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The Urbanist

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Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system. If elected, she would be the first woman and the first person of color in this role. Outside of the prosecutor's office, Manion has served several leadership roles, including on the boards of the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle, and as co-founding partner of Choose 180, which offers coaching and diversion programs to keep youth out of the juvenile justice system.

    Manion's top priorities include tackling the backlog of 4,500 cases filed during the pandemic's work halt, increasing funding for reforms like mental health court, and intervening in gun violence before people become victims or offenders. High on her agenda is continuing to prosecute violent crimes while addressing racial disparities and providing culturally responsive care to victims.

    In our interview with Manion, she offered compelling insights about the prosecuting attorney's office and how she would manage it if elected. She spoke of her experience building a well-functioning team and solid working relationships throughout the legal system, as evidenced by the fact that she earned the endorsement of SEIU 925, the union that includes public defenders. She also spoke about the need to apply racial justice principles to better reflect the values of the community, and invite the community to public listening sessions or possibly convene community advisory boards. Finally, Manion committed to spending more time going to monthly police and sheriff meetings to build relationships throughout the county.

    We recommend Manion for her impressive platform and extensive track record of results, as well as the broad support of many progressive and Democratic organizations.

    Leesa Manion

    Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system.

    Leesa Manion

    Leesa Manion has worked as the chief of staff of the King County prosecuting attorney’s office for the last 15 years. She is now running for King County prosecutor to provide consistent leadership to the office and support important reforms to the criminal legal system.

Legislative Races

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below legislative races on your ballot.

  • Democrat

    Davina Duerr

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Incumbent Rep. Davina Duerr is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 1st Legislative District. Duerr joined the House in 2019 when she replaced Derek Stanford who moved to the Senate. Prior to joining the Legislature, she served as deputy city mayor from 2016 to 2019 while on the Bothell City Council, where she still serves in an at-large position. She also chaired the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board for eight years and founded the M.I.L.K. Money campaign at the Northshore Schools Foundation to support students experiencing homelessness.

    In the Legislature, Duerr has sponsored an impressive slate of progressive legislation. Most recently, she supported bills to make sure all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and to reduce gun violence caused by homemade guns. Duerr has worked to increase affordable housing options, invest in public schools, and ensure environmental protection.

    Duerr's opponent is Republican John Peeples, who unsuccessfully ran for Seattle City Council in 2019 and state representative in the 43rd Legislative District in 2018. This year, he is running again largely to fight against public health requirements that kept Washingtonians safe during the pandemic. Peeples does not have elected or community leadership experience.

    Duerr has been a strong and consistent progressive leader in the House and deserves re-election to Position 1 of the 1st Legislative District.

    Davina Duerr

    Incumbent Rep. Davina Duerr is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 1st Legislative District. Duerr joined the House in 2019 when she replaced Derek Stanford who moved to the Senate.

    Davina Duerr

    Incumbent Rep. Davina Duerr is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 1st Legislative District. Duerr joined the House in 2019 when she replaced Derek Stanford who moved to the Senate.

  • Progressive incumbent Rep. David Hackney is running for a second term representing the 11th Legislative District in Position 1. Before joining the Legislature, Hackney spent 25 years as a practicing attorney, including at the U.N., and worked at a handful of progressive organizations that focused on environmental protections and workers' rights. In 2019, he was appointed to the Washington State Human Rights Commission by Gov. Inslee.

    This past session, three of Hackney's bills were signed into law. His legislation protected the sensitive information of currently or formerly incarcerated Washingtonians, created a tax exemption for organizations maintaining affordable housing, and increased access to electricity as a transportation fuel for all Washingtonians. Hackney is running for re-election to continue investing in a clean energy future, tackling the housing crisis, and building safe and economically secure communities.

    His challenger this year is Republican precinct committee officer Stephanie Peters, who is running under the extreme Election Integrity Party mantle. Her main priority is to question election security, echoing the messages of MAGA Republicans who are trying to overturn the will of the people in the last presidential election. As of late October, Peters does not have a functioning campaign website to detail her priorities.

    Rep. Hackney is by far the best choice in this race for his experience and his effective first session as a legislator.

    G. David Hackney

    Progressive incumbent Rep. David Hackney is running for a second term representing the 11th Legislative District in Position 1.

    G. David Hackney

    Progressive incumbent Rep. David Hackney is running for a second term representing the 11th Legislative District in Position 1.

  • Democratic Rep. Strom Peterson is running for re-election to represent the 21st Legislative District in House Position 1. Prior to joining the Legislature, Peterson served on the Edmonds City Council for six years where he proved to be a capable and thoughtful leader.

    In Olympia, Peterson has had a hand in passing several important progressive bills. This year, Peterson sponsored legislation to limit the sale of ghost guns and restrict guns in certain public locations like school board meetings. He also sponsored the wealth tax, which would finally make Washington's extremely wealthy pay their share for the resources that we all use, and he supported the middle housing bill to expand housing around transit.

