• VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • Nicole Ng-A-Qui is running for Snohomish County Council in District 1. Ng-A-Qui has owned a small business for nearly 20 years and has experience working in forestry and restoration ecology as well as education. Additionally, she served on the policy advisory council for the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program for two years.

    Ng-A-Qui’s campaign is focused on making Snohomish County a model for sustainable development, keeping forests and watersheds healthy while protecting jobs and keeping the budget balanced. She is endorsed by local leaders including county council member Megan Dunn and Rep. Emily Wicks as well as community groups including the Sauk-Suiattle Tribe and the Snohomish County Democrats.

    Ng-A-Qui is challenging conservative incumbent Nate Nehring, who was elected in 2017. Nehring is campaigning to criminalize addiction and oppose greater investments in community services that would provide alternatives to law enforcement while reducing mass incarceration. Nehring is supported by staunch Republicans including Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Dave Reichert.

    Ng-A-Qui is the best choice in the race for Snohomish County Council in District 1 and deserves your vote.

    Nicole Ng-A-Qui

    Nicole Ng-A-Qui is running for Snohomish County Council in District 1. Ng-A-Qui has owned a small business for nearly 20 years and has experience working in forestry and restoration ecology as well as education.

    Nicole Ng-A-Qui

    Nicole Ng-A-Qui is running for Snohomish County Council in District 1. Ng-A-Qui has owned a small business for nearly 20 years and has experience working in forestry and restoration ecology as well as education.

  • Apoyadas Por: Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, SEPAC , Snohomish County Democratic Central Committee, Sauk Suiattle Tribe
  • Democrat

    Jared Mead

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term. Last year, Mead chaired the Regional Law & Justice and Human Services committee on the council.

    Mead is a strong progressive who has worked to prohibit discrimination, fight the climate crisis, and secure an energy-independent state for future generations. His campaign priorities include reducing traffic and pollution through transit-oriented development and protecting the county's urban growth areas. In this race, he is supported by many local progressive leaders and our partner organizations.

    Mead faces a challenge from Republican Brenda Carrington. She has a business background in construction and landscaping and lost to Mead in last year's election. Carrington opposes new funding for essential services and disagrees with efforts to redirect some funding to community safety and prevention.

    Mead is the clear choice for Snohomish County Council in District 4.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Washington Conservation Voters, Housing Action Fund , Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, 38th and 44th Legislative District Democrats
  • Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5. Donaghy serves on the board of directors for the Communities of Color Coalition and regularly volunteers to provide emergency services and disaster relief to the Snohomish community.

    Donaghy has spent her professional life advocating for a high quality of life for all Snohomish residents. She is a strong progressive whose campaign priorities include COVID-19 recovery that incorporates community support, housing security, justice reform, and maintaining green space. She is endorsed by many of our partner organizations and a number of progressive elected leaders in this race.

    Low is an outspoken Republican on the council who voted in June against $4 per hour hazard pay for grocery store workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Earlier this spring, he badgered and voted against the appointment of a young woman of color to the Regional Law and Justice Council because he disagreed with some of her social media posts.

    Donaghy would bring a much-needed progressive perspective to the council and is the obvious choice for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

  • Apoyadas Por: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, Sage Leaders, Sierra Club, SEPAC, Washington Conservation Voters, Housing Action Fund , Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, Snohomish County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below races on your ballot.

  • Incumbent David Simpson is running to retain his seat as Commissioner of District 1 for the Port of Everett, which he was elected to in 2019 to fill an unexpired term. Simpson also works as a member of the Committee for Housing and Community Development. He has an extensive record in public service, having served as an Everett City Council member, a Washington state representative for the 38th Legislative District, and a member of the Snohomish County Charter Review Commission representing county council District 2. Simpson has also worked in the aviation industry as a manufacturing engineer and aviation mechanic.

    Simpson's campaign platform prioritizes economic development, protecting the environment, and living wages. He has a slate of projects underway, including the Waterfront Place Central Development, that he believes will help Everett and the port recover from the community and economic impact of the pandemic.

    Simpson faces a challenge from Scott Murphy, an Everett City Council member since 2013. Murphy strongly emphasizes his business background and has previously boasted of expanding Everett’s police budget during his time as a council member despite public support to reallocate some of those funds to community alternatives. If elected, he would push the port in a more politically conservative direction.

    Snohomish County has benefitted from Simpson's commitment to bringing community-minded leadership to the port. David Simpson is the clear choice for Port of Everett Commissioner in District 1.

    David Simpson

    Enviado por alexwhite el Jue, 30/09/2021 - 14:53

    Incumbent David Simpson is running to retain his seat as Commissioner of District 1 for the Port of Everett, which he was elected to in 2019 to fill an unexpired term. Simpson also works as a member of the Committee for Housing and Community Development.

    David Simpson

    Enviado por alexwhite el Jue, 30/09/2021 - 14:53

    Incumbent David Simpson is running to retain his seat as Commissioner of District 1 for the Port of Everett, which he was elected to in 2019 to fill an unexpired term. Simpson also works as a member of the Committee for Housing and Community Development.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy. Currently, she works as a co-chair on Bothell’s Anti-Racist Communities team and is a parent member of the Northshore School District's Ethnic Studies pilot program. As a Harvard Business School graduate and a Vietnamese American from an immigrant family, Tran wants to bring her unique perspective to create community-driven solutions that make Bothell a more equitable place.

    Tran believes housing and food are human rights and would work on policies to address housing and food insecurity in Bothell. She wants to expand the RADAR program, a de-escalation initiative with Bothell police that seeks to avoid the use of force when responding to people with behavioral health issues or developmental disabilities. She would also look into investing in other community-based public safety initiatives. Tran is committed to supporting Bothell’s small business community and wants to provide grants and career pathways for business owners who are people of color, women, veterans, and LGBTQ+.

    Tran is challenging incumbent council member and current deputy mayor Jeanne Zornes, a moderate Republican who has been in office since 2017. Zornes is also a substitute teacher for Northshore public schools and a freelance photographer. She is campaigning to build up Bothell's business sector and increase law enforcement funding rather than invest in community alternatives. Despite claiming to run a completely nonpartisan race, Zornes has endorsed other conservatives this year.

    Tran will bring strong, progressive leadership to the council. She deserves your vote for Bothell City Council, Position 1.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

  • Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School. She is also a parent to three children on the autism spectrum whom she homeschools.

    Alderks is running on a detailed platform that includes generating equitable small business growth, investing in affordable housing to lessen the growing wealth gap in Bothell, and building an environmentally sustainable future for the area through the COVID recovery. As a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell, Alderks has already begun advancing equity in her community. If elected, she wants to expand the RADAR (Response Awareness, De-escalation, and Referral) program, which helps Bothell police respond to health emergencies without the use of force.

    Also in this race is incumbent Rosemary McAuliffe, a longtime Democratic elected official who was elected to the city council in 2017 after serving as a state senator for over a decade. Before that, she spent 14 years on the Northshore School Board. As of mid-October, McAuliffe has not yet shared a detailed platform in this race but mentioned that she wants to support small businesses through recovery from the pandemic.

    With strong progressive values and partner support, Alderks is the best choice in this race for Position 3 on Bothell’s city council.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

  • Matt Kuehn is running for Bothell City Council, Position 5. He serves as Rep. Davina Duerr's legislative aide and previously worked for Sen. Guy Palumbo. His platform includes expanding the park and trail systems, creating more walkable neighborhoods, and increasing affordable housing. Kuehn also wants to reduce traffic congestion and expand bike infrastructure.

    Kuehn is running against Ben Mahnkey. He is an Amazon employee running on a platform that praises law enforcement without offering any mention of increased community accountability or reform. He also fails to offer solutions for how to fund essential services in Bothell that everyone relies on.

    Kuehn is the best choice in the race for Bothell City Council, Position 5.

    Matt Kuehn

    Matt Kuehn is running for Bothell City Council, Position 5. He serves as Rep. Davina Duerr's legislative aide and previously worked for Sen. Guy Palumbo. His platform includes expanding the park and trail systems, creating more walkable neighborhoods, and increasing affordable housing.

    Matt Kuehn

    Matt Kuehn is running for Bothell City Council, Position 5. He serves as Rep. Davina Duerr's legislative aide and previously worked for Sen. Guy Palumbo. His platform includes expanding the park and trail systems, creating more walkable neighborhoods, and increasing affordable housing.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club
  • Community organizer Rami Al-Kabra is running for Bothell City Council, Position 7. Al-Kabra serves as a member of the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board and a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell. As a Palestinian Muslim, he has been a strong community advocate and has founded both the Washington chapter of the largest Islamic civil rights organization in the nation (CAIR) and the Islamic Center of Bothell. In 2020, he helped to organize the March for Black Lives in Bothell when 200 residents showed up to call for systemic change.

    In this race, Al-Kabra is running to bring sustainable and equitable progress to Bothell. His platform includes green city planning, budget reform, amplifying human services, and small business support. Specifically, he wants to advance housing affordability projects with eco-friendly building practices in order to make Bothell more sustainable and more affordable at the same time. He also wants to bring more constituent voices into discussions about the budget to ensure that the funds are being used in the best interest of the community.

    Al-Kabra is running against Beca Nistrian, who owns a Bothell coffee shop and writes children’s books. Her social media presence leans more conservative and she is supporting other conservative candidates this year. 

    Rami Al-Kabra deserves your vote for Bothell City Council, Position 7 to make Bothell a place where all residents can thrive.

    Rami Al-Kabra

    Community organizer Rami Al-Kabra is running for Bothell City Council, Position 7. Al-Kabra serves as a member of the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board and a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell.

    Rami Al-Kabra

    Community organizer Rami Al-Kabra is running for Bothell City Council, Position 7. Al-Kabra serves as a member of the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board and a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell.

  • Apoyadas Por: OneAmerica Votes, Sage Leaders, Housing Action Fund, Civic Alliance for a Progressive Economy (CAPE) Rating: 5 stars , King and Snohomish County Democrats, Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Evergreen Future
  • Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board. She has extensive community leadership experience including working for the Edmonds Senior Center, Edmonds Chamber of Commerce, and the Edmonds Sister City Commission.

    In this campaign, Crank is prioritizing housing affordability, transparent and responsive government, thoughtful growth, and public safety initiatives to reduce gun violence. She has proposed green building practices and constructing mixed-use developments to make sure that Edmonds can grow while remaining committed to environmental sustainability and economic diversity. Crank is running a strong campaign and has earned endorsements from progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Crank is running against incumbent council member Kristiana Johnson. First elected in 2012, Johnson has made environmental protections a focus of her time on the council. Unfortunately, she sent a racially insensitive email last year regarding federal grants for white-owned and Asian-owned businesses that drew criticism from her fellow council members. She has since apologized, but the situation raises concerns about her ability to engage an equity lens and to serve all Edmonds residents.

    Alicia Crank is the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Position 1 on the Edmonds City Council.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

  • Will Chen, a corporate auditor and small business owner, is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 2. Chen currently serves with many community groups, including on the Edmonds Citizens' Housing Commission and as a board member of the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce. Earlier this year, he helped to organize the Edmonds Rally Against Hate in response to the racist shooting in Atlanta.

    Chen wants to make sure that municipal government is working efficiently and equitably so that all Edmonds residents can thrive, and he would utilize his background in holding corporations accountable and promoting responsible governance to do it. His policy priorities include climate action, small business support, and infrastructure upgrades (including to the Highway 99 corridor). Chen is supported by local progressive elected officials in this race.

    Also in this race is Janelle Cass, a former bioenvironmental engineer for the Air Force and small business owner who serves on the board of directors for the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce. Cass' conservative platform prioritizes the interests of businesses and opposes zoning changes, keeping housing out of reach for those who need more affordable options.

    Will Chen is the best choice for Edmonds City Council, Position 2.

    Will Chen, a corporate auditor and small business owner, is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 2. Chen currently serves with many community groups, including on the Edmonds Citizens' Housing Commission and as a board member of the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce. Earlier this year, he helped to organize the Edmonds Rally Against Hate in response to the racist shooting in Atlanta.

    Chen wants to make sure that municipal government is working efficiently and equitably so that all Edmonds residents can thrive, and he would utilize his background in holding corporations accountable and promoting responsible governance to do it. His policy priorities include climate action, small business support, and infrastructure upgrades (including to the Highway 99 corridor). Chen is supported by local progressive elected officials in this race.

    Also in this race is Janelle Cass, a former bioenvironmental engineer for the Air Force and small business owner who serves on the board of directors for the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce. Cass' conservative platform prioritizes the interests of businesses and opposes zoning changes, keeping housing out of reach for those who need more affordable options.

    Will Chen is the best choice for Edmonds City Council, Position 2.

    Will Chen

    Will Chen, a corporate auditor and small business owner, is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 2. Chen currently serves with many community groups, including on the Edmonds Citizens' Housing Commission and as a board member of the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce.

  • Adrienne Fraley-Monillas is running for re-election to Edmonds City Council, Position 3. Fraley-Monillas serves as president of the Snohomish County Health District, volunteers at the Edmonds Senior Center, and works on the city’s Diversity Commission, of which she was a founding member.

    In her three terms as a council member, she has proven her commitment to health care opportunities for everyone and protecting the environment. Fraley-Monillas has supported achieving sanctuary city status through Edmonds' Safe City Resolution, developing public green spaces, and investing in infrastructure to keep Edmonds safe. Going forward, updating Highway 99 and advancing diversity and equity in Edmonds remain her long-term priorities. She is endorsed by a wide range of progressive leaders and organizations in this race.

    Challenging Fraley-Monillas is Neil Tibbott, the executive director of a Christian leadership organization. Tibbott’s campaign emphasizes an exclusionary housing policy that would make Edmonds less affordable. He claims he wants to bring “political climate change” to the city council, which would mean cutting community programs and slowing progress on issues facing Edmonds residents.

    Fraley-Monillas is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote for Edmonds City Council, Position 3.

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas is running for re-election to Edmonds City Council, Position 3. Fraley-Monillas serves as president of the Snohomish County Health District, volunteers at the Edmonds Senior Center, and works on the city’s Diversity Commission, of which she was a founding member.

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas is running for re-election to Edmonds City Council, Position 3. Fraley-Monillas serves as president of the Snohomish County Health District, volunteers at the Edmonds Senior Center, and works on the city’s Diversity Commission, of which she was a founding member.

  • Apoyadas Por: Fuse, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Her tenure as mayor, which began in 2017, came at a difficult moment in the city's financial history. Washington cities are required by law to produce a balanced budget. With a deficit of $18 million for the city, up from $15 million inherited before her term due to pandemic-related causes, Franklin and the city council cut costs to balance the budget. Their budget closed service locations like the Carl Gipson Senior Center and the Forest Park Swim Center, reduced library hours, and eliminated city-sponsored events like fireworks, the animal farm, and flower festival, along with laying off or voluntary separating from over 130 employees. Disappointingly, despite calls by Black activists to reduce or move funds from the police department budget into more community services, the police budget was not cut like most other departments. Franklin states that the department's body camera program and training efforts are meeting the changes demanded by activists.

    Budget aside, Franklin has worked hard in the pandemic to administer pandemic relief funds and issued a stay-home directive in the early days of the COVID crisis.

    Franklin's opponent is Steve Oss, president of the Everett Transit Union. Oss does not have a website or detailed policy proposals as of mid-October. He states in a local interview that he believes businesses need support and the city's deficit needs to be addressed.

    While Franklin is fairly moderate, her endorsements on both the conservative and progressive ends of the spectrum represent local faith in her second run, and she is the only viable choice in this race.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

  • Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

    Fosse has accomplished much in the community and beyond, especially for environmental causes. She led neighbor volunteers in an education campaign about toxic soil from the Asparco copper smelter, and was awarded $5 million from the Department of Ecology for the environmental justice cleanup of the Delta neighborhood. She was also awarded as Conservation Leader of the Year in 2020 from the Snohomish Conservation District for her work in promoting organic gardening and green pest management.

    Fosse wants to harness her environmental experience into a campaign that centers the wellness and quality of life of Everett residents. Her priorities include working on equitable COVID recovery, pushing the city forward on sustainability, and leading on housing solutions.

    We lean towards Fosse for Everett City Council, District 1.

    Mary Fosse

    Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

    Mary Fosse

    Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

  • Paul Roberts was first elected to the council in 2006 and is now running for his fifth term in office. Because the new District 1 will contain so many of the city's water resources, we believe it's important to elect a candidate from this district who will focus on the environment and conservation.

    Roberts has had a long career in public service. He currently serves as chair of the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency Board and vice chair on the board of Sound Transit. He also works with the Association of Washington Cities on climate change and sustainability. It won't surprise voters that one of Roberts' goals if re-elected will be reducing the city's greenhouse gas emissions and supporting green economic development. He also wants see more moderate- and low-income housing to alleviate the crisis in both homelessness and the overall lack of affordable options. Roberts joined fellow Everett City Council member Liz Vogeli as the two council members who were in favor of supportive housing for students experiencing homelessness and their families, though he later supported the no-sit, no-lie policy that criminalized homelessness in a 10-block area in north Everett.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 1 includes northwest Everett, all of the Delta and Riverside neighborhoods, the northeast half of Bayside, and a small area of the westernmost part of Port Gardner. It also includes the port, Navy base, Snohomish River, and Port Gardner Bay.

    Paul Roberts

    Paul Roberts was first elected to the council in 2006 and is now running for his fifth term in office.

    Paul Roberts

    Paul Roberts was first elected to the council in 2006 and is now running for his fifth term in office.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Paula Rhyne is currently working as a legislative aide for Snohomish County Council member Megan Dunn. She has also worked on the King County Council for Rod Dembowski and then-council member Bob Ferguson. Her campaign is driven by a desire to pilot the city towards more affordable housing, stronger environmental protections, and an economic recovery that leaves no one behind.

    Rhyne says that she will focus on supporting business owners through this phase of the pandemic, including preparing for more remote work and online shopping. She states that when the eviction moratorium ends, the city will need greater access to affordable and middle-income housing, and wants the council to incentivize the development of more moderate multi-family housing developments. She is a staunch supporter of investing in the community before punitive law enforcement measures. On one hand, that means providing police officers with more support staff to respond to nonviolent calls. That also means preventing crime, including nonviolent crimes caused by poverty, before they happen. Education and a focus on housing those without homes are two other core components of her campaign. Rhyne is committed to instituting equity-driven decision making and has centered her campaign around working together to improve the city.

    Voters in District 2 have two good choices when it comes to picking a council member this year. We lean towards Rhyne for her progressive agenda and her support from our partners.

    Paula Denise Rhyne

    Paula Rhyne is currently working as a legislative aide for Snohomish County Council member Megan Dunn. She has also worked on the King County Council for Rod Dembowski and then-council member Bob Ferguson.

    Paula Denise Rhyne

    Paula Rhyne is currently working as a legislative aide for Snohomish County Council member Megan Dunn. She has also worked on the King County Council for Rod Dembowski and then-council member Bob Ferguson.

  • Greg Lineberry is an Army veteran and a captain in the Everett Police Department. He is a longtime member of the Everett Rotary Club and serves on the board for Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County. He is running to increase affordable housing and help small businesses recover from the pandemic. Like Rhyne, Lineberry also believes that the time is now to adapt the methods of law enforcement to improve safety for officers and for the community. Some of the changes he's supported in this regard include eliminating the "hog-tie" restraint, increasing police academy training hours, and limiting police vehicle pursuits. If elected, he will retire from the police department before joining the council.

    Lineberry's willingness to reform public safety has earned him a solid roster of community support, including from local Democratic groups, four Everett council members, and several state House representatives and senators.

    Gregory Michael Lineberry

    Greg Lineberry is an Army veteran and a captain in the Everett Police Department. He is a longtime member of the Everett Rotary Club and serves on the board for Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County.

    Gregory Michael Lineberry

    Greg Lineberry is an Army veteran and a captain in the Everett Police Department. He is a longtime member of the Everett Rotary Club and serves on the board for Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County.

  • Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3. He worked as a firefighter for more than three decades and has served on various boards in the community and at the state level, including as a board member of the Snohomish County Red Cross and on Washington's Council of Fire Fighters. He currently works for Snohomish County Treasurer Brian Sullivan and as an associate faculty member at Everett Community College.

    Schwab states that the police and fire departments should be fully staffed and funded. He notes that Everett has one of the highest rates of COVID infections in the state, and supports expanding paid sick leave and family leave. He also supports fast-tracking the light rail system to stimulate economic development downtown and along Evergreen Way, promoting housing density, and improving citywide energy efficiency among other considerations.

    Schwab is running against Lacey Sauvageau, a 911 dispatcher for Snohomish County. She previously ran as a Democrat against now Rep. Emily Wicks in the 38th Legislative District. Her campaign website is not accessible as of mid-October and detailed policy proposals are not available. Sauvageau's official voters' guide statement outlines her priorities as securing affordable housing, empowering the police, eliminating "wasteful spending," and supporting mental health for people experiencing homelessness.

    Given that the city cut nearly every department aside from law enforcement in the last few months, we would like to see Schwab's policies on law enforcement evolve into a model that prioritizes investing more into human services. Nevertheless, Schwab is the best candidate in this race.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 3 includes all of Boulevard Bluffs, Harborview Seahurst Glenhaven, View Ridge-Madison, Evergreen, and the southernmost tip of South Forest Park.

    Don Schwab

    Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3.

    Don Schwab

    Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals. She was the lone no-vote for the "no-sit, no-lie" ordinance that passed this February, which criminalizes sitting or laying on the sidewalk in a roughly 10-block area, a policy which national legal advocacy organizations called "cruel and unusual punishment" for those who will be fined or jailed because they can't afford shelter. She has also voted to provide supportive housing for homeless students.

    If re-elected, Vogeli aims to incentivize more affordable and climate-friendly housing, support much-needed access to the library, advocate for de-escalation and mental health experts to work alongside law enforcement, and push for more sustainable transit. She enjoys strong support from a wide breadth of progressive advocacy organizations, including health care workers, environmental organizations, and labor unions.

    Challenging Vogeli is Tommie Rubatino, a teacher and pastor. His top campaign priorities are addressing homelessness, neighborhood safety, and supporting businesses. However, as of mid-October he does not have detailed policy proposals available on his website, and there is nothing that particularly points to a progressive agenda. His endorsements by Republican elected officials imply that Rubatino would lead from a more conservative angle if elected.

    Vogeli has served the people of Everett well with her progressive vision for the city. We strongly recommend a vote to re-elect Liz Vogeli for Everett City Council in District 4.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 4 includes the neighborhoods of Westmont and Holly.

