Endorsements

Sierra Club

Sierra Club

If you want laws protecting our environment, the only way to get them is to elect good lawmakers. The Washington State Chapter of the Sierra Club interviews candidates running for public office, endorsing those it believes will be environmental leaders. The committee then supports endorsed candidates with funds from Sierra Club Political Action Committees (PAC), either by direct contribution to candidates, or through Sierra Club volunteer-powered campaigns.

County Council Races

Whatcom County Council

  • Non-Partisan
  • Evergreen Future
  • Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally-focused nonprofit in the area. As part of this work, Ury played a key role in helping craft new rules that will finally protect critical areas at Cherry Point. 

    Ury is running on a platform that includes affordable housing, sustainable energy, social justice, accessibility government, revitalizing economics, public health, and fair elections. He has a strong track record in community leadership and received praise for his work to bring various stakeholders to the table and build consensus.

    Ury is a good choice if you're looking for a candidate who would bring strong new leadership to the council on climate and environmental conservation. 

    Eddy Ury

    Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee.

  • Non-Partisan
  • Evergreen Future
  • Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union. Lewis' campaign priorities include supporting living wage jobs, updating public utilities, and protecting the environment. As a labor leader, she wants to expand community work agreements, apprenticeships, and prevailing wages. She also wants the county to invest in rural infrastructure with reliable broadband and cell service. Lewis states that further development on lakes should be ceased as a way to protect the watershed for 100,000 people in the county.

    Her opponent, incumbent Tyler Byrd, is a board member of the Whatcom Business Alliance. Byrd is a conservative candidate prioritizing the needs of businesses above the local community. He was one of two council members to vote against the 0.1% sales tax to help fund affordable housing. On the environment, he voted against the moratorium on Cherry Point shipping unrefined fossil fuels, despite concerns about the cultural significance for the Lummi Nation and environmental threats. Finally, he voted against a $4 million coronavirus relief package last April.

    Also in this race are Kathy Sabel and Fred Rinard. Sabel, a Bellingham resident, has no campaign website or detailed policy proposals available as of June 21. Her voters' guide statement indicates that her primary reason for running is addressing water rights. Like Sabel, Rinard of Everson does not have a campaign website or detailed information available as of June 21. His voters' guide statement says that his primary concerns include asbestos in Swift Creek.

    Lewis is the best choice for Whatcom County Council in District 3.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union. Lewis' campaign priorities include supporting living wage jobs, updating public utilities, and protecting the environment.

  • Non-Partisan
  • Evergreen Future
  • Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially in this difficult past year. He is the chair of the Whatcom County Incarceration Reduction and Prevention Taskforce and is seeking to provide alternatives to booking people for low-level crimes through the LEAD program established in 2019. He supports both the Whatcom Crisis Stabilization Center and East Whatcom Regional Resource Center, which serve those experiencing mental health crises and hunger. Buchanan has also worked in previous terms in office to ban fracking and protect the environment.

    He is running against Bob Burr, Misty Flowers, and Kamal Bhachu. Burr has run for a number of positions in Whatcom, including Public Utility District, Bellingham City Council, and Whatcom County Council. Burr's campaign website is still focused on his run for the utility district, leaving no information on his current run. In his voter statement, Burr says that he will be a single-issue candidate on climate change and preventing mass extinction.

    Kamal Bhachu works as a senior maintenance engineer at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center and as a firearms instructor. His platform states that he would address affordable housing, living-wage jobs, and pride in the community, but doesn't offer enough policy details to evaluate. Misty Flowers is a Bellingham musician who has no campaign platform available as of May 25, and her Twitter is filled with covid vaccine conspiracies.

    Buchanan is the best choice in this race.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially in this difficult past year.

Snohomish County Council

  • Democrat
  • Evergreen Future
  • Jared Mead is running for re-election to a four-year term on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

    Mead is a strong progressive who has worked to prohibit discrimination, fight the climate crisis, and secure an energy-independent state for future generations. His campaign priorities include reducing traffic and pollution through transit-oriented development and protecting the county's urban growth areas.

