• VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained for a sustainable climate future

  • This spring, Democrats in Olympia passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5974, which included a small increase in aircraft fuel taxes. This change would raise an estimated $14 million in public revenue and help our state achieve its climate goals.

    This bill was sponsored by some of Washington’s most progressive lawmakers and passed with a clear majority in the session. The legislation will help our state create a sustainable future where generations can thrive with clean air and water.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 39.

    This spring, Democrats in Olympia passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5974, which included a small increase in aircraft fuel taxes. This change would raise an estimated $14 million in public revenue and help our state achieve its climate goals.

    This bill was sponsored by some of Washington’s most progressive lawmakers and passed with a clear majority in the session. The legislation will help our state create a sustainable future where generations can thrive with clean air and water.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 39.

  • Endorsed By The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained for rideshare worker protections

  • Last session, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2076 which increases worker protections and rights for rideshare drivers.

    The legislation, which had bipartisan support, requires that rideshare companies pay their drivers a minimum amount per trip, offer paid sick leave, and give compensation benefits. It is a positive step in the direction of protecting workers’ rights in the growing gig economy so that we all can afford the basics, be treated fairly in our place of work, and have the chance to succeed.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 40.
    Last session, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2076 which increases worker protections and rights for rideshare drivers.

    The legislation, which had bipartisan support, requires that rideshare companies pay their drivers a minimum amount per trip, offer paid sick leave, and give compensation benefits. It is a positive step in the direction of protecting workers’ rights in the growing gig economy so that we all can afford the basics, be treated fairly in our place of work, and have the chance to succeed.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 40.
  • Endorsed By The Stranger
  • VOTE APPROVED

    Vote Yes for child care and early learning for Whatcom County

  • Building a resilient and sustainable community means making sure that all children can access the resources and services they need to thrive. Whatcom County Proposition 5, adopted by the county council earlier this year, represents a major investment in our children’s wellbeing and future.

    The measure proposes to create a Healthy Children's Fund to support and expand early learning programs and child care countywide, and to provide additional services for kids who are vulnerable and at-risk, covered by a small property tax increase. These services are proposed in direct response to the growing needs in the county to increase affordable child care options, alleviate homelessness and the cycle of poverty, and ensure all our children are healthy and safe. The owner of a median $595,000 home in Whatcom county would pay approximately $9 per month to support these important services.

    By giving our children the tools and support they need now, we reduce the need for other social supports later in life while building a stronger community for all. Vote “Yes” for Proposition 5 in Whatcom County.
    Building a resilient and sustainable community means making sure that all children can access the resources and services they need to thrive. Whatcom County Proposition 5, adopted by the county council earlier this year, represents a major investment in our children’s wellbeing and future.

    The measure proposes to create a Healthy Children's Fund to support and expand early learning programs and child care countywide, and to provide additional services for kids who are vulnerable and at-risk, covered by a small property tax increase. These services are proposed in direct response to the growing needs in the county to increase affordable child care options, alleviate homelessness and the cycle of poverty, and ensure all our children are healthy and safe. The owner of a median $595,000 home in Whatcom county would pay approximately $9 per month to support these important services.

    By giving our children the tools and support they need now, we reduce the need for other social supports later in life while building a stronger community for all. Vote “Yes” for Proposition 5 in Whatcom County.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    Vote Approved to maintain local fire and emergency medical services

  • When a loved one is experiencing a health crisis, the last thing to worry about should be whether or not our firefighters and ambulance services have the funding they need to help. Whatcom County Proposition 6 proposes to renew funding for the county’s emergency services network to ensure that crisis response is there when we need it most.

    In Whatcom, emergency responses have grown more than 24% since the funding was first introduced. Emergency medical help that we can all access is essential to making our community safer.

    Vote “Yes” to approve Proposition 6 for a critical investment in public safety in the county.
    When a loved one is experiencing a health crisis, the last thing to worry about should be whether or not our firefighters and ambulance services have the funding they need to help. Whatcom County Proposition 6 proposes to renew funding for the county’s emergency services network to ensure that crisis response is there when we need it most.

