The Washington Bus

The Washington Bus

The Washington Bus engages tomorrow's leaders on their own terms, and empowers them through education, civic and cultural engagement, and hands-on democracy. We take control of, and responsibility for, our own future by making sure our friends and peers are registered to vote, know the issues, and fill out their ballots.

County Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system. If elected, she would be the first woman and the first person of color in this role. Outside of the prosecutor's office, Manion has served several leadership roles, including on the boards of the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle, and as co-founding partner of Choose 180, which offers coaching and diversion programs to keep youth out of the juvenile justice system.

    Manion's top priorities include tackling the backlog of 4,500 cases filed during the pandemic's work halt, increasing funding for reforms like mental health court, and intervening in gun violence before people become victims or offenders. High on her agenda is continuing to prosecute violent crimes while addressing racial disparities and providing culturally responsive care to victims.

    In our interview with Manion, she offered compelling insights about the prosecuting attorney's office and how she would manage it if elected. She spoke of her experience building a well-functioning team and solid working relationships throughout the legal system, as evidenced by the fact that she earned the endorsement of SEIU 925, the union that includes public defenders. She also spoke about the need to apply racial justice principles to better reflect the values of the community, and invite the community to public listening sessions or possibly convene community advisory boards. Finally, Manion committed to spending more time going to monthly police and sheriff meetings to build relationships throughout the county.

    We recommend Manion for her impressive platform and extensive track record of results, as well as the broad support of many progressive and Democratic organizations.

    Leesa Manion

    Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system.

    Leesa Manion

    Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system.

  • Maggie Yates is running for Spokane County Commission, District 5 to improve the health of families, support affordable housing, and expand economic opportunity for all. She has served as Spokane County's regional law and justice administrator where she has been a leader on criminal legal reform. Some of her projects and recommendations for the local legal system have included remote court access, expanded data analytics, and an intake and release center.

    Yates wants to see more investment in housing that everyone can access, including rental assistance, programs for first-time buyers, and more. She also wants to see expanded apprenticeship programs to help the local workforce, as well as expanded mental health care and child care. In our local council's questionnaire, Yates states that she's looking forward to repairing and investing in relationships with tribes, community partners, and jurisdictions. She believes that the best way forward on quality child care, clean water and air, better broadband, and more is to work together.

    Yates' opponent is Spokane County Commissioner Al French, who is essentially the incumbent for this newly-created district. French served eight years on the Spokane City Council from 2002 to 2009 and has been on the county commission since then. He is a conservative developer with a combative style and a history of ethical problems. French alienated local cities by promoting aggressive urban sprawl and caused them to opt-out of a regional garbage system that has cost the county millions in revenue.

    The differences between these two candidates are stark. While Yates is seeking a regional response to homelessness, including more affordable housing and community-based resources, French states that the county has done enough on homelessness already. While Yates is prepared to continue her work on reform and reducing recidivism with focused programs, French wants to avoid the root of the problem and pour millions into building a new jail.

    Spokane County families need a representative like Yates on the council who will work hard and bring people together to move our region forward. Maggie Yates is the clear choice in this race.

    Maggie Yates

    Maggie Yates is running for Spokane County Commission, District 5 to improve the health of families, support affordable housing, and expand economic opportunity for all.

    Maggie Yates

    Maggie Yates is running for Spokane County Commission, District 5 to improve the health of families, support affordable housing, and expand economic opportunity for all.

Legislative Races

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below legislative races on your ballot.

  • John Zingale is a first-time candidate running for the 18th Legislative District, Position 1 to bring a progressive voice to the seat vacated by Rep. Brandon Vick. Zingale is a middle school social studies teacher in the public school system. He has earned state and local awards as an educator who focuses on civic engagement and he serves on educational boards.

    Zingale’s campaign priorities are based on the everyday conversations he has with students and families in the district. He is running to bring municipal broadband to the region, invest in our schools to prepare all our kids to succeed, and help local businesses thrive. Zingale also believes we need to build more affordable housing options, create more living-wage jobs, and break the cycle of generational poverty by addressing the high cost of living with community services.

    Stephanie McClintock, a member of the Battle Ground School Board and chair of the Clark County Republican Party, is also vying for the 18th Legislative District seat. McClintock is running on a typically conservative platform to cut public funding that helps improve schools, transit, parks, and community services while spending more further militarizing and expanding police forces. McClintock is also campaigning on divisive rhetoric about school curriculums and wants to erase some of our communities from the history books.

    Zingale is the best choice in this race and deserves your vote to bring progressive leadership to House Position 1 representing the 18th Legislative District.

    John Zingale

    John Zingale is a first-time candidate running for the 18th Legislative District, Position 1 to bring a progressive voice to the seat vacated by Rep. Brandon Vick. Zingale is a middle school social studies teacher in the public school system.

    John Zingale

    John Zingale is a first-time candidate running for the 18th Legislative District, Position 1 to bring a progressive voice to the seat vacated by Rep. Brandon Vick. Zingale is a middle school social studies teacher in the public school system.

  • Emily Randall is one of the Legislature's strongest advocates for expanding access to health care and protecting reproductive freedom. Prior to running for public office in 2018, Randall worked at Planned Parenthood, where she advocated for improving health outcomes for local underserved populations.

    Randall has been a productive legislator responsible for writing and passing a host of bills during her four years in office. Her accomplishments include raising the minimum wage for people with disabilities, eliminating disparities in medical training, and extending postpartum health care coverage. She also sponsored legislation that would have protected health care access for families in rural areas.

    Randall is running for re-election to reduce the cost of higher education and expand job training programs for graduating high school seniors. She also wants to expand access to affordable health care for Washington families.

    In stark contrast to Randall's record of building consensus to pass legislation, her opponent, Rep. Jesse Young, is one of the most extreme MAGA Republicans in Olympia. Young sponsored several bills aimed at eliminating abortion access long before the Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade. After the 2020 election, Young traveled to Arizona to promote Trump's election conspiracy that sought to overturn the will of the people. During the height of the pandemic, he promoted dangerous, anti-science lies that put lives at risk.

    Beyond his radical policy positions, Young also displayed serious lapses in judgment and character while in office. In 2017, Young was banned from managing legislative staff because of "a pattern of hostile and intimidating behavior" in his office. If elected to the Senate, Young can be expected to continue pushing a radical agenda that's far out of step with the people of the 26th Legislative District.

    As abortion and health care come under attack by conservatives both federally and at the state level, it is imperative that senators continue to expand coverage and make sure that health care is accessible for all. We strongly recommend a vote for Sen. Emily Randall in the 26th Legislative District.

    Emily Randall

    Emily Randall is one of the Legislature's strongest advocates for expanding access to health care and protecting reproductive freedom.

    Emily Randall

    Emily Randall is one of the Legislature's strongest advocates for expanding access to health care and protecting reproductive freedom.

  • Former House representative Kristine Reeves is running for the vacant seat left open by the retirement of Rep. Jesse Johnson this year. She currently serves on the Washington State Gambling Commission and is the former director of Economic Development for the Military and Defense sector for Washington state.

    In the Legislature, Reeves was a champion for paid family and medical leave, gun safety, linking students with apprenticeships, and making child care more affordable. She is motivated to address affordable housing and homelessness by using her experience growing up as a foster child and being homeless herself at times. Reeves also wants to see child care workers compensated more fairly, advocate for military families and veterans, achieve greater climate action, and protect abortion rights by closing fake "crisis pregnancy centers" that pretend to offer abortion services.

    Reeves is running against Ashli Tagoai, a lawyer and former communications director for the Washington State Republican Party. Like many MAGA Republicans running this year, Tagoai is trying to divide and scare us about crime instead of providing our communities the care, security, and support we need. Rather than supporting proven strategies to reduce gun violence and address homelessness, Tagoai wants us to believe that the solution is just to put even more people in jail. She also has no desire to balance our state's upside-down tax code and would allow corporations and the wealthy to avoid paying what they owe our communities.

    While Reeves has been progressive on several issues, she's taken a more cautious approach to others, including voting against taxing polluters. She was also one of only three Democrats to vote no on eviction protections in 2019, especially notable in this district because eviction disproportionately affects Black and Latino residents. While we hope that Reeves will vote differently on these issues, Tagoai's far-right agenda would drag the 30th Legislative District backward. Reeves is by far the best choice in this race.

    Kristine Reeves

    Former House representative Kristine Reeves is running for the vacant seat left open by the retirement of Rep. Jesse Johnson this year.

    Kristine Reeves

    Former House representative Kristine Reeves is running for the vacant seat left open by the retirement of Rep. Jesse Johnson this year.

  • Incumbent Sen. Joe Nguyen is running to continue bringing strong progressive leadership to the state Senate from the 34th Legislative District, where he has served since 2018. Outside of the Legislature, he has spent almost a decade at Microsoft as a senior program manager. He is running to put people over politics and keep helping Washingtonians access the resources they need to thrive.

    This year, Nguyen sponsored a bill to prohibit the sale of high-capacity firearm magazines and keep our communities safe from gun violence. He also supported Move Ahead Washington, a historic policy package that will upgrade the state’s public transportation while making it more accessible for all and reducing our environmental impact. Throughout his first term, Nguyen’s priorities have included working toward environmental justice, balancing our state’s upside-down tax code, reforming our broken criminal legal system, and making sure all Washingtonians have equitable opportunities.

    Nguyen faces a challenge from Republican John Potter, a paraeducator with the Highline School District and a member of the Teamsters Local 763. Potter would bring extremely conservative views to office if elected. He has a transphobic opinion of gender-affirming health services and wants to revoke our freedom to decide whether and when to grow our families by trying to ban safe, legal abortion. Potter’s approach to the housing crisis is to vilify our neighbors struggling to secure stable housing while cutting funding for the community services so many of us rely on.

    Joe Nguyen has fought to make our state a place where all families and communities can thrive. He deserves to be re-elected and is the clear choice in this race.

    Joe Nguyen

    Incumbent Sen. Joe Nguyen is running to continue bringing strong progressive leadership to the state Senate from the 34th Legislative District, where he has served since 2018. Outside of the Legislature, he has spent almost a decade at Microsoft as a senior program manager.

    Joe Nguyen

    Incumbent Sen. Joe Nguyen is running to continue bringing strong progressive leadership to the state Senate from the 34th Legislative District, where he has served since 2018. Outside of the Legislature, he has spent almost a decade at Microsoft as a senior program manager.

  • School librarian Leah Griffin is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault. After police refused to test her rape kit, she worked with state officials on legislation that led to testing all 11,000 of the state's backlogged rape kits, passed a survivor's bill of rights, and more. Griffin also worked with Sen. Patty Murray on the federal Survivors’ Access to Supportive Care Act, founded the Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) Task Force, and organized for the R-90 campaign for age-appropriate sexual health education.

    Griffin is now running for the Legislature to advocate for more access to behavioral health care, public safety reform, and affordable housing. In our interview with Griffin, she elaborated on the immense need for more behavioral and mental health care across the population - for frontline workers with PTSD, youth, teachers, people experiencing homelessness, and many others. She wants to see counselors embedded in union halls and wraparound services at shelters, giving care at the point of need where people can access it. As a victim of violent crime, Griffin states that a lack of behavioral health care, housing, and education are the undercurrents for crime, and putting people in prison without resources is morally bankrupt. Griffin also wants to see an increase in green energy like tidal power, community-centered child care programs, and greater unionization of workers.

    Both Griffin and Alvarado are progressive and support bills like the capital gains tax, which aim to flip Washington's deeply regressive tax code to stop favoring the ultra-wealthy. Griffin in particular is a good choice if you are looking for a candidate with a long record of grassroots advocacy who will focus on expanding health care access.

    Leah Griffin

    School librarian Leah Griffin is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault. After police refused to test her rape kit, she worked with state officials on legislation that led to testing all 11,000 of the state's backlogged rape kits, passed a survivor's bill of rights, and more.

    Leah Griffin

    School librarian Leah Griffin is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault. After police refused to test her rape kit, she worked with state officials on legislation that led to testing all 11,000 of the state's backlogged rape kits, passed a survivor's bill of rights, and more.

  • Rep. Noel Frame is running for the state Senate on a strong and progressive record of action in the state House. First elected as a representative in 2016, she previously served as the Washington state director of Progressive Majority, where she worked to recruit and elect progressive candidates from underrepresented communities. She has spent her time in Olympia advocating for working families, funding our public schools, and rebalancing our state's upside-down tax code.

    Frame had a particularly productive legislative session this year. She sponsored many of the progressive bills that passed into law, including limiting ghost guns, restricting guns in certain public areas, creating a system to locate missing Indigenous people, and creating middle housing near transit. Though the bill didn't pass this year, Frame also sponsored the wealth tax bill that would make the extraordinarily wealthy finally pay their share for the resources we all use. She has supported juvenile justice reform, expanded the number of families who qualify for child care assistance, and protected us from surprise medical billing by continuing to push for a progressive Washington.

    Frame faces planning and design consultant Kate Martin, who ran for Seattle City Council last year against Teresa Mosqueda, in 2019 against Councilmember Dan Strauss, and in 2013 for Seattle mayor.

    While Martin filed for office as a Democrat, her values and public statements make it clear that she's not progressive. In December of 2020, Martin stated that "I joined the GOP today" and claims to have re-joined the Democratic Party only recently. However, her Facebook page is an endless stream of Republican conspiracy theories and disinformation about unions, the LGBTQ community, homelessness, and people struggling with addiction.

    This race offers a clear contrast between a hard-working, proven leader in Olympia and a candidate who would block the kind of bold progressive reforms our communities need. While Martin filed for office as a Democrat, voters should know that her public statements reveal the truth about her far-right beliefs on a wide range of topics.

    Rep. Frame has been a strong advocate for the district and deserves your vote.

    Noel Frame

    Rep. Noel Frame is running for the state Senate on a strong and progressive record of action in the state House.

    Noel Frame

    Rep. Noel Frame is running for the state Senate on a strong and progressive record of action in the state House.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community. Reed has worked in several levels of government, including in the Obama State Department as a Special Envoy for Middle East Peace, as a senior policy advisor for workforce development in the Seattle mayor's office, and most recently as a public policy consultant. Reed is also the former chair of the 36th Legislative District Democrats, a current volunteer board member for the YMCA Social Impact Center, and a board member at Fuse Washington, which produces this guide.

    Reed offers the most comprehensive and detailed policy proposals in this race, covering topics from housing to health. Reed recognizes that appropriate density is a must. Washington has the fewest units of housing per household of any state and market-rate, middle-income, affordable, duplexes, accessory dwelling units, and permanent supportive housing are all needed to alleviate the pressure. While working for the city of Seattle, Reed helped establish an internship program for Seattle Promise community college students. She wants to expand apprenticeship, technical college, and work-based learning opportunities to get students ready for jobs of the future.

    If elected, Reed would advocate for making zero-carbon transportation available in every city, including electrifying buses and ferries and expanding electric car infrastructure, among other climate priorities. Reed is one of the few candidates this year to show interest in a pilot program for universal basic income, which could be a game-changer for struggling families and working people.

    In our interview with Reed, she was thoughtful and informed about the ways that the Legislature could partner with and invest in communities of color, youth, and others to build a more resilient Washington. Since the primary, Reed has garnered even more support from progressive organizations for her forward-thinking priorities. For her deep experience and readiness to bring innovative solutions to Olympia, we recommend Julia Reed for the 36th Legislative District in Position 1.

    Julia Reed

    Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community.

    Julia Reed

    Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community.

  • As a community organizer deeply rooted in the community, Emijah Smith wants to bring the voices and needs of the community to the forefront through investment in small businesses, trauma-informed health care, and racial justice.

    In our interview, she spoke of how the war on drugs in the Central District was her first doorway into being an advocate for her community. After years of working with Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, Smith worked at Solid Ground with those experiencing housing and food insecurity, and spent 11 years organizing in Olympia as a community engagement manager at the Children’s Alliance. As a legislator, she wants to prioritize flexible afterschool programs, access to addiction services, and truly affordable childcare.

    Smith has served as PTSA president and vice president of the Seattle Public Schools PTSA. Unique to her candidacy is her experience advocating for her children in the district, which led to developing better investments for marginalized students. In a point of differentiation between Smith and her opponent Chipalo Street, only Smith spoke of ending gentrification in the Central and International District, Rainier Valley, and Renton by ending predatory real estate development practices. She was also the only candidate to discuss the need to support survivors of domestic violence by unraveling the difficult knot of laws and procedures around getting protection.

    Smith's notable endorsements include King County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay, Rep. Tarra Simmons, Rep. Jamila Taylor, and former King County Councilmember Larry Gossett, all of whom are outstanding advocates for racial justice and community building.

    Smith is a great choice if you are looking for a candidate with a long record of work in the community who centers Black liberation, self-determination, and using local knowledge to inform policy.

    Emijah Smith

    As a community organizer deeply rooted in the community, Emijah Smith wants to bring the voices and needs of the community to the forefront through investment in small businesses, trauma-informed health care, and racial justice.

    Emijah Smith

    As a community organizer deeply rooted in the community, Emijah Smith wants to bring the voices and needs of the community to the forefront through investment in small businesses, trauma-informed health care, and racial justice.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District. She is a professor at Western Washington University, a member of Bellingham’s Lettered Streets Neighborhood Association, and an active union member. Her background in agricultural economics paired with her progressive values have made her an effective representative for residents of the 42nd Legislative District.

    Shewmake’s top priorities for the Senate include investing in good schools, living-wage jobs, clean air and water, a productive local farm industry, and safe communities. This year, she sponsored a number of commonsense bills focused on protecting marine habitats, promoting cleaner business standards, and working towards greater social equity in our state. Shewmake also wants to make sure that all residents can access prescription medication and health care services, including the freedom to make personal reproductive health decisions.

    Shewmake is challenging Trump Republican Sen. Simon Sefzik, who was appointed to take over Sen. Doug Ericksen’s seat when the late incumbent passed away last December. Prior to being appointed to the state Senate at age 22, Sefzik served as an intern at the White House during the last year of the Trump administration.

    Since joining the Senate, Sefzik has minimized the real issues facing our communities and used his platform to promote divisive and extreme positions. Recently, Sefzik reaffirmed that he opposes reproductive freedom at a time when abortion access is under attack nationwide. In the state Senate, Sefzik and his Republican colleagues oppose funding services that help working Washingtonians afford groceries, gas, rent, and prescription medication. He also sponsored short-sighted legislation that would have cut funding for badly needed transportation projects in Whatcom County and across the state.

    Sharon Shewmake has spent the last three years working to make the 42nd Legislative District a place where everyone has the chance to thrive. She is the clear choice for Senate.

    Sharon Shewmake

    Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District.

    Sharon Shewmake

    Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences. She is the public policy director with Disability Rights Washington, an organization that provides free services to people with disabilities and protects the rights of people with disabilities statewide. Farivar has also served as co-chair of the Seattle Women's Commission, policy chair of the State Special Education Advisory Council, and is currently a board member of Peyvand, which supports Iranian students at UW.

    A focus on disability rights runs through Farivar's campaign, from her priorities in housing, criminal justice reform, health care, and more. In our interview, Farivar stated that she wants to build up diversion programs and ensure accessible housing units for people experiencing homelessness, noting that 40 percent of homeless people report having a disability. Farivar also makes the interesting point that disabilities cut across partisan lines and she would be willing to work across the aisle to move forward with legislation that works for everyone. She wants to see investments in robust mass transit, including infrastructure to get people to the district's three light rail stops and would be very supportive of transit-centered housing.

    Farivar states that she would be the first Middle Eastern woman serving in Olympia. As the daughter of refugees, she wants to establish a commission for Middle Eastern affairs to help the Legislature work in unison with Middle Eastern communities. Since the primary, she has solidified broad support from progressive organizations and earned the endorsement of the three leading Democrats who did not advance from the primary.

    Farivar is a good choice if you're looking for a candidate who would center underrepresented voices and ensure truly accessible services and housing for all.

    Darya Farivar

    Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences.

    Darya Farivar

    Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences.

  • Claudia Kauffman is a former state senator from the 47th Legislative District. She is running for the Legislature again to uplift the need for early learning, affordable housing, climate action, and more. Kauffman currently serves as the Intergovernmental Affairs Liaison for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe where she oversees the tribe's legislative agenda on a local, state, and federal level, and she is the founder of Native Action Network. A member of the Nez Perce Tribe, if elected again to the Legislature, Kauffman would be one of a very small number of Indigenous lawmakers, alongside incumbent Rep. Lekanoff and potentially candidate Chris Stearns.

    In our interview with Kauffman, she pointed out how the district's history of swinging between red and blue is an open opportunity for someone with her experience to win the seat. She wants to see the Housing Trust Fund increased, and would help teachers earn higher pay alongside opening more slots for early learning. Removing salmon culverts and cleaning up superfund sites on the Duwamish River are high on her environmental agenda and Kauffman wants to see more transit-oriented housing. On public safety, she believes that there should be more communication between police and the community.

    Kauffman's opponent in this race is Kent City Council member and Republican Bill Boyce. He has just a few points on his agenda available on his site, including repealing the state's long-term care program. Boyce's desire to cut back on health care is unfortunate. According to NPR, about 70 percent of those over the age of 65 will need long-term care for everyday needs like bathing and dressing, not to mention people of any age who require a caregiver.

    Despite his campaign's promise that he will fight regressive taxes, Boyce makes no mention of making the wealthy finally pay their share. The Republicans in Olympia he hopes to join have voted against a capital gains tax and other measures aimed at making corporations and extraordinarily wealthy individuals pay what they owe our communities, and Boyce would likely vote similarly if elected.

    As the district recovers from the pandemic, our communities need greater investments in transit, housing, and the environment. Kauffman is by far the best choice in this race.

    Claudia Kauffman

    Claudia Kauffman is a former state senator from the 47th Legislative District. She is running for the Legislature again to uplift the need for early learning, affordable housing, climate action, and more.

    Claudia Kauffman

    Claudia Kauffman is a former state senator from the 47th Legislative District. She is running for the Legislature again to uplift the need for early learning, affordable housing, climate action, and more.

  • Rep. Debra Entenman is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 47th Legislative District. Before running for office, she served as the district director for U.S. Rep. Adam Smith. Entenman currently serves on the Renton Technical College Board of Trustees and previously served on the boards of Neighborhood House and Kent Youth and Family Services.

    Entenman has had a consistent record of working to improve the lives of her constituents throughout her time in Olympia. This year, she was the prime sponsor of a bill to increase police accountability by creating an independent civilian office to investigate law enforcement incidents involving the use of force. In previous years she sponsored bills to provide youth with access to attorneys if contacted by law enforcement, limit facial recognition technology, and expand access to assistance for vulnerable families in need.

    As part of her commitment to the wellbeing of all in the district, Entenman's campaign platform focuses on education, technology, public health, and the economy. She wants to increase food security for students, improve the availability of broadband internet, and make sure consumer data is safe and private. Entenman also wants to reimagine public safety using proven methods like violence reduction programs, housing, and mental health care.

    Entenman faces a challenge from far-right Republican Kyle Lyebyedyev, who states that he will be "pro-Christianity," pro-guns, and anti-abortion. He challenged Entenman in 2020 on a platform that made false accusations about immigrants and refused to balance the state's upside-down code. Since 2020, his platform has remained staunchly conservative - against environmental protections, against public transit, and notably silent on making the wealthy pay their share for the resources we all use.

    Entenman has been a stalwart and principled leader during her time in Olympia. As the district navigates pandemic recovery and building healthy, safe communities, it needs a serious legislator to tackle these issues. Rep. Entenman is the best choice in this race.

    Debra Entenman

    Rep. Debra Entenman is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 47th Legislative District. Before running for office, she served as the district director for U.S. Rep. Adam Smith.

    Debra Entenman

    Rep. Debra Entenman is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 47th Legislative District. Before running for office, she served as the district director for U.S. Rep. Adam Smith.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Dr. Shukri Olow is running for Position 2 in the 47th Legislative District. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old. Olow credits the food bank, social workers, and Kent public housing system for helping her find opportunities, and wants to now help meet the needs of those struggling in the district today. She works at King County's Best Starts for Kids Initiative, leads the Youth Development Strategy, and served on multiple community nonprofit boards.

    With House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan retiring this year, Olow wants to bring her commitment to improve the lives of families, working people, and people of color to Olympia with her focus on labor, housing, and health care.

    If elected, some of Olow's top priorities would be addressing the youth mental health crisis with resources that are culturally relevant, increasing affordable housing, and hosting community listening sessions across the district. She wants to see everyone, no matter their race, age, or where they're from, feel safe in their communities. To accomplish that, she wants to make greater investments in social workers, crisis responders, and behavioral health that is not tied to law enforcement. Olow also wants to expand housing vouchers, and work in tandem with the community to develop her agenda as a legislator. She has a strong set of endorsements, especially with labor groups.

    We lean toward Olow in this race because of her strong record of advocacy for youth, families, working people, and communities of color, and her impressive list of endorsements from our partners.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is running for Position 2 in the 47th Legislative District. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is running for Position 2 in the 47th Legislative District. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to introduce ranked choice voting for Seattle elections

  • We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

    We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

  • Endorsed By The Washington Bus, Fuse, Sierra Club, The Urbanist, Washington CAN!, Washington Conservation Voters , FairVote Washington, King County Democrats, Washington Community Alliance
  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to raise wages for Tukwila workers in large businesses

  • Tukwila Initiative 1 – the “Raise the Wage” initiative – will allow working people to be compensated fairly for their labor, help residents keep pace with the cost of living, and invest in the local economy.

    The initiative would require businesses with more than 500 employees to pay employee wages equivalent to comparable positions in nearby cities that rise with inflation. The measure is meant to address Tukwila’s relatively low wages compared with neighboring cities, which have caused residents to search for jobs outside the city.

    Vote “Yes” on Initiative 1 to support working people and keep Tukwila's economy competitive.
    Tukwila Initiative 1 – the “Raise the Wage” initiative – will allow working people to be compensated fairly for their labor, help residents keep pace with the cost of living, and invest in the local economy.

    The initiative would require businesses with more than 500 employees to pay employee wages equivalent to comparable positions in nearby cities that rise with inflation. The measure is meant to address Tukwila’s relatively low wages compared with neighboring cities, which have caused residents to search for jobs outside the city.

    Vote “Yes” on Initiative 1 to support working people and keep Tukwila's economy competitive.