Endorsements

Teamsters Joint Council 28

Teamsters Joint Council 28

With unwavering integrity, Joint Council of Teamsters No. 28 empowers and supports our Local Unions and their membership across Washington, Alaska, and Northern Idaho. Through organizing, education, and political action we will expand the rights, wages, and benefits of working families. Moving forward, united as one.

County Council Races

Whatcom County Council

  • Non-Partisan
  • Evergreen Future
  • Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee. She has worked as a legislative assistant in the state House of Representatives, and as a staff assistant and community liaison in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.

    If elected, Galloway will push forward on the county's critical affordable housing needs and focus on restoring water quality for both salmon populations and Whatcom communities, which includes supporting the reduction of pollution runoff. She wants to address sustainability in infrastructure, transit, and other public needs through the lens of climate justice which to her means considering the needs of communities of color and those with lower incomes, who are disproportionately impacted by pollution and health disparities.

    Kaylee is a good choice if you're looking for someone who will prioritize affordable housing and environmental conservation. 

    Kaylee Galloway

    Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee.

  • Endorsed By: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, SEIU Local 925, Teamsters Joint Council 28, Housing Action Fund , Northwest Washington Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Bellingham/Whatcom County Firefighters (IAFF Local 106), Alliance for Gun Responsibility

King County Council

  • Non-Partisan
  • Evergreen Future
  • Chris Franco is an Army veteran who serves on the leadership team in the Office of Equity and Social Justice of the King County Executive. He also serves as co-chair of the county's Latinx Affinity Group and on the county's anti-racism Core Team, which develops policy and budget priorities based on feedback from organizations and communities of color.

    In our interview with Franco, he emphasized his readiness to jump into the county's biggest issues as a public servant focused on equity. He wants to address the history of redlining by changing building laws to make it easier to build affordable housing. He noted that the region's growth is outpacing infrastructure and he would prioritize planning housing around clean energy and transportation needs if elected.

    Franco stated that some funding from the law enforcement system could be better used to provide mental health and child care services. Drawing on his Army experience, he believes that police should not be armed like soldiers and that demilitarization of the police should be a priority.

    Chris Franco

    Chris Franco is an Army veteran who serves on the leadership team in the Office of Equity and Social Justice of the King County Executive.

Mayoral Races

Seattle Mayor

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her leadership in advocating for working families and marginalized communities. Lorena González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, González is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    González is one of Seattle’s three representatives on the King County Regional Homelessness Authority. She wants to push the city further than the current mayor was willing to go when it comes to building more permanent supportive housing.

     

    González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She states that she would increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color, the homeless, and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to childcare access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

     

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

     

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her leadership in advocating for working families and marginalized communities.

City Attorney Races

Seattle City Attorney

  • Evergreen Future
  • Incumbent Pete Holmes is running for re-election to be the Seattle City Attorney. Holmes was first elected in 2009 and has had a progressive track record in office. He is the former chair of the Office of Police Accountability Review Board and spent 25 years working in business litigation before his public service. His highlights include successfully defending the city's hazard pay law, working to decriminalize marijuana, and preventing the incarceration of Washington residents for marijuana use. Holmes also worked to reduce prosecutions for people driving with their license suspended due to lack of payment and opposed mandatory deportation for immigrants in the legal system.

    If re-elected, Holmes has a progressive vision for the role of city attorney in response to the coronavirus pandemic and the movement for racial justice. His priorities include improving police accountability, gun safety, and creating a level playing field in our legal system and city. To achieve these goals, Holmes proposes passing stronger gun laws, reducing excessive force on the part of the Seattle Police Department, vacating marijuana charges, and keeping people housed post-pandemic, among other policies.

    Holmes' track record in office has earned him the support of our partner organizations, as well as progressive local leaders including City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay, and Attorney General Bob Ferguson. He's a good choice to continue building upon the reforms he has spearheaded as city attorney over the last 12 years.

    Pete Holmes

    Submitted by Collin on Fri, 07/09/2021 - 17:07

    Incumbent Pete Holmes is running for re-election to be the Seattle City Attorney. Holmes was first elected in 2009 and has had a progressive track record in office.

City Council Races

Olympia City Council

  • Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    Huỳnh is running against Robbi Kesler and Bruce Wilkinson Jr. Kesler is the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County.

    Kesler does not have a plan for homelessness or housing affordability on her website, but her answers in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy. She states that she wants to consider "plan[s] to remove trespassers from private property," but does not expand on critical affordable housing needs, instead of saying that the city should focus on rapid rehousing. She also wants to increase law enforcement funding, which she states may or may not go to more police, instead of mental health funding.

    While Kesler's government service is impressive, we're disappointed with her decision to not address the city's housing crisis and her lacking commitment to meaningful police reform.

    Wilkinson Jr. has served on the board of the Northwest Alliance for Alternative Media and Education for 8 years and previously worked as a coordinator for Jill Stein for President and Charlie Hardy for U.S. Congress. He is a clear progressive with a long list of issues for the city to tackle, including implementing low-barrier housing and preserving more green space in the city. However, Huỳnh has broader community support from elected officials and unions.

    Huỳnh is the best choice in this race.

    Yến Huỳnh

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature.

  • Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2. She is a board member of LOTT Clean Water Alliance.

    Parshley is looking for a second term on the council to continue her work on climate, economic recovery, and more. During her time on the council, Parshley has supported the council's vote for grocery stores with over 250 employees to provide hazard pay to workers during the pandemic. Parshley sponsored an ordinance banning the retail sale of dogs and cats in the city limits. She also joined the unanimous vote of her colleagues on the council in the ban of chemical weapons on demonstrators last summer.

    Parshley has earned strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations and local elected leaders in Thurston County. 

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2. She is a board member of LOTT Clean Water Alliance.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Olympia Firefighters (IAFF L468), UFCW Local 367, Boeing Machinists IAM District 751

Tacoma City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years. She chairs the Community Vitality and Safety Committee and is a member of groups including the Parks Policy Board and Opioid Prevention Taskforce.

    In her time on the council, Ushka supported apprenticeship programs by changing labor codes to make these programs more accessible. If she's re-elected, Ushka wants to do more to fight racial inequalities in health, housing, education, employment, and law enforcement. She states that she will continue to work for more flexible federal funding for housing and shelters, including low-barrier shelters with fewer barriers to entry for the city's unhoused population. Ushka also feels the city needs to increase zoning density where suitable to address the housing deficit and provide additional resources for responding to mental health crises. 

    Also in this race are Israel James McKinney and Nolan Hibbard-Pelly. McKinney has worked for Boeing and Xfinity and currently works for Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services. His platform includes prioritizing education, supporting police reform and accountability, and reducing the gap in affordable housing. Hibbard-Pelly is an environmental activist and student at the University of Washington Tacoma whose platform includes bringing a Green New Deal to Tacoma, municipal broadband for everyone in Tacoma, and improving accessibility of neighborhoods through public works.

    Our local council was disappointed with some of Ushka's interview answers, including her support for moving the migrant detention center to the Nalley Valley. However, Ushka’s support from local progressive groups and our partner organizations makes her the best choice in the race for Tacoma City Council, Position 4.

    Catherine Ushka

    Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years.

Burien City Council

Des Moines City Council

  • Soleil Lewis, a special education teacher and community leader, is running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7. Her campaign priorities include increasing government transparency, promoting civic engagement and education, expanding employment opportunities for youth, and improving neighborhood infrastructure. She wants to see the city expand online access to public meetings and improve language resources, alongside greater participation by the city in regional government.

    If elected, Lewis also wants to create an airport committee, which would evaluate the impact of the Sea-Tac Airport on Des Moines residents. Additionally, Lewis works with Seattle King County and Vancouver NAACP on issues of diversity and inclusion and she is excited to represent new voices on the city council as an African- and Haitian-American woman.

    We recommend Soliel Lewis because of her progressive values and strong support from our partners and local leaders.

    Soleil Lewis

    Soleil Lewis, a special education teacher and community leader, is running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7.

Seattle City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Brianna Thomas is the chief of staff for Seattle City Council President and current Position 9 Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez. Previously, she led the effort to bring democracy vouchers to Seattle through the Honest Elections Initiative and worked as a legislative aide for state Senator Bob Hasegawa. She also worked on the “Yes for SeaTac” campaign to raise the minimum wage to $15 and joined Gonzalez’s team in 2015.

    Thomas’s campaign platform is impressively detailed. She wants to prioritize criminal justice reforms like ending the system of cash bail, increased police accountability measures, and sending mental health professionals in the place of armed police officers. Support for small businesses including investing in businesses owned, operated, and staffed by Black, brown, and Indigenous people, and adopting new, affordable housing options are also key to Thomas’s campaign. 

    In our interview, she emphasized her commitment to fixing the city's infrastructure. She wants to draw upon the connections she’s built with state and federal agencies to maximize outside funding for local roads and bridges. More broadly, she demonstrated her deep knowledge of policy details and how to make government work from her time working for the council. 

    Brianna Thomas

    Brianna Thomas is the chief of staff for Seattle City Council President and current Position 9 Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez.