• VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013. Outside of public service, she owns her own small business and volunteers as a member of the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County board.

    Gregerson is running a very progressive campaign based on economic recovery, community growth, and safety for all. If re-elected, she wants to continue the public investment in the local economy following the more than $400,000 previously distributed in small business grants. Gregerson also wants to improve the waterfront promenade and upgrade the Harbour Reach Corridor, for which she has secured state funding. She has earned the support of many local organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Former mayor Joe Marine is challenging Gregerson on a more conservative platform that emphasizes exclusionary housing policy and cutting community services. Marine was mayor from 2006 until 2012, and served on the city council from 1998 to 2000 and again from 2020 until the present.

    Jennifer Gregerson is the obvious choice in this race for Mukilteo mayor and she deserves your vote to keep bringing progressive values to city hall.

    Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013. Outside of public service, she owns her own small business and volunteers as a member of the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County board.

    Gregerson is running a very progressive campaign based on economic recovery, community growth, and safety for all. If re-elected, she wants to continue the public investment in the local economy following the more than $400,000 previously distributed in small business grants. Gregerson also wants to improve the waterfront promenade and upgrade the Harbour Reach Corridor, for which she has secured state funding. She has earned the support of many local organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Former mayor Joe Marine is challenging Gregerson on a more conservative platform that emphasizes exclusionary housing policy and cutting community services. Marine was mayor from 2006 until 2012, and served on the city council from 1998 to 2000 and again from 2020 until the present.

    Jennifer Gregerson is the obvious choice in this race for Mukilteo mayor and she deserves your vote to keep bringing progressive values to city hall.

    Jennifer Gregerson

    Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013.

  • Apoyadas Por: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Public benefit specialist Louis Harris was appointed to Position 1 on the Mukilteo City Council in 2020. His work with the state Department of Social and Health Services, as well as his service as the vice president of the NAACP of Snohomish County and on the boards of the YMCA and Communities of Color Coalition, have prepared Harris well to serve all residents of Mukilteo.

    During his first year on the council, Harris voted in favor of adopting a plan that would improve housing options for seniors. He also supported a program to educate residents about services that could help them stay in their homes. If re-elected, he states that he will address noise pollution from Paine Field, invest in infrastructure improvements, and promote local businesses.

    Harris faces conservative businessman and misinformation-promoter Peter Zieve, who is running for Mukilteo City Council for the third time. Zieve is notorious for funding a hateful mailer campaign to oppose the construction of a mosque in Mukilteo in 2016, as well as pouring $1 million into Donald Trump's first campaign. He also funded misleading political campaigns against progressive candidates in 2018 and 2019, and in 2020 funded yet another mailer campaign aimed at keeping low-income residents out of Mukilteo.

    Harris has earned an impressive list of endorsements from state representatives, neighboring elected officials, and local progressive organizations. Harris is by far the best choice for Mukilteo City Council, Position 1.

    Louis Harris

    Public benefit specialist Louis Harris was appointed to Position 1 on the Mukilteo City Council in 2020.

    Louis Harris

    Public benefit specialist Louis Harris was appointed to Position 1 on the Mukilteo City Council in 2020.

  • Apoyadas Por: SEPAC

No Hay Recomendación

There are no progressive candidates running for Mukilteo City Council, Position 2.

Former Mukilteo Councilmember Kevin Stoltz is running again to bring back the Mukilteo Park and Ride, revisit traffic calming policies, and discourage nighttime passenger jets. He served on the council for two terms between 2006 and 2013. Like his fellow candidate Schmalz in Position 3, Stoltz was recently featured in the Mukilteo Beacon where some raised the issue of favoritism towards the former councilmembers after speed humps were installed near their homes. While traffic concerns certainly affect quality of life for residents, without a broader platform or values, we don't have reason to think that Stoltz will pursue progressive reforms on the council.

Stoltz is running against Tom Jordal, a small business owner whose campaign lacks detail about how he would affect policy change in Mukilteo. He does not have relevant community or leadership experience and only states that if elected, he would bring more festivals and concerts to the city.

We make no recommendation in this race.

No Hay Recomendación

Because information about these two candidates is not as detailed as we would like, we are not making a recommendation in this race. Voters should review the following candidates and pick the one whose values most align with their own.

Former Mukilteo city council member Steve Schmalz was elected to the council in 2012 and served until 2019. He is also a member of the Mukilteo Arts Guild. His current run is focused almost entirely on infrastructure, and he states that if re-elected he will focus on traffic, trail maintenance, and funding law enforcement. Schmalz was recently featured in the Mukilteo Beacon where some raised the issue of favoritism towards the former council member after speed humps were installed near and fellow candidate Kevin Stoltz's homes. Given his previous record and the underdeveloped platform for his current run, Schmalz should not be expected to be a progressive voice for the residents of Mukilteo.

Alex Crocco is a former operations manager at Boeing. Crocco has also served in the Army reserves, National Guard, and on the Bishop's Committee for his church. He does not have a campaign website as of early October and his voters' guide statement only mentions the issues of land use and economic development, public safety, and infrastructure.
  • VOTO YES

    Vote YES to keep Mukilteo affordable!

  • Mukilteo’s Resolution 8 is an advisory vote asking the public whether the city should encourage “high-density” housing options. Though written vaguely, and unattached to any real policy, the advisory vote is an opportunity to let the city government know that all options should be considered to address the housing crisis in Mukilteo.

    Proponents of this ballot measure argue that the resolution's writers intentionally worded it vaguely to scare voters about future development and sway the outcome of future policy. In reality, this non-binding vote is a gesture at making Mukilteo more affordable and achieving housing stability for all. If approved by voters, this measure will only amount to a statement of support rather than any specific policy change.

    Thoughtful growth and housing development have happened throughout Mukilteo’s history to the benefit of the community. Now is not the time for divisive, fear-mongering and empty political gestures. Vote “Yes” to “Approve” City of Mukilteo Resolution 8 to let the municipal government know that Mukilteo should progress as an inclusive and affordable city for all.

    Mukilteo’s Resolution 8 is an advisory vote asking the public whether the city should encourage “high-density” housing options. Though written vaguely, and unattached to any real policy, the advisory vote is an opportunity to let the city government know that all options should be considered to address the housing crisis in Mukilteo.

    Proponents of this ballot measure argue that the resolution's writers intentionally worded it vaguely to scare voters about future development and sway the outcome of future policy. In reality, this non-binding vote is a gesture at making Mukilteo more affordable and achieving housing stability for all. If approved by voters, this measure will only amount to a statement of support rather than any specific policy change.

    Thoughtful growth and housing development have happened throughout Mukilteo’s history to the benefit of the community. Now is not the time for divisive, fear-mongering and empty political gestures. Vote “Yes” to “Approve” City of Mukilteo Resolution 8 to let the municipal government know that Mukilteo should progress as an inclusive and affordable city for all.