violations, and other bills. He scores a Lifetime CS of 94 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Holden currently sits on four standing committees, including chairing the Appropriations Committee, as well as co-chairing the Select Committee on Corporate Board and California Workplace Diversity and chairing the Select Committee on Regional Transportation Solutions.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Holden has served in this assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with 58% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 31 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Holden was a mayor and city council member in Pasadena. Assm. Holden has been a longtime supporter of efforts to fight wildfires and foster environmental justice.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chris Holden (D), 96.7%; and Michael McMahon (R), 3.3%. McMahon was a write-in. Holden and McMahon will compete in the November 8 run-off election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Holden’s campaign has raised $1,000,275 and has some problematic funders, like California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, California Real Estate PAC, and some other corporate PACs.

    Opponent: Michael McMahon

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: The McMahon campaign has not filed any fundraising disclosures with the secretary of state’s office for this race.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 41st Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 28% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-41 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 26% Latino, 13% Asian, and 8% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-41 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 33 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 17 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Chris Holden

    Reelect Assemblymember Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Holden’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Holden has the endorsement of some labor unions, including SEIU CA and California Labor Federation.

    Top issues: Transportation, health care, and prison reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Holden’s priorities for AD-41 have included 43 bills about health care and health-care facilities, prison confinement, and victims’ compensation. Of these, 26 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored legislation on safer drinking water, the reporting of excessive-force violations, and other bills. He scores a Lifetime CS of 94 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Holden currently sits on four standing committees, including chairing the Appropriations Committee, as well as co-chairing the Select Committee on Corporate Board and California Workplace Diversity and chairing the Select Committee on Regional Transportation Solutions.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Holden has served in this assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with 58% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 31 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Holden was a mayor and city council member in Pasadena. Assm. Holden has been a longtime supporter of efforts to fight wildfires and foster environmental justice.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Chris Holden (D), 96.7%; and Michael McMahon (R), 3.3%. McMahon was a write-in. Holden and McMahon will compete in the November 8 run-off election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Holden’s campaign has raised $1,000,275 and has some problematic funders, like California Correctional Peace Officers Association PAC, California Real Estate PAC, and some other corporate PACs.

    Opponent: Michael McMahon

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: The McMahon campaign has not filed any fundraising disclosures with the secretary of state’s office for this race.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 41st Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 28% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-41 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 26% Latino, 13% Asian, and 8% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-41 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 33 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 17 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Jacqui Irwin

    Reelect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Jacqui Irwin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-42. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the Assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Progressive Endorsements: Assm. Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and California Labor Federation. She has also received the endorsement of many state and local elected officials, including Senator Alex Padilla, State Senator Henry Stern, and Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis. However, she is also endorsed and funded by many police leaders and organizations, including California Correctional Peace Officers’ Association, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Ventura County Deputy Sheriffs Association. She is the recipient of campaign donations from many problematic donors across industries, including Sempra Energy, PG&E Corporation, Facebook, California Real Estate PAC, and Fox Corporation.

    Top issues: Technology and information security, pandemic recovery, economic growth, public health and health care, and STEM education.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for her current district, AD-44, have included 47 bills about health care, technology and information security, and education. Of these, twelve have been chaptered into law, eleven are enrolled, seven have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee. Assm. Irwin scores a Lifetime CS of 47 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, she failed to vote on reductions to youth probation, a retroactive implementation of the California Racial Justice Act of 2020, and limitations on law-enforcement agencies acquiring military equipment. She also voted against several criminal-justice reform bills, including those to seal criminal records for individuals who have completed sentences, repealing loitering laws to reduce the harassment of sex workers, and removing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug crimes.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Irwin currently serves on five standing committees, including as chair of Revenue and Taxation. She also serves as chair of the Select Committee on Cybersecurity.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 22 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin, an engineer and a public official, has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), 56%; Lori Mills (R), 29%; and Ted Nordblum (R), 15%. Assm. Jacqui Irwin and Lori Mills will contend in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $899,000 and has received donations from many problematic organizations, including those in the police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate industries.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Lori Mills

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Mills’s campaign has raised $81,000 and is funded by real estate interests.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 41% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans and Independents typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-42 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by ten points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Jacqui Irwin

    Reelect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Jacqui Irwin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-42. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the Assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Progressive Endorsements: Assm. Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and California Labor Federation. She has also received the endorsement of many state and local elected officials, including Senator Alex Padilla, State Senator Henry Stern, and Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis. However, she is also endorsed and funded by many police leaders and organizations, including California Correctional Peace Officers’ Association, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Ventura County Deputy Sheriffs Association. She is the recipient of campaign donations from many problematic donors across industries, including Sempra Energy, PG&E Corporation, Facebook, California Real Estate PAC, and Fox Corporation.

    Top issues: Technology and information security, pandemic recovery, economic growth, public health and health care, and STEM education.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for her current district, AD-44, have included 47 bills about health care, technology and information security, and education. Of these, twelve have been chaptered into law, eleven are enrolled, seven have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee. Assm. Irwin scores a Lifetime CS of 47 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, she failed to vote on reductions to youth probation, a retroactive implementation of the California Racial Justice Act of 2020, and limitations on law-enforcement agencies acquiring military equipment. She also voted against several criminal-justice reform bills, including those to seal criminal records for individuals who have completed sentences, repealing loitering laws to reduce the harassment of sex workers, and removing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug crimes.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Irwin currently serves on five standing committees, including as chair of Revenue and Taxation. She also serves as chair of the Select Committee on Cybersecurity.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 22 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin, an engineer and a public official, has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), 56%; Lori Mills (R), 29%; and Ted Nordblum (R), 15%. Assm. Jacqui Irwin and Lori Mills will contend in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $899,000 and has received donations from many problematic organizations, including those in the police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate industries.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Lori Mills

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Mills’s campaign has raised $81,000 and is funded by real estate interests.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 41% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans and Independents typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-42 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by ten points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Jacqui Irwin

    Reelect Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-42 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Jacqui Irwin’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative leader for the constituents of AD-42. While she has opposed some significant progressive legislation during her time in the Assembly, our analysis shows that she will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district if she is subject to increased community accountability.

    Progressive Endorsements: Assm. Irwin has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and California Labor Federation. She has also received the endorsement of many state and local elected officials, including Senator Alex Padilla, State Senator Henry Stern, and Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis. However, she is also endorsed and funded by many police leaders and organizations, including California Correctional Peace Officers’ Association, Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Ventura County Deputy Sheriffs Association. She is the recipient of campaign donations from many problematic donors across industries, including Sempra Energy, PG&E Corporation, Facebook, California Real Estate PAC, and Fox Corporation.

    Top issues: Technology and information security, pandemic recovery, economic growth, public health and health care, and STEM education.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Irwin’s priorities for her current district, AD-44, have included 47 bills about health care, technology and information security, and education. Of these, twelve have been chaptered into law, eleven are enrolled, seven have died, and the majority of the others remain in committee. Assm. Irwin scores a Lifetime CS of 47 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Irwin has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. This term, she failed to vote on reductions to youth probation, a retroactive implementation of the California Racial Justice Act of 2020, and limitations on law-enforcement agencies acquiring military equipment. She also voted against several criminal-justice reform bills, including those to seal criminal records for individuals who have completed sentences, repealing loitering laws to reduce the harassment of sex workers, and removing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug crimes.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Irwin currently serves on five standing committees, including as chair of Revenue and Taxation. She also serves as chair of the Select Committee on Cybersecurity.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Irwin has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 22 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Irwin spent ten years on the Thousand Oaks City Council, including two terms as mayor. In this local role, she worked for increased public safety and the preservation of open lands. She started her career in engineering, and has championed Assembly bills centered on the expansion of STEM education centers and improved cybersecurity policies.

    Other background: Assm. Irwin, an engineer and a public official, has lived in Thousand Oaks for 20 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Jacqui Irwin (D), 56%; Lori Mills (R), 29%; and Ted Nordblum (R), 15%. Assm. Jacqui Irwin and Lori Mills will contend in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Irwin’s campaign has raised $899,000 and has received donations from many problematic organizations, including those in the police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate industries.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Lori Mills

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Mills’s campaign has raised $81,000 and is funded by real estate interests.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 42nd Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 41% Democrat, 30% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans and Independents typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-42 is 5% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 9% Asian, and 2% Black

    Recent election results: AD-42 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by ten points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Luz Rivas

    Reelect Assemblymember Luz Rivas to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Luz Rivas’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rivas has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, Sierra Club, and Equality California. However, she has received financial support from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Edison International, Amazon, and AT&T.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, STEM education, environmental and water protections, and transportation.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rivas’s priorities for her current district, AD-39, have included 43 bills about homelessness and housing, early childhood and post-secondary education, and transportation. Of these, 17 have been chaptered into law, five have died, and the rest remain in committee. Notably, she authored AB 71, which seeks to establish a permanent source of funding for long-term solutions to homelessness in California through a state taxation adjustment. This bill has not yet passed the Assembly and the Senate, but is demonstrative of her innovative approach to resolving social issues. She scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rivas has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Rivas currently serves on six standing committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources committee and chair of the Select Committee on the Non-Profit Sector.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rivas has served in the assembly since 2018, when she was elected with over 77% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by 48 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rivas spent her early career as an electrical engineer, where she developed a strong interest in early STEM education. She completed a master of education program before, in 2011, founding DIY Girls, which is a nonprofit organization that partners with local schools to expose girls to STEM programming. Before winning election to the Assembly in 2018, she served as Public Works Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles.

