• VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained for a sustainable climate future

  • This spring, Democrats in Olympia passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5974, which included a small increase in aircraft fuel taxes. This change would raise an estimated $14 million in public revenue and help our state achieve its climate goals.

    This bill was sponsored by some of Washington’s most progressive lawmakers and passed with a clear majority in the session. The legislation will help our state create a sustainable future where generations can thrive with clean air and water.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 39.

    This spring, Democrats in Olympia passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5974, which included a small increase in aircraft fuel taxes. This change would raise an estimated $14 million in public revenue and help our state achieve its climate goals.

    This bill was sponsored by some of Washington’s most progressive lawmakers and passed with a clear majority in the session. The legislation will help our state create a sustainable future where generations can thrive with clean air and water.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 39.

  • Endorsed By The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained for rideshare worker protections

  • Last session, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2076 which increases worker protections and rights for rideshare drivers.

    The legislation, which had bipartisan support, requires that rideshare companies pay their drivers a minimum amount per trip, offer paid sick leave, and give compensation benefits. It is a positive step in the direction of protecting workers’ rights in the growing gig economy so that we all can afford the basics, be treated fairly in our place of work, and have the chance to succeed.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 40.
    Last session, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2076 which increases worker protections and rights for rideshare drivers.

    The legislation, which had bipartisan support, requires that rideshare companies pay their drivers a minimum amount per trip, offer paid sick leave, and give compensation benefits. It is a positive step in the direction of protecting workers’ rights in the growing gig economy so that we all can afford the basics, be treated fairly in our place of work, and have the chance to succeed.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 40.
  • Endorsed By The Stranger
  • VOTE APPROVED

    Vote Yes for even-year county elections

  • King County Charter Amendment 1 proposes Ordinance 2022–0180, which pertains to when county elections appear on the ballot. The ordinance is supported by a progressive coalition of local organizations and passed the King County Council by a 7-2 margin, with only the two most conservative council members in opposition.

    If ratified, the ordinance will shift the elections for the county executive, assessor, elections director, and council positions to even-numbered years. By making this change, local leaders will be chosen during high-turnout years, increasing voter participation and reaching a wider, more diverse group for local positions.

    Vote “Yes” to on Amendment 1 to the King County Charter to strengthen our democracy and give more voters a voice in our county government.
    King County Charter Amendment 1 proposes Ordinance 2022–0180, which pertains to when county elections appear on the ballot. The ordinance is supported by a progressive coalition of local organizations and passed the King County Council by a 7-2 margin, with only the two most conservative council members in opposition.

    If ratified, the ordinance will shift the elections for the county executive, assessor, elections director, and council positions to even-numbered years. By making this change, local leaders will be chosen during high-turnout years, increasing voter participation and reaching a wider, more diverse group for local positions.

    Vote “Yes” to on Amendment 1 to the King County Charter to strengthen our democracy and give more voters a voice in our county government.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    Vote Approved to extend the Conservation Futures Levy

  • King County Proposition 1 would extend the Conservation Futures levy. The levy provides long-term funding to support local ecosystems and open spaces so that farms, forests, shorelines, and greenways are protected for generations to come.

    Since 1982, funding from Conservation Futures levies has helped protect more than 100,000 acres of land as open space in every corner of the county. Some of the projects include the Discovery Park Capehart Dorest, the Sammamish River Trail, and the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park. Proposition 1 would cost the owner of a median King County home approximately $22 a year.

    The Conservation Futures level is a critical investment in protecting our natural environment and ensuring a climate future in Washington. Vote "Approved” on King County Proposition 1.

    King County Proposition 1 would extend the Conservation Futures levy. The levy provides long-term funding to support local ecosystems and open spaces so that farms, forests, shorelines, and greenways are protected for generations to come.

    Since 1982, funding from Conservation Futures levies has helped protect more than 100,000 acres of land as open space in every corner of the county. Some of the projects include the Discovery Park Capehart Dorest, the Sammamish River Trail, and the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park. Proposition 1 would cost the owner of a median King County home approximately $22 a year.

    The Conservation Futures level is a critical investment in protecting our natural environment and ensuring a climate future in Washington. Vote "Approved” on King County Proposition 1.

  • Sen. Patty Murray has been a consistent and strong progressive voice in the U.S. Senate. She's seeking re-election to continue fighting for our basic rights and a better quality of life in Washington and beyond.

    Murray was first elected in 1992 and has been a champion for veterans, working families, women, and economic opportunities for all. Before her tenure in the Senate, Murray worked as a preschool teacher, on the Shoreline School Board, and in the Washington state Senate.

    During her time in Congress, Sen. Murray has worked hard to keep our communities safe from gun violence, protect abortion access at the federal level so that everyone has reproductive freedom, and expand access to affordable childcare. This year, she voted in support of the Women’s Health Protection Act, the Freedom to Vote Act, and a slate of other progressive bills that invest in working communities so that our country is a place where everyone can thrive. Murray has earned an impressive and diverse coalition of endorsements from local and national organizations, elected leaders, and unions.

    Sen. Murray faces Tiffany Smiley, a triage nurse running on a MAGA Republican platform. Smiley has never held public office but she previously worked on Capitol Hill. Her Trump-inspired agenda aims to divide us while she seeks to cut funding from our most essential services and repurpose it for a needless border wall and more militarized police forces. Working Washingtonians need real solutions so that we can access the basics like gas, groceries, rent, and prescription medicine – not MAGA rhetoric and tax breaks for the wealthy.

    Sen. Patty Murray is a national leader on many of the most important issues facing our country. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Patty Murray

    Sen. Patty Murray has been a consistent and strong progressive voice in the U.S. Senate. She's seeking re-election to continue fighting for our basic rights and a better quality of life in Washington and beyond.

    Patty Murray

    Sen. Patty Murray has been a consistent and strong progressive voice in the U.S. Senate. She's seeking re-election to continue fighting for our basic rights and a better quality of life in Washington and beyond.

  • Rep. Pramila Jayapal is running for re-election in the 7th Congressional District. She has a long history of civic leadership on immigration reform, economic justice, and civil liberties. Rep. Jayapal founded OneAmerica (formerly Hate Free Zone) in 2001 and built it into the largest immigrant rights organization in the state and a national model. She also played a key role on the Mayoral Advisory Committee that created Seattle’s $15 minimum wage, and this year secured $31 million in federal funding for community projects in the Seattle area, including housing, sciences, education, and the environment.

    Since her election to Congress in 2016, Jayapal has resisted the Trump administration and conservative extremists at every turn and provided a voice for progressives across the country. She has supported the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and the Dream Act, which would provide a path to citizenship for young DACA recipients. She also introduced legislation to expand collective bargaining and provide relief to workers and businesses during the pandemic. More recently, she has called for a national women's strike in response to the Supreme Court's ban on abortion and the curtailing of reproductive freedom across the country. Jayapal is also seeking to codify a transgender bill of rights to protect our country from the erosion of trans civil rights.

    Her opponent, Republican Cliff Moon, founded Moon Construction Company and is running because he believes Congress needs more "normal" people. Unfortunately, he echoes Republican Party talking points about the 2020 election, opposes stronger gun safety laws, and he supports building a divisive border wall. Moon states that he's open to exploring a federal ban on abortion after 15 weeks in a move to limit the reproductive freedom nationwide. While Jayapal is seeking to broadly improve the lives of her constituents with affordable housing, upgrades to infrastructure, and expanding childcare, Moon is focused on the conservative agenda of pouring more money into militarized policing. 

    Jayapal is highly experienced and responsive to her constituents, and has held more than 100 town halls during her time in Congress. As chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, she has been one of the strongest progressive advocates in Washington for the needs of all in this country. Pramila Jayapal has earned your vote as a national leader for progressive causes.

