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  • Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Navy veteran Bob Kettle is challenging incumbent Lewis for the District 7 seat. Kettle is not running a progressive campaign. He would ignore the public call for policing alternatives and community investments that would actually keep our neighbors safe. If elected, Kettle also wants to criminalize addiction and increase inhumane sweeps that don’t alleviate our housing crisis. 

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Navy veteran Bob Kettle is challenging incumbent Lewis for the District 7 seat. Kettle is not running a progressive campaign. He would ignore the public call for policing alternatives and community investments that would actually keep our neighbors safe. If elected, Kettle also wants to criminalize addiction and increase inhumane sweeps that don’t alleviate our housing crisis. 

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7. 

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

  • King County Assessor John Wilson is running unopposed for re-election. He worked as the chief deputy assessor for four years before being elected by the public to lead the office in 2015. Wilson has also worked in the county’s Department of Information Technology and in public affairs consulting. 

    In office, Wilson has focused on housing affordability, making sure our tax code is balanced, and improving the efficiency of assessor services. One of his top priorities has been to ensure that property taxes don’t push our senior neighbors out of their homes. Wilson also revamped the office’s web services and instituted the Taxpayer Transparency Tool so county residents can easily calculate how policy changes impact their upcoming taxes. In this race, Wilson’s platform emphasizes similar values of accessibility, innovation, and efficiency in the office while working on community issues like housing and immigration.

    With his years of experience and strong community focus, John Wilson deserves your vote to serve another term as King County Auditor. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-18

    John Wilson

    King County Assessor John Wilson is running unopposed for re-election. He worked as the chief deputy assessor for four years before being elected by the public to lead the office in 2015.

    King County Assessor John Wilson is running unopposed for re-election. He worked as the chief deputy assessor for four years before being elected by the public to lead the office in 2015. Wilson has also worked in the county’s Department of Information Technology and in public affairs consulting. 

    In office, Wilson has focused on housing affordability, making sure our tax code is balanced, and improving the efficiency of assessor services. One of his top priorities has been to ensure that property taxes don’t push our senior neighbors out of their homes. Wilson also revamped the office’s web services and instituted the Taxpayer Transparency Tool so county residents can easily calculate how policy changes impact their upcoming taxes. In this race, Wilson’s platform emphasizes similar values of accessibility, innovation, and efficiency in the office while working on community issues like housing and immigration.

    With his years of experience and strong community focus, John Wilson deserves your vote to serve another term as King County Auditor. 

    John Wilson

    King County Assessor John Wilson is running unopposed for re-election. He worked as the chief deputy assessor for four years before being elected by the public to lead the office in 2015.

  • Endorsed By: King County Democrats
  • Incumbent Julie Wise is running for her third term serving as King County Director of Elections. Wise has worked in elections since 2000 and as the county’s director since 2015. During her two terms, she has brought innovative community services to the offices that have advanced civic education and voter participation.

    Wise has led progress in the county elections office, instituting the Voter Education Fund (a public-philanthropic partnership), providing prepaid postage on ballots, introducing new language options, and adding 65 new ballot drop-off locations. Her past term included successfully navigating the storm of election misinformation and conspiracy theories about the democratic process. Wise has won numerous awards for her leadership in the office.

    Wise’s campaign reflects her continued commitment to reducing barriers to voting, protecting elections from infringement, building community trust in the accuracy of election results, and making sure every vote is counted. Her biggest priorities for a third term are continuing progressive efforts to increase accessibility while investing in security to protect voters and elections offices from intimidation.

    Republican Doug Basler is challenging Wise in this race. Basler runs a digital video and marketing services company, and he has previously run for office. His campaign platform dangerously promotes far-right fictions of election fraud that fueled the 2020 criminal conspiracy to overthrow the will of the people. Basler has also previously questioned the integrity of county elections, and even participated in lawsuits aimed at overturning the function of our democratic institutions. 

    King County voters deserve an elections director who is focused on delivering quality and accurate services rather than someone who wants to overturn our votes and stoke chaos in order to elevate their position and that of their party. Julie Wise deserves re-election for another term as King County Director of Elections to continue bringing strong leadership to the office. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Julie Wise

    Incumbent Julie Wise is running for her third term serving as King County Director of Elections. Wise has worked in elections since 2000 and as the county’s director since 2015.

    Incumbent Julie Wise is running for her third term serving as King County Director of Elections. Wise has worked in elections since 2000 and as the county’s director since 2015. During her two terms, she has brought innovative community services to the offices that have advanced civic education and voter participation.

    Wise has led progress in the county elections office, instituting the Voter Education Fund (a public-philanthropic partnership), providing prepaid postage on ballots, introducing new language options, and adding 65 new ballot drop-off locations. Her past term included successfully navigating the storm of election misinformation and conspiracy theories about the democratic process. Wise has won numerous awards for her leadership in the office.

    Wise’s campaign reflects her continued commitment to reducing barriers to voting, protecting elections from infringement, building community trust in the accuracy of election results, and making sure every vote is counted. Her biggest priorities for a third term are continuing progressive efforts to increase accessibility while investing in security to protect voters and elections offices from intimidation.

    Republican Doug Basler is challenging Wise in this race. Basler runs a digital video and marketing services company, and he has previously run for office. His campaign platform dangerously promotes far-right fictions of election fraud that fueled the 2020 criminal conspiracy to overthrow the will of the people. Basler has also previously questioned the integrity of county elections, and even participated in lawsuits aimed at overturning the function of our democratic institutions. 

    King County voters deserve an elections director who is focused on delivering quality and accurate services rather than someone who wants to overturn our votes and stoke chaos in order to elevate their position and that of their party. Julie Wise deserves re-election for another term as King County Director of Elections to continue bringing strong leadership to the office. 

    Julie Wise

    Incumbent Julie Wise is running for her third term serving as King County Director of Elections. Wise has worked in elections since 2000 and as the county’s director since 2015.

  • Endorsed By: APACE, The Stranger

County Council District Races

Depending on the county district you live in, you may have the following races on your ballot.

  • Attorney and nonprofit founder Girmay Zahilay is running unopposed for re-election for King County Council, District 2. 

    In his first four-year term, Zahilay has been a standout progressive on the council, focusing on equitable development, preventing gun violence, and fighting for justice at the county level. He has pushed for more funding and opportunities for Skyway, an unincorporated part of the county with the highest proportion of Black people of any community in the state that also faces immense disinvestment, childhood poverty, and a low median income. Zahilay has worked to increase funding for Metro transit, open a tiny home village, fund $5 million in affordable housing, and $10 million in seed funding for a community center. Finally, he played a lead role in amending the county charter to appoint the sheriff, as well as giving more investigational power to the county on cases of police brutality. 

    Zahilay has earned your vote for King County Council.  

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Attorney and nonprofit founder Girmay Zahilay is running unopposed for re-election for King County Council, District 2. 

    In his first four-year term, Zahilay has been a standout progressive on the council, focusing on equitable development, preventing gun violence, and fighting for justice at the county level. He has pushed for more funding and opportunities for Skyway, an unincorporated part of the county with the highest proportion of Black people of any community in the state that also faces immense disinvestment, childhood poverty, and a low median income. Zahilay has worked to increase funding for Metro transit, open a tiny home village, fund $5 million in affordable housing, and $10 million in seed funding for a community center. Finally, he played a lead role in amending the county charter to appoint the sheriff, as well as giving more investigational power to the county on cases of police brutality. 

    Zahilay has earned your vote for King County Council.  

  • Jorge Barón is running to elevate the experiences of marginalized communities and bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    Compared to fellow candidate Sarah Reyneveld's broader experience in many areas, Barón's experience runs particularly deep in one area. As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that doesn’t generate the outcomes we want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Barón also plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate nonprofits around the region on housing and other issues. He believes that a more equitable county addresses the disparities in our communities, such as providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change, whether it's wildfires, pollution, or other impacts, and making sure that everyone can access public transit. 

    The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón has swept the majority of the progressive endorsements in this race and is a great choice If you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader with deep ties to the immigrant community and a record of effective advocacy. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Jorge Barón is running to elevate the experiences of marginalized communities and bring a holistic vision of equity, justice, and prosperity for all to King County. 

    Compared to fellow candidate Sarah Reyneveld's broader experience in many areas, Barón's experience runs particularly deep in one area. As the executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Barón has dedicated the last 15 years to helping to establish the civil rights division in the Attorney General's office and fighting the Trump administration's deportation policies and family separation. He has been frequently recognized for this work, including receiving the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service from the King County Council in 2018 and being named one of the Most Influential Seattleites in Seattle Magazine in 2017.

    A racial justice and equity focus is strongly interwoven in Barón's proposals. In our interview, he noted that a large portion of the county's budget - about 70 percent - is invested in “justice and safety," which is actually the criminal legal system. This is investing resources in a system that doesn’t generate the outcomes we want, namely, mass incarceration. Barón suggested increasing the percentage of the general fund that goes toward improving behavioral health programs and increasing diversionary and community-based restorative justice initiatives. As a member of the Joint Legislative Task Force on the Use of Deadly Force in Community Policing, he agrees with Reyneveld on increasing police oversight and accountability.

    Barón also plans to use his executive nonprofit experience to better coordinate nonprofits around the region on housing and other issues. He believes that a more equitable county addresses the disparities in our communities, such as providing resources to communities most challenged by the effects of climate change, whether it's wildfires, pollution, or other impacts, and making sure that everyone can access public transit. 

    The accomplishment of which he is most proud is rallying 63 organizations across the state to provide funds for asylum seekers, including legal assistance and expansion of services. Barón has swept the majority of the progressive endorsements in this race and is a great choice If you are looking for an experienced nonprofit leader with deep ties to the immigrant community and a record of effective advocacy. 

  • Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting environmental and public health. 