    In previous years, Peterson was a sponsor of Breakfast Before the Bell, which provides meals for hungry students. In 2018, he was the primary sponsor of the Secure Drug Medicine Back Act, an innovative program to limit the usage of unused and expired prescriptions in Washington communities.

    Peterson faces a challenge from Republican Amy Schaper. She has previously stated that she opposes reproductive freedom and comprehensive, age-appropriate sexual health education. In this race, she is running on a typically conservative platform that does not serve the needs of the community.

    Peterson is the clear choice for Legislature in this race.

    Strom Peterson

    Democratic Rep. Strom Peterson is running for re-election to represent the 21st Legislative District in House Position 1. Prior to joining the Legislature, Peterson served on the Edmonds City Council for six years where he proved to be a capable and thoughtful leader.

    Strom Peterson

    Democratic Rep. Strom Peterson is running for re-election to represent the 21st Legislative District in House Position 1. Prior to joining the Legislature, Peterson served on the Edmonds City Council for six years where he proved to be a capable and thoughtful leader.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Beth Doglio is running for Position 1 in the 22nd Legislative District to highlight the need for climate action, affordable health care, and more.

    Doglio was first elected to this seat in 2016 and stepped down in 2020 to run for Congress in the 10th District. During her congressional run, she expressed her support for a Green New Deal and Medicare for All, and she earned the sole endorsement of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. Prior to running for office, Doglio worked as the Climate Solutions campaign director and was the founding executive director of Washington Conservation Voters.

    While in the Legislature, Doglio advocated for numerous climate and environmental bills, as well as legislation to protect sexual assault survivors and increase funding for affordable housing. If re-elected, Doglio would work to make greater investments in housing for the vulnerable, uphold the ban on assault weapons, increase wages for working people, and more.

    Doglio is running against Republican Loretta Byrnes. Leading up to the primary election, her campaign policies were broadly about reducing regulations on businesses, and she attributed an entire slate of social topics - the housing crisis, mental and behavioral health, and criminal reform - to an issue of “dependency.” Much of Byrnes' campaign post-primary election is focused on education, but her positions go against research on youth wellness and education experts. She does not approve of social learning, which helps kids develop healthy friendships and interpersonal skills. Byrnes also does not want universal preschool, which is sorely needed for working parents, nor does she approve of comprehensive sexual health education, which provides age-appropriate, medically accurate education about sex and healthy relationships.

    Doglio's work as a progressive leader in many areas during her previous two terms in office would be an asset to the district. Beth Doglio is the clear choice in this race.

    Beth Doglio

    Beth Doglio is running for Position 1 in the 22nd Legislative District to highlight the need for climate action, affordable health care, and more.

    Beth Doglio

    Beth Doglio is running for Position 1 in the 22nd Legislative District to highlight the need for climate action, affordable health care, and more.

  • Rep. Jessica Bateman is running for re-election to the state House after an outstanding first term of supporting housing solutions and Washington families. Before her election to the House in 2020, Bateman served on the Olympia City Council, on the city's planning commission, and as deputy mayor.

    This year Bateman was the prime sponsor for the "middle housing" bill, which sought to expand housing options near transit. She was also a sponsor for accountability on ghost guns and prohibiting open carry in local government buildings where city council and school district board meetings take place.

    Bateman's challenger Republican Kate Plager is running on a vague agenda, one that is both conservative and lacking any deeper knowledge of the district or policy details. She states that she will reduce "wasteful" spending and continue to provide the same level of services, without evidence of what is wasteful or would be cut. Like other Republicans this cycle, she references being a law and order candidate in a fear-driven attempt to garner votes without a foundation of what she would improve for the community.

    Bateman's strong work on community safety, housing, and more has made her one of the rising stars in the Legislature. Rep. Bateman is by far the best choice in this race.

    Jessica Bateman

    Rep. Jessica Bateman is running for re-election to the state House after an outstanding first term of supporting housing solutions and Washington families.

    Jessica Bateman

    Rep. Jessica Bateman is running for re-election to the state House after an outstanding first term of supporting housing solutions and Washington families.

  • Nursing home administrator Matt Macklin is running for the 26th Legislative District, Position 2 to build healthier communities and advocate for workers.

    He notes that the fragile and underfunded systems of healthcare and housing buckled under the strain of the pandemic. He believes the Legislature can do more to retain skilled workers, including more fair reimbursement for mid-level providers. He also believes that investment into broadband internet and green energy would help grow the economy in the right direction. Macklin wants to see training centers for trade jobs, including health trades but also electricians, teachers, and more.

    His opponent is Republican incumbent Michelle Caldier, who has stood in opposition of progressive policies more often in recent years. In 2022, she opposed legislation to expand access to reproductive health care and opposed commonsense gun safety legislation, including prohibiting the sale of high capacity gun magazines. In past years, she voted against prohibiting discrimination based on immigration status or citizenship and she opposed automatic voter registration, which makes it easier for eligible citizens to vote.

    Macklin is the best choice in this race.

    Matt Macklin

    Nursing home administrator Matt Macklin is running for the 26th Legislative District, Position 2 to build healthier communities and advocate for workers.