    Other background: Assm. Rivas is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Luz Rivas (D), 98%; and Siaka Massaquoi (W/I), 2%. Incumbent Assm. Luz Rivas and Siaka Massaquoi will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rivas’s campaign has raised $605,000 and is not funded by police interests. She has received donations from real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests, including Tesla Inc., California Real Estate PAC, Google, Meta Platforms Inc., and SoCAL Edison.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Siaka Massaquoi

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Massaquoi’s campaign has raised $10,000 and is primarily funded by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 25% Republican, and 13% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-43 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 56 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Luz Rivas

    Reelect Assemblymember Luz Rivas to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Luz Rivas’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rivas has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, Sierra Club, and Equality California. However, she has received financial support from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Edison International, Amazon, and AT&T.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, STEM education, environmental and water protections, and transportation.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rivas’s priorities for her current district, AD-39, have included 43 bills about homelessness and housing, early childhood and post-secondary education, and transportation. Of these, 17 have been chaptered into law, five have died, and the rest remain in committee. Notably, she authored AB 71, which seeks to establish a permanent source of funding for long-term solutions to homelessness in California through a state taxation adjustment. This bill has not yet passed the Assembly and the Senate, but is demonstrative of her innovative approach to resolving social issues. She scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rivas has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Rivas currently serves on six standing committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources committee and chair of the Select Committee on the Non-Profit Sector.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rivas has served in the assembly since 2018, when she was elected with over 77% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by 48 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rivas spent her early career as an electrical engineer, where she developed a strong interest in early STEM education. She completed a master of education program before, in 2011, founding DIY Girls, which is a nonprofit organization that partners with local schools to expose girls to STEM programming. Before winning election to the Assembly in 2018, she served as Public Works Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles.

    Other background: Assm. Rivas is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Luz Rivas (D), 98%; and Siaka Massaquoi (W/I), 2%. Incumbent Assm. Luz Rivas and Siaka Massaquoi will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rivas’s campaign has raised $605,000 and is not funded by police interests. She has received donations from real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests, including Tesla Inc., California Real Estate PAC, Google, Meta Platforms Inc., and SoCAL Edison.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Siaka Massaquoi

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Massaquoi’s campaign has raised $10,000 and is primarily funded by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 25% Republican, and 13% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-43 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 56 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Luz Rivas

    Reelect Assemblymember Luz Rivas to keep AD-43 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Luz Rivas’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-43 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rivas has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, Sierra Club, and Equality California. However, she has received financial support from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Edison International, Amazon, and AT&T.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, STEM education, environmental and water protections, and transportation.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rivas’s priorities for her current district, AD-39, have included 43 bills about homelessness and housing, early childhood and post-secondary education, and transportation. Of these, 17 have been chaptered into law, five have died, and the rest remain in committee. Notably, she authored AB 71, which seeks to establish a permanent source of funding for long-term solutions to homelessness in California through a state taxation adjustment. This bill has not yet passed the Assembly and the Senate, but is demonstrative of her innovative approach to resolving social issues. She scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rivas has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Rivas currently serves on six standing committees, and is chair of the Natural Resources committee and chair of the Select Committee on the Non-Profit Sector.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rivas has served in the assembly since 2018, when she was elected with over 77% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by 48 points.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rivas spent her early career as an electrical engineer, where she developed a strong interest in early STEM education. She completed a master of education program before, in 2011, founding DIY Girls, which is a nonprofit organization that partners with local schools to expose girls to STEM programming. Before winning election to the Assembly in 2018, she served as Public Works Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles.

    Other background: Assm. Rivas is a lifelong resident of the San Fernando Valley.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Luz Rivas (D), 98%; and Siaka Massaquoi (W/I), 2%. Incumbent Assm. Luz Rivas and Siaka Massaquoi will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rivas’s campaign has raised $605,000 and is not funded by police interests. She has received donations from real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel interests, including Tesla Inc., California Real Estate PAC, Google, Meta Platforms Inc., and SoCAL Edison.

    Opposing candidate: Independent Siaka Massaquoi

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Massaquoi’s campaign has raised $10,000 and is primarily funded by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 56% Democrat, 25% Republican, and 13% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-43 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 64% Latino, 9% Asian, and 5% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-43 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 50 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 56 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Laura Friedman

    Reelect Assemblymember Friedman to keep AD-44 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Friedman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Friedman has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including SEIU California, Emily’s List, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and others.

    Top issues: Housing, health care, environment, and working families.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Friedman’s priorities for AD-44 have included 40 bills about firearm safety, wildfires, and housing and development. Of these, 19 have been chaptered into law. She has sponsored and passed legislation to encourage property owners to build accessory dwellings on their property. She scores a Lifetime CS of 99 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Friedman has also supported a bill to remove critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Friedman currently serves on five standing committees, two subcommittees, and twelve subcommittees, including chairing the Transportation Committee, the Sexual Harassment Prevention and Response Subcommittee, and the Select Committee on Urban Development to Combat Climate Change.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Friedman has served in this assembly seat since 2016, when she was elected with 29% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Friedman was a member of the Glendale City Council. Assm. Friedman has been a longtime supporter of health care and environmental justice.

    Other background: Assm. Friedman, a former vice president of development at a film production company, is from South Florida. She also served a term as the mayor of Glendale.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Friedman (D), 73.2%; and Barry Jacobsen (R), 26.8%. Friedman and Jacobsen will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Friedman’s campaign has raised $662,414.40 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Barry Jacobsen

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Jacobsen’s fundraising is not available this cycle.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 50% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2014. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-44 is 2% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 42 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Laura Friedman

    Reelect Assemblymember Friedman to keep AD-44 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Friedman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Friedman has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including SEIU California, Emily’s List, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and others.

    Top issues: Housing, health care, environment, and working families.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Friedman’s priorities for AD-44 have included 40 bills about firearm safety, wildfires, and housing and development. Of these, 19 have been chaptered into law. She has sponsored and passed legislation to encourage property owners to build accessory dwellings on their property. She scores a Lifetime CS of 99 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Friedman has also supported a bill to remove critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Friedman currently serves on five standing committees, two subcommittees, and twelve subcommittees, including chairing the Transportation Committee, the Sexual Harassment Prevention and Response Subcommittee, and the Select Committee on Urban Development to Combat Climate Change.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Friedman has served in this assembly seat since 2016, when she was elected with 29% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Friedman was a member of the Glendale City Council. Assm. Friedman has been a longtime supporter of health care and environmental justice.

    Other background: Assm. Friedman, a former vice president of development at a film production company, is from South Florida. She also served a term as the mayor of Glendale.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Friedman (D), 73.2%; and Barry Jacobsen (R), 26.8%. Friedman and Jacobsen will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Friedman’s campaign has raised $662,414.40 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Barry Jacobsen

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Jacobsen’s fundraising is not available this cycle.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 50% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2014. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-44 is 2% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 42 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Laura Friedman

    Reelect Assemblymember Friedman to keep AD-44 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Friedman’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-44 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Friedman has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including SEIU California, Emily’s List, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and others.

    Top issues: Housing, health care, environment, and working families.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Friedman’s priorities for AD-44 have included 40 bills about firearm safety, wildfires, and housing and development. Of these, 19 have been chaptered into law. She has sponsored and passed legislation to encourage property owners to build accessory dwellings on their property. She scores a Lifetime CS of 99 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Friedman has also supported a bill to remove critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Friedman currently serves on five standing committees, two subcommittees, and twelve subcommittees, including chairing the Transportation Committee, the Sexual Harassment Prevention and Response Subcommittee, and the Select Committee on Urban Development to Combat Climate Change.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Friedman has served in this assembly seat since 2016, when she was elected with 29% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 30 points.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Friedman was a member of the Glendale City Council. Assm. Friedman has been a longtime supporter of health care and environmental justice.

