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School Districts

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below school district races on your ballot.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to fund critical improvements to our schools

  • Edmonds' public schools rely on levies and bonds to supplement state funding and provide the best local education possible. Edmonds School District Proposition 1 aims to finance capital projects and improvements to meet the needs of our students through bonds. If approved by voters, the bonds would replace the expiring 2021 Capital Levy and allow accelerated construction on school replacement projects.

    Proposed by the Edmonds School Board last year, the authorization of bonds maturing in 25 years would raise around $594 million. They would fund key projects such as the completion of Oak Heights Elementary School construction, the construction of a fifth middle school where Alderwood Middle was located, and the replacement of several other existing, aging schools. A yes vote also enables districtwide upgrades in safety, utilities, and infrastructure, such as boilers, roofs, HVAC, and plumbing. Additionally, the proposition aims to move sixth graders to middle school, giving them access to lab sciences and greater course offerings.

    The estimated total bond rate, including previous measures, would be $0.81 in 2025, costing the owner of a median $850,000 Edmonds home about $689 a year.

    Of the 34 schools in the district, 15 were constructed over 50 years ago and need upgrades and replacements to give our students the best learning environment possible. Vote Yes on Edmonds School District Proposition 1 to make strong investments in the quality of our local schools and the potential of our students.

    Last updated: 2024-01-22

    Edmonds' public schools rely on levies and bonds to supplement state funding and provide the best local education possible. Edmonds School District Proposition 1 aims to finance capital projects and improvements to meet the needs of our students through bonds. If approved by voters, the bonds would replace the expiring 2021 Capital Levy and allow accelerated construction on school replacement projects.

    Proposed by the Edmonds School Board last year, the authorization of bonds maturing in 25 years would raise around $594 million. They would fund key projects such as the completion of Oak Heights Elementary School construction, the construction of a fifth middle school where Alderwood Middle was located, and the replacement of several other existing, aging schools. A yes vote also enables districtwide upgrades in safety, utilities, and infrastructure, such as boilers, roofs, HVAC, and plumbing. Additionally, the proposition aims to move sixth graders to middle school, giving them access to lab sciences and greater course offerings.

    The estimated total bond rate, including previous measures, would be $0.81 in 2025, costing the owner of a median $850,000 Edmonds home about $689 a year.

    Of the 34 schools in the district, 15 were constructed over 50 years ago and need upgrades and replacements to give our students the best learning environment possible. Vote Yes on Edmonds School District Proposition 1 to make strong investments in the quality of our local schools and the potential of our students.

    Edmonds' public schools rely on levies and bonds to supplement state funding and provide the best local education possible. Edmonds School District Proposition 1 aims to finance capital projects and improvements to meet the needs of our students through bonds. If approved by voters, the bonds would replace the expiring 2021 Capital Levy and allow accelerated construction on school replacement projects.

    Proposed by the Edmonds School Board last year, the authorization of bonds maturing in 25 years would raise around $594 million. They would fund key projects such as the completion of Oak Heights Elementary School construction, the construction of a fifth middle school where Alderwood Middle was located, and the replacement of several other existing, aging schools. A yes vote also enables districtwide upgrades in safety, utilities, and infrastructure, such as boilers, roofs, HVAC, and plumbing. Additionally, the proposition aims to move sixth graders to middle school, giving them access to lab sciences and greater course offerings.

    The estimated total bond rate, including previous measures, would be $0.81 in 2025, costing the owner of a median $850,000 Edmonds home about $689 a year.

    Of the 34 schools in the district, 15 were constructed over 50 years ago and need upgrades and replacements to give our students the best learning environment possible. Vote Yes on Edmonds School District Proposition 1 to make strong investments in the quality of our local schools and the potential of our students.

    Edmonds School District No. 15 Proposition No. 1

    Edmonds' public schools rely on levies and bonds to supplement state funding and provide the best local education possible. Edmonds School District Proposition 1 aims to finance capital projects and improvements to meet the needs of our students through bonds.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to equip our students with modern learning resources

  • To prepare Edmonds students for our dynamic and fast-changing world, we need to offer a high-quality education facilitated by modern technology. Edmonds School District Proposition 2 authorizes the replacement of an expiring 2020 technology capital levy to ensure continued access to key resources in our schools.

