• VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES for equity and inclusion

  • King County Charter Amendment 1 proposes a revision to fix a grammatical error and to update the language to better reflect the values and community of King County. Specifically, the amendment would add “for all” and “equitable” into the county charter's preamble in order to demonstrate the county’s commitment to serving all residents. It would also include the addition of “protect and enhance” and “promote a superior quality of life” which further emphasize the county government’s purpose to meet community needs and strengthen regional services so that residents can thrive.

    The King County Charter defines the responsibilities of county government and the relationship it has to voters. With the proposed language updates to the preamble, the charter will better reflect its role as a service provider focused on improving the quality of life for all residents in an equitable manner.

    Vote “Yes” to approve Amendment 1 to the King County Charter.

    King County Charter Amendment 1 proposes a revision to fix a grammatical error and to update the language to better reflect the values and community of King County. Specifically, the amendment would add “for all” and “equitable” into the county charter's preamble in order to demonstrate the county’s commitment to serving all residents. It would also include the addition of “protect and enhance” and “promote a superior quality of life” which further emphasize the county government’s purpose to meet community needs and strengthen regional services so that residents can thrive.

    The King County Charter defines the responsibilities of county government and the relationship it has to voters. With the proposed language updates to the preamble, the charter will better reflect its role as a service provider focused on improving the quality of life for all residents in an equitable manner.

    Vote “Yes” to approve Amendment 1 to the King County Charter.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to clarify rules for county intitiatives

  • King County Charter Amendment 2 would bring the county into compliance with state law on timelines for initiatives, referenda, and charter ballot measures. The amendment would also provide greater clarity around the terms associated with, and process for, measures.

    Currently, the charter allows for voters to submit initiatives and referenda to the King County Council that may be adopted or put on the ballot. With this update to the language of the charter, voters will better understand the rules around submission and those rules will be in clearer alignment on state and county levels.

    Vote “Yes” to “Approve” Amendment 2 to the King County Charter which will improve the initiatives, referenda, and ballot measure process for voters and county government.

    King County Charter Amendment 2 would bring the county into compliance with state law on timelines for initiatives, referenda, and charter ballot measures. The amendment would also provide greater clarity around the terms associated with, and process for, measures.

    Currently, the charter allows for voters to submit initiatives and referenda to the King County Council that may be adopted or put on the ballot. With this update to the language of the charter, voters will better understand the rules around submission and those rules will be in clearer alignment on state and county levels.

    Vote “Yes” to “Approve” Amendment 2 to the King County Charter which will improve the initiatives, referenda, and ballot measure process for voters and county government.

  • Endorsed By: The Stranger
  • Non-Partisan

    Dow Constantine

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career. As a state legislator, on the King County Council, and as King County Executive, Constantine has fought for and delivered transportation and transit solutions, action on climate, improvements in public health, and an efficiently run government.

    Under his leadership, King County has expanded Metro transit service, improved oil safety rules, and created one of the best urban forestry programs in the nation. Constantine also led efforts to pass Best Starts for Kids, a model initiative that increases access to healthy food, affordable housing, and public health services for many of King County's most vulnerable children.

    Constantine is now running for a fourth term as King County Executive to build on a pandemic recovery that puts people first and creates inclusive communities. If he is re-elected, one of Constantine's priorities will be to reform the King County Sheriff's Office. During our interview, he expressed his frustration at the challenges of getting answers or reforms out of the current independent sheriff's office. As the county shifts to an executive-appointed sheriff, which voters approved last fall, Constantine said he will push for more transparency and demand that officers wear body cameras.

    In addition, Constantine is hoping to continue and expand his efforts to open more hotels to house homeless residents of King County. He expressed pride in a new zero-emissions, low-income housing development in Renton and hopes to expand that model across the county.

    Constantine has faced some criticism during his tenure around the building of the $242 million King County Youth Detention Center, which voters approved in 2012 and opened in 2018. During the protests for racial justice last summer, Constantine announced his support for transitioning the jail away from holding youth by 2025.

    Constantine has earned overwhelming support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations as well as elected and community leaders. He is the best choice in this race.

    Dow Constantine

    King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career.

    Dow Constantine

    King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career.

  • Non-Partisan

    Joe Nguyen

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Sen. Joe Nguyen was elected to the Washington state Senate in 2018 and has worked as a senior program manager at Microsoft since 2013. His parents were refugees from Vietnam who came to White Center, where Nguyen was born and raised.

    During Nguyen's time in the Legislature, he has been an advocate for Washington's families and equality, including playing a leadership role in fully funding the Working Families Tax Credit. In addition, he co-sponsored legislation to require anti-racism and equity training in public schools.

    Nguyen is running for county executive to implement sweeping actions on the affordable housing crisis, to reform the criminal justice system with deep changes and accountability, and to make the state's economy work for everyone, not just the wealthiest people. In particular, Nguyen has proposed to make all transit services free to improve access and increase ridership. He also wants to leverage the new Regional Homelessness Authority to significantly scale up the building of affordable housing.

    Nguyen has the support of elected leaders including state Reps. Kirsten Harris-Talley and David Hackney as well as state Sen. Bob Hasegawa and Treasurer Mike Pellicciotti. Nguyen is a progressive choice if you're looking for new leadership in the executive's office who will prioritize racial justice and systemic change.

    Joe Nguyen

    Sen. Joe Nguyen was elected to the Washington state Senate in 2018 and has worked as a senior program manager at Microsoft since 2013. His parents were refugees from Vietnam who came to White Center, where Nguyen was born and raised.

    Joe Nguyen

    Sen. Joe Nguyen was elected to the Washington state Senate in 2018 and has worked as a senior program manager at Microsoft since 2013. His parents were refugees from Vietnam who came to White Center, where Nguyen was born and raised.

  • Incumbent Rod Dembowski is an attorney who has represented District 1 since 2013. He has served in county affairs in several capacities, including as a pro bono counsel for the King County Superior Court, policy analyst in the county executive's office, and special prosecuting attorney.

    If re-elected, Dembowski will continue working on sustainable human services funding, protecting the wild areas of the Puget Sound region, and looking for sustainable transit funding that improves transportation options. He also wants to expand housing with an eye on reducing commute times and increasing affordability for workers and families. While on the council, Dembowski has sponsored several progressive reforms, including giving grocery workers hazard pay in the pandemic and moving to make the sheriff an appointed position through the council and an advisory committee.

    Challenging Dembowski is Kenmore resident and first-time candidate Sally Caverzan. According to her LinkedIn, she has worked as a long-term care social worker and is passionate about the environment. Her official voters' guide statement says that she would support instituting term limits for politicians, expanding mental health and addiction care with the creation of a King County regional treatment facility, and increasing supportive and permanent housing.

    Dembowski has earned broad support from elected officials, reproductive health and environmental organizations, labor unions, and many more. We recommend Dembowski for King County Council in District 1 because of his proven track record of progressive leadership.

    Rod Dembowski

    Incumbent Rod Dembowski is an attorney who has represented District 1 since 2013. He has served in county affairs in several capacities, including as a pro bono counsel for the King County Superior Court, policy analyst in the county executive's office, and special prosecuting attorney.

    Rod Dembowski

    Incumbent Rod Dembowski is an attorney who has represented District 1 since 2013. He has served in county affairs in several capacities, including as a pro bono counsel for the King County Superior Court, policy analyst in the county executive's office, and special prosecuting attorney.

  • Stephanie Angelis is an environmental professional and real estate broker running to bring a progressive and equitable vision to Lake Forest City Council, Position 3.

    She currently serves on the board of the Ballinger Neighborhood Association and as a precinct committee officer for the 32nd Legislative District Democrats. Angelis also volunteers in King County shelters and advocates for low-income and homeless individuals.

    Angelis' campaign is centered on three priorities: environmental ethics, strengthening community, and affordable housing. Building off of her environmental background, she wants to create a model environmental community that protects open spaces and parks, conserves urban forests, and welcomes diversity into the community. Angelis' plan has earned her the support of local progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Angelis' opponent in this race is Jon Lebo, an architect and deputy project director of the East Link Extension project at Sound Transit. Lebo is also a youth soccer coach and has served on the Lake Forest Park Planning Commission, including three years as chair. Lebo is taking a more moderate tack to the race that is not likely to go far enough to solve some of the most pressing issues in Lake Forest Park. Lebo states that he will create more types of housing and preserve single-family neighborhoods, but Angelis goes further in her willingness to encourage low-impact development, reverse historical redlining that has kept families from owning property in some neighborhoods, and support affordable housing. Notably, Lebo is openly campaigning against Proposition 1, which would support sidewalks, initially around schools, as well as the first-ever free public lakefront access in Lake Forest Park.

    With home prices in the Shoreline-Lake Forest Park area up by 14 percent and housing stock at a historic low, families who want to live, work, and play in Lake Forest Park will struggle without progressive leadership from the city council. We recommend Stephanie Angelis for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 3.

    Stephanie Angelis is an environmental professional and real estate broker running to bring a progressive and equitable vision to Lake Forest City Council, Position 3.

    She currently serves on the board of the Ballinger Neighborhood Association and as a precinct committee officer for the 32nd Legislative District Democrats. Angelis also volunteers in King County shelters and advocates for low-income and homeless individuals.

    Angelis' campaign is centered on three priorities: environmental ethics, strengthening community, and affordable housing. Building off of her environmental background, she wants to create a model environmental community that protects open spaces and parks, conserves urban forests, and welcomes diversity into the community. Angelis' plan has earned her the support of local progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Angelis' opponent in this race is Jon Lebo, an architect and deputy project director of the East Link Extension project at Sound Transit. Lebo is also a youth soccer coach and has served on the Lake Forest Park Planning Commission, including three years as chair. Lebo is taking a more moderate tack to the race that is not likely to go far enough to solve some of the most pressing issues in Lake Forest Park. Lebo states that he will create more types of housing and preserve single-family neighborhoods, but Angelis goes further in her willingness to encourage low-impact development, reverse historical redlining that has kept families from owning property in some neighborhoods, and support affordable housing. Notably, Lebo is openly campaigning against Proposition 1, which would support sidewalks, initially around schools, as well as the first-ever free public lakefront access in Lake Forest Park.

    With home prices in the Shoreline-Lake Forest Park area up by 14 percent and housing stock at a historic low, families who want to live, work, and play in Lake Forest Park will struggle without progressive leadership from the city council. We recommend Stephanie Angelis for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 3.

    Stephanie Angelis

    Stephanie Angelis is an environmental professional and real estate broker running to bring a progressive and equitable vision to Lake Forest City Council, Position 3.

  • Endorsed By: 46th Legislative District Democrats, National Women's Political Caucus of Washington
  • Tracy Furutani is a scientist and educator who has taught about climate change at North Seattle College for the last 25 years. Furutani is now running for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 5 to lead on sustainability and equity for all residents. Outside of his work at the college, he also writes for Shoreline Area News, serves on the board of Shorelake Arts, and works as an administrator and stream monitor for Lake Forest Park Streamkeepers.

    Furutani states that Lake Forest Park should join many other cities in King County in creating a climate action plan that would help mitigate and reduce the effects of climate change on the city. He would seek grants and other funding sources to maintain parks and green spaces and continue improving the health of Lyon Creek and McAleer Creek. If elected, Furutani would also prioritize walkability and work with the police department to ensure that, in the wake of nationwide protests and calls for accountability, the community's expectations meet the level of service.

    Running against Furutani is Maddy Larson, current chair of the Lake Forest Park Planning Commission. She has also worked as a teacher and in nonprofit museum management. Larson's campaign priorities are balanced growth, community building, and "legacy building" through economic and environmental stewardship. Though she states that she has worked on recommendations for modifying the accessory dwelling unit (ADU) code, Larson is not specific on her campaign website about how, where, and if she would champion growth in other areas of the city, with a greater focus on parks, bikes, and pedestrian pathways. Larson has declined to state a position on Proposition 1, which if passed will support sidewalks and the city's first free public lakefront access, while Furutani supports it.

    We lean towards Furutani because of his support from the progressive community.

    Tracy Furutani is a scientist and educator who has taught about climate change at North Seattle College for the last 25 years. Furutani is now running for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 5 to lead on sustainability and equity for all residents. Outside of his work at the college, he also writes for Shoreline Area News, serves on the board of Shorelake Arts, and works as an administrator and stream monitor for Lake Forest Park Streamkeepers.

    Furutani states that Lake Forest Park should join many other cities in King County in creating a climate action plan that would help mitigate and reduce the effects of climate change on the city. He would seek grants and other funding sources to maintain parks and green spaces and continue improving the health of Lyon Creek and McAleer Creek. If elected, Furutani would also prioritize walkability and work with the police department to ensure that, in the wake of nationwide protests and calls for accountability, the community's expectations meet the level of service.

    Running against Furutani is Maddy Larson, current chair of the Lake Forest Park Planning Commission. She has also worked as a teacher and in nonprofit museum management. Larson's campaign priorities are balanced growth, community building, and "legacy building" through economic and environmental stewardship. Though she states that she has worked on recommendations for modifying the accessory dwelling unit (ADU) code, Larson is not specific on her campaign website about how, where, and if she would champion growth in other areas of the city, with a greater focus on parks, bikes, and pedestrian pathways. Larson has declined to state a position on Proposition 1, which if passed will support sidewalks and the city's first free public lakefront access, while Furutani supports it.

    We lean towards Furutani because of his support from the progressive community.

    Tracy Furutani

    Tracy Furutani is a scientist and educator who has taught about climate change at North Seattle College for the last 25 years. Furutani is now running for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 5 to lead on sustainability and equity for all residents.