    Other background: Assm. Friedman, a former vice president of development at a film production company, is from South Florida. She also served a term as the mayor of Glendale.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Friedman (D), 73.2%; and Barry Jacobsen (R), 26.8%. Friedman and Jacobsen will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Friedman’s campaign has raised $662,414.40 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Barry Jacobsen

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Jacobsen’s fundraising is not available this cycle.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 50% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2014. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-44 is 2% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 18% Latino, 11% Asian, and 5% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-44 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 38 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 42 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Jesse Gabriel

    Reelect Assemblymember Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Sierra Club California, California Labor Federation, and Planned Parenthood.

    Top issues: Police officer training, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 54 bills about pandemic relief, wildfires, and homelessness. Of these, 21 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to make social media more transparent, and to require violence-prevention services to be covered by insurance. He scores a Lifetime CS of 84 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has not supported the repeal of sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently serves on five standing committees and four select committees, including chairing the Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee and the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he was elected with 70% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 33 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, a former lawyer for the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Jesse Gabriel (D), 67%; and Dana Caruso (R), 33%. Gabriel and Caruso will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $1,045,320.79 and is not funded by fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Dana Caruso

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Caruso’s fundraising is not available.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2012. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-46 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 35 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 40 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

    Jesse Gabriel

    Reelect Assemblymember Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Sierra Club California, California Labor Federation, and Planned Parenthood.

    Top issues: Police officer training, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 54 bills about pandemic relief, wildfires, and homelessness. Of these, 21 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to make social media more transparent, and to require violence-prevention services to be covered by insurance. He scores a Lifetime CS of 84 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has not supported the repeal of sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently serves on five standing committees and four select committees, including chairing the Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee and the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he was elected with 70% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 33 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, a former lawyer for the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Jesse Gabriel (D), 67%; and Dana Caruso (R), 33%. Gabriel and Caruso will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $1,045,320.79 and is not funded by fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Dana Caruso

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Caruso’s fundraising is not available.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2012. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-46 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 35 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 40 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

    Jesse Gabriel

    Reelect Assemblymember Gabriel to keep AD-46 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Gabriel’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-46 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Gabriel has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Sierra Club California, California Labor Federation, and Planned Parenthood.

    Top issues: Police officer training, voting rights, and housing.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Gabriel’s priorities for AD-46 have included 54 bills about pandemic relief, wildfires, and homelessness. Of these, 21 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to make social media more transparent, and to require violence-prevention services to be covered by insurance. He scores a Lifetime CS of 84 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gabriel has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Gabriel has not supported the repeal of sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Gabriel currently serves on five standing committees and four select committees, including chairing the Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee and the Select Committee on Jobs and Innovation in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Gabriel has served in this assembly seat since 2018, when he was elected with 70% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 33 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Gabriel was counselor to former US Senator Evan Bayh. Assm. Gabriel has been a longtime supporter of expanding legal services to low-income Californians.

    Other background: Assm. Gabriel, a former lawyer for the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, is from Berkeley. He represented survivors of abuse and other notable groups, like Holocaust survivors, in his legal practice.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Jesse Gabriel (D), 67%; and Dana Caruso (R), 33%. Gabriel and Caruso will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $1,045,320.79 and is not funded by fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Dana Caruso

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Caruso’s fundraising is not available.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

    Voter registration: 51% Democrat, 19% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2012. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-46 is 4% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 29% Latino, 12% Asian, and 6% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-46 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 35 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 40 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

No Recommendation

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 48th

The Democratic incumbent in this race has a problematic track record and is considered to be a safe win in this district. We make no recommendation in this race. Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.

Assm. Blanca Rubio has a problematic track record and policy positions. We recommend that voters hold her accountable to better represent this district if she wins reelection.

Progressive endorsements: Assm. Blanca Rubio has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including AFSCME California and Stonewall Democratic Club.

Ryan Maye has no endorsements.

Priority bills: Assm Rubio has successfully supported paid sick leave for certain essential workers among a few other bills, but she has deep ties to the fossil fuel industry. She scores a Lifetime CS of 48 out of 100 and has a Dishonorable Mention on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rubio has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. As assemblymember, she has supported the fossil fuel industry and predatory banks and lenders, and she has opposed environmental protections, criminal-justice reforms, and tenant protections.

Maye is anti-choice and pro–Second Amendment with no campaign policy positions of substance.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rubio has served in this seat since at least 2016, when she was elected with 64% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a challenger with 100% of the vote.

Prior to her election to the California Assembly, Assm. Rubio was a schoolteacher. She has been a longtime supporter of protections for survivors of domestic violence.

Maye is an Army veteran.

Other background: Assm. Rubio is from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

Maye is a plumber.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rubio (D), 97.1%; and Ryan Maye (R), a write-in candidate, 2.9%. Rubio and Maye will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rubio’s campaign has raised $1,355,866.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 48th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

Voter registration: 49% Democrat, 22% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2016. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-48 is 4% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 56% Latino, 18% Asian, and 4% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

Recent election results: AD-48 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 31 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 29 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 48th

The Democratic incumbent in this race has a problematic track record and is considered to be a safe win in this district. We make no recommendation in this race. Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.

Assm. Blanca Rubio has a problematic track record and policy positions. We recommend that voters hold her accountable to better represent this district if she wins reelection.

Progressive endorsements: Assm. Blanca Rubio has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including AFSCME California and Stonewall Democratic Club.

Ryan Maye has no endorsements.

Priority bills: Assm Rubio has successfully supported paid sick leave for certain essential workers among a few other bills, but she has deep ties to the fossil fuel industry. She scores a Lifetime CS of 48 out of 100 and has a Dishonorable Mention on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rubio has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote. As assemblymember, she has supported the fossil fuel industry and predatory banks and lenders, and she has opposed environmental protections, criminal-justice reforms, and tenant protections.

Maye is anti-choice and pro–Second Amendment with no campaign policy positions of substance.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rubio has served in this seat since at least 2016, when she was elected with 64% of the vote. In 2020, she won her reelection against a challenger with 100% of the vote.

Prior to her election to the California Assembly, Assm. Rubio was a schoolteacher. She has been a longtime supporter of protections for survivors of domestic violence.

Maye is an Army veteran.

Other background: Assm. Rubio is from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

Maye is a plumber.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rubio (D), 97.1%; and Ryan Maye (R), a write-in candidate, 2.9%. Rubio and Maye will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rubio’s campaign has raised $1,355,866.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 48th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

Voter registration: 49% Democrat, 22% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2016. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-48 is 4% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 56% Latino, 18% Asian, and 4% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

Recent election results: AD-48 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 31 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 29 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Mike Fong

    Reelect Assemblymember Mike Fong to keep AD-49 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Mike Fong’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-49 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Fong has the endorsement of many labor organizations and the Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus. He has also received endorsements from many local leaders, including Congressmember Judy Chu, State Controller Betty Yee, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assemblymember Alex Lee, and Los Angeles Supervisor Hilda Solis.

    Top issues: Education, workforce development, disability access, environmental protections, homelessness and housing, and technological infrastructure.

    Priority bills: Since winning the special election for his Assembly seat in February 2022, Assm. Fong’s priorities for AD-49 have included eight bills about climate protections, higher-education funding, workforce development, and disability access. Of these, two have been chaptered into law, two have been enrolled, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve infrastructure and digital access for disabled people, improve broadband access for Californians, provide ethics training for educational agencies, improve the diversity of curriculum for the California State university system, and support student retention for universities.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Fong currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Rules, and Banking and Finance.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Fong won a special election for this seat in 2022 with 67% of the vote after Gov. Gavin Newsom appointed Assm. Ed Chau to serve on the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Fong served in seat number 7 on the Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees after winning his 2020 election with 42% of the vote.

    Assm. Fong served as director of policy and government relations for the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, which he did to support local integration of public services. Before holding this role, Fong served as the East Area director for Los Angeles Mayor Villaraigosa. He also served as commissioner of the Alhambra Transportation Commission, and as an advisory board member for LA’s BEST Afterschool Enrichment Program. Throughout his career, Fong has shown a commitment to supporting education initiatives and programs that allow young people to transition from the classroom through workforce-development opportunities and into meaningful careers in their communities.

    Other background: Assm. Fong is a lifelong resident of Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Mike Fong (D), 70%; and Burton Brink (R), 30%. Assm. Mike Fong and Burton Brink will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Fong’s campaign has raised $640,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. His problematic donors include Sempra Energy, Huntington Beach Police Officers Association PAC, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T Services.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Burton Brink

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Brink’s campaign has raised $17,000 and is funded primarily by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 49th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 46% Democrat, 18% Republican, and 31% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-49 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 28% Latino, 53% Asian, and 2% Black

    Recent election results: AD-49 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 36 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Mike Fong

    Reelect Assemblymember Mike Fong to keep AD-49 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Mike Fong’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-49 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Fong has the endorsement of many labor organizations and the Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus. He has also received endorsements from many local leaders, including Congressmember Judy Chu, State Controller Betty Yee, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assemblymember Alex Lee, and Los Angeles Supervisor Hilda Solis.