    Evidence shows that when our schools offer updated infrastructure, safe classrooms, and modern learning resources, our students perform the best. We can’t afford to wait for our students to succeed in spite of their circumstances; it is up to us to invest in high-quality learning environments from the start. Moreover, keeping our schools up to date with technology infrastructure also helps close equity gaps so that all students have the chance to thrive.

    At an approximate rate between $0.53 and $0.60 per $1,000 of assessed property level (about $564 in 2025 for the owner of a median-priced $940,000 Edmonds home), the levy would generate an estimated $30 million in the first year alone to invest in our schools. If passed, Proposition 1 would cover the costs of student computers, cybersecurity tools, classroom technology, translation tablets, digital literacy, learning subscriptions, and home internet access for students who cannot otherwise afford it. 

    Opponents of the proposition suggest that students should fund their own access to digital literacy through personal devices, but this perspective overlooks equity issues and forms of instructional and security technology that help our schools deliver quality curriculums and safe classrooms.

    Vote Yes on Edmonds School District Proposition 2 to ensure our students can meet their highest potential in tomorrow’s increasingly digital world.

    Last updated: 2024-01-22

    To prepare Edmonds students for our dynamic and fast-changing world, we need to offer a high-quality education facilitated by modern technology. Edmonds School District Proposition 2 authorizes the replacement of an expiring 2020 technology capital levy to ensure continued access to key resources in our schools.

    Evidence shows that when our schools offer updated infrastructure, safe classrooms, and modern learning resources, our students perform the best. We can’t afford to wait for our students to succeed in spite of their circumstances; it is up to us to invest in high-quality learning environments from the start. Moreover, keeping our schools up to date with technology infrastructure also helps close equity gaps so that all students have the chance to thrive.

    At an approximate rate between $0.53 and $0.60 per $1,000 of assessed property level (about $564 in 2025 for the owner of a median-priced $940,000 Edmonds home), the levy would generate an estimated $30 million in the first year alone to invest in our schools. If passed, Proposition 1 would cover the costs of student computers, cybersecurity tools, classroom technology, translation tablets, digital literacy, learning subscriptions, and home internet access for students who cannot otherwise afford it. 

    Opponents of the proposition suggest that students should fund their own access to digital literacy through personal devices, but this perspective overlooks equity issues and forms of instructional and security technology that help our schools deliver quality curriculums and safe classrooms.

    Vote Yes on Edmonds School District Proposition 2 to ensure our students can meet their highest potential in tomorrow’s increasingly digital world.

    To prepare Edmonds students for our dynamic and fast-changing world, we need to offer a high-quality education facilitated by modern technology. Edmonds School District Proposition 2 authorizes the replacement of an expiring 2020 technology capital levy to ensure continued access to key resources in our schools.

    Evidence shows that when our schools offer updated infrastructure, safe classrooms, and modern learning resources, our students perform the best. We can’t afford to wait for our students to succeed in spite of their circumstances; it is up to us to invest in high-quality learning environments from the start. Moreover, keeping our schools up to date with technology infrastructure also helps close equity gaps so that all students have the chance to thrive.

    At an approximate rate between $0.53 and $0.60 per $1,000 of assessed property level (about $564 in 2025 for the owner of a median-priced $940,000 Edmonds home), the levy would generate an estimated $30 million in the first year alone to invest in our schools. If passed, Proposition 1 would cover the costs of student computers, cybersecurity tools, classroom technology, translation tablets, digital literacy, learning subscriptions, and home internet access for students who cannot otherwise afford it. 

    Opponents of the proposition suggest that students should fund their own access to digital literacy through personal devices, but this perspective overlooks equity issues and forms of instructional and security technology that help our schools deliver quality curriculums and safe classrooms.

    Vote Yes on Edmonds School District Proposition 2 to ensure our students can meet their highest potential in tomorrow’s increasingly digital world.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to continue funding a quality education for Lakewood students

  • The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and quality of Lakewood educations. Lakewood School District Proposition 1 would replace an expiring levy that covers about 14 percent of the district’s day-to-day budget.