    Pramila Jayapal

    Rep. Pramila Jayapal is running for re-election in the 7th Congressional District. She has a long history of civic leadership on immigration reform, economic justice, and civil liberties. Rep.

    Pramila Jayapal

    Rep. Pramila Jayapal is running for re-election in the 7th Congressional District. She has a long history of civic leadership on immigration reform, economic justice, and civil liberties. Rep.

  • Democrat Steve Hobbs is running to retain his position as secretary of state for the remainder of the two-year term. He is a first-generation Japanese American and a 30-year member of the military, serving tours in Kosovo and Iraq before becoming a Lieutenant Colonel in the Washington Army National Guard.

    Hobbs was appointed as secretary of state in November of last year after Kim Wyman resigned to join the Biden Administration. Prior to his appointment, he served four terms in the Washington state Senate representing the 44th Legislative District. His voting record was consistently progressive on social issues and leaned more conservative on taxes and workers' rights.

    During his first 8 months in office, Hobbs has been laser-focused on protecting our electoral systems from attacks. He has used his background in national security to partner closely with the Department of Homeland Security to stop digital threats to our voting systems, both foreign and domestic. Hobbs also understands the challenge that misinformation poses to the integrity of our elections. He has been working to set up a division within his office specifically to combat misinformation and wants to work closely with social media companies to ensure they take down dangerous conspiracy theories.

    As the pandemic recedes, Hobbs is committed to restarting his office's voter outreach program. He is very enthusiastic about a trusted messenger program he's launching to utilize community leaders to talk about the importance of voting. He also wants to improve outreach to reduce the racial disparities in rejected ballots because of signature mismatches.

    The only issue of concern with Hobbs is his personal opposition to ranked choice voting. During our interview, he shared that he's concerned about implementing a complicated new voting system at a moment of low trust in our elections. In addition, he is concerned that voters like his mother, who speaks English as a second language, will have a difficult time learning and participating in the new system. Experts have reiterated that ranked choice voting is simple for all voters and has been used successfully on ballots in multiple languages.

    Hobbs made a compelling case that the secretary of state must adapt to the new and complex challenges of running modern elections. Hobbs is a good choice if you're looking for someone with broad Democratic endorsements and with national security experience to safeguard and rebuild trust in our electoral system.

    Steve Hobbs

    Democrat Steve Hobbs is running to retain his position as secretary of state for the remainder of the two-year term.

    Steve Hobbs

    Democrat Steve Hobbs is running to retain his position as secretary of state for the remainder of the two-year term.

  • Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson is running as an independent to bring a non-partisan voice to the secretary of state's office. Anderson served on the Tacoma City Council before running for county auditor in 2009 and winning re-election three times. As Pierce County auditor, which is a nonpartisan position, she has administered dozens of elections while also overseeing licensing and public record-keeping.

    Anderson is running because she believes political parties shouldn't be involved in running elections they are simultaneously trying to win. Her campaign priorities include supporting more local races becoming non-partisan, increasing access to voting and election information, and improving election security. She wants to translate the voters' pamphlet into 10 languages, going beyond what is mandated by the Voting Rights Act. She also wants to conduct risk-limiting audits in all 39 Washington counties and "pre-bunk" rumors to increase confidence in our state's election systems.

    During our interview, Anderson expressed support for ranked choice voting because she believes it will allow candidates to break through our two-party political system. This is one of the biggest points of difference between Anderson and Hobbs.

    Anderson offers voters an experienced option if they are looking for a nonpartisan administrator to manage our state's elections and support ranked choice voting.

    Julie Anderson

    Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson is running as an independent to bring a non-partisan voice to the secretary of state's office. Anderson served on the Tacoma City Council before running for county auditor in 2009 and winning re-election three times.

    Julie Anderson

    Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson is running as an independent to bring a non-partisan voice to the secretary of state's office. Anderson served on the Tacoma City Council before running for county auditor in 2009 and winning re-election three times.

