• VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • Bob Iyall is running for the Port of Olympia, District 2. Iyall is a Nisqually Tribal Elder who works in management with the Medicine Creek Enterprise Corporation (MCEC). He has also served as a member of the Nisqually Board of Economic Development and has been a member of the Bricklayers Union for over 40 years. Iyall's platform includes healing parts of the local environment and revising the port's approach to operations as we continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic.

    His opponent in this race is Jessie Simmons, an Army veteran and former political consultant. Simmons also served as a board member with the Lacey Gold Star Memorial Foundation. His campaign is emphasizing protecting good-paying jobs and balancing organized labor with environmentalism. Additionally, Simmons wants to create an electric ferry service to run from the port to places like Tacoma and Bremerton.

    Iyall is the best choice for Port of Olympia, District 2.

    Bob Iyall is running for the Port of Olympia, District 2. Iyall is a Nisqually Tribal Elder who works in management with the Medicine Creek Enterprise Corporation (MCEC). He has also served as a member of the Nisqually Board of Economic Development and has been a member of the Bricklayers Union for over 40 years. Iyall's platform includes healing parts of the local environment and revising the port's approach to operations as we continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic.

    His opponent in this race is Jessie Simmons, an Army veteran and former political consultant. Simmons also served as a board member with the Lacey Gold Star Memorial Foundation. His campaign is emphasizing protecting good-paying jobs and balancing organized labor with environmentalism. Additionally, Simmons wants to create an electric ferry service to run from the port to places like Tacoma and Bremerton.

    Iyall is the best choice for Port of Olympia, District 2.

    Bob Iyall

    Submitted by Isabel on Tue, 10/12/2021 - 13:15

    Bob Iyall is running for the Port of Olympia, District 2. Iyall is a Nisqually Tribal Elder who works in management with the Medicine Creek Enterprise Corporation (MCEC).

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Joel Hansen is running a progressive campaign for Port of Olympia commissioner in District 3. He works at a solar energy company, and serves on both the Port of Olympia Citizens Advisory Committee and Tumwater Planning Commission and as a precinct committee officer. Hansen wants to put his expertise in finance and environmental science to use in order to strengthen the port economy without compromising on climate action.

    If elected, Hansen wants to take a holistic approach to the commissioner position in order to generate living-wage jobs, attract local eco-friendly businesses, and engage an equity lens for port policymaking. He says he will listen to constituents about port issues and seek to better the communications between commissioners and those who live and work near the ort. Further, Hansen wants to advance environmental justice, and social justice broadly. He is supported by a number of local progressives and community leaders in this race.

    Real estate broker and attorney Amy Evans is the other candidate in this race. Evans’ priorities include public access to port property, environmental stewardship, and job growth. Unfortunately, she lacks both a background in community leadership and widespread support in this race.

    We recommend Hansen for Port of Olympia in District 3 to bring strong progressive leadership and a new perspective to the port.

    Joel Hansen

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    Joel Hansen is running a progressive campaign for Port of Olympia commissioner in District 3. He works at a solar energy company, and serves on both the Port of Olympia Citizens Advisory Committee and Tumwater Planning Commission and as a precinct committee officer.

    Joel Hansen

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    Joel Hansen is running a progressive campaign for Port of Olympia commissioner in District 3. He works at a solar energy company, and serves on both the Port of Olympia Citizens Advisory Committee and Tumwater Planning Commission and as a precinct committee officer.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club , Thurston Environmental Voters, AFSCME Local 443, Thurston County Young Democrats

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Robin Vazquez is a Lacey Planning Commissioner running for Lacey City Council, Position 4. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable housing and providing more public transit and transportation choices. As a member of the commission, Vazquez has supported increasing the housing supply in Lacey to match the need for more affordable options. She mentions that as a certified instructor for teaching English as a second language and as a Community Emergency Response Team member, she wants to develop a city language access plan and multilingual disaster preparation.

    Vazquez is running against Emma McSharry, who said her frustrations with the state's COVID regulations and homelessness spurred her to run for office. Her Facebook states that her three priorities include fiscal responsibility, supporting businesses, and cleanliness, though more detailed policies are not available on her website. This snapshot of her potential agenda, along with endorsements by the police officer's guild and Republican elected officials, indicate she would likely pursue a moderate to conservative agenda if elected.

    Vazquez has earned the support of several members of the current city council, as well as a large number of city councilmembers from neighboring cities and progressive members of the state legislature. Vazquez is by far the best choice in this race.

    Robin Vazquez

    Robin Vazquez is a Lacey Planning Commissioner running for Lacey City Council, Position 4. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable housing and providing more public transit and transportation choices.

    Robin Vazquez

    Robin Vazquez is a Lacey Planning Commissioner running for Lacey City Council, Position 4. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable housing and providing more public transit and transportation choices.

  • Mayor Andy Ryder is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council.

    He has served on the council since 2010, and is a member of the board of directors for thee Race, Equity, and Leadership Council (REAL) for the National League of Cities. In his time on the council, Ryder has been supportive of veterans services, the city's newly-instated commission of equity, and expanding housing options.
    Mayor Andy Ryder is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council.

    He has served on the council since 2010, and is a member of the board of directors for thee Race, Equity, and Leadership Council (REAL) for the National League of Cities. In his time on the council, Ryder has been supportive of veterans services, the city's newly-instated commission of equity, and expanding housing options.

    Andy Ryder

    Mayor Andy Ryder is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council.
  • Michael Steadman is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council, Position 6. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and owner of a commercial leasing company.

    Steadman is running to use his experience as a small business owner to help Lacey recover economically from the COVID-19 pandemic. Last year, Steadman ran as a Democrat for Thurston County Commissioner, a campaign in which he promoted tackling water quality issues, improving alternative criminal justice options, and improving mental health services.
    Michael Steadman is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council, Position 6. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and owner of a commercial leasing company.

    Steadman is running to use his experience as a small business owner to help Lacey recover economically from the COVID-19 pandemic. Last year, Steadman ran as a Democrat for Thurston County Commissioner, a campaign in which he promoted tackling water quality issues, improving alternative criminal justice options, and improving mental health services.

    Michael Steadman

    Michael Steadman is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council, Position 6. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and owner of a commercial leasing company.
  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Carolyn Cox was elected in 2018 and is serving her first term as a councilmember for Position 7. She represents the city in several organizations, including as chair of the Intercity Transit Authority, on the Thurston County Regional Housing Council, and on the Thurston Climate Mitigation Steering Committee. Cox is now running for mayor to bring these issues to the forefront in a combined local and regional approach to continue to improve the lives of residents.

    Cox notes that there is not enough housing to meet the needs of residents, especially the unsheltered. She wants to continue working with the housing council to build more lower-cost housing. The council also just unanimously approved the creation of mobile outreach teams, who will work with police to contact and help those who are homeless or in crisis. She supports the creation and expansion of bike lanes, safe pedestrian walkways, and public transit. As the city begins to recover from the pandemic, Cox states that the $1 million grant fund to small businesses is just the first step in making sure that residents and establishments get back on their feet.

    Cox faces a challenge from Felix Peguero-Reyes, a U.S. Army veteran who now works as a financial advisor. He has not released a detailed platform but states he wants to focus on economic development and safety. He has been endorsed by some conservative business groups and Republican elected officials.

    Cox has earned an impressive set of progressive endorsements because of her track record on the council and detailed platform. Cox is the clear choice for Lacey City Council, Position 7.

    Carolyn Cox was elected in 2018 and is serving her first term as a councilmember for Position 7. She represents the city in several organizations, including as chair of the Intercity Transit Authority, on the Thurston County Regional Housing Council, and on the Thurston Climate Mitigation Steering Committee. Cox is now running for mayor to bring these issues to the forefront in a combined local and regional approach to continue to improve the lives of residents.

    Cox notes that there is not enough housing to meet the needs of residents, especially the unsheltered. She wants to continue working with the housing council to build more lower-cost housing. The council also just unanimously approved the creation of mobile outreach teams, who will work with police to contact and help those who are homeless or in crisis. She supports the creation and expansion of bike lanes, safe pedestrian walkways, and public transit. As the city begins to recover from the pandemic, Cox states that the $1 million grant fund to small businesses is just the first step in making sure that residents and establishments get back on their feet.