    Top issues: Education, workforce development, disability access, environmental protections, homelessness and housing, and technological infrastructure.

    Priority bills: Since winning the special election for his Assembly seat in February 2022, Assm. Fong’s priorities for AD-49 have included eight bills about climate protections, higher-education funding, workforce development, and disability access. Of these, two have been chaptered into law, two have been enrolled, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve infrastructure and digital access for disabled people, improve broadband access for Californians, provide ethics training for educational agencies, improve the diversity of curriculum for the California State university system, and support student retention for universities.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Fong currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Rules, and Banking and Finance.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Fong won a special election for this seat in 2022 with 67% of the vote after Gov. Gavin Newsom appointed Assm. Ed Chau to serve on the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Fong served in seat number 7 on the Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees after winning his 2020 election with 42% of the vote.

    Assm. Fong served as director of policy and government relations for the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, which he did to support local integration of public services. Before holding this role, Fong served as the East Area director for Los Angeles Mayor Villaraigosa. He also served as commissioner of the Alhambra Transportation Commission, and as an advisory board member for LA’s BEST Afterschool Enrichment Program. Throughout his career, Fong has shown a commitment to supporting education initiatives and programs that allow young people to transition from the classroom through workforce-development opportunities and into meaningful careers in their communities.

    Other background: Assm. Fong is a lifelong resident of Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Mike Fong (D), 70%; and Burton Brink (R), 30%. Assm. Mike Fong and Burton Brink will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Fong’s campaign has raised $640,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. His problematic donors include Sempra Energy, Huntington Beach Police Officers Association PAC, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T Services.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Burton Brink

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Brink’s campaign has raised $17,000 and is funded primarily by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 49th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 46% Democrat, 18% Republican, and 31% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-49 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 28% Latino, 53% Asian, and 2% Black

    Recent election results: AD-49 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 36 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Mike Fong

    Reelect Assemblymember Mike Fong to keep AD-49 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Mike Fong’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-49 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Fong has the endorsement of many labor organizations and the Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus. He has also received endorsements from many local leaders, including Congressmember Judy Chu, State Controller Betty Yee, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assemblymember Alex Lee, and Los Angeles Supervisor Hilda Solis.

    Top issues: Education, workforce development, disability access, environmental protections, homelessness and housing, and technological infrastructure.

    Priority bills: Since winning the special election for his Assembly seat in February 2022, Assm. Fong’s priorities for AD-49 have included eight bills about climate protections, higher-education funding, workforce development, and disability access. Of these, two have been chaptered into law, two have been enrolled, one has been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to improve infrastructure and digital access for disabled people, improve broadband access for Californians, provide ethics training for educational agencies, improve the diversity of curriculum for the California State university system, and support student retention for universities.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Fong currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Rules, and Banking and Finance.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Fong won a special election for this seat in 2022 with 67% of the vote after Gov. Gavin Newsom appointed Assm. Ed Chau to serve on the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Fong served in seat number 7 on the Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees after winning his 2020 election with 42% of the vote.

    Assm. Fong served as director of policy and government relations for the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, which he did to support local integration of public services. Before holding this role, Fong served as the East Area director for Los Angeles Mayor Villaraigosa. He also served as commissioner of the Alhambra Transportation Commission, and as an advisory board member for LA’s BEST Afterschool Enrichment Program. Throughout his career, Fong has shown a commitment to supporting education initiatives and programs that allow young people to transition from the classroom through workforce-development opportunities and into meaningful careers in their communities.

    Other background: Assm. Fong is a lifelong resident of Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Mike Fong (D), 70%; and Burton Brink (R), 30%. Assm. Mike Fong and Burton Brink will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Fong’s campaign has raised $640,000 and has received donations from police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, and real estate interests. His problematic donors include Sempra Energy, Huntington Beach Police Officers Association PAC, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T Services.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Burton Brink

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Brink’s campaign has raised $17,000 and is funded primarily by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 49th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 46% Democrat, 18% Republican, and 31% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-49 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 28% Latino, 53% Asian, and 2% Black

    Recent election results: AD-49 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 36 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Rick Chavez Zbur

    Courage California endorses Rick Chavez Zbur for State Assembly to put AD-51 on the right track for progress.

    Rick Chavez Zbur’s record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    Electoral history: Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin.

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: As a nonprofit and community leader, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of social-service access for underserved populations and economic revitalization. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. He also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Other background: Rick Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rick Chavez Zbur (D), 62%; and Louis Abramson (D), 38%. Rick Chavez Zbur and Louis Abramson will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is not funded by police interests. He has received problematic donations from Edison International, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Louis Abramson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Abramson’s campaign has raised $220,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 58% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Courage California endorses Rick Chavez Zbur for State Assembly to put AD-51 on the right track for progress.

    Rick Chavez Zbur’s record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    Electoral history: Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin.

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: As a nonprofit and community leader, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of social-service access for underserved populations and economic revitalization. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. He also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Other background: Rick Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rick Chavez Zbur (D), 62%; and Louis Abramson (D), 38%. Rick Chavez Zbur and Louis Abramson will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is not funded by police interests. He has received problematic donations from Edison International, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Louis Abramson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Abramson’s campaign has raised $220,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 58% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Courage California endorses Rick Chavez Zbur for State Assembly to put AD-51 on the right track for progress.

    Rick Chavez Zbur’s record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    Electoral history: Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin.

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: As a nonprofit and community leader, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of social-service access for underserved populations and economic revitalization. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. He also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Other background: Rick Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rick Chavez Zbur (D), 62%; and Louis Abramson (D), 38%. Rick Chavez Zbur and Louis Abramson will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is not funded by police interests. He has received problematic donations from Edison International, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Louis Abramson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Abramson’s campaign has raised $220,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 58% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Wendy Carrillo

    Reelect Assemblymember Carrillo to keep AD-52 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Carrillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including AFSCME California, California Labor Federation, Equality California, and Planned Parenthood.

    Top issues: Health care, the environment, housing and homelessness, community safety, education, working families, and a fair economy.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Carrillo’s priorities for the current AD-51 district have included 47 bills about pollution, health care/COVID-19, and worker protection. Of these, 17 have been successfully chaptered into law. She has sponsored and passed legislation to target air pollution from short-haul trucks, obtain help with recession planning, and provide deportation protection. She scores a Lifetime CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Carrillo currently sits on five standing committees, two subcommittees, eleven select committees, and a joint committee. She chairs the Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration and the Select Committee on Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Carrillo has served in this assembly seat since 2017, when she was elected with 54% of the vote. In 2020, she ran unopposed for reelection.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Carrillo was a journalist who hosted radio and digital media. Assm. Carrillo has been a longtime supporter of workers’ rights.

    Other background: Assm. Carrillo grew up in Boyle Heights and City Terrace. As a child, she came to the US as an undocumented refugee from El Salvador.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Carrillo (D), 50%; Mia Livas Porter (D), 36%; and Gia d’Amato (R), 13%. Carrillo and Porter will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Carrillo's campaign has raised $665,410 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Mia Livas Porter

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Livas Porter’s campaign has raised $123,538 and is funded primarily by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-52 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 70 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Wendy Carrillo

    Reelect Assemblymember Carrillo to keep AD-52 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Carrillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including AFSCME California, California Labor Federation, Equality California, and Planned Parenthood.

    Top issues: Health care, the environment, housing and homelessness, community safety, education, working families, and a fair economy.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Carrillo’s priorities for the current AD-51 district have included 47 bills about pollution, health care/COVID-19, and worker protection. Of these, 17 have been successfully chaptered into law. She has sponsored and passed legislation to target air pollution from short-haul trucks, obtain help with recession planning, and provide deportation protection. She scores a Lifetime CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Carrillo currently sits on five standing committees, two subcommittees, eleven select committees, and a joint committee. She chairs the Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration and the Select Committee on Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Carrillo has served in this assembly seat since 2017, when she was elected with 54% of the vote. In 2020, she ran unopposed for reelection.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Carrillo was a journalist who hosted radio and digital media. Assm. Carrillo has been a longtime supporter of workers’ rights.

