• VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger

No Good Choices

There are no good choices for Yakima County Commissioner in District 3.

Republicans LaDon Linde and Autumn Torres are running for this position. Both candidates want to remove pandemic safety protocols like mask requirements at a time when local hospitals are still buckling under the influx of coronavirus patients. The Department of Health noted in August that cases have increased in Yakima County by 100-299%. Both candidates also want to see the eviction moratorium lifted, which service providers have warned will hurt struggling families and cause a spike in homelessness.

Write in a progressive candidate of your choice for Yakima County Commissioner in District 3.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Danny Herrera is a public school teacher who is running to utilize his experience in education and racial justice on the city council. He has served in the community in several roles, including as a member of NAACP Yakima Branch, as a youth room tutor at YMCA Downtown, and as co-founder of the College Success Foundation Yakima Alumni Board. Herrera was lauded by our endorsing partners as a committed educator who has clear knowledge about the importance of reforming the state tax code so that everyone benefits, not just the wealthy. He is ready to join the council as an advocate for community investment in safer infrastructure, youth programming, and equitable economic growth.

    Herrera is running against Edgar Hernandez, who does not currently have a website as of mid-October. Some of the goals listed in his candidate literature include addressing the drug crisis and homelessness, though he does not expand on what policies he might put in place. However, Hernandez is endorsed by a right-wing organization whose priorities include removing historical discussions about race and history from schools and perpetuating fraudulent claims about rigged 2020 elections.

    For his dedication to improving the lives of youths and his support from our Progressive Voters Guide partners, we recommend Danny Herrera in this race.

    Danny Herrera

    Danny Herrera is a public school teacher who is running to utilize his experience in education and racial justice on the city council.

    Danny Herrera

    Danny Herrera is a public school teacher who is running to utilize his experience in education and racial justice on the city council.

  • Janice Deccio is a communications coordinator who is running for the Yakima City Council's District 4 seat vacated by incumbent Kay Funk, who is not running for re-election. Deccio has served on several boards in the community, including Wellness House, an organization that supports cancer patients and their families, and the Yakima Symphony. Her platform includes supporting affordable housing and maintaining city infrastructure. However, Deccio's highlighting of "suppressing crime" with law enforcement does not speak to progressive values, and we hope that the candidate's position will evolve to address the many factors that contribute to and can decelerate gun violence, including expanding mental health support, providing outreach workers, and improving school dropout prevention.

    Deccio is running against Mark Shervey, the owner of a local coffee roaster. Shervey's priorities include addressing infrastructure, gang violence, homelessness, the economy, and the city's image, but he lacks detailed proposals for what he would do about these issues. He is endorsed by at least one conservative group whose key issues include some of the worst and most divisive hallmarks of the right-wing agenda.

    We appreciate Deccio's attention on social media to health inequalities and standing against racism, and hope that if elected she will follow the lead of more progressive council members. While Deccio is a fairly moderate candidate, she is the best choice in this race.

    Janice Deccio is a communications coordinator who is running for the Yakima City Council's District 4 seat vacated by incumbent Kay Funk, who is not running for re-election. Deccio has served on several boards in the community, including Wellness House, an organization that supports cancer patients and their families, and the Yakima Symphony. Her platform includes supporting affordable housing and maintaining city infrastructure. However, Deccio's highlighting of "suppressing crime" with law enforcement does not speak to progressive values, and we hope that the candidate's position will evolve to address the many factors that contribute to and can decelerate gun violence, including expanding mental health support, providing outreach workers, and improving school dropout prevention.

    Deccio is running against Mark Shervey, the owner of a local coffee roaster. Shervey's priorities include addressing infrastructure, gang violence, homelessness, the economy, and the city's image, but he lacks detailed proposals for what he would do about these issues. He is endorsed by at least one conservative group whose key issues include some of the worst and most divisive hallmarks of the right-wing agenda.

    We appreciate Deccio's attention on social media to health inequalities and standing against racism, and hope that if elected she will follow the lead of more progressive council members. While Deccio is a fairly moderate candidate, she is the best choice in this race.

    Janice Deccio

    Janice Deccio is a communications coordinator who is running for the Yakima City Council's District 4 seat vacated by incumbent Kay Funk, who is not running for re-election. Deccio has served on several boards in the community, including Wellness House, an organization that supports cancer p

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Healthcare 1199NW , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Lisa Wallace is a former victim-witness advocate with the Yakima County Prosecutor’s office and probation officer with the Yakima County Juvenile Court. She also serves as the vice chair of the Yakima Planning Commission and is a founding board member of Voices for Children.

    If elected, she pledges to help find solutions for attainable housing, safety, and homelessness. Recognizing the shortage of affordable housing, Wallace wants to form more partnerships with housing nonprofits, and has supported the Housing Action Plan as a member of the planning commission. She also supports pairing crisis responders with police officers when situations involve mental health issues.

    Her opponent, Matt Brown, describes himself as a Christian and small business owner who helps churches utilize technology to spread the gospel. Much of his campaign is focused on a conservative agenda of promoting businesses and reducing spending, though he does not describe what city services will be cut. Brown is also endorsed by a right-wing group that wants to remove historically accurate lessons from schools and promote Trump-style politics and anti-vaccine fear mongering.

    Wallace is the better choice for Yakima City Council in District 6.

    Lisa Wallace is a former victim-witness advocate with the Yakima County Prosecutor’s office and probation officer with the Yakima County Juvenile Court. She also serves as the vice chair of the Yakima Planning Commission and is a founding board member of Voices for Children.

    If elected, she pledges to help find solutions for attainable housing, safety, and homelessness. Recognizing the shortage of affordable housing, Wallace wants to form more partnerships with housing nonprofits, and has supported the Housing Action Plan as a member of the planning commission. She also supports pairing crisis responders with police officers when situations involve mental health issues.

    Her opponent, Matt Brown, describes himself as a Christian and small business owner who helps churches utilize technology to spread the gospel. Much of his campaign is focused on a conservative agenda of promoting businesses and reducing spending, though he does not describe what city services will be cut. Brown is also endorsed by a right-wing group that wants to remove historically accurate lessons from schools and promote Trump-style politics and anti-vaccine fear mongering.

    Wallace is the better choice for Yakima City Council in District 6.

    Lisa Kristine Wallace

    Lisa Wallace is a former victim-witness advocate with the Yakima County Prosecutor’s office and probation officer with the Yakima County Juvenile Court. She also serves as the vice chair of the Yakima Planning Commission and is a founding board member of Voices for Children.