    Matt Macklin

    Nursing home administrator Matt Macklin is running for the 26th Legislative District, Position 2 to build healthier communities and advocate for workers.

  • Democrat Rep. Cindy Ryu is running for re-election to the 32nd Legislative District, Position 1. Ryu was originally elected in 2011 when she became the first Korean American to join the state Legislature. Before that, Ryu also made history as the first Korean American woman mayor in the country when she served the City of Shoreline.

    Ryu has been an advocate for public education, transportation, small business owners, and the environment in the Legislature. Recently, she sponsored a slate of progressive bills including legislation to prohibit guns at school board meetings, city council meetings, and election offices. In the last few weeks, Ryu reaffirmed her support for reproductive freedom for all Washingtonians.

    Ryu faces a challenge this year from Lori Theis, the former director of Alliance for the Advancement of Canine Welfare. Theis is one of several extreme conservatives this year running as a member of the "Election Integrity Party." Her main reason for running is to question election security, echoing the messages of Trump Republicans who tried to overturn the will of the people in the last presidential election.

    Ryu is by far the best choice in this race.

    Cindy Ryu

    Democrat Rep. Cindy Ryu is running for re-election to the 32nd Legislative District, Position 1. Ryu was originally elected in 2011 when she became the first Korean American to join the state Legislature.

    Cindy Ryu

    Democrat Rep. Cindy Ryu is running for re-election to the 32nd Legislative District, Position 1. Ryu was originally elected in 2011 when she became the first Korean American to join the state Legislature.

  • Incumbent Sen. Joe Nguyen is running to continue bringing strong progressive leadership to the state Senate from the 34th Legislative District, where he has served since 2018. Outside of the Legislature, he has spent almost a decade at Microsoft as a senior program manager. He is running to put people over politics and keep helping Washingtonians access the resources they need to thrive.

    This year, Nguyen sponsored a bill to prohibit the sale of high-capacity firearm magazines and keep our communities safe from gun violence. He also supported Move Ahead Washington, a historic policy package that will upgrade the state’s public transportation while making it more accessible for all and reducing our environmental impact. Throughout his first term, Nguyen’s priorities have included working toward environmental justice, balancing our state’s upside-down tax code, reforming our broken criminal legal system, and making sure all Washingtonians have equitable opportunities.

    Nguyen faces a challenge from Republican John Potter, a paraeducator with the Highline School District and a member of the Teamsters Local 763. Potter would bring extremely conservative views to office if elected. He has a transphobic opinion of gender-affirming health services and wants to revoke our freedom to decide whether and when to grow our families by trying to ban safe, legal abortion. Potter’s approach to the housing crisis is to vilify our neighbors struggling to secure stable housing while cutting funding for the community services so many of us rely on.

    Joe Nguyen has fought to make our state a place where all families and communities can thrive. He deserves to be re-elected and is the clear choice in this race.

    Joe Nguyen

    Incumbent Sen. Joe Nguyen is running to continue bringing strong progressive leadership to the state Senate from the 34th Legislative District, where he has served since 2018. Outside of the Legislature, he has spent almost a decade at Microsoft as a senior program manager.

    Joe Nguyen

    Incumbent Sen. Joe Nguyen is running to continue bringing strong progressive leadership to the state Senate from the 34th Legislative District, where he has served since 2018. Outside of the Legislature, he has spent almost a decade at Microsoft as a senior program manager.

  • School librarian Leah Griffin is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault. After police refused to test her rape kit, she worked with state officials on legislation that led to testing all 11,000 of the state's backlogged rape kits, passed a survivor's bill of rights, and more. Griffin also worked with Sen. Patty Murray on the federal Survivors’ Access to Supportive Care Act, founded the Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) Task Force, and organized for the R-90 campaign for age-appropriate sexual health education.

    Griffin is now running for the Legislature to advocate for more access to behavioral health care, public safety reform, and affordable housing. In our interview with Griffin, she elaborated on the immense need for more behavioral and mental health care across the population - for frontline workers with PTSD, youth, teachers, people experiencing homelessness, and many others. She wants to see counselors embedded in union halls and wraparound services at shelters, giving care at the point of need where people can access it. As a victim of violent crime, Griffin states that a lack of behavioral health care, housing, and education are the undercurrents for crime, and putting people in prison without resources is morally bankrupt. Griffin also wants to see an increase in green energy like tidal power, community-centered child care programs, and greater unionization of workers.

    Both Griffin and Alvarado are progressive and support bills like the capital gains tax, which aim to flip Washington's deeply regressive tax code to stop favoring the ultra-wealthy. Griffin in particular is a good choice if you are looking for a candidate with a long record of grassroots advocacy who will focus on expanding health care access.

    Leah Griffin

    School librarian Leah Griffin is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault. After police refused to test her rape kit, she worked with state officials on legislation that led to testing all 11,000 of the state's backlogged rape kits, passed a survivor's bill of rights, and more.

    Leah Griffin

    School librarian Leah Griffin is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault. After police refused to test her rape kit, she worked with state officials on legislation that led to testing all 11,000 of the state's backlogged rape kits, passed a survivor's bill of rights, and more.

  • Environmental advocate Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon is running for re-election to Position 2 in the 34th Legislative District. Fitzgibbon worked as a legislative staffer and served on the Burien Planning Commission before joining the Legislature in 2010.

    Fitzgibbon is running for re-election to build on his impressive track record of success. He played a leading role in passing clean fuels legislation that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lead to cleaner air. In addition, he supported legislation to cut plastic bag pollution, reduce gender pay disparities, and improve gun safety laws.

    This session, Fitzgibbon also passed bills to streamline the permitting process for salmon recovery projects, increase the construction of affordable housing, and expand coverage of paid family and medical leave. His other priorities in office include addressing mass incarceration and inequities in our criminal legal system, expanding voting rights, and investing in public transportation.

    Software engineer and Republican Andrew Pilloud is running against Fitzgibbon to roll back many of these progressive victories. He does not have elected experience but volunteers with a robotics program. Pilloud's thin platform mentions mental health and addiction as the drivers of homelessness without addressing the cause that local housing experts have pointed to for years: the lack of affordable housing options. Pilloud also makes vague statements about criminals and a confusing statement about abortion that implies that he does not fully support the freedom of Washingtonians to decide whether and when we have children.

    Rep. Fitzgibbon has been one of the most effective progressive legislators in Olympia and has earned your support for another term.

    Joe Fitzgibbon

    Environmental advocate Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon is running for re-election to Position 2 in the 34th Legislative District. Fitzgibbon worked as a legislative staffer and served on the Burien Planning Commission before joining the Legislature in 2010.

    Joe Fitzgibbon

    Environmental advocate Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon is running for re-election to Position 2 in the 34th Legislative District. Fitzgibbon worked as a legislative staffer and served on the Burien Planning Commission before joining the Legislature in 2010.

  • Rep. Noel Frame is running for the state Senate on a strong and progressive record of action in the state House. First elected as a representative in 2016, she previously served as the Washington state director of Progressive Majority, where she worked to recruit and elect progressive candidates from underrepresented communities. She has spent her time in Olympia advocating for working families, funding our public schools, and rebalancing our state's upside-down tax code.

    Frame had a particularly productive legislative session this year. She sponsored many of the progressive bills that passed into law, including limiting ghost guns, restricting guns in certain public areas, creating a system to locate missing Indigenous people, and creating middle housing near transit. Though the bill didn't pass this year, Frame also sponsored the wealth tax bill that would make the extraordinarily wealthy finally pay their share for the resources we all use. She has supported juvenile justice reform, expanded the number of families who qualify for child care assistance, and protected us from surprise medical billing by continuing to push for a progressive Washington.

    Frame faces planning and design consultant Kate Martin, who ran for Seattle City Council last year against Teresa Mosqueda, in 2019 against Councilmember Dan Strauss, and in 2013 for Seattle mayor.

    While Martin filed for office as a Democrat, her values and public statements make it clear that she's not progressive. In December of 2020, Martin stated that "I joined the GOP today" and claims to have re-joined the Democratic Party only recently. However, her Facebook page is an endless stream of Republican conspiracy theories and disinformation about unions, the LGBTQ community, homelessness, and people struggling with addiction.

    This race offers a clear contrast between a hard-working, proven leader in Olympia and a candidate who would block the kind of bold progressive reforms our communities need. While Martin filed for office as a Democrat, voters should know that her public statements reveal the truth about her far-right beliefs on a wide range of topics.

    Rep. Frame has been a strong advocate for the district and deserves your vote.

    Noel Frame

    Rep. Noel Frame is running for the state Senate on a strong and progressive record of action in the state House.

    Noel Frame

    Rep. Noel Frame is running for the state Senate on a strong and progressive record of action in the state House.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community. Reed has worked in several levels of government, including in the Obama State Department as a Special Envoy for Middle East Peace, as a senior policy advisor for workforce development in the Seattle mayor's office, and most recently as a public policy consultant. Reed is also the former chair of the 36th Legislative District Democrats, a current volunteer board member for the YMCA Social Impact Center, and a board member at Fuse Washington, which produces this guide.

    Reed offers the most comprehensive and detailed policy proposals in this race, covering topics from housing to health. Reed recognizes that appropriate density is a must. Washington has the fewest units of housing per household of any state and market-rate, middle-income, affordable, duplexes, accessory dwelling units, and permanent supportive housing are all needed to alleviate the pressure. While working for the city of Seattle, Reed helped establish an internship program for Seattle Promise community college students. She wants to expand apprenticeship, technical college, and work-based learning opportunities to get students ready for jobs of the future.

    If elected, Reed would advocate for making zero-carbon transportation available in every city, including electrifying buses and ferries and expanding electric car infrastructure, among other climate priorities. Reed is one of the few candidates this year to show interest in a pilot program for universal basic income, which could be a game-changer for struggling families and working people.

    In our interview with Reed, she was thoughtful and informed about the ways that the Legislature could partner with and invest in communities of color, youth, and others to build a more resilient Washington. Since the primary, Reed has garnered even more support from progressive organizations for her forward-thinking priorities. For her deep experience and readiness to bring innovative solutions to Olympia, we recommend Julia Reed for the 36th Legislative District in Position 1.

    Julia Reed

    Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community.

    Julia Reed

    Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Democrat Liz Berry is running unopposed for re-election to the 36th Legislative District in House Position 2. Berry is the former director of the Washington State Association of Justice, which advocates for the legal rights of patients, consumers, and injured workers. She also previously served as the president of the National Women's Political Caucus and on the board of NARAL Pro-Choice Washington.

    Berry had a prolific first session as a legislator on many progressive priorities. She sponsored successful community safety initiatives to restrict untraceable ghost guns and to prohibit carrying guns in certain settings like school board meetings, which is especially notable as Berry was a legislative director for former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords. Berry also sponsored the creation of an alert system for missing Indigenous people. If that weren't enough, she worked to flip the state's regressive tax code with a wealth tax and supported important legislation to expand housing options near transit.

    Berry has had a successful first term and deserves your vote.

    Liz Berry

    Democrat Liz Berry is running unopposed for re-election to the 36th Legislative District in House Position 2. Berry is the former director of the Washington State Association of Justice, which advocates for the legal rights of patients, consumers, and injured workers.

    Liz Berry

    Democrat Liz Berry is running unopposed for re-election to the 36th Legislative District in House Position 2. Berry is the former director of the Washington State Association of Justice, which advocates for the legal rights of patients, consumers, and injured workers.

  • Chipalo Street is running for 37th Legislative District, Position 2 to improve education, expand economic opportunity, and close the digital divide. He works in Microsoft's office of the CTO as a senior leader on emerging technology. He also serves on the board of the Institute For A Democratic Future, which trains up-and-coming civic leaders, and he is the co-founder of the Teacher Scientist Partnership at Technology Access Foundation Academy, which teaches a computer science curriculum in south Seattle.

    Street is running on a strong progressive platform that includes supporting reproductive rights, delivering affordable housing, strengthening tenant protections, fighting for clean energy and environmental justice, expanding early education and childcare access, and strengthening laws that reduce gun violence.

    In our interview with Street, he was very passionate about education with an emphasis on technology. Street believes that Washington can lead the nation in STEM education and that the Legislature can do more for students by funding free two-year college. He also spoke extensively about his experience being a small landlord and how he believes that tenants and owners should work in partnership. Street emphasized that during the pandemic he was able to keep all his tenants housed despite a third of them losing work. He supports tenant protections, rental assistance, housing vouchers, and ending exclusionary zoning in transit areas, which would bring more housing options like triplexes and duplexes.

    Street's notable individual endorsements include Port Commissioners Hamdi Mohamed and Sam Cho, King County Councilmember Rod Dembowski, and Tukwila City Councilmember Mohamed Abdi, who all emphasized Street's work with small businesses, civic leadership, and his values around housing.

    If you are looking for a candidate who is pushing to bridge the digital divide through education in the 37th Legislative District, Street would be a good choice.

    Chipalo Street

    Chipalo Street is running for 37th Legislative District, Position 2 to improve education, expand economic opportunity, and close the digital divide. He works in Microsoft's office of the CTO as a senior leader on emerging technology.

    Chipalo Street

    Chipalo Street is running for 37th Legislative District, Position 2 to improve education, expand economic opportunity, and close the digital divide. He works in Microsoft's office of the CTO as a senior leader on emerging technology.

  • Democrat

    Nicole Macri

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Nicole Macri is running unopposed for re-election to the 43rd Legislative District, House Position 1. Rep. Macri is a strong progressive who has worked as an advocate for those with mental illnesses and people struggling with homelessness. She is currently the deputy director at the Downtown Emergency Service Center and president of the board of directors of the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance.

    This session, she sponsored a wide slate of progressive legislation, including successful bills to restrict ghost guns and establish a statewide alert system for missing Indigenous women. She also sponsored two bills to help working people - a wealth tax to flip the state's regressive tax code and a bill to increase "missing middle" housing options near transit, like duplexes and triplexes. In previous sessions, Macri supported legislation to require the state to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and to establish the Washington State Office of Equity.

    Macri has 20 years of experience in human services, championing affordable housing, and expanding health care. Her expertise and passion for expanding affordable housing options continue to be an incredible asset in Olympia. Macri deserves your vote to remain in the state House representing the 43rd Legislative District.

    Nicole Macri

    Rep. Nicole Macri is running unopposed for re-election to the 43rd Legislative District, House Position 1. Rep. Macri is a strong progressive who has worked as an advocate for those with mental illnesses and people struggling with homelessness.

    Nicole Macri

    Rep. Nicole Macri is running unopposed for re-election to the 43rd Legislative District, House Position 1. Rep. Macri is a strong progressive who has worked as an advocate for those with mental illnesses and people struggling with homelessness.

  • Evergreen Future
  • John Lovick is running to retain the 44th Legislative District Senate seat. Lovick is a former Snohomish County executive and Mill Creek City Council member, and he served as the House speaker pro tem for five years. In late 2021, he was appointed by the Snohomish County Council to this seat when incumbent Sen. Steve Hobbs was named secretary of state.

    During his time in the Legislature, Lovick has been a strong supporter of unions and working people. In the Senate, Lovick wrote a bill to reduce drunk driving crashes by lowering the allowable legal blood alcohol limit. He also sponsored the successful paid family and medical leave act, as well as legislation to keep our communities safe from gun violence. By sponsoring the historic transportation bill this year, Lovick has invested in not only road maintenance but also transit, ferries, sidewalks, and more, supporting transportation that everyone across the state can access. With demonstrated progressive priorities, he offers experienced leadership at this challenging moment.

    Lovick's challenger, Republican Jeb Brewer, does not have elected or community leadership experience, but says he will bring a business lens to the Senate. Unfortunately, much of his conservative agenda doesn't suit the needs of the district. Rather than focusing on proven solutions driven by the community, he wants to roll back the long-overdue police accountability laws that have passed in recent years. Brewer's one-dimensional approach to transportation would short-change the options our diverse community needs to get to school, work, and recreation, especially compared to Lovick's sponsored bill. Finally, Brewer's policy on homelessness doesn't address the keystone issue that pushes individuals and families into homelessness - the incredibly high cost of housing. Criminalizing homelessness will only make the problem worse and cost taxpayers even more money.

    Sen. Lovick's unique perspective has helped him sponsor and hone legislation that works for everyone in the district. He has earned your vote.

    John Lovick

    John Lovick is running to retain the 44th Legislative District Senate seat. Lovick is a former Snohomish County executive and Mill Creek City Council member, and he served as the House speaker pro tem for five years.

    John Lovick

    John Lovick is running to retain the 44th Legislative District Senate seat. Lovick is a former Snohomish County executive and Mill Creek City Council member, and he served as the House speaker pro tem for five years.

  • Incumbent Rep. Brandy Donaghy is running to build on her strong first term serving the 44th District. She was appointed to the House by the Snohomish County Council in late 2021 when former representative John Lovick moved to the Senate.

    Donaghy is a Navy veteran and community organizer who has been involved in emergency preparedness training. She put her professional experience to work during her first term by expanding emergency workers' ability to protect the community. Donaghy sponsored legislation to address safe staffing levels for health care workers, which aimed to improve health and safety for both patients and practitioners. She also supported legislation to allow EMTs to provide vaccines and testing outside of an emergency in response to a public health agency's request.

    Donaghy faces a challenge from former Republican Rep. Mark Harmsworth. He served two terms in the state House before losing to Democrat Jared Mead in the 2018 election. While he was a representative, Harmsworth pushed a very conservative agenda that aimed to reduce access to health care and the freedom to vote. He voted against the Reproductive Parity Act, which required that all insurance plans in Washington that cover maternity care also cover the full range of reproductive health services, and also voted against the Washington Voting Rights Act. In addition, he wasted taxpayer money on a politically driven investigation into Sound Transit. If elected this year, expect Harmsworth to continue fighting against public transportation and the right for everyone to access equal treatment, whether at the doctor's office or the ballot box.

    Voters rejected Harmsworth's regressive agenda in 2018 and should do so again in 2022. Donaghy will fight for our shared values and has earned your vote.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Incumbent Rep. Brandy Donaghy is running to build on her strong first term serving the 44th District. She was appointed to the House by the Snohomish County Council in late 2021 when former representative John Lovick moved to the Senate.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Incumbent Rep. Brandy Donaghy is running to build on her strong first term serving the 44th District. She was appointed to the House by the Snohomish County Council in late 2021 when former representative John Lovick moved to the Senate.

  • Sen. Manka Dhingra is running for re-election in the 45th Legislative District. Dhingra was first elected to the seat in 2017 and she now serves as the deputy majority floor leader. She is a senior prosecuting attorney in King County and she has worked in crisis intervention training for law enforcement, as well as with an array of diversion courts. Dhingra also helped start API Chaya, a well-respected resource for people experiencing gender-based violence in our community.

    Dhingra has worked to foster justice, healing, and community safety while in office. Recently, she co-sponsored climate action legislation and voted for three key gun safety bills: banning ghost guns, banning firearms in certain locations like schools and government events, and prohibiting the sale of high-capacity firearm magazines. In this election, she is campaigning to fight for reproductive freedom and strengthen law enforcement training and accountability resources.

    Republican Ryika Hooshangi is challenging Dhingra on a reactionary platform. Hooshangi is an attorney and former diplomat who works as an elected commissioner for the Sammamish Plateau Water District. She is running to pour more funding into militarizing and expanding police forces while stripping away accountability measures that keep our communities safer. If elected, Hooshangi would oppose efforts by progressive leaders to expand health care access and rebalance our tax code.

    Sen. Dhingra deserves your vote for re-election to represent the 45th Legislative District and keep working for resilient and healthy communities.

    Manka Dhingra

    Sen. Manka Dhingra is running for re-election in the 45th Legislative District. Dhingra was first elected to the seat in 2017 and she now serves as the deputy majority floor leader.

    Manka Dhingra

    Sen. Manka Dhingra is running for re-election in the 45th Legislative District. Dhingra was first elected to the seat in 2017 and she now serves as the deputy majority floor leader.

  • Democrat

    Javier Valdez

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Javier Valdez is running for the 46th Legislative District Senate seat. Valdez was appointed to the state House in 2017 and was re-elected in 2018 and 2020. He also served as the first president of the Washington State Council of County and City Employees (AFSCME Council 2).

    In Olympia, Valdez has worked to find equitable, progressive solutions to problems facing residents in his district. He supported legislation to prevent discrimination based on citizenship or immigration status, and he advocated for requiring the state to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

    This year, Valdez sponsored several successful bills that protect our communities, including being the prime sponsor of the law to restrict ghost guns. He also sought to provide safe places for civic discourse by banning guns in settings like school board meetings and supported an alert system for missing Indigenous people.

    Valdez deserves credit for sponsoring the middle housing bill, which would have provided more housing options around transit, and the wealth tax, which aimed to finally make the extraordinarily wealthy residents of Washington pay their share into education, transportation, and more. These two bills will be critical progressive priorities in the coming years.

    Valdez is running against King County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Matthew Gross. His platform includes making housing more affordable and tackling homelessness in the district. There is much to appreciate about Gross' platform - he wants to end exclusionary zoning and gradually increase the housing supply with duplexes or triplexes. He also wants to see more investments in the state Housing Trust Fund and mental health care.

    While Gross is progressive, Valdez has swept nearly every endorsement from a broad spectrum of progressive organizations and elected officials. This reflects both the breadth of his platforms and his experience in lawmaking and legislative leadership. Rep. Javier Valdez is the best choice in this race.

    Javier Valdez

    Rep. Javier Valdez is running for the 46th Legislative District Senate seat. Valdez was appointed to the state House in 2017 and was re-elected in 2018 and 2020. He also served as the first president of the Washington State Council of County and City Employees (AFSCME Council 2).

    Javier Valdez

    Rep. Javier Valdez is running for the 46th Legislative District Senate seat. Valdez was appointed to the state House in 2017 and was re-elected in 2018 and 2020. He also served as the first president of the Washington State Council of County and City Employees (AFSCME Council 2).

  • Evergreen Future
  • Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences. She is the public policy director with Disability Rights Washington, an organization that provides free services to people with disabilities and protects the rights of people with disabilities statewide. Farivar has also served as co-chair of the Seattle Women's Commission, policy chair of the State Special Education Advisory Council, and is currently a board member of Peyvand, which supports Iranian students at UW.

    A focus on disability rights runs through Farivar's campaign, from her priorities in housing, criminal justice reform, health care, and more. In our interview, Farivar stated that she wants to build up diversion programs and ensure accessible housing units for people experiencing homelessness, noting that 40 percent of homeless people report having a disability. Farivar also makes the interesting point that disabilities cut across partisan lines and she would be willing to work across the aisle to move forward with legislation that works for everyone. She wants to see investments in robust mass transit, including infrastructure to get people to the district's three light rail stops and would be very supportive of transit-centered housing.

    Farivar states that she would be the first Middle Eastern woman serving in Olympia. As the daughter of refugees, she wants to establish a commission for Middle Eastern affairs to help the Legislature work in unison with Middle Eastern communities. Since the primary, she has solidified broad support from progressive organizations and earned the endorsement of the three leading Democrats who did not advance from the primary.

    Farivar is a good choice if you're looking for a candidate who would center underrepresented voices and ensure truly accessible services and housing for all.

    Darya Farivar

    Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences.

    Darya Farivar

    Darya Farivar is running for the 46th Legislative District, Position 2 to bring a keen eye to the intersection of policy and marginalized experiences.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Dr. Shukri Olow is running for Position 2 in the 47th Legislative District. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old. Olow credits the food bank, social workers, and Kent public housing system for helping her find opportunities, and wants to now help meet the needs of those struggling in the district today. She works at King County's Best Starts for Kids Initiative, leads the Youth Development Strategy, and served on multiple community nonprofit boards.

    With House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan retiring this year, Olow wants to bring her commitment to improve the lives of families, working people, and people of color to Olympia with her focus on labor, housing, and health care.

    If elected, some of Olow's top priorities would be addressing the youth mental health crisis with resources that are culturally relevant, increasing affordable housing, and hosting community listening sessions across the district. She wants to see everyone, no matter their race, age, or where they're from, feel safe in their communities. To accomplish that, she wants to make greater investments in social workers, crisis responders, and behavioral health that is not tied to law enforcement. Olow also wants to expand housing vouchers, and work in tandem with the community to develop her agenda as a legislator. She has a strong set of endorsements, especially with labor groups.