    Liz Vogeli

    Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals.

    Liz Vogeli

    Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals.

  • Demi Chatters is an education advocate who has spent over a decade working to bring inclusive and quality education to public school students. She is deeply embedded in the community as a member of the Snohomish Human Rights Commission and Evergreen Middle School Equity Team. She also serves on the board for Seattle Suns, a youth sports organization that focuses on youth experiencing poverty, and is a committee member for LGBTQ organization NOLOSE.

    If elected, Chatters wants to advocate for an equitable and sustainable recovery from COVID that benefits everyone in the city. To that end, she will prioritize infrastructure investments, work on sustainable business development, and champion workers' rights through fair collective bargaining. She notes that the increasing struggle of residents to secure housing should be met with additional services in the form of mental health care, encouraging more housing options, and moving the unsheltered towards more housing options. Specifically for District 5, Chatters wants to see the completion of the Silver Lake trail, reinforced road stability, and opportunities for parks within neighborhoods.

    Chatters is running against Ben Zarlingo, a communications technology consultant and a leadership member of the Silver Lake Neighborhood Association. He intends to address the city's enormous $16.5 million deficit with a somewhat inconsistent strategy of avoiding cuts to services and revenue increases through taxes while leaning more on welcoming new businesses. Zarlingo's other priorities include pairing housing and mental health treatment for people experiencing homelessness and supporting family services like the Baker Heights project.

    Demi Chatters has the support of several local progressive officials and is committed to building an Everett that supports working families. She is by far the best choice in this race.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 5 includes parts of the neighborhoods of Twin Creeks, Westmont, Cascade View, and Pinehurst Beverly Park, as well as all of Silver Creek.

    Demi Chatters

    Demi Chatters is an education advocate who has spent over a decade working to bring inclusive and quality education to public school students. She is deeply embedded in the community as a member of the Snohomish Human Rights Commission and Evergreen Middle School Equity Team.

    Demi Chatters

    Demi Chatters is an education advocate who has spent over a decade working to bring inclusive and quality education to public school students. She is deeply embedded in the community as a member of the Snohomish Human Rights Commission and Evergreen Middle School Equity Team.

  • Joyce Copley is running for Position 2 on the Lake Stevens City Council to bring positive change to the city. Copley is a retired Boeing engineer who now works for the city of Shoreline’s Planning & Community Development department. She has community leadership experience through her involvement with the Kaiser Permanente Patient Advisory Board, diversity and inclusion work with the city of Shoreline, and Lake Stevens equity training.

    Copley has a progressive campaign platform that includes building stronger communication between residents and the council, working closely with first responders and law enforcement to improve safety for all residents, and making city development choices that prioritize affordability and sustainability. She believes that her primary responsibility as a council member will be to listen to her constituents and make policy decisions that contribute to the greater good for all. In this race, Copley has earned an impressive roster of progressive support from elected leaders and the county’s labor council.

    Copley is challenging incumbent Gary Petershagen, who is running for re-election to the council where he has served since 2017. His professional experience is in real estate and he currently heads a local inspection company. Petershagen has worked on the city’s Planning Commission and the Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce. He is running on a conservative platform that prioritizes business interests above community needs.

    Joyce Copley is the best choice in this race and has earned your vote for Position 2 on the Lake Stevens City Council.

    Joyce Copley is running for Position 2 on the Lake Stevens City Council to bring positive change to the city. Copley is a retired Boeing engineer who now works for the city of Shoreline’s Planning & Community Development department. She has community leadership experience through her involvement with the Kaiser Permanente Patient Advisory Board, diversity and inclusion work with the city of Shoreline, and Lake Stevens equity training.

    Copley has a progressive campaign platform that includes building stronger communication between residents and the council, working closely with first responders and law enforcement to improve safety for all residents, and making city development choices that prioritize affordability and sustainability. She believes that her primary responsibility as a council member will be to listen to her constituents and make policy decisions that contribute to the greater good for all. In this race, Copley has earned an impressive roster of progressive support from elected leaders and the county’s labor council.

    Copley is challenging incumbent Gary Petershagen, who is running for re-election to the council where he has served since 2017. His professional experience is in real estate and he currently heads a local inspection company. Petershagen has worked on the city’s Planning Commission and the Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce. He is running on a conservative platform that prioritizes business interests above community needs.

    Joyce Copley is the best choice in this race and has earned your vote for Position 2 on the Lake Stevens City Council.

    Joyce Copley

    Joyce Copley is running for Position 2 on the Lake Stevens City Council to bring positive change to the city. Copley is a retired Boeing engineer who now works for the city of Shoreline’s Planning & Community Development department.

  • Jessica Wadhams, a community advocate and mother, is running for Position 6 on the Lake Stevens City Council. Wadhams has a professional background in retail and management, and she recently helped to found Lake Stevens Allies for BIPOC. By leading with progressive values and an equity lens, she wants to make Lake Stevens a better place for all residents to live and work.

    Wadhams wants to invest in infrastructure and public safety through sidewalk upgrades, bike lane expansion, and other road improvements. She also wants to provide support for small businesses that have struggled during the recent economic downturn and represent an important part of the Lake Stevens community. Wadham’s leadership and bid for office are endorsed by an extensive slate of Democratic organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Incumbent Steve Ewing is running to keep his seat on the council, which he first joined in 2019. Ewing works for the state's Department of Corrections and previously served on the city’s Planning Commission and the Homeowners Association. He is running on a right-of-center campaign to increase police funding despite crime rates being on the decline and the critical need for funding in other public services.

    Jessica Wadhams is the best choice for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 6. She deserves your vote to bring positive change to the council.

    Jessica Wadhams

    Jessica Wadhams, a community advocate and mother, is running for Position 6 on the Lake Stevens City Council. Wadhams has a professional background in retail and management, and she recently helped to found Lake Stevens Allies for BIPOC.

    Jessica Wadhams

    Jessica Wadhams, a community advocate and mother, is running for Position 6 on the Lake Stevens City Council. Wadhams has a professional background in retail and management, and she recently helped to found Lake Stevens Allies for BIPOC.

  • Apoyadas Por: Washington Conservation Voters , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Joseph Jensen is running for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7. Jensen is a consultant for technology companies and serves as the chairman of the Technology Committees for both the 44th Legislative District Democrats and the Snohomish County Democrats. Jensen lives in Lake Stevens with his wife, who manages the city’s Farmers Market.

    Jensen is running to build a better Lake Stevens community for all. Among his campaign priorities are investing in infrastructure, caretaking of public green spaces, and making broadband more widely accessible. Jensen wants to work to make ​​local government more accountable, transparent, and accessible to community members. Earlier this year, he used his platform to share scientific information about the vaccines and encourage Lake Stevens residents to get vaccinated. In this race, Jensen has the support of some of our partner organizations and progressive leaders.

    Jensen is challenging incumbent council member Marcus Tageant, a Marine veteran with a property management business. Now the council president, he was first elected to this position in 2009 and unsuccessfully ran for mayor in 2015. He is running on a more conservative platform that doesn't reflect the changing needs of the rapidly growing community.

    Jensen is the best choice for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7.

    Joseph Jensen

    Joseph Jensen is running for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7. Jensen is a consultant for technology companies and serves as the chairman of the Technology Committees for both the 44th Legislative District Democrats and the Snohomish County Democrats.

    Joseph Jensen

    Joseph Jensen is running for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7. Jensen is a consultant for technology companies and serves as the chairman of the Technology Committees for both the 44th Legislative District Democrats and the Snohomish County Democrats.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club
  • Former Lynnwood City Council member Shirley Sutton is running for Position 1. Sutton served on the council from 2015 to 2019 and was previously the executive director of diversity affairs at Edmonds Community College. She has also served as the chair of the Neighborhood Demographics Diversity Commission in Lynnwood and has experience as a Democratic precinct committee officer.

