Endorsements

National Organization for Women PAC

National Organization for Women PAC

The National Organization for Women (NOW) is the largest organization of feminist activists in the United States. NOW has 500,000 contributing members and 550 chapters in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Since its founding in 1966, NOW's goal has been to take action to bring about equality for all women. The National Organization for Women (NOW) Federal PAC endorses candidates for the federal elections and the WA State NOW PAC endorses candidates for local and state elections.

Mayoral Races

Seattle Mayor

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her leadership in advocating for working families and marginalized communities. Lorena González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, González is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    González is one of Seattle’s three representatives on the King County Regional Homelessness Authority. She wants to push the city further than the current mayor was willing to go when it comes to building more permanent supportive housing.

     

    González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She states that she would increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color, the homeless, and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to childcare access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

     

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

     

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her leadership in advocating for working families and marginalized communities.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Colleen Echohawk is the executive director of the Chief Seattle Club, a nonprofit whose mission is to build new affordable housing for urban Native people. She has also spent four years as a community police commissioner, an experience that she hopes to leverage into meaningful police reform. Echohawk is an enrolled member of the Kithehaki Band of the Pawnee Nation and a member of the Upper Athabascan people of Mentasta Lake. Her campaign centers equity in its approach to economic recovery, homelessness, and public safety.

    If elected, Echohawk would launch a 14-month emergency housing plan to build 4,000 units of temporary housing and create a citizen volunteer corps to provide mutual aid. She plans to activate Seattle’s Emergency Operations Center to track and report data, which can collaborate across city departments and report analytics. Echohawk points out that with an 80 percent vacancy rate in hotels, the city can bargain to use them along with tiny homes and modular housing to expand more dignified shelter options.

    Echohawk brings unique experience working in the Community Police Commission, which was established in 2010 and aims to provide oversight and accountability on needed reforms to the Seattle Police Department. She states that she supports reinvestment of some police funding into services such as mental health responders. She wants to repair the legitimacy of the department by rebuilding the police union contract, opposing militarization, refocusing the police to tackling issues like violent crimes and emergencies, and creating a culture with zero tolerance for bad cops.

    Other priorities for Echohawk include expanding access to transit passes for low-income residents, upping funding for bridges and road projects, and establishing an Office of Indigenous Affairs to further the city’s practices in ecology and other policies.

    What sets Echohawk apart from her opponents is her hands-on experience working for and within the urban native community, as well as on the issues of homelessness and affordable housing. If elected, she would be the first Indigenous mayor of Seattle. If you’re looking for a candidate from outside City Hall who has community and organizational leadership experience, vote for Colleen Echohawk.

    Colleen Echohawk

    Colleen Echohawk is the executive director of the Chief Seattle Club, a nonprofit whose mission is to build new affordable housing for urban Native people.

City Attorney Races

Seattle City Attorney

  • Evergreen Future
  • Incumbent Pete Holmes is running for re-election to be the Seattle City Attorney. Holmes was first elected in 2009 and has had a progressive track record in office. He is the former chair of the Office of Police Accountability Review Board and spent 25 years working in business litigation before his public service. His highlights include successfully defending the city's hazard pay law, working to decriminalize marijuana, and preventing the incarceration of Washington residents for marijuana use. Holmes also worked to reduce prosecutions for people driving with their license suspended due to lack of payment and opposed mandatory deportation for immigrants in the legal system.

    If re-elected, Holmes has a progressive vision for the role of city attorney in response to the coronavirus pandemic and the movement for racial justice. His priorities include improving police accountability, gun safety, and creating a level playing field in our legal system and city. To achieve these goals, Holmes proposes passing stronger gun laws, reducing excessive force on the part of the Seattle Police Department, vacating marijuana charges, and keeping people housed post-pandemic, among other policies.

    Holmes' track record in office has earned him the support of our partner organizations, as well as progressive local leaders including City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay, and Attorney General Bob Ferguson. He's a good choice to continue building upon the reforms he has spearheaded as city attorney over the last 12 years.

    Pete Holmes

    Submitted by Collin on Fri, 07/09/2021 - 17:07

    Incumbent Pete Holmes is running for re-election to be the Seattle City Attorney. Holmes was first elected in 2009 and has had a progressive track record in office.

City Council Races

Edmonds City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board. She has extensive community leadership experience including working for the Edmonds Senior Center, Edmonds Chamber of Commerce, and the Edmonds Sister City Commission.

    In this campaign, Crank is prioritizing housing affordability, transparent and responsive government, thoughtful growth, and public safety such as reducing gun violence. She has proposed green building practices and constructing mixed-use developments to make sure that Edmonds can grow while remaining committed to environmental sustainability and economic diversity. Crank is running a strong campaign and has earned endorsements from progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Crank is running against incumbent Councilmember Kristiana Johnson and Brian Hartman. First elected in 2012, Johnson has made environmental protections a focus of her time on the council. Unfortunately, she sent a racially insensitive email last year regarding federal grants for white-owned and Asian-owned businesses that drew criticism from her fellow council members. She has since apologized but the situation raises concerns about her ability to engage an equity lens and to serve all Edmonds residents.