    Also in this race is Republican candidate Brenda Carrington. Carrington has a business background in construction and landscaping and opposed Mead for the same position last year. Carrington opposes new funding for essential services and disagrees with efforts to redirect some law enforcement funding to community safety and prevention. 

    Mead is the clear choice for Snohomish County Council in District 4.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running for re-election to a four-year term on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

  • Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Samuel Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5. She is a strong progressive whose campaign priorities include COVID-19 recovery that incorporates community support, housing security, justice reform, and maintaining green space. Donaghy serves on the board of directors for the Communities of Color Coalition. She also regularly volunteers to provide emergency services and disaster relief to the Snohomish community.

    Low has been an outspoken Republican voice on the council. In June, Low voted against $4 per hour hazard pay for grocery store workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Earlier this spring, he badgered and voted against the appointment of a young woman of color to the Regional Law and Justice Council because he disagreed with some of her social media posts.

    Donaghy would bring a much-needed progressive perspective to the council and is the obvious choice for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Samuel Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

Mayoral Races

Tacoma Mayor

  • Victoria Woodards is running for re-election to be the mayor of Tacoma. She had a long track record of public service before becoming mayor in 2017. Woodards supports working families and is committed to maintaining safe and healthy neighborhoods across Tacoma. She also crucially understands the importance of addressing institutional racism and has a demonstrated history of working within communities of color and building diverse coalitions to address the problems facing Tacoma. In her time on the Tacoma City Council, Woodards worked on establishing Tacoma’s Office of Equity and Human Rights.

    While Woodards previously supported the proposal to build a highly polluting liquefied natural gas facility in Tacoma because it would have created jobs, she has since emphasized she does not support any new fossil fuel facilities in the Tideflats.

    Also in this race are Jamika Scott and Steve Haverly. Scott has worked as a domestic violence advocate at YWCA Pierce County and mentored students with AmeriCorps at Peace Community Center. She is also a co-founder and organizer with the Tacoma Action Collective and a board member with the Tacoma Public Library Foundation Board of Directors. Scott is very progressive and her platform includes advocating for rent control, bringing a restorative justice model to Tacoma, and meeting the transportation and social service needs of people experiencing homelessness. Haverly is a first-time candidate who works in construction and land management. Haverly does not have a strong or progressive campaign platform and while he claims to be non-partisan, what little campaign information he does have available demonstrates his priorities would not align with what Tacoma's communities need as we come together to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Woodards has earned broad support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations and numerous elected officials. Woodards is the best choice for mayor of Tacoma.

    Victoria Woodards

    Victoria Woodards is running for re-election to be the mayor of Tacoma. She had a long track record of public service before becoming mayor in 2017. Woodards supports working families and is committed to maintaining safe and healthy neighborhoods across Tacoma.

Vancouver Mayor

  • Anne McEnerny-Ogle was elected to the Vancouver City Council in 2013 and was elected as mayor in 2018, making her the first woman elected to the position in the city's history.

    She has a long record of service to community causes such as Daybreak Youth Services and the Assistance League. While she served on the council, McEnerny-Ogle was an advocate for improving transportation options through development grants and green spaces like the Shumway Neighborhood Park. As mayor, she helped coordinate the city's COVID response, including organizing a food bank and vaccination clinic at Tower Mall. She has also supported the inclusive housing Heights District project.

    Her opponents are Doug Coop and Earl Bowerman. Coop is a Republican who is running to promote conservative ideology, curb families' reproductive rights, and promote business. Bowerman has challenged U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler as an alternative who would have been more loyal to former President Donald Trump. In 2019, while Bowerman was the Clark County Republican Chair, his own party sought his resignation after his inaction against a committee chair who had been convicted of inappropriate behavior with a teenage girl.