    Sutton is running on a very progressive platform that includes police accountability, civil rights, climate justice, and affordable housing. She wants to improve public transportation by introducing a town shuttle which would help to build community and lower crime rates. Sutton also wants to work on housing affordability and to make housing more accessible to all income-earners. She is committed to climate action with a ten-year vision that includes municipal carbon neutrality, making all city vehicles electric or hybrid, zero waste, and continued access to public green spaces. In this race, Sutton has earned the endorsement of the Snohomish County Democrats.

    Small business owner Nick Coelho is also running for Position 1. His priorities include affordable housing, making Lynnwood walkable and managing growth, and investing in parks and public green spaces. He has served on the South Lynnwood Neighborhood Co-Design Committee and as the chair of the city’s Parks and Recreation Advisory Board since 2020.

    We recommend Shirley Sutton because of her proven progressive leadership and her ample community support in this race.

    Shirley Sutton

    Former Lynnwood City Council member Shirley Sutton is running for Position 1. Sutton served on the council from 2015 to 2019 and was previously the executive director of diversity affairs at Edmonds Community College.

    Shirley Sutton

    Former Lynnwood City Council member Shirley Sutton is running for Position 1. Sutton served on the council from 2015 to 2019 and was previously the executive director of diversity affairs at Edmonds Community College.

  • Apoyadas Por: SEPAC
  • Community leader Naz Lashgari is running for Lynnwood City Council, Position 2. Most recently, Lashgari served as the chair of Lynnwood’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Commission. She also worked for the Community Health Center during the pandemic in order to support marginalized communities through the public health crisis. She wants to use her management expertise and her background in equity work to build a better Lynnwood for everyone.

    Previously, Lashgari spearheaded the “All Are Welcome” campaign and is dedicated to celebrating Lynnwood’s multiculturalism while working towards equity. If elected, she will continue working on issues including homelessness, housing, health care, and safety. Lashgari believes it is crucial that all Lynnwood residents feel that their voice matters.

    Lashgari is challenging incumbent councilmember Patrick Decker, who was appointed to the Lynnwood City Council this April in order to fill the seat vacated by Ian Cotton. Decker works in finance at Microsoft and has served as chair on the city’s Planning Commission. He is running on a more conservative platform and, disappointingly, Decker has made divisive and insulting comments about local residents experiencing homelessness.

    We need leaders who will bring the people of Lynnwood together to address the complex challenges facing the city. Naz Lashgari is the clear choice for Lynnwood City Council, Position 2.

    Naz Lashgari

    Community leader Naz Lashgari is running for Lynnwood City Council, Position 2. Most recently, Lashgari served as the chair of Lynnwood’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Commission.

    Naz Lashgari

    Community leader Naz Lashgari is running for Lynnwood City Council, Position 2. Most recently, Lashgari served as the chair of Lynnwood’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Commission.

  • Joshua Binda is running for Position 3 on the Lynnwood City Council. Binda is an Edmonds College alum and has professional experience as an aerospace mechanic at Boeing and in cybersecurity at Microsoft. He has extensive community leadership experience and chairs the Lynnwood Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Commission. Additionally, Binda serves on the boards of the WA-GRO Foundation and the League of Women Voters of Snohomish County.

    If elected, Binda’s priorities include affordable housing, community budgeting, pedestrian and transit accessibility, drug counseling, and environmental protections. He will pursue this progressive agenda by leveraging his relationship with community members and drawing on his local leadership experience. Binda's inclusive platform has earned him a long list of endorsements from local leaders.

    Binda is running against former Lynnwood Councilmember Lisa Utter. Utter served on the council from 1998 until 2009 and also worked on the Community Transit Board during that time. Until 2019, she was the executive director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, Snohomish County. While not conservative, Utter lacks Binda's ambitious vision for Lynnwood's future.

    We recommend Joshua Binda because of the support he has earned from our progressive partners.

    Joshua Binda

    Joshua Binda is running for Position 3 on the Lynnwood City Council. Binda is an Edmonds College alum and has professional experience as an aerospace mechanic at Boeing and in cybersecurity at Microsoft.

    Joshua Binda

    Joshua Binda is running for Position 3 on the Lynnwood City Council. Binda is an Edmonds College alum and has professional experience as an aerospace mechanic at Boeing and in cybersecurity at Microsoft.

  • Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for Position 1 on the Marysville City Council. She has served the public as a representative with the Women’s Law Caucus in Snohomish County from 2012 to 2015. Outside of elected work, Gobel has worked in law enforcement and as a mediator, and she has done substantial work in voter registration. She spent 27 years as a union member and has worked on the Community Emergency Response Team since 2008.

    Gobel is running to bring her extensive experience in public service to the Marysville City Council. If elected, she would focus on expanding affordable housing, supporting small businesses, and improving infrastructure.

    Gobel is facing incumbent Jeffrey Vaughan. First elected in 2003, Vaughan's platform includes typical conservative proposals like cutting funding for essential services. In addition, he opposes redirecting some law enforcement funding to proven community-based alternatives.

    In this race, Gobel is supported by the local Democrats and local progressive leaders. Cindy Gobel's record of public service and leadership on civic issues makes her the best choice for Marysville City Council, Position 1.

    Cindy Gobel

    Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for Position 1 on the Marysville City Council. She has served the public as a representative with the Women’s Law Caucus in Snohomish County from 2012 to 2015.

    Cindy Gobel

    Cindy Gobel, a certification and training specialist with the Washington Secretary of State, is running for Position 1 on the Marysville City Council. She has served the public as a representative with the Women’s Law Caucus in Snohomish County from 2012 to 2015.

  • Apoyadas Por: Snohomish County Democrats
  • Incumbent Stephanie Vignal is running for re-election for Position 2 on the Mill Creek City Council. Vignal first joined the council when she was appointed in 2019 and was then elected in 2020 to complete the rest of the term. During this time, she was elected by her fellow council members to serve as the mayor pro tem. Previously, Vignal served on the Parks and Recreation board. She has worked in the private sector in property management and small business financial management.

    In office, Vignal has spearheaded bridging communication between city and state policymakers and serves as the council liaison with the Alliance of Housing Affordability. If re-elected, she wants to invest in public green spaces and city infrastructure, work on making Mill Creek as inclusive as possible, and focus on positive economic development as the state looks forward towards life post-pandemic. Vignal has received a number of endorsements from key progressive leaders and organizations, both locally and statewide.

    Challenging Vignal in this race is Nicholas Swett, a Republican precinct committee officer. Swett lacks a campaign website and detailed platform as of mid-October.

    Vignal is by far the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Mill Creek City Council, Position 2.

    Stephanie Vignal

    Incumbent Stephanie Vignal is running for re-election for Position 2 on the Mill Creek City Council. Vignal first joined the council when she was appointed in 2019 and was then elected in 2020 to complete the rest of the term.

    Stephanie Vignal

    Incumbent Stephanie Vignal is running for re-election for Position 2 on the Mill Creek City Council. Vignal first joined the council when she was appointed in 2019 and was then elected in 2020 to complete the rest of the term.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club
  • Benjamin Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek City Council in 2020 and is now running to retain his seat in Position 3. Before joining the council, Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek Arts & Beautification Board, and then later both the Mill Creek Blvd Sub-Area Project Advisory Committee and the Snohomish County Planning Commission. Outside of public service, he worked as an engineer with Boeing.