  • Endorsed By: Teamsters Joint Council 28, Teamsters 117, UFCW 3000 , Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Democrat

    Javier Valdez

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Javier Valdez is running for the 46th Legislative District Senate seat. Valdez was appointed to the state House in 2017 and was re-elected in 2018 and 2020. He also served as the first president of the Washington State Council of County and City Employees (AFSCME Council 2).

    In Olympia, Valdez has worked to find equitable, progressive solutions to problems facing residents in his district. He supported legislation to prevent discrimination based on citizenship or immigration status, and he advocated for requiring the state to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

    This year, Valdez sponsored several successful bills that protect our communities, including being the prime sponsor of the law to restrict ghost guns. He also sought to provide safe places for civic discourse by banning guns in settings like school board meetings and supported an alert system for missing Indigenous people.

    Valdez deserves credit for sponsoring the middle housing bill, which would have provided more housing options around transit, and the wealth tax, which aimed to finally make the extraordinarily wealthy residents of Washington pay their share into education, transportation, and more. These two bills will be critical progressive priorities in the coming years.

    Valdez is running against King County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Matthew Gross. His platform includes making housing more affordable and tackling homelessness in the district. There is much to appreciate about Gross' platform - he wants to end exclusionary zoning and gradually increase the housing supply with duplexes or triplexes. He also wants to see more investments in the state Housing Trust Fund and mental health care.

    While Gross is progressive, Valdez has swept nearly every endorsement from a broad spectrum of progressive organizations and elected officials. This reflects both the breadth of his platforms and his experience in lawmaking and legislative leadership. Rep. Javier Valdez is the best choice in this race.

    Javier Valdez

    Rep. Javier Valdez is running for the 46th Legislative District Senate seat. Valdez was appointed to the state House in 2017 and was re-elected in 2018 and 2020. He also served as the first president of the Washington State Council of County and City Employees (AFSCME Council 2).

    Javier Valdez

    Rep. Javier Valdez is running for the 46th Legislative District Senate seat. Valdez was appointed to the state House in 2017 and was re-elected in 2018 and 2020. He also served as the first president of the Washington State Council of County and City Employees (AFSCME Council 2).

  • Democrat

    Gerry Pollet

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Gerry Pollet is running for re-election to the 46th Legislative District, House Position 1. He is the executive director of Heart of America Northwest, a group devoted to cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Pollet's background as an attorney and educator has enhanced his policy work on the issues of climate change, equitable education, and government transparency.

    In the Legislature, Pollet has been a reliable vote for protecting the environment and for education. This session, Pollet sponsored bills to restrict untraceable ghost guns and limit carrying weapons in public places such as school board meetings. In addition, he supported a wealth tax, which would have been a big step toward making the state's extremely wealthy pay their share for the resources we all depend on. In previous years, he sponsored a bill to require the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050 and bills to lower class sizes and offer free community college.

    While Pollet has been excellent on environmental issues, we were extremely disappointed that he was an obstacle to important legislation related to housing affordability. The "missing middle" housing bill, sponsored by Rep. Batemen, would have given Washingtonians more housing options by increasing density near transit lines. As the chair of the Local Government Committee, Pollet used his position to water down this bill with amendments in a way that would exempt much of his district. This isn't the first time Pollet has opposed important legislation that would reduce the cost of housing. In previous years, he also weakened or blocked bills that would allow homeowners to build and rent backyard cottages. We hope Pollet reconsiders his position on these bills to alleviate the crushing cost of housing for residents of his district.

    Pollet's opponent in this race was Hadeel Jeanne, a longtime resident of the 46th whose campaign was focused on the experiences of everyday working people and parents in the district, many of whom struggle to afford rising rents and home prices. Regrettably, Jeanne announced on July 12 that she was suspending her campaign for family reasons, though she will still appear on the general election ballot.