    Other background: Assm. Carrillo grew up in Boyle Heights and City Terrace. As a child, she came to the US as an undocumented refugee from El Salvador.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Carrillo (D), 50%; Mia Livas Porter (D), 36%; and Gia d’Amato (R), 13%. Carrillo and Porter will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Carrillo's campaign has raised $665,410 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Mia Livas Porter

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Livas Porter’s campaign has raised $123,538 and is funded primarily by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-52 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 70 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Wendy Carrillo

    Reelect Assemblymember Carrillo to keep AD-52 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Carrillo’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-52 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Carrillo has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including AFSCME California, California Labor Federation, Equality California, and Planned Parenthood.

    Top issues: Health care, the environment, housing and homelessness, community safety, education, working families, and a fair economy.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Carrillo’s priorities for the current AD-51 district have included 47 bills about pollution, health care/COVID-19, and worker protection. Of these, 17 have been successfully chaptered into law. She has sponsored and passed legislation to target air pollution from short-haul trucks, obtain help with recession planning, and provide deportation protection. She scores a Lifetime CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Carrillo currently sits on five standing committees, two subcommittees, eleven select committees, and a joint committee. She chairs the Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration and the Select Committee on Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Carrillo has served in this assembly seat since 2017, when she was elected with 54% of the vote. In 2020, she ran unopposed for reelection.

    Prior to her election to the Assembly, Assm. Carrillo was a journalist who hosted radio and digital media. Assm. Carrillo has been a longtime supporter of workers’ rights.

    Other background: Assm. Carrillo grew up in Boyle Heights and City Terrace. As a child, she came to the US as an undocumented refugee from El Salvador.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Carrillo (D), 50%; Mia Livas Porter (D), 36%; and Gia d’Amato (R), 13%. Carrillo and Porter will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Carrillo's campaign has raised $665,410 and is not funded by police.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Mia Livas Porter

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Livas Porter’s campaign has raised $123,538 and is funded primarily by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 52nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 62% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-52 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 50% Latino, 15% Asian, and 3% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-52 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 63 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 70 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

No Recommendation

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 53rd

The Democratic incumbent in this race has a problematic track record and is considered to be a safe win in this district. We make no recommendation in this race. Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.

Assm. Freddie Rodriguez has a problematic track record and policy positions. We recommend that voters hold him accountable to better represent this district if he wins reelection.

Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rodriguez has the endorsement of a few progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood. He has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

Toni Holle has no endorsements. She has no campaign policy positions of substance.

Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rodriguez’s priorities for AD-53 have included 23 bills about law enforcement and the environment. Of these, all have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to increase heavy-handed policing, has opposed legislation that would raise environmental standards of online sellers, and refused to support a police accountability bill, leaving California as just one of four states without a formal way to decertify dangerous officers. He scores a Lifetime CS of 49 out of 100 and is in our Hall of Shame on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. He has repeatedly failed to utilize his vote in the Capitol, and when he does, it is often against key progressive issues. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rodriguez has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rodriguez has served in this Assembly seat since 2013, when he was elected with over 5% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against Republican challenger Toni Holle by 36 points.

Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Rodriguez was a Pomona City Council member. Assm. Rodriguez has been a longtime supporter of improving conditions for emergency responders and local transportation.

Other background: Assm. Rodriguez, a former EMT, is from Pomona. He helped survivors of Hurricane Katrina and Rita, and in 2014 was named EMT of the Year by the California Emergency Medical Services Authority.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rodriguez (D), 61%; and Toni Holle (R), 39%. Rodriguez and Holle will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $740,000 and is funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate money.

Opposing candidate: Republican Toni Holle

Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Holl’s campaign has not yet made any campaign-finance filings.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 53rd Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

Voter registration: 48% Democrat, 22% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2013. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-53 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 58% Latino, 10% Asian, and 7% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

Recent election results: AD-53 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 30 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 28 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

Member of the State Assembly - No Recommendation - 53rd

The Democratic incumbent in this race has a problematic track record and is considered to be a safe win in this district. We make no recommendation in this race. Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.

Assm. Freddie Rodriguez has a problematic track record and policy positions. We recommend that voters hold him accountable to better represent this district if he wins reelection.

Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rodriguez has the endorsement of a few progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood. He has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

Toni Holle has no endorsements. She has no campaign policy positions of substance.

Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rodriguez’s priorities for AD-53 have included 23 bills about law enforcement and the environment. Of these, all have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to increase heavy-handed policing, has opposed legislation that would raise environmental standards of online sellers, and refused to support a police accountability bill, leaving California as just one of four states without a formal way to decertify dangerous officers. He scores a Lifetime CS of 49 out of 100 and is in our Hall of Shame on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. He has repeatedly failed to utilize his vote in the Capitol, and when he does, it is often against key progressive issues. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rodriguez has supported few progressive bills that made it to a vote.

Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rodriguez has served in this Assembly seat since 2013, when he was elected with over 5% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against Republican challenger Toni Holle by 36 points.

Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Rodriguez was a Pomona City Council member. Assm. Rodriguez has been a longtime supporter of improving conditions for emergency responders and local transportation.

Other background: Assm. Rodriguez, a former EMT, is from Pomona. He helped survivors of Hurricane Katrina and Rita, and in 2014 was named EMT of the Year by the California Emergency Medical Services Authority.

The Race

Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rodriguez (D), 61%; and Toni Holle (R), 39%. Rodriguez and Holle will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $740,000 and is funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate money.

Opposing candidate: Republican Toni Holle

Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Holl’s campaign has not yet made any campaign-finance filings.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 53rd Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

Voter registration: 48% Democrat, 22% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2013. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-53 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

District demographics: 58% Latino, 10% Asian, and 7% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

Recent election results: AD-53 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 30 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 28 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Miguel Santiago

    Reelect Assemblymember Miguel Santiago to keep AD-54 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Santiago’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Santiago has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, and NARAL Pro-Choice California.

    Top issues: Tax, health care, and environment.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Santiago’s priorities for AD-54 have included 68 bills about taxes, health care, and the environment. Of these, 25 have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to support education and free tax-assistance grants, better labeling for compostable and biodegradable products, and to provide health care for all. He scores a Lifetime CS of 93 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Santiago has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    He authored AB 19, a law passed in 2017 that made community college free in California for the first year. In 2019, he authored and passed AB 2, which added a second year of free community college. Santiago has also delivered millions of dollars for legal services to support unaccompanied minors facing deportation, and those affected by the White House’s decision to terminate Temporary Protected Status.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Santiago currently sits on five committees, and chairs the Governmental Organization Committee.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Santiago has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 12 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Santiago was involved in community organizing, and worked on expanding affordable health care and housing. He is a longtime supporter of education, just immigration policies, and economic development.

    Other background: Assm. Santiago is from Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Miguel Santiago (D), 100%; and Elaine Alaniz (R), 0%. Santiago and Alaniz will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Santiago’s campaign has raised $1.5 million and is not funded by real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Elaine Alaniz

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Alaniz’s campaign has not filed campaign finances.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2002. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-54 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 66 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Miguel Santiago

    Reelect Assemblymember Miguel Santiago to keep AD-54 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Santiago’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Santiago has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, and NARAL Pro-Choice California.

    Top issues: Tax, health care, and environment.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Santiago’s priorities for AD-54 have included 68 bills about taxes, health care, and the environment. Of these, 25 have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to support education and free tax-assistance grants, better labeling for compostable and biodegradable products, and to provide health care for all. He scores a Lifetime CS of 93 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Santiago has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    He authored AB 19, a law passed in 2017 that made community college free in California for the first year. In 2019, he authored and passed AB 2, which added a second year of free community college. Santiago has also delivered millions of dollars for legal services to support unaccompanied minors facing deportation, and those affected by the White House’s decision to terminate Temporary Protected Status.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Santiago currently sits on five committees, and chairs the Governmental Organization Committee.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Santiago has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 12 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Santiago was involved in community organizing, and worked on expanding affordable health care and housing. He is a longtime supporter of education, just immigration policies, and economic development.

    Other background: Assm. Santiago is from Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Miguel Santiago (D), 100%; and Elaine Alaniz (R), 0%. Santiago and Alaniz will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Santiago’s campaign has raised $1.5 million and is not funded by real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Elaine Alaniz

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Alaniz’s campaign has not filed campaign finances.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2002. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-54 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 66 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Miguel Santiago

    Reelect Assemblymember Miguel Santiago to keep AD-54 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Santiago’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-54 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Santiago has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Environmental Voters, Equality California, and NARAL Pro-Choice California.