    Enhancing public spaces with an eye for beauty and inclusion has always been a focus for Briles. One of his early government projects was featuring local high schoolers’ art traffic-signal box wraps. To continue building community and bettering Mill Creek, Briles wants to strategically manage growth, expand city services, plan ahead for traffic and city service needs, and maintain Mill Creek’s unique character. In this race, he has earned the endorsements of a number of local progressive leaders.

    Conservative challenger and Boeing manager Connie Allison is also in this race. Allison wants to cut social services and opposes affordable housing for Mill Creek.

    Benjamin Briles is the clear choice for Mill Creek City Council, Position 3.

    Benjamin Briles

    Benjamin Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek City Council in 2020 and is now running to retain his seat in Position 3.

    Benjamin Briles

    Benjamin Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek City Council in 2020 and is now running to retain his seat in Position 3.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club
  • Incumbent Brian Holtzclaw is running for re-election to Position 4 on the Mill Creek City Council. Holtzclaw joined the council in 2014 and has served as mayor since September 2020. Outside of elected office, he works as general counsel for a development company. If re-elected, Holtzclaw wants to focus on developing the 14-acre public lot adjacent to the Mill Creek Sports Park, strengthening responsible budget management, and increasing post-pandemic economic growth through tourism.

    Eric Cooke, an agent with the Washington State Department of Revenue, is challenging Holtzclaw in this race. Cooke is running on a more conservative platform, advocating for exclusionary housing policy that would make Mill Creek less affordable, increased police patrolling in all neighborhoods rather than alternative community safety programs, and cutting social services. He is not a progressive choice.

    We recommend Brian Holtzclaw in this race for Mill Creek City Council, Position 4.

    Brian Holtzclaw

    Incumbent Brian Holtzclaw is running for re-election to Position 4 on the Mill Creek City Council. Holtzclaw joined the council in 2014 and has served as mayor since September 2020. Outside of elected office, he works as general counsel for a development company.

    Brian Holtzclaw

    Incumbent Brian Holtzclaw is running for re-election to Position 4 on the Mill Creek City Council. Holtzclaw joined the council in 2014 and has served as mayor since September 2020. Outside of elected office, he works as general counsel for a development company.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020. Outside of public service, she works with nonprofits and foundations on communications and project management to build change.

    If elected, Duque wants to expand and protect public green spaces, foster responsive and transparent government, ensure economic recovery for Mill Creek businesses, and be smart about city growth. Duque began to actualize some of these goals during her time on the Parks and Recreation Board, where she worked on the opening of Exploration Park and the updates to Heron Park. In this race, Duque has earned an impressive slate of endorsements from progressive leaders and Democratic organizations.

    Duque is facing incumbent council member Adam Morgan. He first joined the council after being appointed in 2020 to fill the spot left vacant by Mike Todd. Morgan is running on a conservative platform that doesn't represent the people of Mill Creek. If re-elected, Morgan would reduce funding for essential services that support local families and keep our community safe.

    We recommend Melissa Duque for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6 because of her progressive support and her strong community focus.

    Melissa Duque

    Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020.

    Melissa Duque

    Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020.

  • Apoyadas Por: Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , Latino Progress, 44th Legislative District Democrats
  • Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013. Outside of public service, she owns her own small business and volunteers as a member of the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County board.

    Gregerson is running a very progressive campaign based on economic recovery, community growth, and safety for all. If re-elected, she wants to continue the public investment in the local economy following the more than $400,000 previously distributed in small business grants. Gregerson also wants to improve the waterfront promenade and upgrade the Harbour Reach Corridor, for which she has secured state funding. She has earned the support of many local organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Former mayor Joe Marine is challenging Gregerson on a more conservative platform that emphasizes exclusionary housing policy and cutting community services. Marine was mayor from 2006 until 2012, and served on the city council from 1998 to 2000 and again from 2020 until the present.

    Jennifer Gregerson is the obvious choice in this race for Mukilteo mayor and she deserves your vote to keep bringing progressive values to city hall.

    Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013. Outside of public service, she owns her own small business and volunteers as a member of the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County board.

    Gregerson is running a very progressive campaign based on economic recovery, community growth, and safety for all. If re-elected, she wants to continue the public investment in the local economy following the more than $400,000 previously distributed in small business grants. Gregerson also wants to improve the waterfront promenade and upgrade the Harbour Reach Corridor, for which she has secured state funding. She has earned the support of many local organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Former mayor Joe Marine is challenging Gregerson on a more conservative platform that emphasizes exclusionary housing policy and cutting community services. Marine was mayor from 2006 until 2012, and served on the city council from 1998 to 2000 and again from 2020 until the present.

    Jennifer Gregerson is the obvious choice in this race for Mukilteo mayor and she deserves your vote to keep bringing progressive values to city hall.

    Jennifer Gregerson

    Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Public benefit specialist Louis Harris was appointed to Position 1 on the Mukilteo City Council in 2020. His work with the state Department of Social and Health Services, as well as his service as the vice president of the NAACP of Snohomish County and on the boards of the YMCA and Communities of Color Coalition, have prepared Harris well to serve all residents of Mukilteo.

    During his first year on the council, Harris voted in favor of adopting a plan that would improve housing options for seniors. He also supported a program to educate residents about services that could help them stay in their homes. If re-elected, he states that he will address noise pollution from Paine Field, invest in infrastructure improvements, and promote local businesses.

    Harris faces conservative businessman and misinformation-promoter Peter Zieve, who is running for Mukilteo City Council for the third time. Zieve is notorious for funding a hateful mailer campaign to oppose the construction of a mosque in Mukilteo in 2016, as well as pouring $1 million into Donald Trump's first campaign. He also funded misleading political campaigns against progressive candidates in 2018 and 2019, and in 2020 funded yet another mailer campaign aimed at keeping low-income residents out of Mukilteo.

    Harris has earned an impressive list of endorsements from state representatives, neighboring elected officials, and local progressive organizations. Harris is by far the best choice for Mukilteo City Council, Position 1.

    Louis Harris

    Public benefit specialist Louis Harris was appointed to Position 1 on the Mukilteo City Council in 2020.

    Louis Harris

    Public benefit specialist Louis Harris was appointed to Position 1 on the Mukilteo City Council in 2020.

  • Apoyadas Por: SEPAC

No Hay Recomendación

There are no progressive candidates running for Mukilteo City Council, Position 2.

Former Mukilteo Councilmember Kevin Stoltz is running again to bring back the Mukilteo Park and Ride, revisit traffic calming policies, and discourage nighttime passenger jets. He served on the council for two terms between 2006 and 2013. Like his fellow candidate Schmalz in Position 3, Stoltz was recently featured in the Mukilteo Beacon where some raised the issue of favoritism towards the former councilmembers after speed humps were installed near their homes. While traffic concerns certainly affect quality of life for residents, without a broader platform or values, we don't have reason to think that Stoltz will pursue progressive reforms on the council.

Stoltz is running against Tom Jordal, a small business owner whose campaign lacks detail about how he would affect policy change in Mukilteo. He does not have relevant community or leadership experience and only states that if elected, he would bring more festivals and concerts to the city.

We make no recommendation in this race.

No Hay Recomendación

Because information about these two candidates is not as detailed as we would like, we are not making a recommendation in this race. Voters should review the following candidates and pick the one whose values most align with their own.

Former Mukilteo city council member Steve Schmalz was elected to the council in 2012 and served until 2019. He is also a member of the Mukilteo Arts Guild. His current run is focused almost entirely on infrastructure, and he states that if re-elected he will focus on traffic, trail maintenance, and funding law enforcement. Schmalz was recently featured in the Mukilteo Beacon where some raised the issue of favoritism towards the former council member after speed humps were installed near and fellow candidate Kevin Stoltz's homes. Given his previous record and the underdeveloped platform for his current run, Schmalz should not be expected to be a progressive voice for the residents of Mukilteo.

Alex Crocco is a former operations manager at Boeing. Crocco has also served in the Army reserves, National Guard, and on the Bishop's Committee for his church. He does not have a campaign website as of early October and his voters' guide statement only mentions the issues of land use and economic development, public safety, and infrastructure.
  • VOTO YES

    Vote YES to keep Mukilteo affordable!

  • Mukilteo’s Resolution 8 is an advisory vote asking the public whether the city should encourage “high-density” housing options. Though written vaguely, and unattached to any real policy, the advisory vote is an opportunity to let the city government know that all options should be considered to address the housing crisis in Mukilteo.

    Proponents of this ballot measure argue that the resolution's writers intentionally worded it vaguely to scare voters about future development and sway the outcome of future policy. In reality, this non-binding vote is a gesture at making Mukilteo more affordable and achieving housing stability for all. If approved by voters, this measure will only amount to a statement of support rather than any specific policy change.

    Thoughtful growth and housing development have happened throughout Mukilteo’s history to the benefit of the community. Now is not the time for divisive, fear-mongering and empty political gestures. Vote “Yes” to “Approve” City of Mukilteo Resolution 8 to let the municipal government know that Mukilteo should progress as an inclusive and affordable city for all.

    Mukilteo’s Resolution 8 is an advisory vote asking the public whether the city should encourage “high-density” housing options. Though written vaguely, and unattached to any real policy, the advisory vote is an opportunity to let the city government know that all options should be considered to address the housing crisis in Mukilteo.

    Proponents of this ballot measure argue that the resolution's writers intentionally worded it vaguely to scare voters about future development and sway the outcome of future policy. In reality, this non-binding vote is a gesture at making Mukilteo more affordable and achieving housing stability for all. If approved by voters, this measure will only amount to a statement of support rather than any specific policy change.

    Thoughtful growth and housing development have happened throughout Mukilteo’s history to the benefit of the community. Now is not the time for divisive, fear-mongering and empty political gestures. Vote “Yes” to “Approve” City of Mukilteo Resolution 8 to let the municipal government know that Mukilteo should progress as an inclusive and affordable city for all.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Current Snohomish City Council president Linda Redmon is running for mayor. Redmon has served on the Snohomish City Council since 2018 and as president since 2020. She also represents portions of the county including Monroe, Gold Bar, and Sultan on the Snohomish County Board of Health. In her time on the city council, Redmon has advocated for more comprehensive access to broadband, worked on support for workers and businesses during the pandemic, and promoted protecting parks and green spaces.

    Redmon is facing John Kartak. As the city's first elected mayor since a shift in the governmental system, Kartak has had a rough and controversial tenure. In May of last year, Kartak faced heavy criticism for allowing a gathering of 100 armed vigilantes with confederate flags to tailgate and intimidate Snohomish protestors. Kartak claimed, falsely, that only a few of the people were associated with fringe groups. In October, Kartak sparked outrage once again by posting a picture on Facebook depicting a toy car running over figurines meant to resemble protesters.

    Kartak has brought endless division and controversy to the City of Snohomish. It's time to elect a leader who can rebuild relationships and unite the city under an inclusive vision. Vote for Linda Redmon for mayor of Snohomish.

    Linda Redmon

    Current Snohomish City Council president Linda Redmon is running for mayor. Redmon has served on the Snohomish City Council since 2018 and as president since 2020. She also represents portions of the county including Monroe, Gold Bar, and Sultan on the Snohomish County Board of Health.

    Linda Redmon

    Current Snohomish City Council president Linda Redmon is running for mayor. Redmon has served on the Snohomish City Council since 2018 and as president since 2020. She also represents portions of the county including Monroe, Gold Bar, and Sultan on the Snohomish County Board of Health.

  • Kari Zimmerman is running for Council-at-Large Position 5 on the Snohomish City Council. Zimmerman is a realtor and community manager who has been involved with local government as a citizen. For this race, she has a vision for Snohomish that includes affordable housing, environmental stewardship, thoughtful growth, and public safety that speaks to equity and inclusion.

    Also in this race is David Flynn, a small business owner who works in flooring. He has worked as a volunteer with the Historic Downtown Snohomish Association and states that he wants to expand the town’s art scene as well as preserve the town's charm, though he does not say what that entails.

    With endorsements and support from progressives in her area, Zimmerman is the best choice for Position 5 on the city council.

    Kari Zimmerman

    Kari Zimmerman is running for Council-at-Large Position 5 on the Snohomish City Council. Zimmerman is a realtor and community manager who has been involved with local government as a citizen.

    Kari Zimmerman

    Kari Zimmerman is running for Council-at-Large Position 5 on the Snohomish City Council. Zimmerman is a realtor and community manager who has been involved with local government as a citizen.

  • Lea Anne Burke is running for Position 6 on the Snohomish City Council. Burke is a current planner with the Tulalip Tribes, where she manages land use, zoning, and permits. Previously, she worked as a tribal liaison at multiple nonprofits. She currently serves on the Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board and spent over ten years on the city’s Park Board.

    Burke’s campaign is focused on strengthening the community through environmental sustainability, diversity and equity policy, infrastructure and safety improvements, and affordable housing. She is particularly interested in creating more space for Indigenous voices in Snohomish city governance and protecting the local ecosystem by expanding greenspace and taking action on climate issues.

    Burke is facing Republican incumbent Larry Countryman, who was elected to Position 6 in 2017 but previously served on the city council in the 1970s and 1980s. He is a MAGA supporter with a personal Facebook page full of hateful, racist messaging from the far right. His conservative vision for the city of Snohomish includes dismantling equity programs and fighting progress at all levels.

    Lea Anne Burke is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote for Snohomish City Council, Position 6.

    Lea Anne Burke

    Lea Anne Burke is running for Position 6 on the Snohomish City Council. Burke is a current planner with the Tulalip Tribes, where she manages land use, zoning, and permits. Previously, she worked as a tribal liaison at multiple nonprofits.

    Lea Anne Burke

    Lea Anne Burke is running for Position 6 on the Snohomish City Council. Burke is a current planner with the Tulalip Tribes, where she manages land use, zoning, and permits. Previously, she worked as a tribal liaison at multiple nonprofits.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Karen Guzak is a small business owner and former council member who is running for Position 7 on the Snohomish City Council. She previously served on the city council from 2007 to 2019 and as the mayor for seven years during that time. Guzak has community leadership experience including as president of the board of directors of Artist Trust, as well as president and developer of Sunny Arms Artist's Cooperative and Union Art Cooperative.

    Guzak is committed to making Snohomish a city that cares for the wellbeing of all of its residents while paying attention to its environmental impact. She wants to preserve the city's history, cultivate town vitality, and build affordable housing. In this race, Guzak is supported by a number of progressive elected officials.

    Guzak is challenging conservative incumbent Steve Dana. Dana has been in his current council position since 2017, but previously served on the council as mayor from 1990 to 1997. Dana runs a right-wing blog where he has defended Trump after the Mueller investigation, blamed students for taking out loans in bad job markets, and criticized government programs for affordable housing. He spreads racist, right-wing ideology on his Facebook page including a recent post where he seemed to defend and identify with those who participated in the January 6 Capitol assault.

    Guzak is the clear choice in this race. She deserves your vote for Council-at-Large Position 7 to bring much-needed progressive values to the Snohomish City Council.

    Karen Guzak

    Karen Guzak is a small business owner and former council member who is running for Position 7 on the Snohomish City Council. She previously served on the city council from 2007 to 2019 and as the mayor for seven years during that time.