    Last year, the Lakewood School Board adopted Resolution 14 to renew the expiring educational programs and operations levy at a rate of $1.73 per $1,000 of assessed property value. This means a cost of about $865 a year for the owner of a $500,000 home in Lakewood. By replacing the levy and funding what the state alone cannot cover, Lakewood schools can continue offering students athletics programs, learning technology, extracurricular clubs, music and drama programs, and more.

    Our entire community is strengthened when we actively invest in our local schools. To thrive in school and beyond, students need upgraded learning technology, holistic health and safety resources, quality education environments, and a well-rounded curriculum, from the arts to advanced coursework to STEM opportunities. Vote Yes to approve Lakewood School District Proposition 1 and ensure our students have the environments, tools, and support they need to succeed.
    Last updated: 2024-01-19
    The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and quality of Lakewood educations. Lakewood School District Proposition 1 would replace an expiring levy that covers about 14 percent of the district’s day-to-day budget.

    Last year, the Lakewood School Board adopted Resolution 14 to renew the expiring educational programs and operations levy at a rate of $1.73 per $1,000 of assessed property value. This means a cost of about $865 a year for the owner of a $500,000 home in Lakewood. By replacing the levy and funding what the state alone cannot cover, Lakewood schools can continue offering students athletics programs, learning technology, extracurricular clubs, music and drama programs, and more.

    Our entire community is strengthened when we actively invest in our local schools. To thrive in school and beyond, students need upgraded learning technology, holistic health and safety resources, quality education environments, and a well-rounded curriculum, from the arts to advanced coursework to STEM opportunities. Vote Yes to approve Lakewood School District Proposition 1 and ensure our students have the environments, tools, and support they need to succeed.
    The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and quality of Lakewood educations. Lakewood School District Proposition 1 would replace an expiring levy that covers about 14 percent of the district’s day-to-day budget.

    Last year, the Lakewood School Board adopted Resolution 14 to renew the expiring educational programs and operations levy at a rate of $1.73 per $1,000 of assessed property value. This means a cost of about $865 a year for the owner of a $500,000 home in Lakewood. By replacing the levy and funding what the state alone cannot cover, Lakewood schools can continue offering students athletics programs, learning technology, extracurricular clubs, music and drama programs, and more.

    Our entire community is strengthened when we actively invest in our local schools. To thrive in school and beyond, students need upgraded learning technology, holistic health and safety resources, quality education environments, and a well-rounded curriculum, from the arts to advanced coursework to STEM opportunities. Vote Yes to approve Lakewood School District Proposition 1 and ensure our students have the environments, tools, and support they need to succeed.

    Lakewood School District No. 306 Proposition No. 1

    The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and qual

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to finance utilities, infrastructure, and safety improvements in Lakewood Schools

  • The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and quality of Lakewood education.

    Lakewood School District Proposition 2, if approved by voters, authorizes a capital projects and safety levy to fund repairs that our school district cannot afford to keep neglecting.

    An investment in our schools is an investment in our entire community, and when our Lakewood students thrive, we all benefit. For too long, the school district has been scraping by with the bare minimum resources to provide a quality education for our students. It’s time to take bold action to set our students up for academic success and bright futures.

    Proposition 2 would authorize a capital levy to fund safety and capital expenses that have fallen by the wayside. At an approximate rate between $0.87 and $0.99 per $1,000 of assessed property value over four years, the owner of a median $500,000 Lakewood home could expect to pay about $435 a year. If passed, the district will have the funds for much-needed improvements in plumbing, roof repair, intercom, HVAC, electrical, fencing, fire alarms, flooring, sidewalk repairs, lock-down systems, and energy efficiency.

    Our students deserve to learn in safe, welcoming, and modern environments. Vote Yes on Lakewood School District Proposition 2.

    Last updated: 2024-01-23

    The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and quality of Lakewood education.

    Lakewood School District Proposition 2, if approved by voters, authorizes a capital projects and safety levy to fund repairs that our school district cannot afford to keep neglecting.

    An investment in our schools is an investment in our entire community, and when our Lakewood students thrive, we all benefit. For too long, the school district has been scraping by with the bare minimum resources to provide a quality education for our students. It’s time to take bold action to set our students up for academic success and bright futures.