    Cox faces a challenge from Felix Peguero-Reyes, a U.S. Army veteran who now works as a financial advisor. He has not released a detailed platform but states he wants to focus on economic development and safety. He has been endorsed by some conservative business groups and Republican elected officials.

    Cox has earned an impressive set of progressive endorsements because of her track record on the council and detailed platform. Cox is the clear choice for Lacey City Council, Position 7.

    Carolyn Cox

    Carolyn Cox was elected in 2018 and is serving her first term as a councilmember for Position 7.

  • Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. The council member wants to see public safety reimagined through the input of the community, and wants to see first responders and diverse community members included as part of the city's public safety decision-making process. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    She is running against Robbi Kesler, the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis, and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County. In the primary, Kesler's initial answers on homelessness in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy, with an overemphasis on private property. Kesler has since significantly expanded her platform, providing more details on her plans to address homelessness, handle waterfront development, and support collective bargaining. However, Huynh's solid track record on the council and support from the progressive community still makes her the best choice in this race.

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. The council member wants to see public safety reimagined through the input of the community, and wants to see first responders and diverse community members included as part of the city's public safety decision-making process. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    She is running against Robbi Kesler, the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis, and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County. In the primary, Kesler's initial answers on homelessness in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy, with an overemphasis on private property. Kesler has since significantly expanded her platform, providing more details on her plans to address homelessness, handle waterfront development, and support collective bargaining. However, Huynh's solid track record on the council and support from the progressive community still makes her the best choice in this race.

    Yến Huỳnh

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature.

  • Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union. Currently, he works as a paraeducator at South Sound High School.

    Gilman's top three campaign priorities are protecting the city's environment and natural spaces, engaging residents in city planning, and encouraging a sense of cooperation in the community. While on the council, Gilman has been an advocate for affordability requirements on tax-incentivized development, which keeps more homes and apartments affordable for all. He also worked to pass renter protections for people falling behind on payments due to COVID. Gilman and the council have also supported reverting Capitol Lake back to an estuary to support salmon populations.

    His opponent is Candace Mercer, who says that she is a 'progressive' who voted for Donald Trump. Much of her writing focuses on her decision to embrace right-wing advocates and ideals. Her secondary focus is on homelessness and addiction, with a stronger focus on the latter, though the measures she suggests are largely punitive. Mercer states that the city should aggressively prosecute drug dealing and sex work, build privatized urban campsites, and push for substance abstinence.

    Gilman's agenda is far more comprehensive and actually progressive, addressing the city's biggest issues at the source with services that help struggling families and prevent people from falling into poverty in the first place. Clark Gilman is the best choice for Olympia City Council, Position 4.

    Clark Gilman

    Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union.

    Clark Gilman

    Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union.

  • Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

    Parshley is seeking a second term on the council to continue her work on climate, economic recovery, and more. During her time on the council, Parshley has supported the council's vote for grocery stores with more than 250 employees to provide hazard pay to workers during the pandemic. Parshley sponsored an ordinance banning the retail sale of dogs and cats in the city limits. She also joined the unanimous vote of her colleagues on the council banning the use of chemical weapons on demonstrators last summer.

    The two candidates in this race represent a philosophical divide in local and national politics on the left. Parshley has led a steady response to community demands that some activists have decried as incrementalism. On the other side, Reed feels a serious urgency to shake up the council and address issues like police violence immediately that some leaders have called unrealistic.

    Parshley has won endorsements from current members of the city council and other elected officials, as well as several Democratic groups and unions.

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Olympia Firefighters (IAFF L468), UFCW Local 367, Boeing Machinists IAM District 751
  • Talauna Reed has dedicated herself to racial justice in Olympia. She is the founder of Justice for Yvonne and organizes with Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) and Black Leaders in Action and Solidarity in Thurston County (BLAST). She states that if elected, she would be the first Black woman serving on the Olympia City Council in more than 30 years.