    Karen Guzak

    Karen Guzak is a small business owner and former council member who is running for Position 7 on the Snohomish City Council. She previously served on the city council from 2007 to 2019 and as the mayor for seven years during that time.

School Districts

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below school district races on your ballot.

  • Nina Kim Hanson is running for Lake Stevens School District 4 in Director District 4. She has taught at the University of Washington and Northwest University for ten years and runs her own business as a freelance writer and public speaker. Hanson is also a member of the Center for Women and Democracy Board and the Lake Stevens Allies for BIPOC Board.

    Hanson's campaign platform includes improving civics and foreign language studies, providing teachers and schools with the tools they need to ensure all students get a great education, and boosting career and college prep resources. She has earned a number of progressive endorsements in this race from both our partner organizations and local elected leaders.

    Also in this race is Republican Brett Rogers, a lawyer, former police officer, and current director of parking enforcement with the Seattle Police Department. Last election, Rogers challenged Bob Ferguson for attorney general. In this race, he wants to decrease staff salaries, emphasize test scores - which are proven to be a poor measure of learning outcomes, and prohibit progressive curriculum changes like multicultural programming and comprehensive sexual health education.

    Hanson is the obvious choice to a school board director in Lake Stevens School District 4 and she deserves your vote.

    Nina Kim Hanson

    Nina Kim Hanson is running for Lake Stevens School District 4 in Director District 4. She has taught at the University of Washington and Northwest University for ten years and runs her own business as a freelance writer and public speaker.

    Nina Kim Hanson

    Nina Kim Hanson is running for Lake Stevens School District 4 in Director District 4. She has taught at the University of Washington and Northwest University for ten years and runs her own business as a freelance writer and public speaker.

  • Vildan Kirby is running for Lake Stevens School Board in District 5. Kirby is a substitute teacher in the city school district and she previously served as the board president of a local co-op preschool. She has a professional background in marketing and advertising and is a parent to twins enrolled in an LSSD school.

    If elected, Kirby wants to invest in emergency preparedness so that the school district can adapt more effectively in situations like the COVID pandemic. Also included in her platform is increasing mental health support and prioritizing an individual student focus. As a citizen, Kirby has spoken publicly in support of the city’s diversity commission. She has earned strong progressive support in this race from local leaders and organizations.

    Veteran Carolyn Bennett is also in this race. Bennett does customer service work at a manufacturing corporation. In addition, she serves as the secretary to the county’s Human Rights Commission and previously lost a 2019 race for Lake Stevens City Council. Bennett was an outspoken supporter of right-wing 2020 candidate for governor Loren Culp and on her personal social media she has posted a flag associated with white supremacist groups. Her 2019 statement included disappointing language about Lake Stevens residents experiencing housing insecurity.

    Kirby is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote to represent District 5 on the Lake Stevens School Board.

    Vildan Kirby

    Vildan Kirby is running for Lake Stevens School Board in District 5. Kirby is a substitute teacher in the city school district and she previously served as the board president of a local co-op preschool.

    Vildan Kirby

    Vildan Kirby is running for Lake Stevens School Board in District 5. Kirby is a substitute teacher in the city school district and she previously served as the board president of a local co-op preschool.

  • Jacqueline McGourty is running for re-election to Northshore School Board in District 1. She has worked in the biotechnology industry for three decades and was elected to the school board in 2017 where she now serves as the vice president. In her leadership role, she has hosted community forums on equity issues facing the Northshore school district.

    In her time on the school board, McGourty advanced mental health support, upgraded learning facilities, and worked to provide internet access and digital devices to all students. Her strong campaign platform includes ensuring students are able to recover from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, closing opportunity and outcome gaps, and making more progress on inclusivity and access to education for all students. In this race, she is endorsed by local Democrats and a number of elected leaders.

    McGourty is being challenged by Elizabeth Crowley, a Boeing employee and concerned parent running without a background in community leadership. Her top campaign priorities are increased cybersecurity for teachers and students as well as stronger communication between the school district and the community.

    McGourty is the best choice in the race for Northshore School Board Director representing District 1.

    Jacqueline McGourty

    Jacqueline McGourty is running for re-election to Northshore School Board in District 1. She has worked in the biotechnology industry for three decades and was elected to the school board in 2017 where she now serves as the vice president.

    Jacqueline McGourty

    Jacqueline McGourty is running for re-election to Northshore School Board in District 1. She has worked in the biotechnology industry for three decades and was elected to the school board in 2017 where she now serves as the vice president.

  • Incumbent director Sandy Hayes is running for re-election to represent District 4 on the Northshore School Board. Hayes first joined the school board in 2009 and has also served as a leadership consultant for the Washington State School Directors’ Association since then. Outside of public service, she runs a restorative justice practice.

    Since joining the board, Hayes has led school district improvements such as building both Ruby Bridges Elementary and North Creek High School, creating one-to-one student access to laptops for learning, and purchasing three electric buses to reduce the school district’s carbon footprint. In this race, she is prioritizing expanding arts programming, achieving digital equity including universally accessible broadband, and building an adaptable curriculum to support career paths that may not yet exist. Hayes defines her campaign against the reactionary politics of some conservative school board candidates, and she has been widely endorsed by progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Aerospace professional and consultant Chris Roberdeau is also in this race. Earlier this year, Roberdeau participated in a reactionary rally to unseat board members for not going back to in-person learning sooner, despite science-based health concerns. Unfortunately, he also subscribes to the Trump-led, right-wing efforts to not teach honest, up-to-date history to students. Roberdeau is not a progressive choice.

    Hayes is the best choice to represent District 4 with her background in law, community leadership, and direct school board experience. She deserves your vote to continue bringing positive change to the school district.

    Sandy Hayes

    Incumbent director Sandy Hayes is running for re-election to represent District 4 on the Northshore School Board. Hayes first joined the school board in 2009 and has also served as a leadership consultant for the Washington State School Directors’ Association since then.

    Sandy Hayes

    Incumbent director Sandy Hayes is running for re-election to represent District 4 on the Northshore School Board. Hayes first joined the school board in 2009 and has also served as a leadership consultant for the Washington State School Directors’ Association since then.

  • Incumbent school board director Amy Cast is running to retain her seat representing District 5 on the Northshore School Board. Cast has served the school district since first being elected in 2013. Outside of elected office, she runs her own website design company and serves as a leadership consultant for the Washington State School Directors’ Association.

    On the board, Cast has helped Northshore to become one of the highest performing school districts in the state through work like adding language immersion programs, investing in alternative career paths through the Career and Technical Education class, and implementing social-emotional health curriculum for kindergartners and up. If elected, she has detailed suggestions to increase equity, including incorporating Universal Design for Learning, expanding cultural competence curriculum, and investing in student services like social-emotional learning, mental health supports, and wrap-around financial need programs. Cast is also prioritizing thoughtful budgeting after a 20% increase in the student population, and she wants to fund programming for modernized skill-building.

    The other candidate in this race is Amy Felt, an attorney, NSD parent, and PTA member. Felt wants to amplify student voices while improving relationships between all school stakeholders including parents, administrators, teachers, unions, and board directors. She supports spending to close learning gaps between students and funding mental health resources.

    Cast is the best choice in this race because of her widespread support from local leaders and organizations as well as her clear plan for bringing positive change to the school district.

    Amy Cast

    Incumbent school board director Amy Cast is running to retain her seat representing District 5 on the Northshore School Board. Cast has served the school district since first being elected in 2013.

    Amy Cast

    Incumbent school board director Amy Cast is running to retain her seat representing District 5 on the Northshore School Board. Cast has served the school district since first being elected in 2013.