    In Whatcom, emergency responses have grown more than 24% since the funding was first introduced. Emergency medical help that we can all access is essential to making our community safer.

    Vote “Yes” to approve Proposition 6 for a critical investment in public safety in the county.
  • Sen. Patty Murray has been a consistent and strong progressive voice in the U.S. Senate. She's seeking re-election to continue fighting for our basic rights and a better quality of life in Washington and beyond.

    Murray was first elected in 1992 and has been a champion for veterans, working families, women, and economic opportunities for all. Before her tenure in the Senate, Murray worked as a preschool teacher, on the Shoreline School Board, and in the Washington state Senate.

    During her time in Congress, Sen. Murray has worked hard to keep our communities safe from gun violence, protect abortion access at the federal level so that everyone has reproductive freedom, and expand access to affordable childcare. This year, she voted in support of the Women’s Health Protection Act, the Freedom to Vote Act, and a slate of other progressive bills that invest in working communities so that our country is a place where everyone can thrive. Murray has earned an impressive and diverse coalition of endorsements from local and national organizations, elected leaders, and unions.

    Sen. Murray faces Tiffany Smiley, a triage nurse running on a MAGA Republican platform. Smiley has never held public office but she previously worked on Capitol Hill. Her Trump-inspired agenda aims to divide us while she seeks to cut funding from our most essential services and repurpose it for a needless border wall and more militarized police forces. Working Washingtonians need real solutions so that we can access the basics like gas, groceries, rent, and prescription medicine – not MAGA rhetoric and tax breaks for the wealthy.

    Sen. Patty Murray is a national leader on many of the most important issues facing our country. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Patty Murray

    Sen. Patty Murray has been a consistent and strong progressive voice in the U.S. Senate. She's seeking re-election to continue fighting for our basic rights and a better quality of life in Washington and beyond.

    Patty Murray

    Sen. Patty Murray has been a consistent and strong progressive voice in the U.S. Senate. She's seeking re-election to continue fighting for our basic rights and a better quality of life in Washington and beyond.

  • Rep. Rick Larsen is a moderate Democrat who is seeking his eleventh term representing Washington's 2nd Congressional District. Before serving in Congress, he served on the Snohomish County Council and worked on economic development for the City of Everett.

    Larsen has been a reliable vote on House Democrats' priorities. Since his last election, he voted for both the bipartisan infrastructure bill and Build Back Better, President Biden's more ambitious effort to fund clean energy, child tax credits, and other progressive priorities. In past years, Larsen supported the Lower Drug Costs Now Act to give Medicare the power to negotiate directly with the drug companies and pass on the lower drug prices to all Americans. He also voted for the Voting Rights Advancement Act, supported the coronavirus pandemic relief packages, and sought to reform student loans.

    Republican Dan Matthews, a veteran and retired commercial airline pilot, is challenging incumbent Larsen in this race. Matthews lists dozens of "areas of concern" on his website with an invitation to "let the dialogue begin" but does not list any actual policy positions. However, some of the topics he lists are consistent with the MAGA Republican agenda we see across the country this year including dangerous rhetoric about voter fraud and border policies that echo Trump's 2016 talking points.

    Larsen is the clear choice for Congress from Washington's 2nd Congressional District.

    Rick Larsen

    Rep. Rick Larsen is a moderate Democrat who is seeking his eleventh term representing Washington's 2nd Congressional District. Before serving in Congress, he served on the Snohomish County Council and worked on economic development for the City of Everett.

    Rick Larsen

    Rep. Rick Larsen is a moderate Democrat who is seeking his eleventh term representing Washington's 2nd Congressional District. Before serving in Congress, he served on the Snohomish County Council and worked on economic development for the City of Everett.

  • Democrat Steve Hobbs is running to retain his position as secretary of state for the remainder of the two-year term. He is a first-generation Japanese American and a 30-year member of the military, serving tours in Kosovo and Iraq before becoming a Lieutenant Colonel in the Washington Army National Guard.

    Hobbs was appointed as secretary of state in November of last year after Kim Wyman resigned to join the Biden Administration. Prior to his appointment, he served four terms in the Washington state Senate representing the 44th Legislative District. His voting record was consistently progressive on social issues and leaned more conservative on taxes and workers' rights.