    Reyneveld has worked to help families and children through many volunteer roles, including as a board member of Washington’s Paramount Duty, an organization that advocates for more education funding, and as chair of the Women’s Advisory Board, which makes recommendations to the county for child care access and affordability. Reyneveld has also been a King County Democrats and 36th District Democrats executive board member, and vice chair of the Washington Conservation Action board of directors.

    In our interview with Reyneveld, she pointed to her longtime advocacy as a sign of her readiness to hit the ground running on her three top priorities: equitable economic recovery, the environment, and housing. With an anticipated budget shortfall looming for the county, she emphasized the need for more progressive revenue to help build 17,000 additional units of housing every year to keep up with population growth. She also mentioned the possibility of a dedicated countywide housing levy, which would create a funding source to build more diverse housing options, from multifamily homes to affordable housing.

    Reyneveld spoke about the need for prevention and helping meet people's needs to improve community safety. She believes that incarceration is not the answer for people struggling with addiction and other health issues. Scaling up gun violence prevention programs and addiction treatment hubs are two policies she would advocate for on the council, and she would also consider policies like a guaranteed basic income to help residents thrive. 

    Reyneveld's longtime experience in Democratic politics, community organizations, and legal advocacy distinguish her in this race.  

    Last updated: 2023-10-18

    Sarah Reyneveld

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting environmental and public health. 

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting environmental and public health. 

    Reyneveld has worked to help families and children through many volunteer roles, including as a board member of Washington’s Paramount Duty, an organization that advocates for more education funding, and as chair of the Women’s Advisory Board, which makes recommendations to the county for child care access and affordability. Reyneveld has also been a King County Democrats and 36th District Democrats executive board member, and vice chair of the Washington Conservation Action board of directors.

    In our interview with Reyneveld, she pointed to her longtime advocacy as a sign of her readiness to hit the ground running on her three top priorities: equitable economic recovery, the environment, and housing. With an anticipated budget shortfall looming for the county, she emphasized the need for more progressive revenue to help build 17,000 additional units of housing every year to keep up with population growth. She also mentioned the possibility of a dedicated countywide housing levy, which would create a funding source to build more diverse housing options, from multifamily homes to affordable housing.

    Reyneveld spoke about the need for prevention and helping meet people's needs to improve community safety. She believes that incarceration is not the answer for people struggling with addiction and other health issues. Scaling up gun violence prevention programs and addiction treatment hubs are two policies she would advocate for on the council, and she would also consider policies like a guaranteed basic income to help residents thrive. 

    Reyneveld's longtime experience in Democratic politics, community organizations, and legal advocacy distinguish her in this race.  

    Sarah Reyneveld

    Assistant Attorney General Sarah Reyneveld is running to bring her experience in government and policy advocacy to the King County Council. In her current role, she oversees a team that leads on protecting environmental and public health. 

  • Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is running for King County Council, District 8. Mosqueda was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017 and has proved a consistent and progressive policymaker. She previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on workers' rights and childrens' healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide. Mosqueda is a proud third-generation Mexican-American who would become the first Latina ever to serve on the King County Council if elected.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She championed the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing, childcare, and climate resilience through a tax on high earners and wealthy corporations. Mosqueda also helped secure paid sick leave and fair wage protections for working people that are often exploited by their employers - like gig drivers, domestic workers, and hotel workers. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8. 
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is running for King County Council, District 8. Mosqueda was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017 and has proved a consistent and progressive policymaker.

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is running for King County Council, District 8. Mosqueda was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017 and has proved a consistent and progressive policymaker. She previously worked at the Washington State Department of Health, Children’s Alliance, Community Health Plan of Washington, and the Washington State Labor Council, with a focus on workers' rights and childrens' healthcare. Among other community roles, she also served on the board of Fuse Washington, which publishes this guide. Mosqueda is a proud third-generation Mexican-American who would become the first Latina ever to serve on the King County Council if elected.

    Mosqueda has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She championed the Jumpstart Seattle legislation, which funds affordable housing, childcare, and climate resilience through a tax on high earners and wealthy corporations. Mosqueda also helped secure paid sick leave and fair wage protections for working people that are often exploited by their employers - like gig drivers, domestic workers, and hotel workers. Her current goal is passing the 2023 Housing Levy, which will be on the ballot for Seattle voters this November and would provide funding for crucial affordable housing, childcare services, and communal and cultural spaces that are disappearing from the city.

    If elected to the county council, Mosqueda hopes to use her experience to address new and pressing issues in the county. Some of her priorities include finding locations for the six new county behavioral health centers, building workforce housing outside of Seattle, increasing apprenticeship programs, and more. 

    Mosqueda is the clear choice for King County Council from District 8. 
     

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is running for King County Council, District 8. Mosqueda was first elected to the Seattle City Council in 2017 and has proved a consistent and progressive policymaker.

Other Candidates

Sofia Aragon

Sofia Aragon is also running for King County Council, District 8. Aragon became the first Filipino immigrant to be named mayor of Burien and has served on the Burien City Council since 2020. She is a registered nurse and the executive director of the Washington Center for Nursing.

Sofia Aragon

Sofia Aragon is also running for King County Council, District 8. Aragon became the first Filipino immigrant to be named mayor of Burien and has served on the Burien City Council since 2020. She is a registered nurse and the executive director of the Washington Center for Nursing.

  • Sam Cho is running unopposed for re-election for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 2. Before his election in 2019, he served on Gov. Jay Inslee’s Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and previously worked on trade issues for a member of Congress. Aside from his work on the commission, Cho also serves on the Bellevue Chamber of Commerce and the Washington Council on International Trade.

    Cho has been a standout on the commission in his first term. When Cho became commission president in 2022, he was the first Asian American to serve in the role in port history. As the son of South Korean immigrants and a fluent Korean speaker, Cho has led several international trade efforts with Korea, including creating a green trade corridor with the Port of Busan and working with Hyundai and KIA to make the Port of Seattle the exclusive importer of their cars.

    Cho deserves your vote for Position 2 on the Seattle Port Commission. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-18

    Sam Cho

    Submitted by airtable on Mon, 09/25/2023 - 15:34

    Sam Cho is running unopposed for re-election for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 2. Before his election in 2019, he served on Gov. Jay Inslee’s Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and previously worked on trade issues for a member of Congress.

    Sam Cho is running unopposed for re-election for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 2. Before his election in 2019, he served on Gov. Jay Inslee’s Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and previously worked on trade issues for a member of Congress. Aside from his work on the commission, Cho also serves on the Bellevue Chamber of Commerce and the Washington Council on International Trade.

    Cho has been a standout on the commission in his first term. When Cho became commission president in 2022, he was the first Asian American to serve in the role in port history. As the son of South Korean immigrants and a fluent Korean speaker, Cho has led several international trade efforts with Korea, including creating a green trade corridor with the Port of Busan and working with Hyundai and KIA to make the Port of Seattle the exclusive importer of their cars.

    Cho deserves your vote for Position 2 on the Seattle Port Commission. 

    Sam Cho

    Submitted by airtable on Mon, 09/25/2023 - 15:34

    Sam Cho is running unopposed for re-election for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 2. Before his election in 2019, he served on Gov. Jay Inslee’s Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and previously worked on trade issues for a member of Congress.

  • Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5, as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    As commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to the Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel. Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukrainian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most among U.S. states.

    Challenging Felleman is Jesse Tam, the managing director for Mega Pacific Investments, a strategic development consulting firm. He is a former parks commissioner for the city of Newcastle, as well as past president and current board director for the Greater Seattle Chinese Chamber of Commerce, among other roles. 

    Tam states that he's running to use his business experience to source well-paying union jobs, negotiate business deals, and lead on climate change. While we agree with Tam's listed priorities, Felleman has been an excellent environmental advocate and scientific mind on the board, and we don't see a strong case for how Tam would bring progressive change to the port. 

    Felleman has earned your vote for re-election to the Port of Seattle, Position #5. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Fred Felleman

    Submitted by airtable on Mon, 09/25/2023 - 15:34

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5, as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5, as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016. With his science background, Felleman has pledged to continue supporting environmentally friendly reforms at the port.

    As commissioner, Felleman has focused on fighting climate change and increasing the port's green energy jobs. He has been a leader on the commission when it comes to protecting orcas, publicly opposing the dangerous Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and advocating for well-paying jobs. Elected commission president in 2021, he has recently supported more efficient and greener policies at the port to reduce pollution, including adding solar panels to the Fishermen's Terminal's net shed and powering new docks so ships don't have to idle and burn additional fuel. Felleman often supports social causes as well, including condemning Trump's Muslim ban and government agencies’ response at the airport, as well as welcoming Ukrainian refugees, with Washington hosting 16,000 refugees, the third most among U.S. states.

    Challenging Felleman is Jesse Tam, the managing director for Mega Pacific Investments, a strategic development consulting firm. He is a former parks commissioner for the city of Newcastle, as well as past president and current board director for the Greater Seattle Chinese Chamber of Commerce, among other roles. 

    Tam states that he's running to use his business experience to source well-paying union jobs, negotiate business deals, and lead on climate change. While we agree with Tam's listed priorities, Felleman has been an excellent environmental advocate and scientific mind on the board, and we don't see a strong case for how Tam would bring progressive change to the port. 

    Felleman has earned your vote for re-election to the Port of Seattle, Position #5. 

    Fred Felleman

    Submitted by airtable on Mon, 09/25/2023 - 15:34

    Incumbent Fred Felleman is an environmental consultant and marine biologist. He is running for re-election to the Seattle Port Commission, Position 5, as the senior member of the commission, having served since 2016.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Maren Costa is the progressive candidate in the race to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan that eventually became the company's official Climate Pledge. In 2020, Costa was illegally fired from the company after sending out an email to rally her coworkers around poor warehouse conditions for workers. With the backing of an open letter from nine U.S. senators, including Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Costa won her case against Amazon and continued advocating for workers and her community.

    Costa is now running to bring her tenacity and experience in management to city hall. In our interview with Costa, she spoke about the importance of raising more money to maintain services as the city faces a $100 million dollar budget shortfall. Her proposals, including a vacancy tax, were squarely aimed at making the wealthiest pay their share. 