    Proposition 2 would authorize a capital levy to fund safety and capital expenses that have fallen by the wayside. At an approximate rate between $0.87 and $0.99 per $1,000 of assessed property value over four years, the owner of a median $500,000 Lakewood home could expect to pay about $435 a year. If passed, the district will have the funds for much-needed improvements in plumbing, roof repair, intercom, HVAC, electrical, fencing, fire alarms, flooring, sidewalk repairs, lock-down systems, and energy efficiency.

    Our students deserve to learn in safe, welcoming, and modern environments. Vote Yes on Lakewood School District Proposition 2.

    The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and quality of Lakewood education.

    Lakewood School District Proposition 2, if approved by voters, authorizes a capital projects and safety levy to fund repairs that our school district cannot afford to keep neglecting.

    An investment in our schools is an investment in our entire community, and when our Lakewood students thrive, we all benefit. For too long, the school district has been scraping by with the bare minimum resources to provide a quality education for our students. It’s time to take bold action to set our students up for academic success and bright futures.

    Proposition 2 would authorize a capital levy to fund safety and capital expenses that have fallen by the wayside. At an approximate rate between $0.87 and $0.99 per $1,000 of assessed property value over four years, the owner of a median $500,000 Lakewood home could expect to pay about $435 a year. If passed, the district will have the funds for much-needed improvements in plumbing, roof repair, intercom, HVAC, electrical, fencing, fire alarms, flooring, sidewalk repairs, lock-down systems, and energy efficiency.

    Our students deserve to learn in safe, welcoming, and modern environments. Vote Yes on Lakewood School District Proposition 2.

    Lakewood School District No. 306 Proposition No. 2

    The Lakewood School District is at a critical juncture where voters can make strong investments in our local schools through two levies on the ballot this election: one that continues basic education funding for operations expenses not covered by state funds, and one to enrich the safety and qual

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to continue vital funding for local emergency response services

  • In an emergency, nobody wants to be worried about whether our crisis response services have the right equipment and proper staffing to help. If approved by voters, Fire District 22 Proposition 1 restores a regular property tax levy to fund district fire protection and emergency medical services. If the measure fails, the fire district cannot maintain the same levels of regular staffing, training hours, tool inspections, station maintenance, and equipment repairs and replacements. 

    Snohomish’s fire protection district board adopted Resolution 6 last year to maintain funding for the operations of our local emergency services, which serves around 5,000 residents around Getchell, Sisco Heights, and Lake Cassidy. A yes vote on Proposition 1 authorizes a levy of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value – a rate previously approved by voters. If approved this year, the owner of a median-priced $680,000 Snohomish home could expect to pay an average of $1,020 a year. The levy would allow the fire district to continue offering the current level of service even as inflation rises.

    When the worst happens, we want the best care for our loved ones. Crisis response and emergency services are funded by us through our tax dollars and supplemented by local levies. Vote Yes on Fire District 22 Proposition 1.

    Last updated: 2024-01-24

    In an emergency, nobody wants to be worried about whether our crisis response services have the right equipment and proper staffing to help. If approved by voters, Fire District 22 Proposition 1 restores a regular property tax levy to fund district fire protection and emergency medical services. If the measure fails, the fire district cannot maintain the same levels of regular staffing, training hours, tool inspections, station maintenance, and equipment repairs and replacements. 

    Snohomish’s fire protection district board adopted Resolution 6 last year to maintain funding for the operations of our local emergency services, which serves around 5,000 residents around Getchell, Sisco Heights, and Lake Cassidy. A yes vote on Proposition 1 authorizes a levy of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value – a rate previously approved by voters. If approved this year, the owner of a median-priced $680,000 Snohomish home could expect to pay an average of $1,020 a year. The levy would allow the fire district to continue offering the current level of service even as inflation rises.

    When the worst happens, we want the best care for our loved ones. Crisis response and emergency services are funded by us through our tax dollars and supplemented by local levies. Vote Yes on Fire District 22 Proposition 1.

    In an emergency, nobody wants to be worried about whether our crisis response services have the right equipment and proper staffing to help. If approved by voters, Fire District 22 Proposition 1 restores a regular property tax levy to fund district fire protection and emergency medical services. If the measure fails, the fire district cannot maintain the same levels of regular staffing, training hours, tool inspections, station maintenance, and equipment repairs and replacements. 

    Snohomish’s fire protection district board adopted Resolution 6 last year to maintain funding for the operations of our local emergency services, which serves around 5,000 residents around Getchell, Sisco Heights, and Lake Cassidy. A yes vote on Proposition 1 authorizes a levy of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value – a rate previously approved by voters. If approved this year, the owner of a median-priced $680,000 Snohomish home could expect to pay an average of $1,020 a year. The levy would allow the fire district to continue offering the current level of service even as inflation rises.

    When the worst happens, we want the best care for our loved ones. Crisis response and emergency services are funded by us through our tax dollars and supplemented by local levies. Vote Yes on Fire District 22 Proposition 1.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to continue funding critical roadway maintenance

  • Our roadways, public transit systems, and sidewalks are foundations of our community that literally bring us together. Marysville Transportation District Proposition 1 authorizes the continuation of a Transportation Benefit District (TBD) sales tax that funds our street preservation, transportation improvement, and sidewalk repair.

    When we invest in lasting and well-maintained roadway infrastructure, our entire community benefits – from families to working commuters to local businesses. Proposition 1, if passed, would retain the current sales and use tax of 0.2 percent, which voters have previously approved, for another ten years. This works out to about 10 cents owed in TBD sales taxes per every $50 purchase. The estimated $3 million raised annually from this tax is earmarked specifically for pavement repair, overlay, crack sealing, patching, sidewalk repair, and other projects included in the City’s Transportation Improvement Plan. Similar resolutions have been passed across the state by local transportation benefit districts as a means of funding critical infrastructure maintenance.

    As a sales tax, this proposition is designed so that all people who use our streets and roads cover the costs of their maintenance – not just residents. While we believe public goods should be covered by more progressive taxes that ask wealthier Washingtonians to pay what they owe to the community, in the absence of a better measure to fund this vital public good, we recommend voting Yes on Marysville Transportation District Proposition 1.

    Last updated: 2024-01-24

    Our roadways, public transit systems, and sidewalks are foundations of our community that literally bring us together. Marysville Transportation District Proposition 1 authorizes the continuation of a Transportation Benefit District (TBD) sales tax that funds our street preservation, transportation improvement, and sidewalk repair.

    When we invest in lasting and well-maintained roadway infrastructure, our entire community benefits – from families to working commuters to local businesses. Proposition 1, if passed, would retain the current sales and use tax of 0.2 percent, which voters have previously approved, for another ten years. This works out to about 10 cents owed in TBD sales taxes per every $50 purchase. The estimated $3 million raised annually from this tax is earmarked specifically for pavement repair, overlay, crack sealing, patching, sidewalk repair, and other projects included in the City’s Transportation Improvement Plan. Similar resolutions have been passed across the state by local transportation benefit districts as a means of funding critical infrastructure maintenance.

    As a sales tax, this proposition is designed so that all people who use our streets and roads cover the costs of their maintenance – not just residents. While we believe public goods should be covered by more progressive taxes that ask wealthier Washingtonians to pay what they owe to the community, in the absence of a better measure to fund this vital public good, we recommend voting Yes on Marysville Transportation District Proposition 1.

    Our roadways, public transit systems, and sidewalks are foundations of our community that literally bring us together. Marysville Transportation District Proposition 1 authorizes the continuation of a Transportation Benefit District (TBD) sales tax that funds our street preservation, transportation improvement, and sidewalk repair.

    When we invest in lasting and well-maintained roadway infrastructure, our entire community benefits – from families to working commuters to local businesses. Proposition 1, if passed, would retain the current sales and use tax of 0.2 percent, which voters have previously approved, for another ten years. This works out to about 10 cents owed in TBD sales taxes per every $50 purchase. The estimated $3 million raised annually from this tax is earmarked specifically for pavement repair, overlay, crack sealing, patching, sidewalk repair, and other projects included in the City’s Transportation Improvement Plan. Similar resolutions have been passed across the state by local transportation benefit districts as a means of funding critical infrastructure maintenance.

    As a sales tax, this proposition is designed so that all people who use our streets and roads cover the costs of their maintenance – not just residents. While we believe public goods should be covered by more progressive taxes that ask wealthier Washingtonians to pay what they owe to the community, in the absence of a better measure to fund this vital public good, we recommend voting Yes on Marysville Transportation District Proposition 1.