    Gerry Pollet

    Rep. Gerry Pollet is running for re-election to the 46th Legislative District, House Position 1. He is the executive director of Heart of America Northwest, a group devoted to cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

    Gerry Pollet

    Rep. Gerry Pollet is running for re-election to the 46th Legislative District, House Position 1. He is the executive director of Heart of America Northwest, a group devoted to cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences. She is the public policy director with Disability Rights Washington, an organization that provides free services to people with disabilities and protects the rights of people with disabilities statewide. Farivar has also served as co-chair of the Seattle Women's Commission, policy chair of the State Special Education Advisory Council, and is currently a board member of Peyvand, which supports Iranian students at UW.

    A focus on disability rights runs through Farivar's campaign, from her priorities in housing, criminal justice reform, health care, and more. In our interview, Farivar stated that she wants to build up diversion programs and ensure accessible housing units for people experiencing homelessness, noting that 40 percent of homeless people report having a disability. Farivar also makes the interesting point that disabilities cut across partisan lines and she would be willing to work across the aisle to move forward with legislation that works for everyone. She wants to see investments in robust mass transit, including infrastructure to get people to the district's three light rail stops and would be very supportive of transit-centered housing.

    Farivar states that she would be the first Middle Eastern woman serving in Olympia. As the daughter of refugees, she wants to establish a commission for Middle Eastern affairs to help the Legislature work in unison with Middle Eastern communities. Since the primary, she has solidified broad support from progressive organizations and earned the endorsement of the three leading Democrats who did not advance from the primary.

    Farivar is a good choice if you're looking for a candidate who would center underrepresented voices and ensure truly accessible services and housing for all.

    Darya Farivar

    Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences.

    Darya Farivar

    Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences.

  • Democrat

    Lelach Rave

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Pediatrician Dr. Lelach Rave is running for office to bring mental health, youth and family health, and education to the forefront of the Legislature's agenda. She is the legislative chair for the Washington Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and has spent years in Olympia advocating for policies like paid family leave, feeding kids through Breakfast After the Bell, and creating the Washington Vaccine Association.

    Rave is the only physician running for Legislature this year. Because of her pediatric focus, Rave highlighted the need to support both kids and parents in this burgeoning mental health crisis. She noted that we can accelerate hiring much-needed mental health staff statewide by lowering the administrative burden on health care workers, especially lower-paid staff.

    In her interview, Rave was also one of the few candidates on any ballot this year to discuss the importance of special education, noting that the state is behind by millions of dollars in funding special education, and that special needs kids fell even further behind than neurotypical kids in the pandemic. Outside of her health-related policies, Rave wants to see additional investments in the Housing Trust Fund, more low- and middle-income housing, reduction of fossil fuels, and more.

    Rave emphasized that there are no medical professionals currently in the Legislature. Rave is a good choice if you are looking for a candidate with the experience and drive to advocate for community health care for children and families.

    Lelach Rave

    Pediatrician Dr. Lelach Rave is running for office to bring mental health, youth and family health, and education to the forefront of the Legislature's agenda.

    Lelach Rave

    Pediatrician Dr. Lelach Rave is running for office to bring mental health, youth and family health, and education to the forefront of the Legislature's agenda.

  • Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system. If elected, she would be the first woman and the first person of color in this role. Outside of the prosecutor's office, Manion has served several leadership roles, including on the boards of the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle, and as co-founding partner of Choose 180, which offers coaching and diversion programs to keep youth out of the juvenile justice system.

    Manion's top priorities include tackling the backlog of 4,500 cases filed during the pandemic's work halt, increasing funding for reforms like mental health court, and intervening in gun violence before people become victims or offenders. High on her agenda is continuing to prosecute violent crimes while addressing racial disparities and providing culturally responsive care to victims.