  • Endorsed By: 46th Legislative District Democrats
  • Larry Goldman is an associate teaching professor in chemistry at UW-Seattle running for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 7. He serves in several community groups, including the grassroots group North Seattle Progressives, the 47th Legislative District Democrats, and the Lake Forest branch of People for Climate Action.

    Much of Goldman's campaign focuses on improving the city's sustainability and infrastructure. As new Sound Transit light rail stations arrive, Goldman notes that the city could do more to drive down greenhouse gases since Lake Forest Park is one of the few cities in the county that has yet to develop a climate action plan. He believes that pedestrian and cyclist access should be emphasized, as well as maintaining the tree canopy, carefully using the funds from Rep. Jayapal's salmon recovery plan to fix local culverts and keep salmon populations healthy. He also speaks to the affordable housing crunch by stating that the city should consider allowing accessory dwelling units (ADUs) to alleviate some of the housing need, and possibly utilize land more efficiently by allowing a limited number of duplexes.

    Goldman's opponent Paul Sanford is a vice president of product management who has coached youth sports. Sanford shares some of Goldman's goals, including protecting the city's watershed and canopy, increasing bike lanes and walkability, and considering accessory dwelling units. However, Sanford is somewhat less concrete on his site about what kinds of housing outside of ADUs that he would support.

    Local Democratic organizations have all stood behind Goldman, who has held more leadership positions in the community pushing for progressive change. We recommend Goldman for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 7.

    Larry Goldman is an associate teaching professor in chemistry at UW-Seattle running for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 7. He serves in several community groups, including the grassroots group North Seattle Progressives, the 47th Legislative District Democrats, and the Lake Forest branch of People for Climate Action.

    Much of Goldman's campaign focuses on improving the city's sustainability and infrastructure. As new Sound Transit light rail stations arrive, Goldman notes that the city could do more to drive down greenhouse gases since Lake Forest Park is one of the few cities in the county that has yet to develop a climate action plan. He believes that pedestrian and cyclist access should be emphasized, as well as maintaining the tree canopy, carefully using the funds from Rep. Jayapal's salmon recovery plan to fix local culverts and keep salmon populations healthy. He also speaks to the affordable housing crunch by stating that the city should consider allowing accessory dwelling units (ADUs) to alleviate some of the housing need, and possibly utilize land more efficiently by allowing a limited number of duplexes.

    Goldman's opponent Paul Sanford is a vice president of product management who has coached youth sports. Sanford shares some of Goldman's goals, including protecting the city's watershed and canopy, increasing bike lanes and walkability, and considering accessory dwelling units. However, Sanford is somewhat less concrete on his site about what kinds of housing outside of ADUs that he would support.

    Local Democratic organizations have all stood behind Goldman, who has held more leadership positions in the community pushing for progressive change. We recommend Goldman for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 7.

    Larry Goldman

    Larry Goldman is an associate teaching professor in chemistry at UW-Seattle running for Lake Forest Park City Council, Position 7.

  • Endorsed By: King County Democrats
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES to invest in public infrastructure and green spaces

  • Lake Forest Park Proposition 1 was placed on the ballot by city council in order to fund public infrastructure and green spaces. With support from the mayor and the entirety of the city council, the proposed 2022 levy is a slight increase from the previous property tax rate, allowing the city to invest in a higher quality of life for all Lake Forest Park residents. This new rate would not affect qualifying seniors, veterans, and disabled homeowners.

    The levy would support a variety of projects, including those from the Safe Streets report and the Parks Recreation Open Space and Trail (PROST) plan. Some top priorities for the funding are installing sidewalks on the way to Lake Forest Park schools, a new two-acre lakefront park, and improvements to the existing city parks. If approved, residents will have greater access to green space, road safety, and upgraded park facilities.

    Vote “Yes” to “Approve” Lake Forest Park Proposition 1 to strengthen community safety and improve public infrastructure.

    Lake Forest Park Proposition 1 was placed on the ballot by city council in order to fund public infrastructure and green spaces. With support from the mayor and the entirety of the city council, the proposed 2022 levy is a slight increase from the previous property tax rate, allowing the city to invest in a higher quality of life for all Lake Forest Park residents. This new rate would not affect qualifying seniors, veterans, and disabled homeowners.

    The levy would support a variety of projects, including those from the Safe Streets report and the Parks Recreation Open Space and Trail (PROST) plan. Some top priorities for the funding are installing sidewalks on the way to Lake Forest Park schools, a new two-acre lakefront park, and improvements to the existing city parks. If approved, residents will have greater access to green space, road safety, and upgraded park facilities.

    Vote “Yes” to “Approve” Lake Forest Park Proposition 1 to strengthen community safety and improve public infrastructure.