    Hartman is a precinct committee officer and senior director of enterprise technology at Blue Origin. He does not have a strong campaign presence but has emphasized that his business background would translate to economic leadership if he is elected.

    Alicia Crank is the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Position 1 on the Edmonds City Council.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

Olympia City Council

  • Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    Huỳnh is running against Robbi Kesler and Bruce Wilkinson Jr. Kesler is the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County.

    Kesler does not have a plan for homelessness or housing affordability on her website, but her answers in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy. She states that she wants to consider "plan[s] to remove trespassers from private property," but does not expand on critical affordable housing needs, instead of saying that the city should focus on rapid rehousing. She also wants to increase law enforcement funding, which she states may or may not go to more police, instead of mental health funding.

    While Kesler's government service is impressive, we're disappointed with her decision to not address the city's housing crisis and her lacking commitment to meaningful police reform.

    Wilkinson Jr. has served on the board of the Northwest Alliance for Alternative Media and Education for 8 years and previously worked as a coordinator for Jill Stein for President and Charlie Hardy for U.S. Congress. He is a clear progressive with a long list of issues for the city to tackle, including implementing low-barrier housing and preserving more green space in the city. However, Huỳnh has broader community support from elected officials and unions.

    Huỳnh is the best choice in this race.

    Yến Huỳnh

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature.

  • On the council since 2011, veteran and incumbent Jim Cooper is the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Cooper and the city council have passed several significant pieces of legislation that benefit the community. Notably, he supported the Olympia Home Fund to build new supportive permanent housing, provided funding for struggling businesses and families during the pandemic, and created a regional climate plan with neighboring cities. If re-elected, Cooper states that he will focus on housing and economic recovery, twin crises that affect everyone in the community, as well as continuing conversations on criminal justice reform.

    Cooper is backed by a significant number of unions, including the Lacey and Olympia firefighters' unions and United Food and Commercial Workers Local 367, as well as by Lt. Gov. Denny Heck and a large number of county and city elected officials.

    Cooper's track record on the council and strong support from our partners and local leaders make him the best choice in this race.

    Jim Cooper

    On the council since 2011, veteran and incumbent Jim Cooper is the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest.

Federal Way City Council

  • Katherine Festa is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 4. She has been a program manager with King County for 20 years and is the vice-chair of the King County Native American Leadership Council. Festa is endorsed by many Democratic elected officials and groups including Rep. Jamila Taylor and the King County Democrats.

    Festa's campaign is focused on improving transportation and addressing homelessness. She wants to use her position on the city council to push Sound Transit to stay on schedule reaching Federal Way, as well as to advocate for more parking at the Federal Way Transit Center. In addition, she is dedicated to reducing homelessness, particularly among veterans, and wants to increase local supportive housing at a scale that is sustainable for the community.

    Also in this race are Daniel Miller and incumbent Hoang Tran. Miller is running to oppose both police accountability reform and efforts to reallocate funding to community safety services. Councilmember Tran was elected in 2017 and previously spent over 20 years as an administrator in public assistance programs for the state Department of Social and Health Services. He shares a conservative platform with Miller.

    Festa is the best choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 4.

    Katherine Festa

    Katherine Festa is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 4. She has been a program manager with King County for 20 years and is the vice-chair of the King County Native American Leadership Council. Festa is endorsed by many Democratic elected officials and groups including Rep.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her Masters in Business and Data Analytics and is running on a strong progressive platform. Seam wants to use her experience in risk management and analytics to ensure community members can remain financially stable or regain financial stability, disrupt the school-prison pipeline, create a Climate Action Plan to increase sustainability and minimize Federal Way's carbon footprint, and be a voice for the marginalized and disadvantaged communities. 

    Seam is facing Adrienne Obregon, Martin Moore, and Jack Dovey. Obregon is involved with the Social Advocates for Youth (SAY) and used to work at a child care center where she worked to found a union and hold the corporation accountable when they fired her for doing so. Her platform includes calls for more police officers and disregards community calls for police accountability. Incumbent Moore was first elected to the city council in 2013 and also works as the director for Audiobook Ministries. While he previously ran as a Republican, he has taken some good votes more recently, including supporting hazard pay through at least July 6 for Federal Way's grocery store workers. Dovey is a marketing manager for GPSLockbox whose campaign website is not functional as of mid-July.

    Seam is the best choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 6.

    Renae Seam

    Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her Masters in Business and Data Analytics and is running on a strong progressive platform.

  • Endorsed By: APACE, National Organization for Women PAC, Housing Action Fund , Alliance for Gun Responsibility, King County Democrats