    Costa wants to look out for working people as well as the vulnerable to make Seattle more livable for all. She spoke to a desire to improve affordability by allowing more mixed-use developments and “four floors and corner stores” in neighborhoods. She believes well-designed, denser neighborhoods are critical as the state faces a severe housing shortage, making living here hard for teachers, nurses, and other working professionals. On homelessness, Costa wants the city to take a housing-first approach, working on getting people into secure housing instead of criminalizing them for sleeping outside. On public safety, Costa offers a vision that funds gun violence prevention, community policing, and alternative response models. 

    The other candidate in this race is Air Force veteran and cybersecurity lawyer Rob Saka. He formerly served on the county's charter review commission, which helped move the county sheriff from an elected position to an appointed one. However, Saka's campaign is somewhat low on specific details that make it unclear exactly how he would vote if elected to the council. In his interview with the Stranger, he said that the city needs more police officers, but declined to say how many or how the city could increase the number of unarmed officers, which he has also proposed. Saka was a no on increasing the JumpStart tax on businesses grossing over $8 million to pay for affordable housing and rent control, but a yes on continuing sweeps of people experiencing homelessness according to the Seattle Times. 

    In addition, since the primary election, every one of the six candidates who ran in this race endorsed Costa over Saka, many citing her experience, management skills, and growth during the campaign.

    Costa's experience managing million-dollar budgets and successfully advocating for corporate climate action makes her stand out as a progressive among the top candidates in the district. That experience plus an impressive set of endorsements, including every other candidate who ran in this race in the primary, make her the best choice for Seattle City Council in District 1. 
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Maren Costa

    Maren Costa is the progressive candidate in the race to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan that eventually became the company's official Climate Pledge.

    Maren Costa is the progressive candidate in the race to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan that eventually became the company's official Climate Pledge. In 2020, Costa was illegally fired from the company after sending out an email to rally her coworkers around poor warehouse conditions for workers. With the backing of an open letter from nine U.S. senators, including Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Costa won her case against Amazon and continued advocating for workers and her community.

    Costa is now running to bring her tenacity and experience in management to city hall. In our interview with Costa, she spoke about the importance of raising more money to maintain services as the city faces a $100 million dollar budget shortfall. Her proposals, including a vacancy tax, were squarely aimed at making the wealthiest pay their share. 

    Costa wants to look out for working people as well as the vulnerable to make Seattle more livable for all. She spoke to a desire to improve affordability by allowing more mixed-use developments and “four floors and corner stores” in neighborhoods. She believes well-designed, denser neighborhoods are critical as the state faces a severe housing shortage, making living here hard for teachers, nurses, and other working professionals. On homelessness, Costa wants the city to take a housing-first approach, working on getting people into secure housing instead of criminalizing them for sleeping outside. On public safety, Costa offers a vision that funds gun violence prevention, community policing, and alternative response models. 

    The other candidate in this race is Air Force veteran and cybersecurity lawyer Rob Saka. He formerly served on the county's charter review commission, which helped move the county sheriff from an elected position to an appointed one. However, Saka's campaign is somewhat low on specific details that make it unclear exactly how he would vote if elected to the council. In his interview with the Stranger, he said that the city needs more police officers, but declined to say how many or how the city could increase the number of unarmed officers, which he has also proposed. Saka was a no on increasing the JumpStart tax on businesses grossing over $8 million to pay for affordable housing and rent control, but a yes on continuing sweeps of people experiencing homelessness according to the Seattle Times. 

    In addition, since the primary election, every one of the six candidates who ran in this race endorsed Costa over Saka, many citing her experience, management skills, and growth during the campaign.

    Costa's experience managing million-dollar budgets and successfully advocating for corporate climate action makes her stand out as a progressive among the top candidates in the district. That experience plus an impressive set of endorsements, including every other candidate who ran in this race in the primary, make her the best choice for Seattle City Council in District 1. 
     

    Maren Costa

    Maren Costa is the progressive candidate in the race to replace Lisa Herbold on the Seattle City Council from District 1. A former Amazon principal designer, Costa advocated for a climate action plan that eventually became the company's official Climate Pledge.

  • Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal, progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to push for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Chinatown-International District (CID) small business owner Tanya Woo is challenging Morales in District 2. Woo’s family ran the Mon Hei Bakery and later renovated the historic Louisa Hotel to have 84 units of workforce housing. She is a longtime advocate for the CID, including starting the CID Community Watch volunteer group in 2020 that walks the neighborhood to provide support and diffuse conflicts. Unfortunately, last year, Woo led a series of rallies against King County's proposal to expand a homeless shelter near the CID. County Executive Dow Constantine eventually canceled the project, which would have included 150 shelter beds and a tiny house village, because of the "community feedback." Woo is now running for Seattle City Council to give a voice to CID residents who don't feel heard by elected leaders. She would focus on improving public safety, expanding community outreach in more languages, and protecting the neighborhood from gentrification.

    Morales has the proven track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal, progressive advocate for this diverse district.

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal, progressive advocate for this diverse district. Previously, she worked with the Rainier Beach Action Coalition to advocate for affordable housing, food security, and other pressing community needs. Beyond the city council, Morales has also served as a legislative director and city budget analyst.

    In her current role, Morales has pushed for safe and walkable streets, corporate accountability, social and other affordable housing measures, and climate crisis emergency responses such as extreme heat and smoke shelters. She is running to build on her previous term to push for Green New Deal funding and environmental protections that will keep Seattle a healthy place to live for generations to come. If re-elected, Morales will continue to champion affordable housing policies, neighborhood revitalization investments, and tenant rights. She has received an extensive and diverse list of endorsements in this race including from fellow city council members and other local progressives.

    Chinatown-International District (CID) small business owner Tanya Woo is challenging Morales in District 2. Woo’s family ran the Mon Hei Bakery and later renovated the historic Louisa Hotel to have 84 units of workforce housing. She is a longtime advocate for the CID, including starting the CID Community Watch volunteer group in 2020 that walks the neighborhood to provide support and diffuse conflicts. Unfortunately, last year, Woo led a series of rallies against King County's proposal to expand a homeless shelter near the CID. County Executive Dow Constantine eventually canceled the project, which would have included 150 shelter beds and a tiny house village, because of the "community feedback." Woo is now running for Seattle City Council to give a voice to CID residents who don't feel heard by elected leaders. She would focus on improving public safety, expanding community outreach in more languages, and protecting the neighborhood from gentrification.

    Morales has the proven track record and the progressive vision necessary to advocate for District 2 on the Seattle City Council. She has earned your vote for re-election.
     

    Tammy Morales

    Community organizer and incumbent Councilmember Tammy Morales is running for her second term serving District 2 on the Seattle City Council. Morales was first elected in 2019 and has been a vocal, progressive advocate for this diverse district.

  • Alex Hudson is running for Seattle City Council to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing. From 2018 to May of this year, she served as Executive Director of the Transportation Choices Coalition, where she successfully advocated for $5 billion in investments in transportation and transit in the 2022 legislative session, including free rides for all youth in Washington. Hudson currently serves on the board of the Puget Sound Regional Council Transportation Policy Board and the Freeway Park Association and has also led the First Hill Improvement Association.

    In our interview with Hudson, she offered a detailed vision for tackling Seattle's housing crisis. In comparison to Hollingsworth, Hudson was very specific in our interview about policies that she believes will affect housing across the entire city, not just the district. As a board member of Bellwether Housing, the largest affordable housing provider in King County, Hudson spoke to how they needed two years to get through permitting, licensing, and review to build housing - far too long, in her opinion. Hudson opposes policies that stifle affordable and middle housing, like duplexes, in wealthier neighborhoods. She supports a municipal capital gains tax to invest more in affordable housing and implementing the social housing authority to kickstart social, publicly-owned housing in Seattle.

    On community safety and policing, Hudson believes the city has dropped the ball on continuing to make our communities safe for all. Like Hollingsworth, Hudson sees value in covering some of the basics - making sure street lights work and parks are full of programs and opportunities. In addition, she wants to ensure that armed officers are showing up only on appropriate calls and make sure people don't end up in the criminal legal system over a bus fare. Hudson also wants to see further investment in a functioning 911 alternative response system. 

    With the departure of Councilmember Mosqueda, who is running for King County Council, the Seattle City Council needs another strong progressive voice on policy, one that can develop laws and organize for them. Hudson absolutely could be that voice, and with her stronger slate of endorsements, we recommend Alex Hudson for Seattle City Council, District 3.
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-20

    Alex Hudson

    Alex Hudson is running for Seattle City Council to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing.

    Alex Hudson is running for Seattle City Council to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing. From 2018 to May of this year, she served as Executive Director of the Transportation Choices Coalition, where she successfully advocated for $5 billion in investments in transportation and transit in the 2022 legislative session, including free rides for all youth in Washington. Hudson currently serves on the board of the Puget Sound Regional Council Transportation Policy Board and the Freeway Park Association and has also led the First Hill Improvement Association.

    In our interview with Hudson, she offered a detailed vision for tackling Seattle's housing crisis. In comparison to Hollingsworth, Hudson was very specific in our interview about policies that she believes will affect housing across the entire city, not just the district. As a board member of Bellwether Housing, the largest affordable housing provider in King County, Hudson spoke to how they needed two years to get through permitting, licensing, and review to build housing - far too long, in her opinion. Hudson opposes policies that stifle affordable and middle housing, like duplexes, in wealthier neighborhoods. She supports a municipal capital gains tax to invest more in affordable housing and implementing the social housing authority to kickstart social, publicly-owned housing in Seattle.

    On community safety and policing, Hudson believes the city has dropped the ball on continuing to make our communities safe for all. Like Hollingsworth, Hudson sees value in covering some of the basics - making sure street lights work and parks are full of programs and opportunities. In addition, she wants to ensure that armed officers are showing up only on appropriate calls and make sure people don't end up in the criminal legal system over a bus fare. Hudson also wants to see further investment in a functioning 911 alternative response system. 