    Top issues: Tax, health care, and environment.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Santiago’s priorities for AD-54 have included 68 bills about taxes, health care, and the environment. Of these, 25 have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to support education and free tax-assistance grants, better labeling for compostable and biodegradable products, and to provide health care for all. He scores a Lifetime CS of 93 out of 100 and is an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Santiago has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    He authored AB 19, a law passed in 2017 that made community college free in California for the first year. In 2019, he authored and passed AB 2, which added a second year of free community college. Santiago has also delivered millions of dollars for legal services to support unaccompanied minors facing deportation, and those affected by the White House’s decision to terminate Temporary Protected Status.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Santiago currently sits on five committees, and chairs the Governmental Organization Committee.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Santiago has served in this assembly seat since 2014, when he was elected with over 63% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 12 points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Santiago was involved in community organizing, and worked on expanding affordable health care and housing. He is a longtime supporter of education, just immigration policies, and economic development.

    Other background: Assm. Santiago is from Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Miguel Santiago (D), 100%; and Elaine Alaniz (R), 0%. Santiago and Alaniz will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Santiago’s campaign has raised $1.5 million and is not funded by real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Elaine Alaniz

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Alaniz’s campaign has not filed campaign finances.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 60% Democrat, 10% Republican, and 24% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2002. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-54 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 54% Latino, 24% Asian, and 8% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-54 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 59 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 66 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Isaac Bryan

    Reelect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California League of Conservation Voters, ACCE Action, and many union organizations. He has also received the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers, including Congressmember Karen Bass, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and LA City Councilmember Nithya Raman.

    Top issues: Climate change, child welfare, education, health care, criminal-justice reform, homelessness and housing, and workforce development and reentry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for his current district, AD-54, have included 24 bills about housing, child welfare, climate change, and criminal justice. Of these, two have been chaptered into law and one has died, and the remaining bills are in committee. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote this year. He received an Honorable Mention distinction from Courage Score this year for his commitment to progressive leadership.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Governmental Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety, and serves as the chair of the Elections Committee.

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Assm. Bryan has served in this assembly seat since 2021, when he won a special election with over 50% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county.

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), 86%; and Keith Girolamo Cascio (R), 14%. Incumbent Assm. Isaac Bryan and Keith Girolamo Cascio will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $716,000 and is not funded by police or fossil fuel interests. However, he has received donations from problematic funders, including Fox Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Girolamo Cascio

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Girolamo Cascio’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the secretary of state’s office as of September 2022.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 65% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, the advantage that Democrats held during the 2020 general election cycle is unchanged.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 73 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Isaac Bryan

    Reelect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California League of Conservation Voters, ACCE Action, and many union organizations. He has also received the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers, including Congressmember Karen Bass, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and LA City Councilmember Nithya Raman.

    Top issues: Climate change, child welfare, education, health care, criminal-justice reform, homelessness and housing, and workforce development and reentry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for his current district, AD-54, have included 24 bills about housing, child welfare, climate change, and criminal justice. Of these, two have been chaptered into law and one has died, and the remaining bills are in committee. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote this year. He received an Honorable Mention distinction from Courage Score this year for his commitment to progressive leadership.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Governmental Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety, and serves as the chair of the Elections Committee.

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Assm. Bryan has served in this assembly seat since 2021, when he won a special election with over 50% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county.

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), 86%; and Keith Girolamo Cascio (R), 14%. Incumbent Assm. Isaac Bryan and Keith Girolamo Cascio will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $716,000 and is not funded by police or fossil fuel interests. However, he has received donations from problematic funders, including Fox Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Girolamo Cascio

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Girolamo Cascio’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the secretary of state’s office as of September 2022.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 65% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, the advantage that Democrats held during the 2020 general election cycle is unchanged.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 73 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Isaac Bryan

    Reelect Assemblymember Isaac Bryan to keep AD-55 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Isaac Bryan’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-55 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Bryan has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, California League of Conservation Voters, ACCE Action, and many union organizations. He has also received the endorsement of many progressive lawmakers, including Congressmember Karen Bass, LA Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and LA City Councilmember Nithya Raman.

    Top issues: Climate change, child welfare, education, health care, criminal-justice reform, homelessness and housing, and workforce development and reentry.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Bryan’s priorities for his current district, AD-54, have included 24 bills about housing, child welfare, climate change, and criminal justice. Of these, two have been chaptered into law and one has died, and the remaining bills are in committee. He scores a CS of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Bryan has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote this year. He received an Honorable Mention distinction from Courage Score this year for his commitment to progressive leadership.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Bryan currently sits on five committees, including Appropriations, Governmental Organization, Human Services, and Public Safety, and serves as the chair of the Elections Committee.

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Assm. Bryan has served in this assembly seat since 2021, when he won a special election with over 50% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Bryan developed his political acumen as a published academic, earning a master’s of public policy degree from UCLA. After graduating, he became founding director of the UCLA Black Policy Project, which aims to address racial inequity through policy analysis and advocacy. His work there allowed him to focus on research regarding the resources needed for successful reentry after incarceration, and larger issues with youth-justice policy. Assm. Bryan’s interest in issues of equity is personal. As one of nine adopted children in a family of 15, he encountered significant academic challenges and observed his siblings struggling with houselessness, addiction, and mental health. Assm. Bryan is a longtime supporter of policy that addresses the intersections of these complex social issues. He co-chaired the committee supporting Measure J, which amended the Los Angeles County charter to require that 10% of local revenue be reinvested in the community and in alternatives to incarcerations. The measure was passed by voters in November 2020, and brings meaningful local investment to the county.

    Other background: Assm. Isaac Bryan lives in Jefferson Park.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Isaac Bryan (D), 86%; and Keith Girolamo Cascio (R), 14%. Incumbent Assm. Isaac Bryan and Keith Girolamo Cascio will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Bryan’s campaign has raised $716,000 and is not funded by police or fossil fuel interests. However, he has received donations from problematic funders, including Fox Corporation, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Keith Girolamo Cascio

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Girolamo Cascio’s campaign has not recorded any fundraising receipts with the secretary of state’s office as of September 2022.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 65% Democrat, 8% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, the advantage that Democrats held during the 2020 general election cycle is unchanged.

    District demographics: 25% Latino, 11% Asian, and 29% Black

    Recent election results: AD-55 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 71 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 73 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Lisa Calderon

    Reelect Assemblymember Lisa Calderon to keep AD-56 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Lisa Calderon’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-56 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Calderon has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including NARAL Pro-Choice California and California Environmental Voters, and labor unions like SEIU, United Healthcare Workers West, and the California Labor Federation. She is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials and leaders, including Congressman Adam Schiff, LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis, and labor organizer Dolores Huerta.

    She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Los Angeles City Council member Gil Cedillo, who has come under fire for his close ties to real estate development.

    Top issues: Protections for vulnerable youth, education, healthcare

    Priority bills: Assm. Calderon’s priorities for AD-56 this year have included 38 bills about foster care, education, insurance coverage, improved emergency responses, and youth health, of which 26 have successfully passed the Assembly. She has sponsored and passed legislation to expand insurance coverage for long-term and in-home care, improving reunification services for foster youth, protect scholarship funds at state universities, plan for environmental disasters, like wildfires, and loosen privacy disclosures requirements by insurance agencies. Calderon also authored legislation that broadened the social services offered to asylum-seekers. She scores a 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Calderon has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Calderon failed to vote on several bills aimed at reforming the criminal legal system, as well as bills to increase environmental protections and reduce carbon emissions.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Calderon currently chairs the Human Services Committee, and sits on the Committees on Aging and Long-Term Care, Appropriations, Emergency Management, and Public Employment and Retirement.

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Assm. Calderon has served in this assembly seat since 2020, when she was elected with over 60% of the vote. She is a commissioner on the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, and was appointed by Assembly Speaker Rendon to the Council of State Governments West Executive Committee.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Calderon served as a legislative aide before working for decades as a manager with Southern California Edison. As government affairs manager with Edison, she ran their corporate PAC. Her connection to corporate and fossil fuel interests raises concerns, especially given that her campaign is principally financed by large donations from corporations.

    Other background: Assm. Calderon is from the Central Valley and has lived in the district for 30 years. She is the daughter of farm laborers. Calderon earned her bachelor’s degree from CSU Sacramento. She organized against California’s Prop 187, which aimed to bar undocumented immigrants from accessing public services, often through racial profiling.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Lisa Calderon (D), 60%; Jessica Martinez (R), 29%; and Natasha "Naty" Serrano (R), 11%. Assm. Calderon and Jessica Martinez will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Calderon’s campaign has raised $715,400. She has accepted donations from corporate PACs, including $35,000 from the pharmaceutical industry, $15,000 from the financial-services industry, and over $40,000 from the insurance industry. She has also accepted tens of thousands of dollars from the real estate industry, fossil fuel interests, and the police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jessica Martinez

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $49,857, and has not committed to refusing donations from corporate PACs, the fossil-fuel industry, the police, or the real estate industry.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 56th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 49% Democrat, 21% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, the voter registration of AD-56 has remained largely unchanged, with Democrats maintaining the 28-point advantage held during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 55% Latino, 27% Asian, and 2% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-56 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 33 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 30 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Lisa Calderon

    Reelect Assemblymember Lisa Calderon to keep AD-56 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Lisa Calderon’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-56 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Calderon has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including NARAL Pro-Choice California and California Environmental Voters, and labor unions like SEIU, United Healthcare Workers West, and the California Labor Federation. She is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials and leaders, including Congressman Adam Schiff, LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis, and labor organizer Dolores Huerta.