    In our interview with Manion, she offered compelling insights about the prosecuting attorney's office and how she would manage it if elected. She spoke of her experience building a well-functioning team and solid working relationships throughout the legal system, as evidenced by the fact that she earned the endorsement of SEIU 925, the union that includes public defenders. She also spoke about the need to apply racial justice principles to better reflect the values of the community, and invite the community to public listening sessions or possibly convene community advisory boards. Finally, Manion committed to spending more time going to monthly police and sheriff meetings to build relationships throughout the county.

    We recommend Manion for her impressive platform and extensive track record of results, as well as the broad support of many progressive and Democratic organizations.

    Leesa Manion

    Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system.

    Leesa Manion

    Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system.

Other Candidates

Manion's opponent is Federal Way mayor Jim Ferrell, who has been elected three times since 2013. Ferrell is a previous three-time member of the Federal Way City Council and was a prosecutor in Renton before later becoming a King County senior deputy prosecutor.

Ferrell is running for King County prosecutor on a different tack than Manion. He has been critical of King County’s highly effective youth diversion program, which provides low-level first-time youth offenders an alternative to prison. The Restorative Community Pathways program has been shown to reduce the percentage of kids who re-offended by more than half. Without evidence, Ferrell continues to attack the program using Republican political talking points about crime.

Ferrell is endorsed by several conservative police guilds, and he appeared at a press conference with Seattle Police Officer Guild leader Mike Solan, who is known for defending the Seattle officers who participated in the January 6th insurrection. During Ferrell's time as mayor, the Federal Way Police Department has had multiple instances of officers using excessive force and behaving inappropriately, including a controversial video posted by an officer that made national news this summer. 

Ferrell is endorsed by the King County Republican Party, and both his record as mayor and his campaign platform make it clear that he would seek to roll back hard-won reforms made in the King County prosecutor's office in recent years. Manion is the clear choice in this race.

  • Justice Mary Yu is running unopposed to continue serving on the state Supreme Court. Yu was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2014, elected by voters to the seat later that year, and re-elected in 2016. Before joining Washington’s highest court, she spent 14 years as a trial court judge in King County Superior Court and earlier as the deputy chief of staff to former King County prosecutor Norm Maleng.

    Yu has an unimpeachable reputation and has been rated “exceptionally well qualified” by a number of key bar associations. On the court, she has been a voice for equal justice and upholding the rights of all. Now, she is running with endorsements from all of her fellow justices as well as a number of retired justices from the court.

    Justice Yu deserves your vote to continue serving as one of Washington’s state Supreme Court justices.

    Mary Yu

    Justice Mary Yu is running unopposed to continue serving on the state Supreme Court. Yu was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2014, elected by voters to the seat later that year, and re-elected in 2016.

    Mary Yu

    Justice Mary Yu is running unopposed to continue serving on the state Supreme Court. Yu was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2014, elected by voters to the seat later that year, and re-elected in 2016.

  • Justice Barbara Madsen has served on the state Supreme Court for 30 years and is running unopposed for re-election this year. She was only the third woman to serve on the court when she was first elected in 1992. During her time on the court, her fellow justices elected her the 55th chief justice of the court – a position she held for 7 years.

    Having spent her career in both prosecution and public defense, Madsen has extensive knowledge of the criminal legal system and a passion for serving her community. Her re-election has been endorsed by each of her fellow justices and a wide range of other judicial leaders and community organizations.

    Justice Madsen has served the state with fair and equal justice. She deserves your vote to remain in her seat on Washington’s Supreme Court.

    Barbara Madsen

    Justice Barbara Madsen has served on the state Supreme Court for 30 years and is running unopposed for re-election this year. She was only the third woman to serve on the court when she was first elected in 1992.

    Barbara Madsen

    Justice Barbara Madsen has served on the state Supreme Court for 30 years and is running unopposed for re-election this year. She was only the third woman to serve on the court when she was first elected in 1992.

  • Justice G. Helen Whitener is running unopposed for re-election to Position 6 on Washington’s Supreme Court. Whitener became the first Black woman to serve on the state’s Supreme Court in April 2020 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy by Gov. Inslee. Later that year, she won her election to fill the remainder of the term. Prior to joining the Washington Supreme Court, Whitener served on the Pierce County Superior Court and worked as both a prosecutor and a defense attorney before becoming a judge.