    McEnergy-Ogle has earned re-election as mayor of Vancouver.

    Anne McEnerny-Ogle

    Anne McEnerny-Ogle was elected to the Vancouver City Council in 2013 and was elected as mayor in 2018, making her the first woman elected to the position in the city's history.

Everett Mayor

  • Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Her tenure as mayor, which began in 2017, came at a difficult moment in the city's financial history. Washington cities are required by law to produce a balanced budget. With a deficit of $18 million for the city, up from $15 million inherited before her term due to pandemic-related causes, Franklin and the city council cut costs to balance the budget. Their budget closed service locations like the Carl Gipson Senior Center and the Forest Park Swim Center, reduced library hours, and eliminated city-sponsored events like fireworks, the animal farm, and flower festival, along with laying off or voluntary separating from over 130 employees. Disappointingly, despite calls by Black activists to reduce or move funds from the police department budget into more community services, the police budget was not cut like most other departments. Franklin states that the department's body camera program and training efforts are meeting the changes demanded by activists.

    Budget aside, Franklin has worked hard in the pandemic to administer pandemic relief funds and issued a stay-home directive in the early days of the COVID crisis.

    Franklin's opponents are Steve Oss and Ron Wittock. Neither have campaign information or websites available as of mid-July. While Franklin is more moderate, her endorsements on both the conservative and progressive ends of the spectrum represent local faith in her second run, and she is the only viable choice in this race.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Snohomish Mayor

  • Evergreen Future
  • Current Snohomish City Council President Linda Redmon is running for mayor of Snohomish. Redmon has served on Snohomish City Council since 2018 and as president since 2020. She also represents portions of the county including Monroe, Gold Bar, and Sultan on the Snohomish County Board of Health. In her time on the city council, she has advocated for more comprehensive access to broadband, worked on support for workers and businesses during the pandemic, and promoted protecting parks and green spaces.

    Redmon is facing Samuel Forest King and John Kartak. As the city's first elected mayor since a shift in the governmental system, Kartak has had a rough and controversial tenure. In May of last year, Kartak faced heavy criticism for allowing a gathering of 100 armed vigilantes with confederate flags to tailgate and intimidate Snohomish protestors. Kartak claimed, falsely, that only a few of the people were associated with fringe groups. In October, Kartak sparked outrage once again by posting a picture on Facebook depicting a toy car running over figurines meant to resemble protesters. Samuel Forest King does not have any campaign information available.

    Kartak has brought endless division and controversy to the City of Snohomish. It's time to elect a leader who can rebuild relationships and unite the city under an inclusive vision. Vote for Linda Redmon for mayor of Snohomish.

    Linda Redmon

    Current Snohomish City Council President Linda Redmon is running for mayor of Snohomish. Redmon has served on Snohomish City Council since 2018 and as president since 2020.

Anacortes Mayor

  • Evergreen Future
  • City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012, and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017. Outside of his work on the council, Walters is the planning and community development director for the Samish Nation and works with the Skagit Land Trust.

    Walters' platform includes affordable housing, high-quality public services and infrastructure, and making Anacortes an inclusive town for all that maintains its unique charm. During his time on the council, Walters helped to develop the Anacortes municipal fiber network, which is now under construction. He also started the council’s first committee on housing and community services. Despite serving a city with two large oil refineries, Walters understands the importance of environmental protections for the natural ecosystem and Anacortes residents alike. If elected mayor, Walters will use his experience in office to implement a community-focused agenda.

    Challenging Walters is Tammy Guffey, an Anacortes resident who is involved with the Island View PTA, Meals on Wheels, and a suicide prevention nonprofit. Guffey moved to Anacortes in 2019, but she has been heavily involved in community volunteering roles in many cities where she has lived. In this race, Guffey has a vague platform that is mostly based on her enthusiasm for Anacortes and her interest in bringing people together. Unfortunately, she lacks experience for the role of mayor.

