Fuse WA

Fuse WA

Fuse is the state's largest progressive organization - people creating change online, on the ground, and on issues that matter. We envision a Washington where everyone who works hard and plays by the rules can be part of a secure middle class, and create a better world for our children.

Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Natasha Hill is running for Congress to be a progressive advocate for everyone in the 5th District, not just the wealthy few. She grew up in Spokane utilizing community resources like SNAP and later experienced homelessness and food insecurity while pursuing her law degree. Now Hill wants to ensure that no one should have to struggle through poverty to get an education in America. Hill currently owns her own law practice and has also served as an adjunct law professor and a member of the Spokane County Redistricting Committee.

    Hill is running to focus on addressing the disparities between working people, seniors, and families and the extraordinarily wealthy corporations that have dominated politics and the economy for decades. Hill wants to make the child tax credit permanent, expand rural health care options, and raise the minimum wage so that any American can meet their basic needs on forty hours of work a week. She also wants to pass the John Lewis Voting Rights Act and overturn obstacles to the vote for youth and people of color. In our Spokane committee's interview with Hill, she expressed strong support for strengthening unions, codifying the right to abortion, and reimagining education, health care, and the criminal legal system.

    Hill is challenging Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, who is running for re-election to the office she has held since 2005. With a 95 percent record of voting with Trump during his presidency, McMorris Rodgers is one of the most damaging lawmakers in Washington. She voted yes on Trump's border wall, supported his trillion-dollar corporate tax cut, and was the only representative from Washington to vote for Trump's bill to cut $800 billion from Medicaid. She voted against raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour and has refused on multiple occasions to hold town halls to answer to her constituents for her votes. McMorris Rodgers also voted against extending benefits for military veterans exposed to toxic pit burns, questioned the FBI's search for Trump's unsecured and critically classified documents, and stated that she believes the 2020 election had "significant irregularities," despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.

    McMorris Rodgers has consistently stood in the way of abortion rights, including attempting to defund Planned Parenthood and its many services to the community. In an early September, she accused Democrats of fearmongering about a national abortion ban; two weeks later her colleague Lindsey Graham introduced one in Congress.

    The district needs progressive representation to make meaningful advances in the lives of people here and across the country. For her bold platform in this time of crisis and widening inequity, as well as her broader organizational support, we recommend Natasha Hill for U.S. Representative of the 5th Congressional District.

    Natasha Hill

    Natasha Hill is running for Congress to be a progressive advocate for everyone in the 5th District, not just the wealthy few. She grew up in Spokane utilizing community resources like SNAP and later experienced homelessness and food insecurity while pursuing her law degree.

    Natasha Hill

    Natasha Hill is running for Congress to be a progressive advocate for everyone in the 5th District, not just the wealthy few. She grew up in Spokane utilizing community resources like SNAP and later experienced homelessness and food insecurity while pursuing her law degree.

  • Dr. Kim Schrier is seeking re-election to her seat in the U.S. House representing Washington’s 8th Congressional District. Prior to serving two terms in Congress, she worked as a pediatrician and ran a local pediatric practice in Issaquah caring for kids and families across the region.

    Schrier has consistently brought her professional health expertise and community-driven values to Congress. Unlike her Republican opponent, Schrier would support a federal law protecting reproductive freedom for all Americans. This term, Schrier supported the bipartisan infrastructure bill that will provide essential funding to improve local roads and bridges, as well as $19 million dollars for pedestrian safety projects in the 8th District alone. She also voted for Build Back Better, which would have provided funding for early education, extended the child tax credit, reduced the cost of child care, and combated climate change. If re-elected, Schrier wants to prioritize the everyday needs of working families as well as be a compelling changemaker on public health issues like affordable prescriptions, gun violence prevention, clean air, and access to healthy food.

    Schrier faces a challenge from Trump Republican Matt Larkin, one of the most far-right candidates on the ballot in Washington this year. He is also one of the state's most staunchly anti-abortion candidates, calling for federal legislation to ban abortions nationwide, and even opposing certain contraceptives and Plan B options. Larkin is running on a Trump Republican platform that scapegoats our community members struggling the most. Larkin also joins some of the most extreme right-wing candidates in his refusal to acknowledge that Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election, ignoring the will of the people. 

    Schrier has been a standout member of Congress working across party lines to get things done for her district. She has earned your vote for re-election.