    She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Los Angeles City Council member Gil Cedillo, who has come under fire for his close ties to real estate development.

    Top issues: Protections for vulnerable youth, education, healthcare

    Priority bills: Assm. Calderon’s priorities for AD-56 this year have included 38 bills about foster care, education, insurance coverage, improved emergency responses, and youth health, of which 26 have successfully passed the Assembly. She has sponsored and passed legislation to expand insurance coverage for long-term and in-home care, improving reunification services for foster youth, protect scholarship funds at state universities, plan for environmental disasters, like wildfires, and loosen privacy disclosures requirements by insurance agencies. Calderon also authored legislation that broadened the social services offered to asylum-seekers. She scores a 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Calderon has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Calderon failed to vote on several bills aimed at reforming the criminal legal system, as well as bills to increase environmental protections and reduce carbon emissions.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Calderon currently chairs the Human Services Committee, and sits on the Committees on Aging and Long-Term Care, Appropriations, Emergency Management, and Public Employment and Retirement.

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Assm. Calderon has served in this assembly seat since 2020, when she was elected with over 60% of the vote. She is a commissioner on the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, and was appointed by Assembly Speaker Rendon to the Council of State Governments West Executive Committee.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Calderon served as a legislative aide before working for decades as a manager with Southern California Edison. As government affairs manager with Edison, she ran their corporate PAC. Her connection to corporate and fossil fuel interests raises concerns, especially given that her campaign is principally financed by large donations from corporations.

    Other background: Assm. Calderon is from the Central Valley and has lived in the district for 30 years. She is the daughter of farm laborers. Calderon earned her bachelor’s degree from CSU Sacramento. She organized against California’s Prop 187, which aimed to bar undocumented immigrants from accessing public services, often through racial profiling.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Lisa Calderon (D), 60%; Jessica Martinez (R), 29%; and Natasha "Naty" Serrano (R), 11%. Assm. Calderon and Jessica Martinez will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Calderon’s campaign has raised $715,400. She has accepted donations from corporate PACs, including $35,000 from the pharmaceutical industry, $15,000 from the financial-services industry, and over $40,000 from the insurance industry. She has also accepted tens of thousands of dollars from the real estate industry, fossil fuel interests, and the police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jessica Martinez

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $49,857, and has not committed to refusing donations from corporate PACs, the fossil-fuel industry, the police, or the real estate industry.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 56th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 49% Democrat, 21% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, the voter registration of AD-56 has remained largely unchanged, with Democrats maintaining the 28-point advantage held during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 55% Latino, 27% Asian, and 2% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-56 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 33 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 30 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Lisa Calderon

    Reelect Assemblymember Lisa Calderon to keep AD-56 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Lisa Calderon’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-56 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Calderon has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including NARAL Pro-Choice California and California Environmental Voters, and labor unions like SEIU, United Healthcare Workers West, and the California Labor Federation. She is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials and leaders, including Congressman Adam Schiff, LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis, and labor organizer Dolores Huerta.

    She has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Los Angeles City Council member Gil Cedillo, who has come under fire for his close ties to real estate development.

    Top issues: Protections for vulnerable youth, education, healthcare

    Priority bills: Assm. Calderon’s priorities for AD-56 this year have included 38 bills about foster care, education, insurance coverage, improved emergency responses, and youth health, of which 26 have successfully passed the Assembly. She has sponsored and passed legislation to expand insurance coverage for long-term and in-home care, improving reunification services for foster youth, protect scholarship funds at state universities, plan for environmental disasters, like wildfires, and loosen privacy disclosures requirements by insurance agencies. Calderon also authored legislation that broadened the social services offered to asylum-seekers. She scores a 77 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Calderon has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Calderon failed to vote on several bills aimed at reforming the criminal legal system, as well as bills to increase environmental protections and reduce carbon emissions.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Calderon currently chairs the Human Services Committee, and sits on the Committees on Aging and Long-Term Care, Appropriations, Emergency Management, and Public Employment and Retirement.

    Governance and Community Leadership Experience: Assm. Calderon has served in this assembly seat since 2020, when she was elected with over 60% of the vote. She is a commissioner on the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, and was appointed by Assembly Speaker Rendon to the Council of State Governments West Executive Committee.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Calderon served as a legislative aide before working for decades as a manager with Southern California Edison. As government affairs manager with Edison, she ran their corporate PAC. Her connection to corporate and fossil fuel interests raises concerns, especially given that her campaign is principally financed by large donations from corporations.

    Other background: Assm. Calderon is from the Central Valley and has lived in the district for 30 years. She is the daughter of farm laborers. Calderon earned her bachelor’s degree from CSU Sacramento. She organized against California’s Prop 187, which aimed to bar undocumented immigrants from accessing public services, often through racial profiling.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Lisa Calderon (D), 60%; Jessica Martinez (R), 29%; and Natasha "Naty" Serrano (R), 11%. Assm. Calderon and Jessica Martinez will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Calderon’s campaign has raised $715,400. She has accepted donations from corporate PACs, including $35,000 from the pharmaceutical industry, $15,000 from the financial-services industry, and over $40,000 from the insurance industry. She has also accepted tens of thousands of dollars from the real estate industry, fossil fuel interests, and the police.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jessica Martinez

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Martinez’s campaign has raised $49,857, and has not committed to refusing donations from corporate PACs, the fossil-fuel industry, the police, or the real estate industry.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 56th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 49% Democrat, 21% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, the voter registration of AD-56 has remained largely unchanged, with Democrats maintaining the 28-point advantage held during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 55% Latino, 27% Asian, and 2% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-56 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 33 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 30 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Reggie Jones-Sawyer

    Reelect Assemblymember Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-57 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jones-Sawyer has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the California Environmental Voters, Equality California, Brady United Against Gun Violence, and Los Angeles County Labor Federation.

    Top issues: Justice reform, health care, and education.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-57 have included 39 bills about a pilot program for public postsecondary education and a bill related to perjury by police officers. Of these, 19 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to count the number of low-income housing credits given to LGBTQIA+ people, women, and minorities. He scores a Lifetime CS of 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jones-Sawyer did not vote to protect homeowners and renters from foreclosure and eviction due to circumstances related to COVID-19.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jones-Sawyer currently sits on five standing committees, one subcommittee, and six select committees, including chairing the Public Safety Committee and the Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jones-Sawyer has served in this Assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with 52% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 15 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jones-Sawyer was assistant deputy mayor of Los Angeles. Assm. Jones-Sawyer has been a longtime supporter of assisting the reentry into society of people who were formerly convicted of crimes.

    Other background: Assm. Jones-Sawyer is from Los Angeles. He helped change the city’s complex regulations surrounding housing development.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Jones-Sawyer (D), 100%. He is not facing a challenger.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $558,913 and is not funded by real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican N/A

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: N/A
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 64% Democrat, 6% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-57 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 74 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 77 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Reggie Jones-Sawyer

    Reelect Assemblymember Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-57 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jones-Sawyer has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the California Environmental Voters, Equality California, Brady United Against Gun Violence, and Los Angeles County Labor Federation.

    Top issues: Justice reform, health care, and education.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-57 have included 39 bills about a pilot program for public postsecondary education and a bill related to perjury by police officers. Of these, 19 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to count the number of low-income housing credits given to LGBTQIA+ people, women, and minorities. He scores a Lifetime CS of 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jones-Sawyer did not vote to protect homeowners and renters from foreclosure and eviction due to circumstances related to COVID-19.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jones-Sawyer currently sits on five standing committees, one subcommittee, and six select committees, including chairing the Public Safety Committee and the Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jones-Sawyer has served in this Assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with 52% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 15 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jones-Sawyer was assistant deputy mayor of Los Angeles. Assm. Jones-Sawyer has been a longtime supporter of assisting the reentry into society of people who were formerly convicted of crimes.

    Other background: Assm. Jones-Sawyer is from Los Angeles. He helped change the city’s complex regulations surrounding housing development.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Jones-Sawyer (D), 100%. He is not facing a challenger.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $558,913 and is not funded by real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican N/A

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: N/A
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 64% Democrat, 6% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-57 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 74 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 77 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Reggie Jones-Sawyer

    Reelect Assemblymember Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-57 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-57 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jones-Sawyer has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the California Environmental Voters, Equality California, Brady United Against Gun Violence, and Los Angeles County Labor Federation.