    Also in this race is current Councilmember Matt Miller. Miller is in his second term on the council and served as the mayor pro tem from 2018 to 2020. He is a veteran and business owner whose community service includes the Citizens Police Academy, a city program that allows citizens to train and roleplay as police officers. He is running on a more conservative platform.

    Walters is the best choice for Mayor of Anacortes.

    Ryan Walters

    City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012, and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017.

City Council Races

Snohomish City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Karen Guzak is a small business owner and former council member who is running for Position 7 on the Snohomish City Council. She previously served on the city council from 2007 to 2019 and as the mayor for seven years during that time. Guzak has community leadership experience including serving as the president of the board of directors for the Artist Trust, as well as president and developer of Sunny Arms Artist's Cooperative and Union Art Cooperative.

    In this race, Guzak is committed to making Snohomish a city that cares for the wellbeing of all of its residents. She wants to preserve local history, cultivate town vitality, and build affordable housing. 

    Guzak is facing Tabitha Baty and conservative incumbent Steve Dana. Dana runs a right-wing blog where he has blamed student debt on the choice to take out loans before entering bad job markets, defended Trump after the Mueller investigation, and criticized programs for affordable housing. Recently, a Facebook post by Dana appeared to defend those who participated in the January 6 Capitol assault.

    Baty is the president of Snohomish for Equity and an aerospace program manager. Baty has been involved with addressing racism and racial inequities in Snohomish. She states that she is running to build a more resilient community, promote accountability at the city government level, and engage residents in open dialogue.

    Guzak deserves your vote for Council-at-Large Position 7 to bring much-needed experience and progressive values to the Snohomish City Council.

    Karen Guzak

    Karen Guzak is a small business owner and former council member who is running for Position 7 on the Snohomish City Council. She previously served on the city council from 2007 to 2019 and as the mayor for seven years during that time.

Vancouver City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Kim Harless is a program manager at a paint recycling nonprofit and a Clark County Review commissioner. She has served in several roles oriented towards feeding the community, including as the president of Slow Food Southwest Washington, vice president of Urban Abundance, and treasurer of Clark County Food System. She also worked for nearly a decade as an environmental operations specialist with Clark County planning recycling systems, providing oversight on contracts.

    Harless states that as an Indigenous and Chicana single mother, she intends to center equity in both her campaign and her tenure on council if elected. She will lead with housing-first solutions to the homelessness crisis, which means securing shelter for people so that they can safely address any health, social, or economic issues they may be facing. In our interview with Harless, she wanted to provide technical expertise on creating a much more robust climate action plan. Police reform should be intentional and focused, she said, and emergency services should evolve so that a more diverse suite of services is available for residents who call 911 for disputes or mental health crises. Harless emphasized that overall, city government absolutely must address the needs of marginalized communities so that Vancouver is truly welcoming and healthy for all.

    Harless has worked hard to bring together the government and public to work on issues that the community cares about most. We recommend Harless in this race for her fresh perspective, strong progressive values, and the technical expertise she could bring to the city council.

    Kim Harless

    Kim Harless is a program manager at a paint recycling nonprofit and a Clark County Review commissioner.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU 775, SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , League of United Latin American Citizens SW WA Council 47013, Sunrise Movement of SW WA
  • Incumbent Erik Paulsen was unanimously appointed to the council in 2019. He served for several years on the Vancouver Planning Commission before his appointment, including five years as chair of the commission, and he also served as a member of the Vancouver Affordable Housing Task Force and Southwest Clean Air Agency.

    Noting that affordability is a critical issue as demand outpaces supply, Paulsen believes the city should assist with strategies to provide housing at all income levels. He also supports investing in infrastructure to make Vancouver safer for cyclists and pedestrians.

