• VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • Adam Kirtley is running to represent the Central Ward in Position 2 on the Walla Walla City Council. Kirtley works as the chaplain at Whitman College and is a member of a local band. He has been heavily involved in community organizations such as the Walla Walla Immigrant Rights Coalition and the Christian Aid Center.

    Kirtley’s campaign priorities include increasing affordable housing, adding community alternatives to traditional policing, promoting environmental protections, and making Walla Walla as inclusive as it can be. He wants to uplift community voices, especially from Indigenous and immigrant communities in Walla Walla. Kirtley has earned widespread community support in this race.

    Brian Casey is a business owner and farmer. In a recent candidate forum, Casey agreed that public safety was an issue in the Central Ward, but he did not offer any solutions other than to keep the police department fully funded. He stated in a recent local article that he would promote affordable housing and street maintenance as well. He is running a more conservative campaign but has not offered detailed policy suggestions on his site as of mid-October.

    Adam Kirtley is the best choice in this race to bring leadership experience and a community-focused approach to Position 2 on the Walla Walla City Council.

    Adam Kirtley

    Adam Kirtley is running to represent the Central Ward in Position 2 on the Walla Walla City Council. Kirtley works as the chaplain at Whitman College and is a member of a local band.

    Adam Kirtley

    Adam Kirtley is running to represent the Central Ward in Position 2 on the Walla Walla City Council. Kirtley works as the chaplain at Whitman College and is a member of a local band.

  • Gustavo Reyna is running for Walla Walla City Council, At-Large Position 3. Reyna is a marketing manager with Intel and previously served as the mayor pro tem for the city of Lafayette, Colorado for five years before moving to Washington. Additionally, he is the president-elect of the Walla Walla Community Council and the council's Affordable Housing Implementation Taskforce chair.

    Reyna wants to help Walla Walla advance opportunity, equity, and affordability so that all residents can experience a high quality of life. He also wants to work on sustainable, human-scale development, helping the local business community to thrive, and investing in public spaces. He is a part of the Walla Walla Latino Alliance and has earned the support of many local leaders in this race.

    Reyna is facing Rick Phillips. Phillips is running on a conservative platform aligned with the local Republican Party that is out of step with the needs of Walla Walla. He has spent more than 30 years in real estate property management, and recently implied insensitively that the lack of affordable housing in Walla Walla has been a benefit to home owners and real estate investors, despite it leaving many Walla Walla residents in difficult financial positions and without secure housing. His other campaign priorities include increasing funding for the police department while cutting social services and prioritizing business interests.

    Given his experience with elected and community leadership, Reyna is the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Position 3 on the city council.

    Gustavo Reyna

    Gustavo Reyna is running for Walla Walla City Council, At-Large Position 3. Reyna is a marketing manager with Intel and previously served as the mayor pro tem for the city of Lafayette, Colorado for five years before moving to Washington.

    Gustavo Reyna

    Gustavo Reyna is running for Walla Walla City Council, At-Large Position 3. Reyna is a marketing manager with Intel and previously served as the mayor pro tem for the city of Lafayette, Colorado for five years before moving to Washington.
  • Incumbent director Terri Trick is running for Walla Walla School Board, Position 2. Trick joined the school board in 2018 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy and was later elected in 2019 to retain the seat for a two-year term. Before that, she spent more than 30 years in education including teaching pre-college courses and developing the GED program at Walla Walla Community College. Trick serves on the boards of Little Theatre of Walla Walla, Friends of the Farm Labor Homes (Valle Lindo), and the American Association of University Women.

    During her time on the school board, Trick has worked to raise the district’s graduation rate above the state average, provide science-based and transparent decisionmaking throughout the pandemic, and most recently, to establish the Summer Sol program to help students who have fallen behind during online learning. If re-elected, she wants to continue putting the budget to good use with school improvements and supportive programs for students. Trick will also continue her work on the ​​district’s Equity and Access Committee. She has earned ample Democratic endorsements and community support in this race.

    Firefighter and union member James Stovall is challenging Trick for this position. Stovall is running to make sure that the school district is meeting the needs of its diverse community and has said that he would use his experience as treasurer for the firefighter’s union to help manage the district’s budget and keep Walla Walla schools well-resourced. However, he does not have a detailed platform as of mid-October.

    Trick will continue building on past school board successes and bringing steady, thoughtful leadership to the district. She deserves your vote for Position 2 on the Walla Walla School Board.

    Terri Trick

    Incumbent director Terri Trick is running for Walla Walla School Board, Position 2. Trick joined the school board in 2018 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy and was later elected in 2019 to retain the seat for a two-year term.

    Terri Trick

    Incumbent director Terri Trick is running for Walla Walla School Board, Position 2. Trick joined the school board in 2018 when she was appointed to fill a vacancy and was later elected in 2019 to retain the seat for a two-year term.