    With the departure of Councilmember Mosqueda, who is running for King County Council, the Seattle City Council needs another strong progressive voice on policy, one that can develop laws and organize for them. Hudson absolutely could be that voice, and with her stronger slate of endorsements, we recommend Alex Hudson for Seattle City Council, District 3.
     

    Alex Hudson

    Alex Hudson is running for Seattle City Council to strengthen the fundamentals of city life through improved transit and housing.

  • Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. 

    Hollingsworth has invested much of her time in community and agriculture. Her family operates one of the few Black-owned cannabis production farms in the state and Joy is currently part of the Food Access Network team at Northwest Harvest. She is also a former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University and previously worked as the Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program.

    In our interview with Hollingsworth, she pointed to her lifelong history and knowledge of the district as a strength. Though she does not have a policy background, she would bring a wealth of community knowledge and priorities to the seat. For example, she spoke about how Black-owned businesses in the Central District had long been overlooked. She would push for greater investments from Seattle’s Business Improvement Areas and Office of Economic Development. She pointed out that the 98118 zip code in Rainier Valley only had one food bank, which hampered residents' ability to put food on the table in difficult times. She would also seek more youth enrichment programs and equitable placement of parks and green spaces by looking for opportunities for both in the district.

    Compared to Hudson's campaign, Hollingsworth's is more locally focused, with a desire to improve youth activities and parks specifically in the district. When it comes to policing, she stated that police should make more of an effort to meet the community, a stance we feel could use more detail. 

    Hollingsworth would be a good choice for voters looking for a candidate with strong community ties who would be a powerful advocate for District 3 at city hall. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Joy Hollingsworth

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. 

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. 

    Hollingsworth has invested much of her time in community and agriculture. Her family operates one of the few Black-owned cannabis production farms in the state and Joy is currently part of the Food Access Network team at Northwest Harvest. She is also a former assistant women's basketball coach at Seattle University and previously worked as the Girls Program Director at Seattle’s A PLUS Youth Program.

    In our interview with Hollingsworth, she pointed to her lifelong history and knowledge of the district as a strength. Though she does not have a policy background, she would bring a wealth of community knowledge and priorities to the seat. For example, she spoke about how Black-owned businesses in the Central District had long been overlooked. She would push for greater investments from Seattle’s Business Improvement Areas and Office of Economic Development. She pointed out that the 98118 zip code in Rainier Valley only had one food bank, which hampered residents' ability to put food on the table in difficult times. She would also seek more youth enrichment programs and equitable placement of parks and green spaces by looking for opportunities for both in the district.

    Compared to Hudson's campaign, Hollingsworth's is more locally focused, with a desire to improve youth activities and parks specifically in the district. When it comes to policing, she stated that police should make more of an effort to meet the community, a stance we feel could use more detail. 

    Hollingsworth would be a good choice for voters looking for a candidate with strong community ties who would be a powerful advocate for District 3 at city hall. 

    Joy Hollingsworth

    Joy Hollingsworth is running to put a spotlight on improving the lives of all residents of District 3. 

  • Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive for affordable housing, community safety, and more. Davis has served in the Roosevelt Neighborhood Association and has been a board member at Futurewise, which advocates for sustainability and livable communities. In our interview with Davis, he emphasized that he's running to be the opposite of retiring incumbent council member Alex Pedersen, who stood in the way of many progressive policies, including efforts to build more housing that's affordable to middle-income Seattlites. 

    If elected, Davis would focus on housing supply, subsidizing housing so that everyone has more affordable access, and increasing stability for renters. Many policies are on the table for Davis to achieve this, including prohibiting rent price gouging, funding social housing, expanding midrise housing, ensuring the "right to return" for people displaced by developers, and offering square footage and height bonuses. Davis is also rigorously pro-science when it comes to treating homelessness as a housing problem. He points out that many challenging and displacing life events like domestic abuse, addiction, and job loss are less catastrophic when people can afford rent and stay off the streets. Aside from the many housing policies above, Davis wants to see 3,500 permanent supportive housing units built. 

    In the primary election, Davis was one of the few candidates, not just in the district but citywide, to acknowledge that even Seattle's own police don't think they can hire 400 more officers during a nationwide shortage. Rather than lowering standards on hires and pouring more money into bonuses, he wants to see aggressive expansion into alternatives to policing for people in crisis. Other top priorities for Davis are worker's rights, including subsidized childcare, closing minimum wage loopholes, and more.

    Davis' opponent, Maritza Rivera, works in Mayor Bruce Harrell's office as Deputy Director of the Department of Arts & Culture. Her number one campaign priority is public safety, specifically in the form of getting 5-minute response times to 911 calls, taking "home and car break-ins seriously," and aggressively targeting drug users. The lack of details on how she would achieve this or any of the city's many other needs does not instill confidence. Rivera doesn't support rent control and wants the city to continue its expensive and inhumane sweeps of encampments. She has no firm stance on increasing revenue for all the 400 additional officers she wants to hire, despite a projected city budget shortfall in the years to come.

    Rivera was also highlighted in a Stranger article around the contents of a letter that the majority of the staff at the Seattle Arts and Culture Department (ARTS) signed, citing "defensive, hostile, and condescending interactions with Rivera." She has taken a large number of donations from corporations and conservatives, including those who often donate to Trump and other Republican campaigns. 

    Vote for Ron Davis for progressive change on the Seattle City Council from District 4.  

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Ron Davis

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive for affordable housing, community safety, and more.

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive for affordable housing, community safety, and more. Davis has served in the Roosevelt Neighborhood Association and has been a board member at Futurewise, which advocates for sustainability and livable communities. In our interview with Davis, he emphasized that he's running to be the opposite of retiring incumbent council member Alex Pedersen, who stood in the way of many progressive policies, including efforts to build more housing that's affordable to middle-income Seattlites. 

    If elected, Davis would focus on housing supply, subsidizing housing so that everyone has more affordable access, and increasing stability for renters. Many policies are on the table for Davis to achieve this, including prohibiting rent price gouging, funding social housing, expanding midrise housing, ensuring the "right to return" for people displaced by developers, and offering square footage and height bonuses. Davis is also rigorously pro-science when it comes to treating homelessness as a housing problem. He points out that many challenging and displacing life events like domestic abuse, addiction, and job loss are less catastrophic when people can afford rent and stay off the streets. Aside from the many housing policies above, Davis wants to see 3,500 permanent supportive housing units built. 

    In the primary election, Davis was one of the few candidates, not just in the district but citywide, to acknowledge that even Seattle's own police don't think they can hire 400 more officers during a nationwide shortage. Rather than lowering standards on hires and pouring more money into bonuses, he wants to see aggressive expansion into alternatives to policing for people in crisis. Other top priorities for Davis are worker's rights, including subsidized childcare, closing minimum wage loopholes, and more.

    Davis' opponent, Maritza Rivera, works in Mayor Bruce Harrell's office as Deputy Director of the Department of Arts & Culture. Her number one campaign priority is public safety, specifically in the form of getting 5-minute response times to 911 calls, taking "home and car break-ins seriously," and aggressively targeting drug users. The lack of details on how she would achieve this or any of the city's many other needs does not instill confidence. Rivera doesn't support rent control and wants the city to continue its expensive and inhumane sweeps of encampments. She has no firm stance on increasing revenue for all the 400 additional officers she wants to hire, despite a projected city budget shortfall in the years to come.

    Rivera was also highlighted in a Stranger article around the contents of a letter that the majority of the staff at the Seattle Arts and Culture Department (ARTS) signed, citing "defensive, hostile, and condescending interactions with Rivera." She has taken a large number of donations from corporations and conservatives, including those who often donate to Trump and other Republican campaigns. 

    Vote for Ron Davis for progressive change on the Seattle City Council from District 4.  

    Ron Davis

    Ron Davis is running for Seattle City Council, District 4 as an outspoken progressive for affordable housing, community safety, and more.

  • ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate running for Seattle City Council in District 5. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run an equity consulting firm. ObeySumner has held leadership positions in many organizations over the years, including as former co-chair of the Seattle Disabilities Commission and former co-chair of the Seattle Renter’s Commission. 

    Given their experience in community advocacy, it's no surprise that ObeySumner's top three priorities in their interview were disability justice, improving accountability in government, and building sustainable and collective infrastructure. They spoke about how as a social worker, they see many causes of homelessness, including domestic violence, increasing rents, lost wages, and caregiving. Therefore, the city's homelessness response must be tailored to meet the needs of many, including adopting a housing-first approach before providing job training, addiction treatment, or other social services. They want to ensure that as the city expands middle housing options like duplexes and triplexes, it also keeps in mind residents with disabilities who may not be able to access all rooms in homes with stairs. In addition, they want denser housing in all neighborhoods, not just along busy streets. 

    ObeySumner wants to see communities of color be able to engage in participatory budgeting and have more say in community policy. On the issue of policing, ObeySumner believes that a greater emphasis on conflict resolution, de-escalation, supporting survivors of violence or crime, mental health crisis teams, and alternatives to calling 911 - advertised through QR codes on buses - would build more trust in law enforcement and provide more strategies for safety. In addition, they would advocate for a "complete streets" infrastructure update that would create more accessibility and safety for people walking and rolling, To pay for these priorities, ObeySumner wants to consider a vacancy tax modeled after Vancouver's 3 to 5 percent property value tax on properties that have been vacant for over a year. 

    ObeySumner's strong endorsements from our progressive partners make them the best choice for Seattle City Council from District 5.  

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate running for Seattle City Council in District 5. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run an equity consulting firm.

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate running for Seattle City Council in District 5. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run an equity consulting firm. ObeySumner has held leadership positions in many organizations over the years, including as former co-chair of the Seattle Disabilities Commission and former co-chair of the Seattle Renter’s Commission. 

    Given their experience in community advocacy, it's no surprise that ObeySumner's top three priorities in their interview were disability justice, improving accountability in government, and building sustainable and collective infrastructure. They spoke about how as a social worker, they see many causes of homelessness, including domestic violence, increasing rents, lost wages, and caregiving. Therefore, the city's homelessness response must be tailored to meet the needs of many, including adopting a housing-first approach before providing job training, addiction treatment, or other social services. They want to ensure that as the city expands middle housing options like duplexes and triplexes, it also keeps in mind residents with disabilities who may not be able to access all rooms in homes with stairs. In addition, they want denser housing in all neighborhoods, not just along busy streets. 

    ObeySumner wants to see communities of color be able to engage in participatory budgeting and have more say in community policy. On the issue of policing, ObeySumner believes that a greater emphasis on conflict resolution, de-escalation, supporting survivors of violence or crime, mental health crisis teams, and alternatives to calling 911 - advertised through QR codes on buses - would build more trust in law enforcement and provide more strategies for safety. In addition, they would advocate for a "complete streets" infrastructure update that would create more accessibility and safety for people walking and rolling, To pay for these priorities, ObeySumner wants to consider a vacancy tax modeled after Vancouver's 3 to 5 percent property value tax on properties that have been vacant for over a year. 

    ObeySumner's strong endorsements from our progressive partners make them the best choice for Seattle City Council from District 5.  

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner

    ChrisTiana ObeySumner is a social equity consultant, educator, and advocate running for Seattle City Council in District 5. They have worked in permanent supportive housing as a service coordinator and assessor, and currently run an equity consulting firm.

  • Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is running for the District 5 seat on the Seattle City Council.

    Moore has worked in public service for decades, including in public defense, as chair of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, and as governor of the Washington State Bar Association. If elected, Moore supports social and workforce housing, improvements to bus services and other transit, and investments in public services such as on-demand substance use treatment and before-and-after school programs. She wants to see more tiny homes villages built to prevent people from needing to live on the street, and believes that rental subsidies should be expanded as well to prevent homelessness. Moore wants to see the city also create a department for climate resiliency that would focus on providing resources like air conditioning at libraries, community centers, and more as climate change drives hotter summers.

    While Moore has many years of public service and shares many progressive values, ObeySumner would be a stronger advocate on the most important issues facing Seattle. Moore supports a slightly more cautious approach when it comes to building desperately needed housing than ObeySumner. The two candidates diverge more when it comes to how best to keep our community safe. Moore supports Mayor Harrell's goal of hiring more than 400 officers, despite a nationwide hiring challenge and anticipated budget shortfalls. Moore states that when the new police guild contract is written, she will ensure that accountability measures are in place, though the city has struggled in the recent past to hold the police department accountable to reforms like investigating complaints against officers.

    During her interview, we were somewhat disappointed with the lack of depth in Moore’s answers given her longtime public service. In contrast, ObeySumner’s advocacy experience came through in their detailed, thoughtful responses to our questions. 
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Cathy Moore

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is running for the District 5 seat on the Seattle City Council.

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is running for the District 5 seat on the Seattle City Council.

    Moore has worked in public service for decades, including in public defense, as chair of the Seattle Human Rights Commission, and as governor of the Washington State Bar Association. If elected, Moore supports social and workforce housing, improvements to bus services and other transit, and investments in public services such as on-demand substance use treatment and before-and-after school programs. She wants to see more tiny homes villages built to prevent people from needing to live on the street, and believes that rental subsidies should be expanded as well to prevent homelessness. Moore wants to see the city also create a department for climate resiliency that would focus on providing resources like air conditioning at libraries, community centers, and more as climate change drives hotter summers.

    While Moore has many years of public service and shares many progressive values, ObeySumner would be a stronger advocate on the most important issues facing Seattle. Moore supports a slightly more cautious approach when it comes to building desperately needed housing than ObeySumner. The two candidates diverge more when it comes to how best to keep our community safe. Moore supports Mayor Harrell's goal of hiring more than 400 officers, despite a nationwide hiring challenge and anticipated budget shortfalls. Moore states that when the new police guild contract is written, she will ensure that accountability measures are in place, though the city has struggled in the recent past to hold the police department accountable to reforms like investigating complaints against officers.

    During her interview, we were somewhat disappointed with the lack of depth in Moore’s answers given her longtime public service. In contrast, ObeySumner’s advocacy experience came through in their detailed, thoughtful responses to our questions. 
     

    Cathy Moore

    Former King County Superior Court Judge Cathy Moore is running for the District 5 seat on the Seattle City Council.

  • Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 6. Strauss was first elected in 2019 and previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. 

    Strauss is running for a second term to continue bringing community-focused leadership to District 6. On the council, Strauss has prioritized creating more affordable housing options and strengthening tenant rights. With investments of $250 million in 2022, permanent supportive housing was purchased in Green Lake, Ballard, and Greenwood. As the land use chair, he also points to how he has cleared encampments without sweeps by connecting people to services. Unfortunately, Strauss recently voted in favor of allowing Republican City Attorney Ann Davison to prosecute people for drug use. In addition, Strauss disappointed many advocates by pushing for larger police budgets, which would increase the presence of militarized police in our communities instead of making us safer. 

    If re-elected, Strauss will continue to develop Ballard Commons Park as a community green space, support the local small business economy, and ensure corporations and the wealthy pay what they owe. While he has not been the progressive leader some had hoped for, his opponent would be a step backward for the district and the city overall.

    Pete Hanning is challenging Dan Strauss for this city council seat. Hanning owned Red Door in Fremont for twenty years and is currently the executive director for the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. Hanning's platform was one of the most conservative in the primary race for this seat. Hanning does not want to increase revenue from large corporations through the Jumpstart tax. His questionnaire with The Seattle Times states that he does not want the city to raise any additional revenue at all, leaving voters to wonder how he intends to pay for proposed infrastructure revitalization on the West Seattle Bridge or continue the expensive and inhumane practice of sweeping homeless encampments. 

    Strauss has earned the majority of endorsements from progressive leaders and organizations and is the clear choice for city council from District 6.
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Dan Strauss

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 6. Strauss was first elected in 2019 and previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. 

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 6. Strauss was first elected in 2019 and previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. 

    Strauss is running for a second term to continue bringing community-focused leadership to District 6. On the council, Strauss has prioritized creating more affordable housing options and strengthening tenant rights. With investments of $250 million in 2022, permanent supportive housing was purchased in Green Lake, Ballard, and Greenwood. As the land use chair, he also points to how he has cleared encampments without sweeps by connecting people to services. Unfortunately, Strauss recently voted in favor of allowing Republican City Attorney Ann Davison to prosecute people for drug use. In addition, Strauss disappointed many advocates by pushing for larger police budgets, which would increase the presence of militarized police in our communities instead of making us safer. 

    If re-elected, Strauss will continue to develop Ballard Commons Park as a community green space, support the local small business economy, and ensure corporations and the wealthy pay what they owe. While he has not been the progressive leader some had hoped for, his opponent would be a step backward for the district and the city overall.

    Pete Hanning is challenging Dan Strauss for this city council seat. Hanning owned Red Door in Fremont for twenty years and is currently the executive director for the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. Hanning's platform was one of the most conservative in the primary race for this seat. Hanning does not want to increase revenue from large corporations through the Jumpstart tax. His questionnaire with The Seattle Times states that he does not want the city to raise any additional revenue at all, leaving voters to wonder how he intends to pay for proposed infrastructure revitalization on the West Seattle Bridge or continue the expensive and inhumane practice of sweeping homeless encampments. 

    Strauss has earned the majority of endorsements from progressive leaders and organizations and is the clear choice for city council from District 6.
     

    Dan Strauss

    Incumbent Dan Strauss is seeking re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 6. Strauss was first elected in 2019 and previously served as a senior policy advisor to Councilmember Sally Bagshaw and worked for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. 

  • Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Navy veteran Bob Kettle is challenging incumbent Lewis for the District 7 seat. Kettle is not running a progressive campaign. He would ignore the public call for policing alternatives and community investments that would actually keep our neighbors safe. If elected, Kettle also wants to criminalize addiction and increase inhumane sweeps that don’t alleviate our housing crisis. 

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission. He also serves as the president of the Seattle Metropolitan Park District where he has worked to create jobs, ensure the cleanliness of public green space, and advance environmental goals for the city.

    In his first term on the council, Lewis prioritized funding affordable housing programs, ensuring community safety, and achieving greater climate protections to make Seattle a healthier place for all of us. He secured funding to fully renovate the Queen Anne Community Center and expanded the JustCARE program, which offers outreach, shelter, and wrap-around services to Seattleites without housing. In this race, he is running on a progressive platform to expand crisis support services, invest in social and transitional housing options, and improve the city’s public transit infrastructure to reduce both traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Navy veteran Bob Kettle is challenging incumbent Lewis for the District 7 seat. Kettle is not running a progressive campaign. He would ignore the public call for policing alternatives and community investments that would actually keep our neighbors safe. If elected, Kettle also wants to criminalize addiction and increase inhumane sweeps that don’t alleviate our housing crisis. 

    Lewis has earned an impressive list of endorsements from elected officials and key community leaders and is the most progressive choice in this race. Vote Andrew Lewis for Seattle City Council from District 7. 

    Andrew Lewis

    Councilmember Andrew Lewis is running for re-election to the Seattle City Council from District 7. Lewis was first elected to the seat in 2019 and previously served as an assistant city attorney, including working on the Seattle Human Rights Commission.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to continue critical funding to address housing needs in the city

  • Everyone in Seattle should have a safe, warm place to live. City of Seattle Proposition 1 replaces the expiring Seattle Housing Levy to continue funding homes that all families can afford. 

    Many landlords in Seattle have driven up rents in recent years, forcing working people into evictions, long commutes, or homelessness. Since first established in 1986, the Seattle Housing Levy is a long-standing policy that has provided homes, pathways to home ownership, and direct support from case managers for generations of residents. Re-approved by 70 percent of voters in 2016, the levy has most recently supported low-income households, keeping working families, seniors, neighbors with disabilities, and people experiencing homelessness sheltered. 