    We lean toward Olow in this race because of her strong record of advocacy for youth, families, working people, and communities of color, and her impressive list of endorsements from our partners.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is running for Position 2 in the 47th Legislative District. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is running for Position 2 in the 47th Legislative District. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

  • Sen. Patty Kuderer is one of the state's most active sponsors of progressive legislation. She was first appointed to the state House in 2015, won her seat in the 2016 election, and was then appointed unanimously to the Senate in 2017.

    She has been a powerhouse for reducing gun violence, voting rights, health care reform, and affordable housing. This year, she sponsored successful bills to limit high-capacity gun magazines and pass a transportation package, as well as bills aimed at flipping the state's upside-down tax code. She also sponsored the missing middle housing legislation that would reduce housing costs by allowing more housing options near transit.

    Kuderer faces a challenge from Michelle Darnell, a paralegal and perennial candidate who alternates between running as Libertarian and Republican. Darnell's divisive agenda attempts to pit parts of the state against each other and whip up voter fear. She argues against investing in public transportation, which gets tens of thousands of people to work, school, and play safely, and even alleviates the traffic congestion that Darnell complains of. Though she notes that Washington has one of the most regressive tax codes in the nation, Darnell makes no mention of the many efforts Kuderer has made to make the wealthiest in our state finally pay their share. Finally, Darnell acknowledges the housing crisis but only promises to reduce regulations on builders, while Kuderer introduced the bill this year that will make a historic effort to address the root cause of the problem.

    As our communities begin recovering from the pandemic, we need serious and experienced leadership, not more political rhetoric that seeks to divide us. Patty Kuderer is by far the best choice for Senate from the 48th Legislative District.

    Patricia Kuderer

    Sen. Patty Kuderer is one of the state's most active sponsors of progressive legislation. She was first appointed to the state House in 2015, won her seat in the 2016 election, and was then appointed unanimously to the Senate in 2017.

    Patricia Kuderer

    Sen. Patty Kuderer is one of the state's most active sponsors of progressive legislation. She was first appointed to the state House in 2015, won her seat in the 2016 election, and was then appointed unanimously to the Senate in 2017.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to maintain public parks and spaces

  • Bellevue’s city council recently adopted Ordinance No. 6671 which would increase the levy that maintains the city’s beautiful public parks and open spaces.

    The levy would provide nine years of funding for improving, expanding, and maintaining green spaces for everyone in Bellevue to enjoy. Specifically, Proposition 1 would allow the city to acquire land and create parks in Eastgate, Factoria, Ashwood Park, Bel-Red, and Wilburton, as well as improve waterfront access and expand off-leash dog areas throughout the park system.

    This levy would cost the owner of a median $1.5 million home approximately $300 per year. Some seniors, veterans, and other qualifying community members would qualify for exemptions to the levy.

    Vote “Yes” on Proposition 1 to keep Bellevue a wonderful place to live, work, and raise a family.
    Bellevue’s city council recently adopted Ordinance No. 6671 which would increase the levy that maintains the city’s beautiful public parks and open spaces.

    The levy would provide nine years of funding for improving, expanding, and maintaining green spaces for everyone in Bellevue to enjoy. Specifically, Proposition 1 would allow the city to acquire land and create parks in Eastgate, Factoria, Ashwood Park, Bel-Red, and Wilburton, as well as improve waterfront access and expand off-leash dog areas throughout the park system.

    This levy would cost the owner of a median $1.5 million home approximately $300 per year. Some seniors, veterans, and other qualifying community members would qualify for exemptions to the levy.

    Vote “Yes” on Proposition 1 to keep Bellevue a wonderful place to live, work, and raise a family.
  • Endorsed By The Urbanist
  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to introduce ranked choice voting for Seattle elections

  • We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

    We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

  • Endorsed By The Washington Bus, Fuse, Sierra Club, The Urbanist, Washington CAN!, Washington Conservation Voters , FairVote Washington, King County Democrats, Washington Community Alliance
  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to raise wages for Tukwila workers in large businesses

  • Tukwila Initiative 1 – the “Raise the Wage” initiative – will allow working people to be compensated fairly for their labor, help residents keep pace with the cost of living, and invest in the local economy.

    The initiative would require businesses with more than 500 employees to pay employee wages equivalent to comparable positions in nearby cities that rise with inflation. The measure is meant to address Tukwila’s relatively low wages compared with neighboring cities, which have caused residents to search for jobs outside the city.

    Vote “Yes” on Initiative 1 to support working people and keep Tukwila's economy competitive.
    Tukwila Initiative 1 – the “Raise the Wage” initiative – will allow working people to be compensated fairly for their labor, help residents keep pace with the cost of living, and invest in the local economy.

    The initiative would require businesses with more than 500 employees to pay employee wages equivalent to comparable positions in nearby cities that rise with inflation. The measure is meant to address Tukwila’s relatively low wages compared with neighboring cities, which have caused residents to search for jobs outside the city.

    Vote “Yes” on Initiative 1 to support working people and keep Tukwila's economy competitive.