    Justice Whitener is both a Trinidadian immigrant and openly gay, and has worked to be a representative voice for justice for all in the state’s highest court. In this race, she has earned the endorsement of each one of her fellow justices as well as some retired justices. Whitener has been rated as "exceptionally well-qualified" by a number of bar associations and has done an exceptional job since joining the court.

    Whitener is an important voice on the State Supreme Court and deserves your voice to continue serving as a justice in Position 6.

    G. Helen Whitener

    Justice G. Helen Whitener is running unopposed for re-election to Position 6 on Washington’s Supreme Court. Whitener became the first Black woman to serve on the state’s Supreme Court in April 2020 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy by Gov. Inslee.

    G. Helen Whitener

    Justice G. Helen Whitener is running unopposed for re-election to Position 6 on Washington’s Supreme Court. Whitener became the first Black woman to serve on the state’s Supreme Court in April 2020 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy by Gov. Inslee.

  • Pooja Vaddadi is currently an adjunct professor of legal writing at Seattle University. Prior to joining the staff, she served as a public defender with the Northwest Defenders Division (NDD) of the King County Department of Public Defense. Vaddadi’s career as a public defender gives her a rare and valuable perspective that most judges - who come from prosecutorial or corporate law - don’t have. She has seen firsthand the deterioration and crisis at our prisons while working with clients who are unhoused or suffering from mental illness. 

    More so than Eisenberg, Vaddadi approaches justice from the angle that there’s no amount of incarceration that’s going to fix crimes of poverty or desperation that she sees daily. Vaddadi is serious about the ways in which she would implement restorative justice from the bench, and speaks of how these efforts need to be sustained carefully over time because there’s no quick fix. If elected, she would be a counterweight to the more heavy-handed and prosecution-friendly judges and city officials in her efforts to treat everyone fairly with respect towards the law. She has a strong set of endorsements from Democratic organizations and progressive elected officials.

    This is a somewhat tricky race, as experienced judges are critical in the post-COVID restrictions courts. But we lean towards Vaddadi because we believe she would add valuable perspectives to the bench, and because of her vision for restorative justice and criminal justice reform.

    Pooja Vaddadi

    Submitted by stephanie on Wed, 11/02/2022 - 10:33

    Pooja Vaddadi is currently an adjunct professor of legal writing at Seattle University. Prior to joining the staff, she served as a public defender with the Northwest Defenders Division (NDD) of the King County Department of Public Defense. Vaddadi’s career as a public defender gives her a rare and valuable perspective that most judges - who come from prosecutorial or corporate law - don’t have.

    Pooja Vaddadi

    Submitted by stephanie on Wed, 11/02/2022 - 10:33

    Pooja Vaddadi is currently an adjunct professor of legal writing at Seattle University. Prior to joining the staff, she served as a public defender with the Northwest Defenders Division (NDD) of the King County Department of Public Defense. Vaddadi’s career as a public defender gives her a rare and valuable perspective that most judges - who come from prosecutorial or corporate law - don’t have.

  • Endorsed By: Sage Leaders, The Stranger
  • Prior to becoming a judge, Adam Eisenberg worked in various legal roles since 1992, including as a civil trial attorney and a criminal prosecutor. He was chosen by his colleagues to be the Presiding Judge on the Seattle Municipal Court. He was appointed to the court in 2017, and has been rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by several bar associations. Eisenberg is particularly focused on domestic violence, and helped create and currently serves on the steering committee for the Domestic Violence Intervention Project. Eisenberg also speaks to expanding access to the courts through virtual hearings and the importance of equality and justice to him personally as a gay and Jewish judge. His supporters point to the need for experienced judges like Eisbenberg to work through the backlog of cases from the pandemic quickly and fairly. He has earned the endorsement of many of his fellow judges, as well as some Democratic leaders.