    Kim Schrier

    Dr. Kim Schrier is seeking re-election to her seat in the U.S. House representing Washington’s 8th Congressional District. Prior to serving two terms in Congress, she worked as a pediatrician and ran a local pediatric practice in Issaquah caring for kids and families across the region.

    Kim Schrier

    Dr. Kim Schrier is seeking re-election to her seat in the U.S. House representing Washington’s 8th Congressional District. Prior to serving two terms in Congress, she worked as a pediatrician and ran a local pediatric practice in Issaquah caring for kids and families across the region.

Legislative Races

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below legislative races on your ballot.

  • Rep. Marcus Riccelli is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 3rd Legislative District. Prior to joining the House in 2013, Riccelli worked as a senior policy aide to state Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown. Outside of the Legislature, he also works as the project manager for the Community Health Association of Spokane and as an advisory board member for the Northside YMCA.

    In Olympia, Riccelli has sponsored key progressive legislation such as bills this session to ensure that all Washingtonians pay their share of taxes and to create more affordable housing options. Recently, he worked to pass the historic Move Ahead Washington transportation package that will benefit transit infrastructure, working families, and the environment.

    Early in the pandemic, Riccelli spearheaded the efforts of the Spokane Food Fighters in donating hundreds of meals to those in need. In the Legislature, Riccelli also sponsored the Hunger-Free Schools Act, which provides a bridge of federal funding for free breakfast to schools where nearly half of students' families are using public assistance.

    Challenging Riccelli is Republican Scotty Nicol, a musician and former assistant to Spokane mayor Nadine Woodward. Nicol is running on a vague, bullet-point agenda that includes standard Republican talking points from Olympia. His promise to help businesses echoes current Republican legislators' efforts to remove environmental regulations and deny workers a fair return on their work. Similarly, his blanket promise of lowering taxes doesn't address the state's regressive tax code - specifically, that the wealthy have avoided paying their share into quality schools, roads, healthcare, and other resources we all use.

    At a time when families are struggling to make ends meet, we can't afford another Republican candidate who caters to businesses and refuses to address the needs of working people. Rep. Riccelli has worked hard during his time in the Legislature to advocate for community-centered legislation and progressive values. Riccelli has earned your vote for state House.

    Marcus Riccelli

    Rep. Marcus Riccelli is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 3rd Legislative District. Prior to joining the House in 2013, Riccelli worked as a senior policy aide to state Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown.

    Marcus Riccelli

    Rep. Marcus Riccelli is running for re-election to Position 1 in the 3rd Legislative District. Prior to joining the House in 2013, Riccelli worked as a senior policy aide to state Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown.

  • Incumbent Democrat Rep. Timm Ormsby is running for re-election to Position 2 in the 3rd Legislative District. He was first elected to the seat in 2003 and has worked on a wide range of progressive issues during his tenure in office. Outside of the Legislature, Ormsby is the president of the Spokane Regional Labor Council and has worked for a number of labor organizations.

    In the House, Ormsby's policy goals include taking action on climate change that supports job growth and sustainable community development. Recently, he supported legislation to keep our communities safe from high-capacity firearms, as well as a bill to ensure cities and counties include affordable housing in their growth plans.

    Ormsby is running against Republican Natalie Poulson, a special education teacher who was one of a handful of Finch Elementary School teachers and administrators who refused to wear masks in class last year. Poulson is a Trump Republican who would promote misinformation in our schools, support militarized police forces in our communities, and offer tax breaks to corporations and the wealthy while working families continue to struggle to pay rent, afford medicine, and put food on the table.

    Rep. Ormsby has been a strong progressive leader and he deserves your vote for re-election to the 3rd Legislative District in House Position 2.

    Timm Ormsby

    Incumbent Democrat Rep. Timm Ormsby is running for re-election to Position 2 in the 3rd Legislative District. He was first elected to the seat in 2003 and has worked on a wide range of progressive issues during his tenure in office.

    Timm Ormsby

    Incumbent Democrat Rep. Timm Ormsby is running for re-election to Position 2 in the 3rd Legislative District. He was first elected to the seat in 2003 and has worked on a wide range of progressive issues during his tenure in office.

  • Democrat Michaela Kelso is running for House Position 2 in the 6th Legislative District. She is an Army veteran of 23 years who wants to usher in progressive reforms that would make life more affordable for working people by focusing on state finances, health care, and education. Kelso believes that the current upside-down tax code, which favors the extremely wealthy over middle- and low-income families, need to be changed.

    If elected she would support a wealth tax on the state's billionaires to finally have them pay their share for the resources we all use. As an immigrant from Germany, she also supports several kinds of improvements for our immigrant neighbors, including establishing dedicated community centers and allowing them to access unemployment insurance, which many immigrants already pay for but can not use. Kelso also supports science-based education without religious interference, encouraging multi-family housing and more affordable housing options, and funding community-wide recovery and addiction services for those who are struggling with drug use.

    Her opponent is incumbent Rep. Jenny Graham, a Trump Republican running for her third term representing the 6th Legislative District. She is a professional cosmetologist and esthetician and has worked as a martial arts and skiing instructor. In 2020, Graham threatened a journalist who reported on her spreading QAnon-related conspiracies, including a video claiming that Democrats are “possessed by demons” and promoting false information about vaccines. She voted against a slate of progressive bills in the Legislature this session including commonsense legislation to reduce gun violence in our communities and a bill to set new carbon reduction goals for the state.

    Residents of the 6th Legislative District deserve a representative who follows the science and puts community needs before personal ideology. Vote Kelso for Position 2 in the 6th Legislative District.

    Michaela Kelso

    Democrat Michaela Kelso is running for House Position 2 in the 6th Legislative District. She is an Army veteran of 23 years who wants to usher in progressive reforms that would make life more affordable for working people by focusing on state finances, health care, and education.

    Michaela Kelso

    Democrat Michaela Kelso is running for House Position 2 in the 6th Legislative District. She is an Army veteran of 23 years who wants to usher in progressive reforms that would make life more affordable for working people by focusing on state finances, health care, and education.

  • Emily Randall is one of the Legislature's strongest advocates for expanding access to health care and protecting reproductive freedom. Prior to running for public office in 2018, Randall worked at Planned Parenthood, where she advocated for improving health outcomes for local underserved populations.

    Randall has been a productive legislator responsible for writing and passing a host of bills during her four years in office. Her accomplishments include raising the minimum wage for people with disabilities, eliminating disparities in medical training, and extending postpartum health care coverage. She also sponsored legislation that would have protected health care access for families in rural areas.

    Randall is running for re-election to reduce the cost of higher education and expand job training programs for graduating high school seniors. She also wants to expand access to affordable health care for Washington families.

    In stark contrast to Randall's record of building consensus to pass legislation, her opponent, Rep. Jesse Young, is one of the most extreme MAGA Republicans in Olympia. Young sponsored several bills aimed at eliminating abortion access long before the Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade. After the 2020 election, Young traveled to Arizona to promote Trump's election conspiracy that sought to overturn the will of the people. During the height of the pandemic, he promoted dangerous, anti-science lies that put lives at risk.

    Beyond his radical policy positions, Young also displayed serious lapses in judgment and character while in office. In 2017, Young was banned from managing legislative staff because of "a pattern of hostile and intimidating behavior" in his office. If elected to the Senate, Young can be expected to continue pushing a radical agenda that's far out of step with the people of the 26th Legislative District.

    As abortion and health care come under attack by conservatives both federally and at the state level, it is imperative that senators continue to expand coverage and make sure that health care is accessible for all. We strongly recommend a vote for Sen. Emily Randall in the 26th Legislative District.

    Emily Randall

    Emily Randall is one of the Legislature's strongest advocates for expanding access to health care and protecting reproductive freedom.

    Emily Randall

    Emily Randall is one of the Legislature's strongest advocates for expanding access to health care and protecting reproductive freedom.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community. Reed has worked in several levels of government, including in the Obama State Department as a Special Envoy for Middle East Peace, as a senior policy advisor for workforce development in the Seattle mayor's office, and most recently as a public policy consultant. Reed is also the former chair of the 36th Legislative District Democrats, a current volunteer board member for the YMCA Social Impact Center, and a board member at Fuse Washington, which produces this guide.

    Reed offers the most comprehensive and detailed policy proposals in this race, covering topics from housing to health. Reed recognizes that appropriate density is a must. Washington has the fewest units of housing per household of any state and market-rate, middle-income, affordable, duplexes, accessory dwelling units, and permanent supportive housing are all needed to alleviate the pressure. While working for the city of Seattle, Reed helped establish an internship program for Seattle Promise community college students. She wants to expand apprenticeship, technical college, and work-based learning opportunities to get students ready for jobs of the future.