    Top issues: Justice reform, health care, and education.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-57 have included 39 bills about a pilot program for public postsecondary education and a bill related to perjury by police officers. Of these, 19 have been successfully chaptered into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to count the number of low-income housing credits given to LGBTQIA+ people, women, and minorities. He scores a Lifetime CS of 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jones-Sawyer has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jones-Sawyer did not vote to protect homeowners and renters from foreclosure and eviction due to circumstances related to COVID-19.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jones-Sawyer currently sits on five standing committees, one subcommittee, and six select committees, including chairing the Public Safety Committee and the Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jones-Sawyer has served in this Assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with 52% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by 15 points.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jones-Sawyer was assistant deputy mayor of Los Angeles. Assm. Jones-Sawyer has been a longtime supporter of assisting the reentry into society of people who were formerly convicted of crimes.

    Other background: Assm. Jones-Sawyer is from Los Angeles. He helped change the city’s complex regulations surrounding housing development.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Jones-Sawyer (D), 100%. He is not facing a challenger.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $558,913 and is not funded by real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican N/A

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: N/A
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 57th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 64% Democrat, 6% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since at least 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-57 is 1% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 57% Latino, 4% Asian, and 30% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-57 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 74 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 77 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Tina McKinnor

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Tina McKinnor for reelection to keep CD-61 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Tina McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including ACCE Action, Black Women for Wellness Action Project, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Working Families Party. She has also received the endorsement of many officials, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, labor leader Dolores Huerta, Treasurer Fiona Ma, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: Assm. McKinnor joined the Assembly after a special election victory in June 2022, and has had limited time to present her priorities through legislation. So far, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for her current district, AD-62, have included one amended bill about housing and zoning code. Before running for office, she also served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. Assm. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. She has not yet been included in Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials, Public Employment & Retirement, and Rules.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Other background: Tina McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Robert Pullen-Miles (D), 39%; Assm. Tina McKinnor (D), 33%; James Arlandus Spencer (R), 14%; Angie Reyes English (D), 11%; and Nico Ruderman (D), 4%. Assm. Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $231,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Robert Pullen-Miles
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $91,000 and is funded by real estate, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Inglewood Police Association PAC, Chevron Policy Government & Public Affairs, and California Real Estate PAC.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 9% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-61 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 69 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Tina McKinnor

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Tina McKinnor for reelection to keep CD-61 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Tina McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including ACCE Action, Black Women for Wellness Action Project, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Working Families Party. She has also received the endorsement of many officials, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, labor leader Dolores Huerta, Treasurer Fiona Ma, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: Assm. McKinnor joined the Assembly after a special election victory in June 2022, and has had limited time to present her priorities through legislation. So far, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for her current district, AD-62, have included one amended bill about housing and zoning code. Before running for office, she also served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. Assm. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. She has not yet been included in Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials, Public Employment & Retirement, and Rules.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Other background: Tina McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Robert Pullen-Miles (D), 39%; Assm. Tina McKinnor (D), 33%; James Arlandus Spencer (R), 14%; Angie Reyes English (D), 11%; and Nico Ruderman (D), 4%. Assm. Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $231,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Robert Pullen-Miles
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $91,000 and is funded by real estate, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Inglewood Police Association PAC, Chevron Policy Government & Public Affairs, and California Real Estate PAC.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 9% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-61 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 69 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Tina McKinnor

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Tina McKinnor for reelection to keep CD-61 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Tina McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including ACCE Action, Black Women for Wellness Action Project, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Working Families Party. She has also received the endorsement of many officials, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, labor leader Dolores Huerta, Treasurer Fiona Ma, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: Assm. McKinnor joined the Assembly after a special election victory in June 2022, and has had limited time to present her priorities through legislation. So far, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for her current district, AD-62, have included one amended bill about housing and zoning code. Before running for office, she also served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. Assm. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. She has not yet been included in Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials, Public Employment & Retirement, and Rules.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Other background: Tina McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Robert Pullen-Miles (D), 39%; Assm. Tina McKinnor (D), 33%; James Arlandus Spencer (R), 14%; Angie Reyes English (D), 11%; and Nico Ruderman (D), 4%. Assm. Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $231,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Robert Pullen-Miles
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $91,000 and is funded by real estate, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Inglewood Police Association PAC, Chevron Policy Government & Public Affairs, and California Real Estate PAC.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 9% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-61 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 69 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Anthony Rendón

    Reelect Assemblymember Anthony Rendón to keep AD-62 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Rendón’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-62 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rendón has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Sierra Club. He has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

    Top issues: Public health, education, environment, and LA River revitalization.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rendón’s priorities for AD-62 have included 70 bills about commemorating various causes and public health. Of these, 67 have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to commemorate Blue Star Mothers, the American Red Cross, and Black History Month. He scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rendón has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he has also been lukewarm in his advocacy for key progressive policies, failing to cast a vote on two recent bills: AB 570, which expanded health insurance to cover parents, and AB 1183, which increased funding for conservation, recreation, and environmental education projects in California’s desert region.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Rendón has served as the speaker of the Assembly since 2016. The speaker sets rules for the Assembly, makes committee assignments, and controls the flow of legislation. In this role, Rendon has given committee chairs more power to make rules for their own committees, which has led to some committee chairs not accepting public comment on legislation. He has also been criticized for rules that do not concur with Senate rules, such as denying Assemblymembers the ability to vote by proxy beyond very narrow definitions. Rendon currently sits on two committees—the Arts and the Rules Committees.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rendón has served in this assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with over 74% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by eight points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rendón served as executive director of Plaza de la Raza Child Development Services, which provides child development, social, and medical services to families in Los Angeles County. He is a longtime supporter of child education. Rendón also served as the interim executive director of the California League of Conservation Voters, now California Environmental Voters.

    Other background: Assm. Rendón is from Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Anthony Rendón (D), 67%; and Maria Estrada (D), 33%. Rendón and Estrada will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rendón’s campaign has raised $1.8 million and is funded by police, corporate, real estate, and fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Maria Estrada

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Estrada’s campaign has raised $14,000 and is mostly funded by individual donors. This is her third challenge of Assm. Rendon.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 62nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 57% Democrat, 15% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since before 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-62 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 67% Latino, 7% Asian, and 9% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-62 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 47 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 48 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Anthony Rendón

    Reelect Assemblymember Anthony Rendón to keep AD-62 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Rendón’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-62 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Rendón has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Sierra Club. He has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including police groups.

    Top issues: Public health, education, environment, and LA River revitalization.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Rendón’s priorities for AD-62 have included 70 bills about commemorating various causes and public health. Of these, 67 have successfully been passed by the Assembly. He has sponsored and passed legislation to commemorate Blue Star Mothers, the American Red Cross, and Black History Month. He scores a Lifetime CS of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Rendón has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he has also been lukewarm in his advocacy for key progressive policies, failing to cast a vote on two recent bills: AB 570, which expanded health insurance to cover parents, and AB 1183, which increased funding for conservation, recreation, and environmental education projects in California’s desert region.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Rendón has served as the speaker of the Assembly since 2016. The speaker sets rules for the Assembly, makes committee assignments, and controls the flow of legislation. In this role, Rendon has given committee chairs more power to make rules for their own committees, which has led to some committee chairs not accepting public comment on legislation. He has also been criticized for rules that do not concur with Senate rules, such as denying Assemblymembers the ability to vote by proxy beyond very narrow definitions. Rendon currently sits on two committees—the Arts and the Rules Committees.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Rendón has served in this assembly seat since 2012, when he was elected with over 74% of the vote. In 2020, he won his reelection against a Republican challenger by eight points.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Rendón served as executive director of Plaza de la Raza Child Development Services, which provides child development, social, and medical services to families in Los Angeles County. He is a longtime supporter of child education. Rendón also served as the interim executive director of the California League of Conservation Voters, now California Environmental Voters.

    Other background: Assm. Rendón is from Los Angeles.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Anthony Rendón (D), 67%; and Maria Estrada (D), 33%. Rendón and Estrada will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Rendón’s campaign has raised $1.8 million and is funded by police, corporate, real estate, and fossil fuel money.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Maria Estrada

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Estrada’s campaign has raised $14,000 and is mostly funded by individual donors. This is her third challenge of Assm. Rendon.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 62nd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 57% Democrat, 15% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since before 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-62 is 2% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 67% Latino, 7% Asian, and 9% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-62 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 47 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 48 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.