    Her platform focuses on authentic engagement with marginalized Olympians. She wants to see the city defund the police department, create a citizen oversight committee, and reallocate the money to solutions such as crisis response teams, addiction health programs, and mental health programs. Reed also wants the city to institute rental discrimination protections, focus on dense growth, and support a housing authority to address the housing crisis. She emphasizes an urgent desire to see the city be more responsive to and transparent with residents.

    Reed has earned the endorsements of several progressive community groups as well as the Thurston County Democrats.

    Talauna Reed

    Talauna Reed has dedicated herself to racial justice in Olympia. She is the founder of Justice for Yvonne and organizes with Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) and Black Leaders in Action and Solidarity in Thurston County (BLAST).

    Talauna Reed

    Talauna Reed has dedicated herself to racial justice in Olympia. She is the founder of Justice for Yvonne and organizes with Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) and Black Leaders in Action and Solidarity in Thurston County (BLAST).

  • Evergreen Future
  • Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

    Payne wants to see the city acknowledge systemic racism and support the use of an equity lens in its policymaking. On housing and homelessness, Payne states that expanded transitional and permanent supportive housing will help alleviate the crisis while providing COVID relief for small businesses and rent stabilization for commercial tenants will aid the city's economic recovery.

    He also supports additional funding for body cameras, social services, mental health, addiction programs, and the city's crisis response unit. In his interview, he stated that his opinion on defunding the police was nuanced and that the city should focus on true reform, justice, and accountability.

    Payne states that if elected, he would be the first Black man to ever serve on the city council. He says that his experience as a gay, Black, former military member would bring the voice of marginalized people to the table.

    He is running against retired Air Force member and former firefighter Corey Gauny, who works as a management analyst for the state's Department of Licensing. The only issue listed in detail on his site is around homelessness. Gauny says that he would tackle the issues by providing resources around behavioral health, but does not address key issues like affordable housing or the need to provide shelter for the hundreds of people who sleep on the streets every night. He also mentions that he wants to focus on a vision of the city that centers businesses. Gauny is also using a Republican consultant, which further indicates he would bring a more conservative voice to the council.

    Payne is the best choice in this race.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Cooper and the city council have passed several significant pieces of legislation that benefit the community. Notably, he supported the Olympia Home Fund to build new supportive permanent housing, provided funding for struggling businesses and families during the pandemic, and created a regional climate plan with neighboring cities. If re-elected, Cooper states that he will focus on housing and economic recovery, twin crises that affect everyone in the community, as well as continuing conversations on criminal justice reform.

    Cooper faces a challenge from conservative Spence Weigand, an Olympia-based realtor. His three listed campaign priorities include addressing homelessness, housing, and improving the business climate. While his site doesn't go into specifics on these as of mid-October, he repeats false and misleading claims about people experiencing homelessness in Thurston County. He also criticizes efforts to clean up and supply sanitation at encampments and wants to see increased law enforcement presence and new mental health facilities. On the matter of affordable housing, he is a supporter of zoning reform on single-family zoning, as well as projects like the 478-unit West Bay Yards project, while disclosing that his real estate firm is involved in the Hardel property.

    Cooper is backed by a significant number of unions, including the Lacey and Olympia firefighters' unions and United Food and Commercial Workers Local 367, as well as by Lt. Gov. Denny Heck and a large number of county and city elected officials. His track record on the council and strong support from our partners and local leaders make him the best choice in this race.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

  • Tumwater City Council member Debbie Sullivan is running for mayor. Sullivan first joined the council in 2013. Before that, she spent a decade on the city’s planning commission, where she was chair for seven years, and worked as a project manager in the private sector. Sullivan currently chairs the General Government Committee and the Tumwater LEOFF 1 Disability Board, and volunteers with Community Youth Services.

    Since joining the council, Sullivan has been heavily focused on economic growth, including job growth programs and the redevelopment of the brewery property. If elected mayor, Sullivan's priorities will be climate action, equity and social justice work, local business support, and infrastructure and public transit improvements. Her candidacy has support from many progressive and Democratic elected leaders in the area.

    Pamela J. Hanson was first motivated to run for office in 2019 when she launched a campaign for a Tumwater City Council seat to oppose government spending and services. Now, she is challenging Sullivan for mayor with a platform of descrambling a local cable channel and providing notifications for Tumwater city meetings.

    While not a progressive, Debbie Sullivan is the best choice in this race to be Tumwater’s next mayor because of her Democratic support and her leadership experience.

    Debbie Sullivan

    Tumwater City Council member Debbie Sullivan is running for mayor. Sullivan first joined the council in 2013. Before that, she spent a decade on the city’s planning commission, where she was chair for seven years, and worked as a project manager in the private sector.

    Debbie Sullivan

    Tumwater City Council member Debbie Sullivan is running for mayor. Sullivan first joined the council in 2013. Before that, she spent a decade on the city’s planning commission, where she was chair for seven years, and worked as a project manager in the private sector.

  • Endorsed By: Housing Action Fund
  • Incumbent Angela Jefferson is running unopposed for Tumwater City Council, Position 2. Jefferson was appointed to the seat in March when Councilmember Tom Oliva vacated the spot. Outside of the council, Jefferson is a personal trainer, licensed massage therapist, and army veteran. She previously served on the Tumwater Planning Commission, the Tumwater Historical Preservation Commission, and the Lacey Parks and Recreation Commission.

    Jefferson is running on a platform that focuses on climate action, reducing homelessness, expanding affordable housing, and supporting local businesses while strategically encouraging new business. If elected, she wants to enact policy to protect the local ecosystem, work with regional partners to create permanent, secure housing for those who need it, and to work directly with small business owners to strengthen the Tumwater business community. In this race, she earned the endorsement of the county Democrats as well as a number of local progressive elected leaders and organizations.

    Jefferson would continue bringing community-focused leadership to the Tumwater City Council. She deserves your vote to retain Position 2 on the Tumwater City Council.

    Angela Jefferson

    Incumbent Angela Jefferson is running unopposed for Tumwater City Council, Position 2. Jefferson was appointed to the seat in March when Councilmember Tom Oliva vacated the spot. Outside of the council, Jefferson is a personal trainer, licensed massage therapist, and army veteran.

    Angela Jefferson

    Incumbent Angela Jefferson is running unopposed for Tumwater City Council, Position 2. Jefferson was appointed to the seat in March when Councilmember Tom Oliva vacated the spot. Outside of the council, Jefferson is a personal trainer, licensed massage therapist, and army veteran.

  • Attorney and incumbent council member Michael Althauser is running unopposed to retain Tumwater City Council, Position 5. Althauser first joined the city council in 2018. Outside of council, he works as a staff attorney at a legal aid and progressive advocacy organization and serves on the board of Washington Bus, which mobilizes voters and develops youth leaders. Althauser is also active with the local Democrats and has served on the Tumwater Planning Commission.

    In office, Althauser has prioritized action on environmental sustainability, affordable housing and reducing homelessness, small business support, and transportation infrastructure investments. He is passionate about investing in the public safety net particularly for working families, addressing housing affordability and security, redeveloping the brewery district, and strengthening local environmental protections. He has earned progressive and Democratic support in this race.

    Michael Althauser deserves your vote to retain Position 5 on the Tumwater City Council.

    Michael Althauser

    Attorney and incumbent council member Michael Althauser is running unopposed to retain Tumwater City Council, Position 5. Althauser first joined the city council in 2018.

    Michael Althauser

    Attorney and incumbent council member Michael Althauser is running unopposed to retain Tumwater City Council, Position 5. Althauser first joined the city council in 2018.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Peter Agabi is running for Position 6 on the Tumwater City Council. Agabi works in health enforcement management systems and consulted with the state Department of Health’s Certificate of Need program for 15 years.

    If elected, Agabi will focus on creating more affordable housing options, preventing homelessness, mitigating climate change, and making Tumwater safer and more inclusive. He also wants to revitalize the historic district and invest in the small business community. Additionally, Agabi aims to build on the progress made by the Thurston Climate Action Team and the Thurston Climate Mitigation Plan to build a sustainable future for Tumwater. To get this work done, Agabi wants to partner with local tribes and engage Tumwater residents to have their voices heard.

    Agabi is running against Alex Rossiter, the manager of a mountainboarding shop. He was appointed to and now serves on the Tumwater Historic Preservation Commission as the vice chair. This is Rossiter’s first race and he is prioritizing building a skatepark, designating the entire brewery district as historic, exploring the benefits of regionalization, and supporting small businesses.

    Peter Agabi is the best choice in this race because of his progressive values and his commitment to collaborate with all stakeholders. He deserves your vote for Tumwater City Council, Position 6.

    Peter Agabi

    Peter Agabi is running for Position 6 on the Tumwater City Council. Agabi works in health enforcement management systems and consulted with the state Department of Health’s Certificate of Need program for 15 years.

    Peter Agabi

    Peter Agabi is running for Position 6 on the Tumwater City Council. Agabi works in health enforcement management systems and consulted with the state Department of Health’s Certificate of Need program for 15 years.

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below school district races on your ballot.

  • Darcy Huffman, a communications and resource director for her church, is running for Olympia School Board in District 3. The former finance professional challenged an incumbent Republican in the state’s 35th Legislative District last year. Huffman currently also works on the Affordable Housing Taskforce for a coalition of Washington churches and as a member of the Quixote Communities board, which works to provide permanent supportive housing for people struggling with homelessness.

    If elected, Huffman wants to make sure that Olympia’s public schools are supportive learning environments for all students. Her platform includes strengthening lines of communications with parents, prioritizing the emotional and social wellbeing of students, funding essential skills learning, and closing the opportunity gap. Huffman’s campaign to create a more equitable school system is supported by a large number of local progressive and Democratic organizations and leaders.

    Wealth advisor Mark Boyer is running against Huffman on a vague platform that highlights no priorities or policy. He was a part of a conservative group that campaigned to bring back in-person learning earlier this year before it was safe to do so.

    We recommend Darcy Huffman because of her progressive background, strong community support, and clear vision for the District 3 director position.

    Darcy Huffman

    Darcy Huffman, a communications and resource director for her church, is running for Olympia School Board in District 3. The former finance professional challenged an incumbent Republican in the state’s 35th Legislative District last year.

    Darcy Huffman

    Darcy Huffman, a communications and resource director for her church, is running for Olympia School Board in District 3. The former finance professional challenged an incumbent Republican in the state’s 35th Legislative District last year.

  • Incumbent Director Scott Clifthorne is running to retain his seat serving District 5 on the Olympia School Board. Clifthorne was first elected in 2017 and now serves as president. Clifthorne works as a negotiator for Teamster 117 and was formerly the president of the Lincoln Community Council. Previously, he was a member of the City of Olympia Community Workgroup on Homelessness.

    During Clifthorne’s time on the board, Olympia was able to secure PE, art, and music teachers in all elementary schools beginning in Fall 2021. In this race, Clifthorne wants to continue expanding student opportunities, deepen lines of communication for families and schools, and address systemic inequities particularly relating to race, disability, and socioeconomic status. With three kids enrolled in Olympia public schools and widespread support from community leaders and organizations, Clifthorne will continue to bring progressive values to the board.

    Challenging Clifthorne is Don Mitchell, a nurse and assistant professor of nursing. Mitchell advocated for school re-opening earlier than was safe, and he is now running on a reactionary platform that ignores scientific-informed, school board decisions. He also wants to continue valuing standardized tests despite ample research that shows that they are not an effective assessment of student success. Mitchell is not a progressive choice.

    We recommend Scott Clifthorne in this race because of his school board experience and inclusive plan for the school district.

    Scott Clifthorne

    Incumbent Director Scott Clifthorne is running to retain his seat serving District 5 on the Olympia School Board. Clifthorne was first elected in 2017 and now serves as president. Clifthorne works as a negotiator for Teamster 117 and was formerly the president of the Lincoln Community Council.

    Scott Clifthorne

    Incumbent Director Scott Clifthorne is running to retain his seat serving District 5 on the Olympia School Board. Clifthorne was first elected in 2017 and now serves as president. Clifthorne works as a negotiator for Teamster 117 and was formerly the president of the Lincoln Community Council.