    If elected, Reed would advocate for making zero-carbon transportation available in every city, including electrifying buses and ferries and expanding electric car infrastructure, among other climate priorities. Reed is one of the few candidates this year to show interest in a pilot program for universal basic income, which could be a game-changer for struggling families and working people.

    In our interview with Reed, she was thoughtful and informed about the ways that the Legislature could partner with and invest in communities of color, youth, and others to build a more resilient Washington. Since the primary, Reed has garnered even more support from progressive organizations for her forward-thinking priorities. For her deep experience and readiness to bring innovative solutions to Olympia, we recommend Julia Reed for the 36th Legislative District in Position 1.

    Julia Reed

    Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community.

    Julia Reed

    Julia Reed is running for the open 36th Legislative District, Position 1 seat to strengthen workers' rights, invest in our neighborhoods, and address inequities at every level of the community.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District. She is a professor at Western Washington University, a member of Bellingham’s Lettered Streets Neighborhood Association, and an active union member. Her background in agricultural economics paired with her progressive values have made her an effective representative for residents of the 42nd Legislative District.

    Shewmake’s top priorities for the Senate include investing in good schools, living-wage jobs, clean air and water, a productive local farm industry, and safe communities. This year, she sponsored a number of commonsense bills focused on protecting marine habitats, promoting cleaner business standards, and working towards greater social equity in our state. Shewmake also wants to make sure that all residents can access prescription medication and health care services, including the freedom to make personal reproductive health decisions.

    Shewmake is challenging Trump Republican Sen. Simon Sefzik, who was appointed to take over Sen. Doug Ericksen’s seat when the late incumbent passed away last December. Prior to being appointed to the state Senate at age 22, Sefzik served as an intern at the White House during the last year of the Trump administration.

    Since joining the Senate, Sefzik has minimized the real issues facing our communities and used his platform to promote divisive and extreme positions. Recently, Sefzik reaffirmed that he opposes reproductive freedom at a time when abortion access is under attack nationwide. In the state Senate, Sefzik and his Republican colleagues oppose funding services that help working Washingtonians afford groceries, gas, rent, and prescription medication. He also sponsored short-sighted legislation that would have cut funding for badly needed transportation projects in Whatcom County and across the state.

    Sharon Shewmake has spent the last three years working to make the 42nd Legislative District a place where everyone has the chance to thrive. She is the clear choice for Senate.

    Sharon Shewmake

    Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District.

    Sharon Shewmake

    Rep. Sharon Shewmake, who currently serves the district in House Position 2, is now running for state Senate representing the 42nd Legislative District.

  • Evergreen Future
  • John Lovick is running to retain the 44th Legislative District Senate seat. Lovick is a former Snohomish County executive and Mill Creek City Council member, and he served as the House speaker pro tem for five years. In late 2021, he was appointed by the Snohomish County Council to this seat when incumbent Sen. Steve Hobbs was named secretary of state.

    During his time in the Legislature, Lovick has been a strong supporter of unions and working people. In the Senate, Lovick wrote a bill to reduce drunk driving crashes by lowering the allowable legal blood alcohol limit. He also sponsored the successful paid family and medical leave act, as well as legislation to keep our communities safe from gun violence. By sponsoring the historic transportation bill this year, Lovick has invested in not only road maintenance but also transit, ferries, sidewalks, and more, supporting transportation that everyone across the state can access. With demonstrated progressive priorities, he offers experienced leadership at this challenging moment.

    Lovick's challenger, Republican Jeb Brewer, does not have elected or community leadership experience, but says he will bring a business lens to the Senate. Unfortunately, much of his conservative agenda doesn't suit the needs of the district. Rather than focusing on proven solutions driven by the community, he wants to roll back the long-overdue police accountability laws that have passed in recent years. Brewer's one-dimensional approach to transportation would short-change the options our diverse community needs to get to school, work, and recreation, especially compared to Lovick's sponsored bill. Finally, Brewer's policy on homelessness doesn't address the keystone issue that pushes individuals and families into homelessness - the incredibly high cost of housing. Criminalizing homelessness will only make the problem worse and cost taxpayers even more money.

    Sen. Lovick's unique perspective has helped him sponsor and hone legislation that works for everyone in the district. He has earned your vote.

    John Lovick

    John Lovick is running to retain the 44th Legislative District Senate seat. Lovick is a former Snohomish County executive and Mill Creek City Council member, and he served as the House speaker pro tem for five years.

    John Lovick

    John Lovick is running to retain the 44th Legislative District Senate seat. Lovick is a former Snohomish County executive and Mill Creek City Council member, and he served as the House speaker pro tem for five years.

County Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Democrat

    Robyn Denson

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Gig Harbor City Council member Robyn Denson is running for Pierce County Council in District 7. She is campaigning to fill Derek Young’s seat when he leaves the council this year because of term limits. Denson has been an active and effective council member in Gig Harbor. She is also a small business owner who works in real estate, hosts a local radio show, and has served on a number of community boards focusing on schools, parks, and equity.

    Denson has worked hard to build equitable economic opportunity in the county. One of her top priorities is addressing the housing crisis, where she plans to draw on her experience as a nonpartisan housing analyst in the state House to implement real solutions. Denson is also running to protect our environment, bring municipal broadband to the region, invest in public transit, and increase access to mental health resources.

    Denson is running against Air Force veteran and human resources manager Paula Lonergan. Her campaign platform mirrors that of many Republicans running this year. She blames the county’s issues on our neighbors who are struggling the most and would rather cut social support services than make investments in our communities so we can all thrive.

    Denson is the best choice for Pierce County Council, District 7.

    Robyn Denson

    Gig Harbor City Council member Robyn Denson is running for Pierce County Council in District 7. She is campaigning to fill Derek Young’s seat when he leaves the council this year because of term limits. Denson has been an active and effective council member in Gig Harbor.

    Robyn Denson

    Gig Harbor City Council member Robyn Denson is running for Pierce County Council in District 7. She is campaigning to fill Derek Young’s seat when he leaves the council this year because of term limits. Denson has been an active and effective council member in Gig Harbor.

  • Chris Jordan is a managing attorney in the Spokane division of the state attorney general’s office and is now running for Spokane County Commission in District 1. Jordan specializes in child safety cases as an attorney and worked with Columbia Legal Services to pass bipartisan legislation to support children and families experiencing housing insecurity. His other community leadership experience includes volunteering with Spokane River Cleanup and West Central Dinner Table.

    Jordan is running on a platform to invest in child care, strengthen the county’s middle class, alleviate traffic congestion in the region, and take action on the climate crisis to safeguard the local environment for generations to come. By expanding access to the basics like rent, groceries, gas, and prescription medications, he will work to make the county a place where everyone can build a healthy life.

    Jordan is running against Republican Kim Plese. She previously owned a small business that offered printing and marketing services. She is running for commissioner on a conservative platform that disregards much-needed community investments in health care, housing, and schools in favor of putting more funding towards larger, militarized police forces.

    Chris Jordan is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote for Spokane County Commissioner, District 1.

    Chris Jordan

    Chris Jordan is a managing attorney in the Spokane division of the state attorney general’s office and is now running for Spokane County Commission in District 1.

    Chris Jordan

    Chris Jordan is a managing attorney in the Spokane division of the state attorney general’s office and is now running for Spokane County Commission in District 1.

  • Amber Waldref is running for Spokane County commissioner in District 2 to make the county a place where everyone can thrive. She served on the Spokane City Council for two terms and founded Priority Spokane, a data-driven organization that aims to increase local high school graduation rates and decrease family homelessness. She also currently serves on the Spokane Housing Authority board and the Spokane County Human Rights Task Force.

    While on the city council, Waldref was a leader on several important issues, including boosts for small businesses, working to clean up the Spokane River, and the ballot campaign to create the new all-electric rapid transit City Line. The former councilwoman now wants to bring that energy to the county level to protect the environment, empower youth, collaborate regionally on homelessness, and more.

    She differs from her conservative opponent in her proactive approach to safety, stating that a new jail is both incredibly expensive to the community and doesn't necessarily reduce crime in any way. Waldref would prefer to see innovative community programming to reduce crime and invest in kids and adults. She points to programs like the Carl Maxey Center and the Spokane Regional Stabilization Center as two ways to address racial disparities in the legal system and keep our communities safe.

    Waldref is running against Michael Cathcart, who has served on the Spokane City Council since 2020. Previously, he was an aide for the very conservative Republican Sen. Michael Baumgartner, who voters may remember for his anti-LGBTQ and anti-abortion stances. As former executive director of the pro-business Better Spokane, Cathcart's campaign coffers and agenda are flooded with big developer money. He takes a conservative and hypocritical stance on issues like the possibility of a new jail, stating that "jail is going to make you a better criminal" but also advocating for building an expensive new one.