    He is running against Tami Martin and Kara Tess. Martin has no campaign website or policy proposals available yet in mid-July. Her priorities listed in her voters' guide statement include supporting businesses and foster children. Tess has served as president of her former HOA and now serves as a board member of her current HOA. Her public campaign site does not currently have many priorities listed, and her interview with our local council reflected some uncertainty about what the city council can do. She states that the city should invest more in mental health and addiction resources, education to reduce the consumption of red meat and other carbon emission contributors, and said that she is running to listen to everyone and make the community a better place.

    Paulsen is the best choice for Vancouver City Council, Position 2.

    Erik Paulsen

    Incumbent Erik Paulsen was unanimously appointed to the council in 2019.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov. Inslee as a commissioner for Washington State Parks and Recreation and serves as a board member of Clark County Volunteer Lawyers Program, which provides law clinics for underserved communities.

    Perez's campaign is focused on improving life for all residents of Vancouver. She wants to incentivize mixed-income communities that have access to public transportation, and create bold solutions for affordable housing that brings the unsheltered community, service providers, and developers to the table. She believes that a community that invests in communities of color can strengthen the entire city, and would focus on removing discriminatory language in housing deeds, center living wage jobs, and look to help small businesses recover post-pandemic.

    She is running against Glen Yung and David Gellatly. Yung, a building contractor, waged a public fight against the Westside Bike Mobility Project. Unlike Perez, he has focused on private car usage over reducing climate emissions and clean air that investing in public transportation could provide. He uses the term equity frequently but seems to be focused on geographical equity, not the racial or economic equity that would help bring Vancouver together.

    Gellatly is the former chair of the Clark County Republican Party as well as a current executive board member of the party. He states that his top priorities would be homelessness and supporting businesses in the city. Gellatly was cited last year as one of the organizers of pro-Trump rallies in Vancouver during protests and after the shooting of Kevin E. Peterson, Jr. As the head of conservative activist group Activate Republicans, Gellatly is likely to continue to push backward policies on the council on social and racial justice, environmental reform, and more.

    Perez has worked tirelessly both professionally and on a volunteer basis to bring community-oriented solutions to Vancouver. She deserves your vote for Vancouver City Council, Position 3.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.

Bellevue City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

    Borbe is a political newcomer who wants to bring an outside perspective to the Bellevue City Council. His campaign is focused on transportation, affordability, and economic development. He supports building more housing, particularly in Factoria and Crossroads, along with making the transit and transportation investments necessary to reduce congestion. In addition, this would help alleviate a severe shortage of housing for low-income residents of Bellevue. If elected, Borbe would also push to improve transparency on the council by reducing voice votes so Bellevue residents have a record of how their representatives vote.

    Borbe is challenging longtime incumbent Conrad Lee, who is running for re-election to the council position he has served in since 1994. Lee is a Republican who opposed the light rail expansion to the Eastside, which will begin service in 2023. More recently, Lee opposed efforts to expand shelter options for people experiencing homelessness in Bellevue. Lee is not a progressive choice.

    Also in this race are Johan Christiansen and Christie Sanam Lo. Christiansen is a recent graduate and writing tutor who was born and raised in Bellevue. He wants to make sure that the arts, parks and public space, schools, and small businesses are not left behind with Bellevue’s growth. Sanam Lo is a program manager at Amazon and a Bollywood entertainer. Lo does not have a detailed platform but she has stated that she prioritizes social and economic justice, climate action, affordable housing, diversity and inclusion, and ranked-choice voting. Though Lo received an endorsement from a local Democratic group, she does not have a strong campaign presence yet.

    Bellevue is a rapidly growing and changing city that deserves leaders who are ready to tackle a host of new challenges. Dexter Borbe is the best choice for Bellevue City Council, Position 2.

    Dexter Borbe

    Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club , King County Democrats

Olympia City Council

  • Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    Huỳnh is running against Robbi Kesler and Bruce Wilkinson Jr. Kesler is the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County.