    However, Eisenberg has also been called out for some issues from the bench, including complaints of failing to be impartial. In particular, he was criticized for implementing a “trial tax” on a defendant who went to trial rather than accept a plea deal. Furthermore, Eisenberg signed on to City Attorney Ann Davison’s controversial effort to exclude over 100 “high utilizers” from community court.

    Adam Eisenberg

    Submitted by stephanie on Wed, 11/02/2022 - 10:53

    Prior to becoming a judge, Adam Eisenberg worked in various legal roles since 1992, including as a civil trial attorney and a criminal prosecutor. He was chosen by his colleagues to be the Presiding Judge on the Seattle Municipal Court. He was appointed to the court in 2017, and has been rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by several bar associations. Eisenberg is particularly focused on domestic violence, and helped create and currently serves on the steering committee for the Domestic Violence Intervention Project.

    Adam Eisenberg

    Submitted by stephanie on Wed, 11/02/2022 - 10:53

    Prior to becoming a judge, Adam Eisenberg worked in various legal roles since 1992, including as a civil trial attorney and a criminal prosecutor. He was chosen by his colleagues to be the Presiding Judge on the Seattle Municipal Court. He was appointed to the court in 2017, and has been rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by several bar associations. Eisenberg is particularly focused on domestic violence, and helped create and currently serves on the steering committee for the Domestic Violence Intervention Project.

  • Incumbent Judge Damon Shadid is running for re-election to his Position 7 seat on the Seattle Municipal Court. Shadid was first elected to the court in 2014 and has been a strong voice for treatment, support, and accountability on the bench. Previously, he worked in legal defense for women facing abusers in court as well as refugees and other non-citizen defendants. Shadid has also been a community leader in working towards racial justice in our legal system including founding the Middle Eastern Legal Association of Washington and serving on multiple equity-focused committees and projects.

    Shadid has a progressive vision for the criminal legal system: delivering justice that keeps our community safe and connecting people with the resources and services they need to get out of the criminal legal system. He helped re-establish the city’s mental health court and has fought to involve case workers in court in a more effective, collaborative way. His judicial track record and commitment to progressive alternatives have earned him an impressive list of endorsements in this race including all Seattle-based Democratic organizations, local progressive officials, and key judicial leaders.

    Assistant City Attorney Nyjat Rose-Atkins is challenging Shadid in this race. Outside the city attorney’s office where she has worked for more than a decade, Rose-Atkins works as a pro tem judge for the district court. She is running with a somewhat more conservative approach to the criminal legal system, including wanting to roll back diversion programs and alternatives that reduce prison overcrowding and help community members get the resources they need.

    Shadid has been an exceptional leader in the court and is helping build a safer and more resilient Seattle. He deserves your vote for another term on the city’s municipal court.

    Damon Shadid

    Submitted by alexwhite on Fri, 09/23/2022 - 18:09

    Incumbent Judge Damon Shadid is running for re-election to his Position 7 seat on the Seattle Municipal Court. Shadid was first elected to the court in 2014 and has been a strong voice for treatment, support, and accountability on the bench. Previously, he worked in legal defense for women facing abusers in court as well as refugees and other non-citizen defendants.

    Damon Shadid

    Submitted by alexwhite on Fri, 09/23/2022 - 18:09

    Incumbent Judge Damon Shadid is running for re-election to his Position 7 seat on the Seattle Municipal Court. Shadid was first elected to the court in 2014 and has been a strong voice for treatment, support, and accountability on the bench. Previously, he worked in legal defense for women facing abusers in court as well as refugees and other non-citizen defendants.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to introduce ranked choice voting for Seattle elections

  • We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

    We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

  • Endorsed By The Washington Bus, Fuse, Sierra Club, The Urbanist, Washington CAN!, Washington Conservation Voters , FairVote Washington, King County Democrats, Washington Community Alliance