    Waldref is experienced and ready for the challenge of bringing progressive leadership to the commission. Vote Waldref for Spokane County Commission, District 2.

    Amber Waldref

    Amber Waldref is running for Spokane County commissioner in District 2 to make the county a place where everyone can thrive.

    Amber Waldref

    Amber Waldref is running for Spokane County commissioner in District 2 to make the county a place where everyone can thrive.

  • Maggie Yates is running for Spokane County Commission, District 5 to improve the health of families, support affordable housing, and expand economic opportunity for all. She has served as Spokane County's regional law and justice administrator where she has been a leader on criminal legal reform. Some of her projects and recommendations for the local legal system have included remote court access, expanded data analytics, and an intake and release center.

    Yates wants to see more investment in housing that everyone can access, including rental assistance, programs for first-time buyers, and more. She also wants to see expanded apprenticeship programs to help the local workforce, as well as expanded mental health care and child care. In our local council's questionnaire, Yates states that she's looking forward to repairing and investing in relationships with tribes, community partners, and jurisdictions. She believes that the best way forward on quality child care, clean water and air, better broadband, and more is to work together.

    Yates' opponent is Spokane County Commissioner Al French, who is essentially the incumbent for this newly-created district. French served eight years on the Spokane City Council from 2002 to 2009 and has been on the county commission since then. He is a conservative developer with a combative style and a history of ethical problems. French alienated local cities by promoting aggressive urban sprawl and caused them to opt-out of a regional garbage system that has cost the county millions in revenue.

    The differences between these two candidates are stark. While Yates is seeking a regional response to homelessness, including more affordable housing and community-based resources, French states that the county has done enough on homelessness already. While Yates is prepared to continue her work on reform and reducing recidivism with focused programs, French wants to avoid the root of the problem and pour millions into building a new jail.

    Spokane County families need a representative like Yates on the council who will work hard and bring people together to move our region forward. Maggie Yates is the clear choice in this race.

    Maggie Yates

    Maggie Yates is running for Spokane County Commission, District 5 to improve the health of families, support affordable housing, and expand economic opportunity for all.

    Maggie Yates

    Maggie Yates is running for Spokane County Commission, District 5 to improve the health of families, support affordable housing, and expand economic opportunity for all.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes to introduce ranked choice voting for Seattle elections

  • We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

    We recommend voting Yes on Question 1 and voting for Proposition 1B on Question 2.

    More than ever before, voters are looking for meaningful choices in elections, with a strong desire to make campaigns less toxic and ensure that our voices are heard. To that end, two propositions appear on the ballot together this year: Seattle Propositions 1A and 1B. While both offer alternatives to the single-choice voting system currently used in Seattle primary elections, Proposition 1B, which offers ranked choice voting, is the most effective and most thoroughly tested method for increasing representation.

    This ballot measure first asks whether either of the propositions should be approved and second asks you to choose between the two, regardless of whether you believe either should be enacted. If the first question passes with a simple majority, the proposition with the most votes from the second question will be approved.

    Proposition 1A refers to Initiative Petition 134 to introduce "approval voting," a method by which voters vote for any and all candidates they approve of. In this system, the two candidates receiving the most total votes for office will continue on to the general election. Some community leaders have voiced concern over the legality of this system and whether it violates the one person, one vote principle. In places where this has been tried, some voters still choose to vote for one candidate so that they don't dilute support for their favorite candidate.

    Ranked choice voting is backed by much more extensive data and research than approval voting. Ranked choice voting has already been implemented in 26 U.S. cities and states, including New York City, Maine, Alaska, and many organizations and countries around the world, compared to just two cities - Fargo and St. Louis - for approval voting. In addition, progressives have raised concern about whether approval voting will give an outsized electoral say to wealthier and whiter primary voters due to its design, which can allow smaller, more homogenous groups of voters to choose both candidates that advance to the general election.

    Ranked choice voting is simple - voters rank candidates in order of preference, and can rank as many candidates as they choose without hurting the chances of their favored candidate. If there is no majority winner, meaning no candidate receives more than half of the first choices, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and any voter who picked that candidate as their top choice will have their next choice counted, until a majority winner emerges.

    Vote "Yes" on Question 1 and vote for Proposition 1B on Question 2 to bring ranked choice voting to Seattle primary elections. 

  • Endorsed By The Washington Bus, Fuse, Sierra Club, The Urbanist, Washington CAN!, Washington Conservation Voters , FairVote Washington, King County Democrats, Washington Community Alliance