    During his first 8 months in office, Hobbs has been laser-focused on protecting our electoral systems from attacks. He has used his background in national security to partner closely with the Department of Homeland Security to stop digital threats to our voting systems, both foreign and domestic. Hobbs also understands the challenge that misinformation poses to the integrity of our elections. He has been working to set up a division within his office specifically to combat misinformation and wants to work closely with social media companies to ensure they take down dangerous conspiracy theories.

    As the pandemic recedes, Hobbs is committed to restarting his office's voter outreach program. He is very enthusiastic about a trusted messenger program he's launching to utilize community leaders to talk about the importance of voting. He also wants to improve outreach to reduce the racial disparities in rejected ballots because of signature mismatches.

    The only issue of concern with Hobbs is his personal opposition to ranked choice voting. During our interview, he shared that he's concerned about implementing a complicated new voting system at a moment of low trust in our elections. In addition, he is concerned that voters like his mother, who speaks English as a second language, will have a difficult time learning and participating in the new system. Experts have reiterated that ranked choice voting is simple for all voters and has been used successfully on ballots in multiple languages.

    Hobbs made a compelling case that the secretary of state must adapt to the new and complex challenges of running modern elections. Hobbs is a good choice if you're looking for someone with broad Democratic endorsements and with national security experience to safeguard and rebuild trust in our electoral system.

    Steve Hobbs

    Democrat Steve Hobbs is running to retain his position as secretary of state for the remainder of the two-year term.

    Steve Hobbs

    Democrat Steve Hobbs is running to retain his position as secretary of state for the remainder of the two-year term.

  • Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson is running as an independent to bring a non-partisan voice to the secretary of state's office. Anderson served on the Tacoma City Council before running for county auditor in 2009 and winning re-election three times. As Pierce County auditor, which is a nonpartisan position, she has administered dozens of elections while also overseeing licensing and public record-keeping.

    Anderson is running because she believes political parties shouldn't be involved in running elections they are simultaneously trying to win. Her campaign priorities include supporting more local races becoming non-partisan, increasing access to voting and election information, and improving election security. She wants to translate the voters' pamphlet into 10 languages, going beyond what is mandated by the Voting Rights Act. She also wants to conduct risk-limiting audits in all 39 Washington counties and "pre-bunk" rumors to increase confidence in our state's election systems.

    During our interview, Anderson expressed support for ranked choice voting because she believes it will allow candidates to break through our two-party political system. This is one of the biggest points of difference between Anderson and Hobbs.

    Anderson offers voters an experienced option if they are looking for a nonpartisan administrator to manage our state's elections and support ranked choice voting.

    Julie Anderson

    Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson is running as an independent to bring a non-partisan voice to the secretary of state's office. Anderson served on the Tacoma City Council before running for county auditor in 2009 and winning re-election three times.

    Julie Anderson

    Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson is running as an independent to bring a non-partisan voice to the secretary of state's office. Anderson served on the Tacoma City Council before running for county auditor in 2009 and winning re-election three times.

  • Endorsed By: Teamsters Joint Council 28, Teamsters 117, UFCW 3000 , Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District. She is a professor at Western Washington University, a member of Bellingham’s Lettered Streets Neighborhood Association, and an active union member. Her background in agricultural economics paired with her progressive values have made her an effective representative for residents of the 42nd Legislative District.

    Shewmake’s top priorities for the Senate include investing in good schools, living-wage jobs, clean air and water, a productive local farm industry, and safe communities. This year, she sponsored a number of commonsense bills focused on protecting marine habitats, promoting cleaner business standards, and working towards greater social equity in our state. Shewmake also wants to make sure that all residents can access prescription medication and health care services, including the freedom to make personal reproductive health decisions.

    Shewmake is challenging Trump Republican Sen. Simon Sefzik, who was appointed to take over Sen. Doug Ericksen’s seat when the late incumbent passed away last December. Prior to being appointed to the state Senate at age 22, Sefzik served as an intern at the White House during the last year of the Trump administration.

    Since joining the Senate, Sefzik has minimized the real issues facing our communities and used his platform to promote divisive and extreme positions. Recently, Sefzik reaffirmed that he opposes reproductive freedom at a time when abortion access is under attack nationwide. In the state Senate, Sefzik and his Republican colleagues oppose funding services that help working Washingtonians afford groceries, gas, rent, and prescription medication. He also sponsored short-sighted legislation that would have cut funding for badly needed transportation projects in Whatcom County and across the state.

    Sharon Shewmake has spent the last three years working to make the 42nd Legislative District a place where everyone has the chance to thrive. She is the clear choice for Senate.

    Sharon Shewmake

    Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District.

    Sharon Shewmake

    Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District.

  • Democrat

    Alicia Rule

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Incumbent Alicia Rule is running for re-election to House Position 1 for the 42nd Legislative District. Rule owns a therapy practice and previously served on the Blaine City Council and as president of the Blaine Downtown Development Association.

    Rule brought her expertise in counseling to the Legislature in her first term by focusing on health care and youth services. Some of the bills she sponsored include increasing access to outdoor education, encouraging young people to participate in fishing and shellfishing, and ensuring that services like counseling are available to public employees. Rule also stepped up quickly to support her community by passing legislation to provide relief for farmers, ranchers, and communities affected by flooding in northwest Washington.

    She is running for re-election to continue working to increase shelter options, create more living-wage jobs in Whatcom County, and keep our communities safe. In addition, Rule is passionate about preserving the environment of Whatcom County and has pursued local conservation efforts both as a volunteer and a city council member.

    Rule faces Republican Tawsha Dykstra Thompson, who has served as a police officer for almost 25 years in Bellingham. She is running to bring a conservative and regressive agenda to Olympia that emphasizes the role of law enforcement in the district. Thompson wants to criminalize homelessness, characterizing law enforcement as the "brakes" on mental health or addiction issues despite the fact that arrests don't address the root causes of these issues and often make them worse. She opposes making billionaires pay their share of the resources we all use.

    Republican politicians keep stoking fears and promising that the answer is always to put more and more people in jail. We need leadership that aims to address the many places where our country lags behind - in education, health, food security, housing, and more.

    Rep. Alicia Rule has embodied the ethos of fully supporting the community and has earned your vote in the 42nd District.

    Alicia Rule

    Incumbent Alicia Rule is running for re-election to House Position 1 for the 42nd Legislative District. Rule owns a therapy practice and previously served on the Blaine City Council and as president of the Blaine Downtown Development Association.

    Alicia Rule

    Incumbent Alicia Rule is running for re-election to House Position 1 for the 42nd Legislative District. Rule owns a therapy practice and previously served on the Blaine City Council and as president of the Blaine Downtown Development Association.

  • Democrat

    Joe Timmons

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Democrat Joe Timmons works in the governor's office as the regional outreach representative for Whatcom and neighboring counties. He is now running for Legislature to ensure that communities that have been disproportionately affected by climate change have access to clean air and water as well as green energy jobs. As we enter the third year of the pandemic, he also wants to see greater investments in mental and behavioral health, reliable internet, and emergency preparedness.

    In our interview with Timmons, he stated that his understanding of how Olympia works would help him hit the ground running if elected. He believes that solving the many shared issues of the district, including child care and housing, would help heal the national divide between Democrats and Republicans. Timmons' platform is well-rounded and thoughtful on increasing housing, addressing flooding, securing reproductive freedom, and jumpstarting early learning programs.

    Timmons' opponent is Marine Corps veteran Dan Johnson, who has worked in the towing business for a large portion of his career. He has served as legislative co-chair of Towing and Recovery Association of Washington (TRAW), and partnered with state officials on legislation such as the 2011 DUI bill known as Hailey's Law. Unfortunately, nearly all of his available campaign material is focused on law enforcement and opposing efforts to improve police accountability. Johnson's listed endorsements so far are all law enforcement, and he offers no solutions on any other issues.

    In late September, Johnson was also called out by The Bellingham Herald for a slew of sexist, anti-government, violent, and racists posts on his social media, which even Johnson himself admitted were anti-Semitic.

    Johnson's wild and bigoted views have no place in Olympia. On the other hand, Timmons has earned an impressive slate of endorsements from local and state elected officials, which speaks well to his potential to build coalitions and pass legislation. Timmons is by far the best choice for the 42 Legislative District, Position 2.

    Joe Timmons

    Democrat Joe Timmons works in the governor's office as the regional outreach representative for Whatcom and neighboring counties.

    Joe Timmons

    Democrat Joe Timmons works in the governor's office as the regional outreach representative for Whatcom and neighboring counties.

  • Eric Richey is the incumbent prosecuting attorney in Whatcom County and he is running unopposed for re-election. Richey was elected to the prosecutor’s office in 2018. Before that, he served as a deputy prosecutor for more than two decades. Richey also works for the community in a number of volunteer positions including the Brigid Collins Foundation and Whatcom County Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Services.

    As prosecutor, Richey has led reform efforts to reduce incarceration in cases of low-level crimes, including founding the county’s Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program. His other primary goal in office has been to address racial injustice in the criminal legal system, and he joined community members in creating the Racial Equity Commission. If re-elected he wants to continue approaching the office with an equity lens while working to address expensive overcrowding in our prisons and invest in crime prevention and alternatives to incarceration.

    Richey has a good track record and proven commitment to progress. He deserves your vote to remain the Whatcom County prosecutor.

    Eric Richey

    Eric Richey is the incumbent prosecuting attorney in Whatcom County and he is running unopposed for re-election. Richey was elected to the prosecutor’s office in 2018. Before that, he served as a deputy prosecutor for more than two decades.

    Eric Richey

    Eric Richey is the incumbent prosecuting attorney in Whatcom County and he is running unopposed for re-election. Richey was elected to the prosecutor’s office in 2018. Before that, he served as a deputy prosecutor for more than two decades.

  • Justice Mary Yu is running unopposed to continue serving on the state Supreme Court. Yu was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2014, elected by voters to the seat later that year, and re-elected in 2016. Before joining Washington’s highest court, she spent 14 years as a trial court judge in King County Superior Court and earlier as the deputy chief of staff to former King County prosecutor Norm Maleng.

    Yu has an unimpeachable reputation and has been rated “exceptionally well qualified” by a number of key bar associations. On the court, she has been a voice for equal justice and upholding the rights of all. Now, she is running with endorsements from all of her fellow justices as well as a number of retired justices from the court.

    Justice Yu deserves your vote to continue serving as one of Washington’s state Supreme Court justices.

    Mary Yu

    Justice Mary Yu is running unopposed to continue serving on the state Supreme Court. Yu was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2014, elected by voters to the seat later that year, and re-elected in 2016.

    Mary Yu

    Justice Mary Yu is running unopposed to continue serving on the state Supreme Court. Yu was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2014, elected by voters to the seat later that year, and re-elected in 2016.

  • Justice Barbara Madsen has served on the state Supreme Court for 30 years and is running unopposed for re-election this year. She was only the third woman to serve on the court when she was first elected in 1992. During her time on the court, her fellow justices elected her the 55th chief justice of the court – a position she held for 7 years.

    Having spent her career in both prosecution and public defense, Madsen has extensive knowledge of the criminal legal system and a passion for serving her community. Her re-election has been endorsed by each of her fellow justices and a wide range of other judicial leaders and community organizations.

    Justice Madsen has served the state with fair and equal justice. She deserves your vote to remain in her seat on Washington’s Supreme Court.

    Barbara Madsen

    Justice Barbara Madsen has served on the state Supreme Court for 30 years and is running unopposed for re-election this year. She was only the third woman to serve on the court when she was first elected in 1992.

    Barbara Madsen

    Justice Barbara Madsen has served on the state Supreme Court for 30 years and is running unopposed for re-election this year. She was only the third woman to serve on the court when she was first elected in 1992.

  • Justice G. Helen Whitener is running unopposed for re-election to Position 6 on Washington’s Supreme Court. Whitener became the first Black woman to serve on the state’s Supreme Court in April 2020 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy by Gov. Inslee. Later that year, she won her election to fill the remainder of the term. Prior to joining the Washington Supreme Court, Whitener served on the Pierce County Superior Court and worked as both a prosecutor and a defense attorney before becoming a judge.

    Justice Whitener is both a Trinidadian immigrant and openly gay, and has worked to be a representative voice for justice for all in the state’s highest court. In this race, she has earned the endorsement of each one of her fellow justices as well as some retired justices. Whitener has been rated as "exceptionally well-qualified" by a number of bar associations and has done an exceptional job since joining the court.

    Whitener is an important voice on the State Supreme Court and deserves your voice to continue serving as a justice in Position 6.

    G. Helen Whitener

    Justice G. Helen Whitener is running unopposed for re-election to Position 6 on Washington’s Supreme Court. Whitener became the first Black woman to serve on the state’s Supreme Court in April 2020 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy by Gov. Inslee.

    G. Helen Whitener

    Justice G. Helen Whitener is running unopposed for re-election to Position 6 on Washington’s Supreme Court. Whitener became the first Black woman to serve on the state’s Supreme Court in April 2020 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy by Gov. Inslee.

  • Jonathan Rands is running for Whatcom County District Court, Position 2 to fill the seat vacated by Judge Matthew Elich. Rands is a criminal defense lawyer who has spent more than two decades as a trial lawyer in local district and municipal courts. He already has four years of judicial experience through his work as a pro tem judge in local courts and he previously served as the president of the Washington Foundation for Criminal Justice.

    Rands wants to bring nonpartisan, community-centric judicial leadership to the court. His goals are to reduce recidivism and seek out restorative justice approaches where possible while fighting for accountability and safety for all. In this race, Rands has received widespread and bipartisan endorsements including from key judicial leaders in the area.

    Also in this race is Gordon Jenkins, a Whatcom County deputy prosecutor. Jenkins previously also worked in defense and he represents the state in Whatcom’s Drug Court. However, he has spent far less time in local courts than Rands and has no judicial experience.

    We recommend Jonathan Rands for Judge Position 2 on the Whatcom County District Court because of his broad community support and his extensive local court experience.

    Jonathan Rands

    Jonathan Rands is running for Whatcom County District Court, Position 2 to fill the seat vacated by Judge Matthew Elich. Rands is a criminal defense lawyer who has spent more than two decades as a trial lawyer in local district and municipal courts.

    Jonathan Rands

    Jonathan Rands is running for Whatcom County District Court, Position 2 to fill the seat vacated by Judge Matthew Elich. Rands is a criminal defense lawyer who has spent more than two decades as a trial lawyer in local district and municipal courts.

  • Former Blaine City Councilmember Jaime Arnett is running for Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) in the commissioner 3 seat. Arnett runs a local company that connects people with animals as a form of mental and behavioral therapy. She also works on community housing issues through Habitat for Humanity and previously worked in the local commercial fishing industry.

    If elected, Arnett would represent a progressive voice on the PUD. Her impressive goals for office include bringing free broadband to the county, safeguarding our clean air and water, ensuring responsible and sustainable fishing, and protecting the Nooksack River. With her commercial fishing background and her proven track record of community leadership, Arnett is equipped to advocate for these community issues effectively and collaboratively, while building good communication with the public.

    Also in this race is Eric Davidson, a current Blaine City Council member and registered nurse. Davidson is running on a more vague platform to safeguard Whatcom’s public utilities and he lacks a campaign website as of late September.

    We recommend Jaime Arnett in this race to bring a strong, progressive voice to the Whatcom County PUD as commissioner 3.

    Jaime Arnett

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 10/10/2022 - 15:23

    Former Blaine City Councilmember Jaime Arnett is running for Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) in the commissioner 3 seat. Arnett runs a local company that connects people with animals as a form of mental and behavioral therapy. She also works on community housing issues through Habitat for Humanity and previously worked in the local commercial fishing industry.

    If elected, Arnett would represent a progressive voice on the PUD. Her impressive goals for office include bringing free broadband to the county, safeguarding our clean air and water, ensuring responsible and sustainable fishing, and protecting the Nooksack River. With her commercial fishing background and her proven track record of community leadership, Arnett is equipped to advocate for these community issues effectively and collaboratively, while building good communication with the public.

    Also in this race is Eric Davidson, a current Blaine City Council member and registered nurse. Davidson is running on a more vague platform to safeguard Whatcom’s public utilities and he lacks a campaign website as of late September.

    We recommend Jaime Arnett in this race to bring a strong, progressive voice to the Whatcom County PUD as commissioner 3.

    Jaime Arnett

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 10/10/2022 - 15:23

    Former Blaine City Councilmember Jaime Arnett is running for Whatcom County Public Utility District (PUD) in the commissioner 3 seat. Arnett runs a local company that connects people with animals as a form of mental and behavioral therapy. She also works on community housing issues through Habitat for Humanity and previously worked in the local commercial fishing industry.

    If elected, Arnett would represent a progressive voice on the PUD. Her impressive goals for office include bringing free broadband to the county, safeguarding our clean air and water, ensuring responsible and sustainable fishing, and protecting the Nooksack River. With her commercial fishing background and her proven track record of community leadership, Arnett is equipped to advocate for these community issues effectively and collaboratively, while building good communication with the public.

    Also in this race is Eric Davidson, a current Blaine City Council member and registered nurse. Davidson is running on a more vague platform to safeguard Whatcom’s public utilities and he lacks a campaign website as of late September.

    We recommend Jaime Arnett in this race to bring a strong, progressive voice to the Whatcom County PUD as commissioner 3.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES for Lynden street improvements

  • Well-maintained roads, bridges, and sidewalks are a crucial part of a connected, modern city. Voters last approved an increase in the sales tax a decade ago, when a 0.2% increase was used to help make improvements to local streets, sidewalks, and trails.

    Proposition 2022-4 seeks to renew the 0.2% increase in the sales and use tax solely to support the Transportation Benefit District. This funds repair and improvement projects in local project areas covered by state funding, such as traffic safety improvements, sidewalk repair, bike lanes, bridge repair, street reconstruction, and more.

    With several million dollars of improvements needed to repair the city's streets and sidewalks, these funds are a crucial investment for all who work, play, live in, and visit Lynden. Vote YES to approve Proposition 2022-4 and help build safer roads and infrastructure for all residents.
    Well-maintained roads, bridges, and sidewalks are a crucial part of a connected, modern city. Voters last approved an increase in the sales tax a decade ago, when a 0.2% increase was used to help make improvements to local streets, sidewalks, and trails.

    Proposition 2022-4 seeks to renew the 0.2% increase in the sales and use tax solely to support the Transportation Benefit District. This funds repair and improvement projects in local project areas covered by state funding, such as traffic safety improvements, sidewalk repair, bike lanes, bridge repair, street reconstruction, and more.

    With several million dollars of improvements needed to repair the city's streets and sidewalks, these funds are a crucial investment for all who work, play, live in, and visit Lynden. Vote YES to approve Proposition 2022-4 and help build safer roads and infrastructure for all residents.

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below school district races on your ballot.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote Approved for new Nooksack Valley school districts

  • The Nooksack Valley School District Board wants to adapt the board structure to best serve the diverse needs of the district and ensure everyone is represented. Prompted by demographic changes and new data for the school district, the school board directors have agreed on a plan to reapportion the director districts.

    The Nooksack Valley School District Proposition 7 proposes to dissolve the five director districts into three distinct director districts and two new at-large seats, keeping the total number of seats at five. This new arrangement would give voters more of a say for who sits on the board.

    Vote “Approved” on Nooksack Valley School District Proposition 7.
    The Nooksack Valley School District Board wants to adapt the board structure to best serve the diverse needs of the district and ensure everyone is represented. Prompted by demographic changes and new data for the school district, the school board directors have agreed on a plan to reapportion the director districts.

    The Nooksack Valley School District Proposition 7 proposes to dissolve the five director districts into three distinct director districts and two new at-large seats, keeping the total number of seats at five. This new arrangement would give voters more of a say for who sits on the board.

    Vote “Approved” on Nooksack Valley School District Proposition 7.