    Kesler does not have a plan for homelessness or housing affordability on her website, but her answers in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy. She states that she wants to consider "plan[s] to remove trespassers from private property," but does not expand on critical affordable housing needs, instead of saying that the city should focus on rapid rehousing. She also wants to increase law enforcement funding, which she states may or may not go to more police, instead of mental health funding.

    While Kesler's government service is impressive, we're disappointed with her decision to not address the city's housing crisis and her lacking commitment to meaningful police reform.

    Wilkinson Jr. has served on the board of the Northwest Alliance for Alternative Media and Education for 8 years and previously worked as a coordinator for Jill Stein for President and Charlie Hardy for U.S. Congress. He is a clear progressive with a long list of issues for the city to tackle, including implementing low-barrier housing and preserving more green space in the city. However, Huỳnh has broader community support from elected officials and unions.

    Huỳnh is the best choice in this race.

    Yến Huỳnh

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature.

  • Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2. She is a board member of LOTT Clean Water Alliance.

    Parshley is looking for a second term on the council to continue her work on climate, economic recovery, and more. During her time on the council, Parshley has supported the council's vote for grocery stores with over 250 employees to provide hazard pay to workers during the pandemic. Parshley sponsored an ordinance banning the retail sale of dogs and cats in the city limits. She also joined the unanimous vote of her colleagues on the council in the ban of chemical weapons on demonstrators last summer.

    Parshley has earned strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations and local elected leaders in Thurston County. 

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2. She is a board member of LOTT Clean Water Alliance.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Olympia Firefighters (IAFF L468), UFCW Local 367, Boeing Machinists IAM District 751
  • Evergreen Future
  • Dontae Payne is a U.S. Army veteran and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound in Governor Jay Inslee's office.

    Payne wants to see the city acknowledge systemic racism and he supports the use of an equity lens in its policymaking. On housing and homelessness, Payne states that expanded transitional and permanent supportive housing will help alleviate the crisis while providing COVID relief for small businesses and rent stabilization for commercial tenants will aid the city's economic recovery.

    Payne and challenger Sarah DeStasio have different views of what law enforcement should look like in Olympia. Payne supports funding body cameras, funding social services, mental health, and addiction programs, and expanding the city's crisis response unit. In his interview, he stated that his opinion on defunding the police was nuanced and that the city should focus on true reform, justice, and accountability.

    He states that his experience as a gay, Black, former military member would bring the voice of marginalized people to the table. If elected, he believes he would be the first Black man ever to serve on the Olympia City Council. Payne is the best choice for Olympia City Council, Position 6.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a U.S. Army veteran and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound in Governor Jay Inslee's office.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • On the council since 2011, veteran and incumbent Jim Cooper is the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Cooper and the city council have passed several significant pieces of legislation that benefit the community. Notably, he supported the Olympia Home Fund to build new supportive permanent housing, provided funding for struggling businesses and families during the pandemic, and created a regional climate plan with neighboring cities. If re-elected, Cooper states that he will focus on housing and economic recovery, twin crises that affect everyone in the community, as well as continuing conversations on criminal justice reform.

    Cooper is backed by a significant number of unions, including the Lacey and Olympia firefighters' unions and United Food and Commercial Workers Local 367, as well as by Lt. Gov. Denny Heck and a large number of county and city elected officials.

    Cooper's track record on the council and strong support from our partners and local leaders make him the best choice in this race.

    Jim Cooper

    On the council since 2011, veteran and incumbent Jim Cooper is the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest.

Tacoma City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years. She chairs the Community Vitality and Safety Committee and is a member of groups including the Parks Policy Board and Opioid Prevention Taskforce.

    In her time on the council, Ushka supported apprenticeship programs by changing labor codes to make these programs more accessible. If she's re-elected, Ushka wants to do more to fight racial inequalities in health, housing, education, employment, and law enforcement. She states that she will continue to work for more flexible federal funding for housing and shelters, including low-barrier shelters with fewer barriers to entry for the city's unhoused population. Ushka also feels the city needs to increase zoning density where suitable to address the housing deficit and provide additional resources for responding to mental health crises. 

    Also in this race are Israel James McKinney and Nolan Hibbard-Pelly. McKinney has worked for Boeing and Xfinity and currently works for Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services. His platform includes prioritizing education, supporting police reform and accountability, and reducing the gap in affordable housing. Hibbard-Pelly is an environmental activist and student at the University of Washington Tacoma whose platform includes bringing a Green New Deal to Tacoma, municipal broadband for everyone in Tacoma, and improving accessibility of neighborhoods through public works.

    Our local council was disappointed with some of Ushka's interview answers, including her support for moving the migrant detention center to the Nalley Valley. However, Ushka’s support from local progressive groups and our partner organizations makes her the best choice in the race for Tacoma City Council, Position 4.

    Catherine Ushka

    Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Anne Artman is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 5. She is the founder and executive director of the Tacoma Recovery Center and previously served as the program manager of the Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center.

    Artman's campaign priorities include dealing with the affordable housing and homelessness crises, increasing behavioral health and social services, bringing more women- and Black-, brown-, and Indigenous-owned businesses to the community, and supporting Tacoma’s small businesses. She is also emphasizing social and racial justice and will work for more accountability, transparency, and equitable opportunities for all communities. Artman has been endorsed by progressive leaders like House Speaker Laurie Jinkins and Rep. Melanie Morgan and groups including the Stonewall Democrats and the National Women’s Political Caucus.

    Also in this race are Joe Bushnell and Treyvon Dunbar. Bushnell is a Tacoma Public Utilities board member and Marine Corps veteran. He is running on a platform that focuses on addressing homelessness and creating jobs. However, Bushnell's orientation toward helping downtown businesses has raised concerns among local labor unions. In addition, he is more focused on improving law enforcement response times than making meaningful police reforms that will keep our community safe.

    Dunbar is the sergeant-at-arms and former treasurer for the 29th Legislative District Democrats as well as the treasurer for the Pierce County Young Democrats. His campaign priorities include affordable housing, police accountability including de-escalation training, and ensuring local construction benefits the community instead of a few developers.

    Artman has earned strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partners, as well as progressive elected and community leaders. Artman is the best choice in the race for Tacoma City Council, Position 5.

    Anne Artman

    Anne Artman is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 5. She is the founder and executive director of the Tacoma Recovery Center and previously served as the program manager of the Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center.

Mill Creek City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020. Outside of public service, she works with nonprofits and foundations on communications and project management to build change.

    If elected, Duque wants to expand and protect public green spaces, foster responsive and transparent government, ensure economic recovery for Mill Creek businesses, and be smart about city growth. Duque has begun to actualize some of these goals during her time on the Parks and Recreation Board where she worked on the opening of Exploration Park and the updates to Heron Park. In this race, Duque has earned an impressive slate of endorsements from progressive leaders and Democratic organizations.

    Duque is facing Shannon Warren and incumbent council member Adam Morgan. Morgan first joined the council after being appointed in 2020 to fill the spot left vacant by Mike Todd. He is running on a conservative platform that doesn't represent the people of Mill Creek. If re-elected, Morgan would reduce funding for essential services that support local families and keep our community safe.

    Warren is a local cook, yoga practitioner, and hairstylist. Rather than submit information on her background to the county voter’s guide, Warren included a paragraph of adjectives that her close friends and family used to describe her. Without a background in public service or demonstrated community leadership, Warren lacks the necessary experience for the role.

    We recommend Melissa Duque for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6 because of her progressive support and her strong community focus.

    Melissa Duque

    Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020.

  • Endorsed By: Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, Sierra Club , Latino Progress, 44th Legislative District Democrats

Seattle City Council

Puyallup City Council

  • Joe Colombo is an elected precinct committee officer in Pierce County and the founder of Indivisible Puyallup.