    Earlier this year, Mayor Harrell and the city council proposed a new seven-year levy that would increase funding to meet the needs of families struggling to live and work in Seattle. The levy would exempt certain qualifying groups and continue helping alleviate the housing crisis in the city. 

    When all Seattleites can have a home, our most basic human need, our city becomes safer, more equitable, healthier, and full of opportunity for all. Vote Yes to approve Seattle Proposition 1.
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Everyone in Seattle should have a safe, warm place to live. City of Seattle Proposition 1 replaces the expiring Seattle Housing Levy to continue funding homes that all families can afford. 

    Many landlords in Seattle have driven up rents in recent years, forcing working people into evictions, long commutes, or homelessness. Since first established in 1986, the Seattle Housing Levy is a long-standing policy that has provided homes, pathways to home ownership, and direct support from case managers for generations of residents. Re-approved by 70 percent of voters in 2016, the levy has most recently supported low-income households, keeping working families, seniors, neighbors with disabilities, and people experiencing homelessness sheltered. 

    Earlier this year, Mayor Harrell and the city council proposed a new seven-year levy that would increase funding to meet the needs of families struggling to live and work in Seattle. The levy would exempt certain qualifying groups and continue helping alleviate the housing crisis in the city. 

    When all Seattleites can have a home, our most basic human need, our city becomes safer, more equitable, healthier, and full of opportunity for all. Vote Yes to approve Seattle Proposition 1.
     

    Everyone in Seattle should have a safe, warm place to live. City of Seattle Proposition 1 replaces the expiring Seattle Housing Levy to continue funding homes that all families can afford. 

    Many landlords in Seattle have driven up rents in recent years, forcing working people into evictions, long commutes, or homelessness. Since first established in 1986, the Seattle Housing Levy is a long-standing policy that has provided homes, pathways to home ownership, and direct support from case managers for generations of residents. Re-approved by 70 percent of voters in 2016, the levy has most recently supported low-income households, keeping working families, seniors, neighbors with disabilities, and people experiencing homelessness sheltered. 

    Earlier this year, Mayor Harrell and the city council proposed a new seven-year levy that would increase funding to meet the needs of families struggling to live and work in Seattle. The levy would exempt certain qualifying groups and continue helping alleviate the housing crisis in the city. 

    When all Seattleites can have a home, our most basic human need, our city becomes safer, more equitable, healthier, and full of opportunity for all. Vote Yes to approve Seattle Proposition 1.
     

    Seattle Prop 1

    Everyone in Seattle should have a safe, warm place to live. City of Seattle Proposition 1 replaces the expiring Seattle Housing Levy to continue funding homes that all families can afford. 

  • Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship. She serves as advocacy chair of both the Olympic Hills Elementary PTA board and the 46th Democrats as a Co-Policy & Advocacy Chair, as well as fundraising chair for the National Women's Political Caucus.

    As a nonbinary person with a diverse family, Carlsen wants schools to be welcoming to all, especially in a climate of conservatives passing anti-LGTBQ laws. Carlsen lists transparency, family engagement, and representation in schools as her top three policy priorities. In her interview with the 36th Legislative District Democrats, she also emphasized robust special education and regaining the confidence of Seattle parents and families.

    On the issue of the budget, Carlsen was hesitant to say that closures were inevitable. Closures in the past have been disastrous, she said, and more community meetings would need to happen in District 1 before she made a decision. She proposed a 15 percent cut to staff in the central office, though it seems very unlikely that this alone would cover a budget gap of this magnitude. 

    On school safety, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar. Both agreed that students had been clear that more surveillance and policing in schools was not the way forward, and both felt that gun violence education and community lobbying for better gun violence legislation were needed. Carlsen felt that directors could and must do more to meet with community members and parents, especially right after the tragedy at Ingraham.

    If voters are looking for an experienced advocate hoping to bring change and improve transparency for parents and students, Carlsen could be a good choice. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-23

    Debbie Carlsen

    Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship.

    Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship. She serves as advocacy chair of both the Olympic Hills Elementary PTA board and the 46th Democrats as a Co-Policy & Advocacy Chair, as well as fundraising chair for the National Women's Political Caucus.

    As a nonbinary person with a diverse family, Carlsen wants schools to be welcoming to all, especially in a climate of conservatives passing anti-LGTBQ laws. Carlsen lists transparency, family engagement, and representation in schools as her top three policy priorities. In her interview with the 36th Legislative District Democrats, she also emphasized robust special education and regaining the confidence of Seattle parents and families.

    On the issue of the budget, Carlsen was hesitant to say that closures were inevitable. Closures in the past have been disastrous, she said, and more community meetings would need to happen in District 1 before she made a decision. She proposed a 15 percent cut to staff in the central office, though it seems very unlikely that this alone would cover a budget gap of this magnitude. 

    On school safety, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar. Both agreed that students had been clear that more surveillance and policing in schools was not the way forward, and both felt that gun violence education and community lobbying for better gun violence legislation were needed. Carlsen felt that directors could and must do more to meet with community members and parents, especially right after the tragedy at Ingraham.

    If voters are looking for an experienced advocate hoping to bring change and improve transparency for parents and students, Carlsen could be a good choice. 

    Debbie Carlsen

    Challenging Rankin this year is Debbie Carlsen, a consultant, former NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Washington Interim Policy Director, and co-founder and executive director of LGTBQ Allyship.

  • Endorsed By: M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Housing Action Fund, Seattle Education Association
  • Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools. Prior to her election, Rankin was a longtime community organizer and artist who had served on the PTA of her children's school as well as on the board of the Seattle Council PTSA and the advisory board at Sand Point Arts and Cultural Exchange at Magnuson Park, among other leadership roles. Rankin began her school activism by bringing food to teachers walking picket lines during the 2015 strike. She ran on a vision to support the school board's new Strategic Plan and ensure that every child has equitable access and opportunity to learn.

    In our extensive interview with Rankin, she reiterated that the board had made excellent progress on those issues, including reducing disproportionate discipline against boys and students of color, banning isolation practices, and limiting restraints. She noted that progress had been made on inclusionary practices for students with disabilities, moving the city's public schools from the bottom quartile to the bottom half nationwide. Rankin is running again to continue this work, but also to address head-on the issues facing students and schools. 

    We found Rankin to be clear-eyed on the issue of the budget. She told us without equivocation that any one-time fixes have run out and expenditures are higher than state revenue provides. Rankin told us that in the last 8 years, 10 schools had opened, and a mismatch of schools open and students who actually attend mean the school closures are likely one of the ways to close the budget gap. For example, she stated that 15 elementary schools have fewer than 250 students and the district could save money on administration and provide better opportunities for students if they were added to larger schools.

    Rankin noted that an upgrade to school lock security would be complete in Seattle Public Schools soon, and outside of that, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar on school safety. 

    Rankin is a good choice if you're looking for someone with institutional knowledge to serve during a challenging time for our schools.  

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Liza Rankin

    Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools.

    Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools. Prior to her election, Rankin was a longtime community organizer and artist who had served on the PTA of her children's school as well as on the board of the Seattle Council PTSA and the advisory board at Sand Point Arts and Cultural Exchange at Magnuson Park, among other leadership roles. Rankin began her school activism by bringing food to teachers walking picket lines during the 2015 strike. She ran on a vision to support the school board's new Strategic Plan and ensure that every child has equitable access and opportunity to learn.

    In our extensive interview with Rankin, she reiterated that the board had made excellent progress on those issues, including reducing disproportionate discipline against boys and students of color, banning isolation practices, and limiting restraints. She noted that progress had been made on inclusionary practices for students with disabilities, moving the city's public schools from the bottom quartile to the bottom half nationwide. Rankin is running again to continue this work, but also to address head-on the issues facing students and schools. 

    We found Rankin to be clear-eyed on the issue of the budget. She told us without equivocation that any one-time fixes have run out and expenditures are higher than state revenue provides. Rankin told us that in the last 8 years, 10 schools had opened, and a mismatch of schools open and students who actually attend mean the school closures are likely one of the ways to close the budget gap. For example, she stated that 15 elementary schools have fewer than 250 students and the district could save money on administration and provide better opportunities for students if they were added to larger schools.

    Rankin noted that an upgrade to school lock security would be complete in Seattle Public Schools soon, and outside of that, Carlsen and Rankin were somewhat similar on school safety. 

    Rankin is a good choice if you're looking for someone with institutional knowledge to serve during a challenging time for our schools.  

    Liza Rankin

    Incumbent Liza Rankin was elected in 2019 and took office shortly before the chaos of the pandemic hit our schools.

  • Endorsed By: OneAmerica Votes, The Stranger, King County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Lisa Rivera Smith is running for her second term on the Seattle School Board Director in District 2. Rivera Smith has served as president and vice president of communications in Hamilton International Middle School PTSA, as founder and co-president of the Lincoln High School PTSA, and as vice chair of the 46th District Democrats.

    In our interview with Rivera Smith, she spoke of the challenges of the last four years, including the pandemic, a budget crisis, and the search for a new superintendent. While there's concern that Rivera Smith isn't actively seeking enough changes to district policy as schools lose more students, she believes that she can put all her experience to work if re-elected by increasing transparency into the inner workings of the district for families and students. 

    She points to her Just Say Why newsletters as one way that she's personally communicated decisions around the budget to families. She emphasized that the board doesn't create the budget, they just approve it, and that if school closures do happen, she wants the district to focus on not losing properties and reducing any impacts to neighborhoods. School closures can be traumatic for neighborhoods, but she states that the need to consolidate resources is high. 

    On student mental health and school safety, Rivera Smith says the focus needs to be on making partnerships with outside organizations through referrals. She points to the safety panel, training for school staff, and the superintendent's safety audit, the results of which are still pending, as ways the district has made steps forward to ensure student safety. 

    Given the amount of turnover on the Seattle School Board in recent years, Rivera Smith wants to provide consistency and experience. She is endorsed by several Democratic organizations as well as the Stranger and MLK Labor. We recommend her in this race because of her stronger endorsements. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Lisa Rivera Smith

    Lisa Rivera Smith is running for her second term on the Seattle School Board Director in District 2.

    Lisa Rivera Smith is running for her second term on the Seattle School Board Director in District 2. Rivera Smith has served as president and vice president of communications in Hamilton International Middle School PTSA, as founder and co-president of the Lincoln High School PTSA, and as vice chair of the 46th District Democrats.

    In our interview with Rivera Smith, she spoke of the challenges of the last four years, including the pandemic, a budget crisis, and the search for a new superintendent. While there's concern that Rivera Smith isn't actively seeking enough changes to district policy as schools lose more students, she believes that she can put all her experience to work if re-elected by increasing transparency into the inner workings of the district for families and students. 

    She points to her Just Say Why newsletters as one way that she's personally communicated decisions around the budget to families. She emphasized that the board doesn't create the budget, they just approve it, and that if school closures do happen, she wants the district to focus on not losing properties and reducing any impacts to neighborhoods. School closures can be traumatic for neighborhoods, but she states that the need to consolidate resources is high. 

    On student mental health and school safety, Rivera Smith says the focus needs to be on making partnerships with outside organizations through referrals. She points to the safety panel, training for school staff, and the superintendent's safety audit, the results of which are still pending, as ways the district has made steps forward to ensure student safety. 

    Given the amount of turnover on the Seattle School Board in recent years, Rivera Smith wants to provide consistency and experience. She is endorsed by several Democratic organizations as well as the Stranger and MLK Labor. We recommend her in this race because of her stronger endorsements. 

    Lisa Rivera Smith

    Lisa Rivera Smith is running for her second term on the Seattle School Board Director in District 2.

  • Endorsed By: M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, The Stranger, Washington Education Association, King County Democrats
  • Christina Posten is challenging incumbent Lisa Rivera Smith to represent District 2 on the Seattle School Board. A former principal of Whitman Middle School and high school science teacher who is currently taking time off for her first child, Posten says that she was inspired to run to repair Seattle Public Schools. 

    Posten's priorities for the board center around transparency, community relationships, and school safety. She wants to see outside auditing of how money is being spent, more involvement from schools and the community in the district's budget decisions, and informed decision-making about possible school closures. Posten says the first step to closing the $100 million dollar budget gap is to trim salaries and staff in the district's central office, though this likely would not cover anywhere close to the gap. 

    When it comes to safety, Posten wants to fund more secure schools with chain link fences. Posten is highly affected by the shooting at Ingraham High, which was perpetrated by a former student at her school. She says it was too easy for the student to re-enroll in another school after threats of violence, and would advocate for schools to implement better plans and safety support systems for students who need them.

    Posten is also supportive of providing more services to meet families' basic needs like child care and transportation and would prioritize equalizing the resources between neighborhoods across Seattle.

    Posten has some progressive priorities, but as of October 17 she has reported raising no money for her campaign and her website lacks substantial details on how she would make concrete changes at Seattle Public Schools.

    Last updated: 2023-10-18

    Christina Posten

    Christina Posten is challenging incumbent Lisa Rivera Smith to represent District 2 on the Seattle School Board.

    Christina Posten is challenging incumbent Lisa Rivera Smith to represent District 2 on the Seattle School Board. A former principal of Whitman Middle School and high school science teacher who is currently taking time off for her first child, Posten says that she was inspired to run to repair Seattle Public Schools. 

    Posten's priorities for the board center around transparency, community relationships, and school safety. She wants to see outside auditing of how money is being spent, more involvement from schools and the community in the district's budget decisions, and informed decision-making about possible school closures. Posten says the first step to closing the $100 million dollar budget gap is to trim salaries and staff in the district's central office, though this likely would not cover anywhere close to the gap. 

    When it comes to safety, Posten wants to fund more secure schools with chain link fences. Posten is highly affected by the shooting at Ingraham High, which was perpetrated by a former student at her school. She says it was too easy for the student to re-enroll in another school after threats of violence, and would advocate for schools to implement better plans and safety support systems for students who need them.

    Posten is also supportive of providing more services to meet families' basic needs like child care and transportation and would prioritize equalizing the resources between neighborhoods across Seattle.

    Posten has some progressive priorities, but as of October 17 she has reported raising no money for her campaign and her website lacks substantial details on how she would make concrete changes at Seattle Public Schools.

    Christina Posten

    Christina Posten is challenging incumbent Lisa Rivera Smith to represent District 2 on the Seattle School Board.

  • A parent of three Seattle Public Schools kids, independent documentary filmmaker Evan Briggs says she's running to bring meaningful change and big-picture thinking as a director for District 3 on the Seattle School Board. She has served as chair of the parent-teacher organization at her children’s elementary school and is currently the Sand Point Elementary PTA representative on the Magnuson Park Advisory Committee.

    When it comes to declining enrollment in Seattle Public Schools, Briggs goes further than her opponent Gitenstein on potential solutions. Both agree that the district needs to identify why families are choosing to homeschool or go to private schools. Briggs wants to see more hybrid options of homeschooling and public schools to attract families to the district, and also believes that schools should partner with community organizations to advocate for more affordable housing, which would keep families from being priced out by rising housing and rent costs.

    Briggs wants to see more mental health professionals in schools as well as stronger relationships with service organizations in the community. She also states that the board should have clearer communication with parents and budget transparency for families. On the budget, Briggs has stated that she will look to pare down administrative and consulting contracts that don't affect student performance. Briggs has earned impressive endorsements from education leaders and progressive organizations. We recommend Briggs for the Seattle School Board from District 3. 
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-24

    Evan Briggs

    A parent of three Seattle Public Schools kids, independent documentary filmmaker Evan Briggs says she's running to bring meaningful change and big-picture thinking as a director for District 3 on the Seattle School Board.

    A parent of three Seattle Public Schools kids, independent documentary filmmaker Evan Briggs says she's running to bring meaningful change and big-picture thinking as a director for District 3 on the Seattle School Board. She has served as chair of the parent-teacher organization at her children’s elementary school and is currently the Sand Point Elementary PTA representative on the Magnuson Park Advisory Committee.

    When it comes to declining enrollment in Seattle Public Schools, Briggs goes further than her opponent Gitenstein on potential solutions. Both agree that the district needs to identify why families are choosing to homeschool or go to private schools. Briggs wants to see more hybrid options of homeschooling and public schools to attract families to the district, and also believes that schools should partner with community organizations to advocate for more affordable housing, which would keep families from being priced out by rising housing and rent costs.

    Briggs wants to see more mental health professionals in schools as well as stronger relationships with service organizations in the community. She also states that the board should have clearer communication with parents and budget transparency for families. On the budget, Briggs has stated that she will look to pare down administrative and consulting contracts that don't affect student performance. Briggs has earned impressive endorsements from education leaders and progressive organizations. We recommend Briggs for the Seattle School Board from District 3. 
     

    Evan Briggs

    A parent of three Seattle Public Schools kids, independent documentary filmmaker Evan Briggs says she's running to bring meaningful change and big-picture thinking as a director for District 3 on the Seattle School Board.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger, King County Democrats
  • Google manager and parent of two Ben Gitenstein is also running for Seattle School Board Director in District 3. He describes himself as a frustrated progressive who doesn't have all the answers but is willing to ask hard questions. His website details his concerns with Seattle Public Schools and its board, including budgets and the incidence of gun violence at Ingraham High that left one student dead. Unfortunately, he does not yet offer specific solutions to these issues as of mid-October other than bringing in new voices, which will naturally happen as there are two retiring incumbents this year. 

    Gitenstein is the former executive director of the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance in the 2000s and has volunteered for school plays and fundraisers. Though he does not appear to be actively involved in Seattle school leadership positions like the PTA, he has worked in education advocacy in New York to bring more resources to community centers. He states that his 15 years as a product manager at startups and tech firms could be put to use in reorganizing the budget.

    Gitenstein's recommendation by The Seattle Times appears to come from what the editorial board describes as his urgency on school issues, "his appetite for real talk," and his distance from anyone who currently works with Seattle Public Schools. Based on local interviews, Gitenstein wants the board to provide more fiscal oversight and address the enrollment drop. He also wants to see increased public accountability and debate at board meetings by eliminating the "intro and action" parts of the agenda. 

    This year in June, the school board moved to Student Outcome Focused Governance (SOFG). Some critics, including Gitenstein, feel it has reduced public oversight and power over the board. In a June interview with The Stranger, Gitenstein did not point out a specific instance in which SOFG had taken away public participation, but he believes that the change gives the board less opportunity for public discussion and policy conversations.

    Gitenstein's urgency to change the direction of the board on community transparency, funding issues, and more has earned him the endorsements of four local Democratic organizations. 
     

    Last updated: 2023-11-03

    Ben Gitenstein

    Google manager and parent of two Ben Gitenstein is also running for Seattle School Board Director in District 3. He describes himself as a frustrated progressive who doesn't have all the answers but is willing to ask hard questions.

    Google manager and parent of two Ben Gitenstein is also running for Seattle School Board Director in District 3. He describes himself as a frustrated progressive who doesn't have all the answers but is willing to ask hard questions. His website details his concerns with Seattle Public Schools and its board, including budgets and the incidence of gun violence at Ingraham High that left one student dead. Unfortunately, he does not yet offer specific solutions to these issues as of mid-October other than bringing in new voices, which will naturally happen as there are two retiring incumbents this year. 

    Gitenstein is the former executive director of the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance in the 2000s and has volunteered for school plays and fundraisers. Though he does not appear to be actively involved in Seattle school leadership positions like the PTA, he has worked in education advocacy in New York to bring more resources to community centers. He states that his 15 years as a product manager at startups and tech firms could be put to use in reorganizing the budget.

    Gitenstein's recommendation by The Seattle Times appears to come from what the editorial board describes as his urgency on school issues, "his appetite for real talk," and his distance from anyone who currently works with Seattle Public Schools. Based on local interviews, Gitenstein wants the board to provide more fiscal oversight and address the enrollment drop. He also wants to see increased public accountability and debate at board meetings by eliminating the "intro and action" parts of the agenda. 

    This year in June, the school board moved to Student Outcome Focused Governance (SOFG). Some critics, including Gitenstein, feel it has reduced public oversight and power over the board. In a June interview with The Stranger, Gitenstein did not point out a specific instance in which SOFG had taken away public participation, but he believes that the change gives the board less opportunity for public discussion and policy conversations.

    Gitenstein's urgency to change the direction of the board on community transparency, funding issues, and more has earned him the endorsements of four local Democratic organizations. 
     

    Ben Gitenstein

    Google manager and parent of two Ben Gitenstein is also running for Seattle School Board Director in District 3. He describes himself as a frustrated progressive who doesn't have all the answers but is willing to ask hard questions.

  • Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election. She is the chief legal counsel and policy advisor to King County Executive Dow Constantine and served on the boards of the 34th Legislative District Democrats and the Seattle Sports Complex Foundation. 

    If elected, Topp aims to cultivate a safe and welcoming environment for all students, empower educators, and engage parents. In her interview with The Seattle Times, Topp stated that her plan for the budget crisis is to advocate for more money at the Legislature - an idea that incumbent Liza Rankin has said was unlikely to succeed because of the recent increase in funding already coming from the state. Despite this, we believe that Topp has the strongest experience and most detailed platform in the race. 

    Topp's opponent is Maryanne Wood, who does not appear to have extensive education advocacy experience. Wood states that her childhood on a dairy farm made her value hard work, and she has six grandchildren in the district. Wood's top message is "no to school closures, and she also says that she will "dial back the mega schools that are already planned at Alki, Rogers, and Montlake."

    Topp's experience and progressive endorsements make her the best choice in District 1 for Seattle School Board Director.
     

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Gina Topp

    Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election.

    Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election. She is the chief legal counsel and policy advisor to King County Executive Dow Constantine and served on the boards of the 34th Legislative District Democrats and the Seattle Sports Complex Foundation. 

    If elected, Topp aims to cultivate a safe and welcoming environment for all students, empower educators, and engage parents. In her interview with The Seattle Times, Topp stated that her plan for the budget crisis is to advocate for more money at the Legislature - an idea that incumbent Liza Rankin has said was unlikely to succeed because of the recent increase in funding already coming from the state. Despite this, we believe that Topp has the strongest experience and most detailed platform in the race. 

    Topp's opponent is Maryanne Wood, who does not appear to have extensive education advocacy experience. Wood states that her childhood on a dairy farm made her value hard work, and she has six grandchildren in the district. Wood's top message is "no to school closures, and she also says that she will "dial back the mega schools that are already planned at Alki, Rogers, and Montlake."

    Topp's experience and progressive endorsements make her the best choice in District 1 for Seattle School Board Director.
     

    Gina Topp

    Gina Topp is running for the open seat vacated by incumbent Leslie Harris, who isn't running for re-election.

  • Endorsed By: M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, OneAmerica Votes, The Stranger, Seattle Education Association

Public Hospital District

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below races on your ballot.

  • Express Recommendation
  • Anthony Berkley is running for King County Public Hospital District 1, Commissioner District 1. Berkley is a nurse, small business owner, nursing home operator, and proud union member. He has also been active in the community as a youth football coach.

    Berkley is running on a progressive platform to care for the entire community. If elected, he wants to ensure healthcare for women, support at-risk populations, strengthen working conditions for frontline health care workers, and increase information about available services. He believes that as a health care worker, he would bring a practical and important perspective to the board of commissioners. His campaign is endorsed by some of the region’s most progressive leaders, unions, and organizations.

    Incumbent commissioner and former surgical care nurse Erin Smith Aboudara is running for another term on the hospital board. While Adoubara has been a voice for South King County’s diverse health needs, she does not share the progressive vision or the widespread support that Berkley has earned in this race.

    We recommend Anthony Berkley for King County Public Hospital District, Commissioner District 1.
    Last updated: 2023-10-31

    Anthony R. Berkley

    Submitted by airtable on Tue, 10/31/2023 - 11:10

    Anthony Berkley is running for King County Public Hospital District 1, Commissioner District 1. Berkley is a nurse, small business owner, nursing home operator, and proud union member. He has also been active in the community as a youth football coach.

    Berkley is running on a progressive platform to care for the entire community. If elected, he wants to ensure healthcare for women, support at-risk populations, strengthen working conditions for frontline health care workers, and increase information about available services. He believes that as a health care worker, he would bring a practical and important perspective to the board of commissioners. His campaign is endorsed by some of the region’s most progressive leaders, unions, and organizations.

    Incumbent commissioner and former surgical care nurse Erin Smith Aboudara is running for another term on the hospital board. While Adoubara has been a voice for South King County’s diverse health needs, she does not share the progressive vision or the widespread support that Berkley has earned in this race.

    We recommend Anthony Berkley for King County Public Hospital District, Commissioner District 1.

    Public Hospital District
    Anthony Berkley is running for King County Public Hospital District 1, Commissioner District 1. Berkley is a nurse, small business owner, nursing home operator, and proud union member. He has also been active in the community as a youth football coach.

    Berkley is running on a progressive platform to care for the entire community. If elected, he wants to ensure healthcare for women, support at-risk populations, strengthen working conditions for frontline health care workers, and increase information about available services. He believes that as a health care worker, he would bring a practical and important perspective to the board of commissioners. His campaign is endorsed by some of the region’s most progressive leaders, unions, and organizations.

    Incumbent commissioner and former surgical care nurse Erin Smith Aboudara is running for another term on the hospital board. While Adoubara has been a voice for South King County’s diverse health needs, she does not share the progressive vision or the widespread support that Berkley has earned in this race.

    We recommend Anthony Berkley for King County Public Hospital District, Commissioner District 1.

    Anthony R. Berkley

    Submitted by airtable on Tue, 10/31/2023 - 11:10

    Anthony Berkley is running for King County Public Hospital District 1, Commissioner District 1. Berkley is a nurse, small business owner, nursing home operator, and proud union member. He has also been active in the community as a youth football coach.

    Berkley is running on a progressive platform to care for the entire community. If elected, he wants to ensure healthcare for women, support at-risk populations, strengthen working conditions for frontline health care workers, and increase information about available services. He believes that as a health care worker, he would bring a practical and important perspective to the board of commissioners. His campaign is endorsed by some of the region’s most progressive leaders, unions, and organizations.

    Incumbent commissioner and former surgical care nurse Erin Smith Aboudara is running for another term on the hospital board. While Adoubara has been a voice for South King County’s diverse health needs, she does not share the progressive vision or the widespread support that Berkley has earned in this race.

    We recommend Anthony Berkley for King County Public Hospital District, Commissioner District 1.

    Public Hospital District
  • Express Recommendation
  • We believe Amber Wise is the best choice in this race based on her impressive endorsements from our progressive partners and trusted community leaders. Wise previously worked at Harborview Medical Center as a preschool teacher for patients' families. She is running to support frontline workers and to build stronger connections between staff, patients, and hospital leadership. She is committed to improving staffing levels to ensure patients continue to receive top-quality care. 

    Wise is challenging longtime board member Jeff Cashman, who previously ran a retirement plan administration and recordkeeping firm. 

    While we have not been able to conduct our standard independent research on this race, we encourage you to visit their website, social media, or voters’ pamphlet statement to learn more. Based on her sweeping endorsements in this race, we recommend Amber Wise for Public Hospital District 2, Position 6. 

    Last updated: 2023-10-19

    Amber Wise

    Submitted by airtable on Fri, 10/13/2023 - 09:10

    We believe Amber Wise is the best choice in this race based on her impressive endorsements from our progressive partners and trusted community leaders. Wise previously worked at Harborview Medical Center as a preschool teacher for patients' families. She is running to support frontline workers and to build stronger connections between staff, patients, and hospital leadership. She is committed to improving staffing levels to ensure patients continue to receive top-quality care. 

    Wise is challenging longtime board member Jeff Cashman, who previously ran a retirement plan administration and recordkeeping firm. 

    While we have not been able to conduct our standard independent research on this race, we encourage you to visit their website, social media, or voters’ pamphlet statement to learn more. Based on her sweeping endorsements in this race, we recommend Amber Wise for Public Hospital District 2, Position 6. 

    Public Hospital District

    We believe Amber Wise is the best choice in this race based on her impressive endorsements from our progressive partners and trusted community leaders. Wise previously worked at Harborview Medical Center as a preschool teacher for patients' families. She is running to support frontline workers and to build stronger connections between staff, patients, and hospital leadership. She is committed to improving staffing levels to ensure patients continue to receive top-quality care. 

    Wise is challenging longtime board member Jeff Cashman, who previously ran a retirement plan administration and recordkeeping firm. 

    While we have not been able to conduct our standard independent research on this race, we encourage you to visit their website, social media, or voters’ pamphlet statement to learn more. Based on her sweeping endorsements in this race, we recommend Amber Wise for Public Hospital District 2, Position 6. 

    Amber Wise

    Submitted by airtable on Fri, 10/13/2023 - 09:10

    We believe Amber Wise is the best choice in this race based on her impressive endorsements from our progressive partners and trusted community leaders. Wise previously worked at Harborview Medical Center as a preschool teacher for patients' families. She is running to support frontline workers and to build stronger connections between staff, patients, and hospital leadership. She is committed to improving staffing levels to ensure patients continue to receive top-quality care. 

    Wise is challenging longtime board member Jeff Cashman, who previously ran a retirement plan administration and recordkeeping firm. 

    While we have not been able to conduct our standard independent research on this race, we encourage you to visit their website, social media, or voters’ pamphlet statement to learn more. Based on her sweeping endorsements in this race, we recommend Amber Wise for Public Hospital District 2, Position 6. 

    Public Hospital District