    Colombo serves on the City of Puyallup Design Review & Historic Preservation board and has worked in IT in project management and facilitation. He brings both community leadership and political experience to his campaign. In this race, Colombo is prioritizing pedestrian safety, affordable housing, economic vitality, equity and diversity, disability accommodations, and community-focused government spending. He has stated that his first objective would be to form an equity and ethics commission that brings Puyallup citizens together to work on making the city better for all residents.

    Joe Colombo

    Joe Colombo is an elected precinct committee officer in Pierce County and the founder of Indivisible Puyallup.

Everett City Council

  • Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3. He worked as a firefighter for more than three decades and has served on various boards in the community and at the state level, including as a board member of the Snohomish County Red Cross and on the Washington State Council of Fire Fighters. He currently works for Snohomish County Treasurer Brian Sullivan and as an associate faculty member at Everett Community College.

    Schwab states that the police and fire departments should be fully staffed and funded. He notes that Everett has one of the highest rates of COVID infections in the state, and supports expanding paid sick leave and family leave. He also supports fast-tracking the light rail system to stimulate economic development downtown and along Evergreen Way, promoting housing density, and improving citywide energy efficiency among other considerations.

    Schwab is running against Lacey Sauvageau and Jacob Vail. Sauvageau is a 911 dispatcher for Snohomish County. She previously ran as a Democrat for Rep. Emily Wicks' House seat for the 38th Legislative District. Her previous campaign website is not accessible as of mid-July. During her previous run, she stated that she would focus on the environment and smaller class sizes, among other priorities. She supports police accountability but doesn't outline a specific policy agenda.

    Jacob Vail is a member of the Everett Civil Service Commission and was appointed in March 2021 as a member of the Snohomish County Parks Board. He states that as a person with disabilities, he has a personal stake in improving accessibility in the community for everyone. His platform is somewhat minimal but includes the high points of using vacant hotels and apartment complexes to help the unsheltered and providing programs for skilled trade. He has earned the endorsement of Humane Voters of Washington in this race. 

    Given that the city cut nearly every department aside from law enforcement in the last few months, we would like to see Schwab's policies on law enforcement evolve into a model that prioritizes investing more into human services. Nevertheless, Schwab is the best candidate in this race.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 3 includes all of Boulevard Bluffs, Harborview Seahurst Glenhaven, View Ridge-Madison, Evergreen, and the southernmost tip of South Forest Park.

    Don Schwab

    Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Bellingham City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring community needs, especially those of historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy. If elected, she states that she would be the first Black person to serve on the Bellingham City Council.

    In our interview with Martens, she emphasized the need for the city to improve outreach from city hall, whether it be to struggling local businesses or residents having a difficult time. One of her top priorities would be to address homelessness in the city through making strong investments in rapid re-housing and permanent shelter. She supports City Councilmember Hammill's proposed 0.1% sales tax for housing because it will save the city money by reducing unnecessary jail time and emergency responses. On police reform, Martens supports shifting police away from responding to jobs they aren't trained to do, like dealing with mental health crises and investing more in diversion programs.

    Martens is one of the people working to found the Whatcom Racial Equity Commission, a joint effort between city and county to hold policy conversations and propose solutions to the challenges that Black, Indigenous, and other community members face. If elected, she is dedicated to continuing to hold conversations to build trust between residents and city hall.

    Her opponents are Russ Whidbee and Tonia Boze. Financial advisor Whidbee has no campaign website as of June 22. He states that his approach to policy will be moderate, but does not have proposals available to voters. Similar to Whidbee, gym owner Tonia Boze was a late filer who does not have campaign policies available as of late June. Her official voter's guide statement says that the city should be welcoming and a place of opportunity.

    Martens is the best choice in this race.

    Kristina Michele Martens

    Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring community needs, especially those of historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility