• VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to strengthen mental health crisis support

  • This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

    This spring, lawmakers passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1477 to expand the state’s crisis response system to include a new hotline dealing exclusively with mental health emergencies.

    Sponsored by Democratic legislators, the law will divert some calls away from 911 so that Washingtonians can get more specialized crisis responses. In addition, law enforcement officers no longer need to take on responsibilities associated with social workers. This will be funded by a tax of 30 cents a month on most phone services in October 2021 until a bump to 75 cents a month starting in July 2024. All revenue generated by the tax will go to crisis line-related expenses, including expanding hotline personnel during the community mental health crisis associated with the pandemic.

    Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 36.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to balance our tax code

  • Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

    Washingtonians deserve an economy that works for us all. An essential part of that is a balanced tax code where everyone pays their share. Yet, Washington boasts the most upside-down system in the nation, where the state’s lowest-income earners pay 17% of their income in taxes while the wealthiest few pay just 3% of their income.

    This legislative session, Democratic lawmakers wrote and passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5096, which created a 7% capital gains tax on the sale of assets like stocks valued above $250,000. The tax is estimated to raise about $415 million primarily for child care and early learning - both services that became clearly essential to Washingtonians during the coronavirus pandemic.

    We know that good public schools, beautiful parks, and strong social services make Washington a great place to live. This long-overdue capital gains tax will go towards making sure that all Washingtonians pay their share in taxes and have the opportunity to thrive.

    Vote "Maintained" on State Advisory Vote 37.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO MAINTAINED

    Vote Maintained to close a tax loophole for insurance companies

  • In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

    In the most recent legislative session, lawmakers passed Second Substitute Senate Bill 5315, which creates a 2% tax on certain insurance premiums. In effect, the law would close a tax loophole for corporations with their own insurance policies, known as captive insurers, so that all insurance companies pay premiums taxes. It is estimated to generate around $53 million over the next decade.

    SB 5315 had bipartisan sponsorship and was passed nearly unanimously with only one vote of opposition between both houses. The legislation was requested by Democratic Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler, who wants to make sure that all insurance companies pay their share of taxes.

    Ensuring big corporations pay their share is an important step toward balancing our state's tax code. Vote “Maintained” on State Advisory Vote 38.

  • Apoyadas Por: The Stranger
  • VOTO APPROVED

    Vote YES to reduce barriers to civic participation

  • Proposition 13 would make it easier for local voters to make their voices heard and participate in the local democratic process through ballot measures.

    Whatcom County has an unusually high threshold for signatures that makes it nearly impossible for residents to put an initiative on the ballot. The Whatcom County Council passed Ordinance 2021-032 in May to reduce the number of signatures required for county ballot measures. If passed, Proposition 13 would implement this ordinance and bring the number of signatures for ballot measures in line with similar counties across the state. Specifically, it would change the signature requirement from 8% of votes cast in the last gubernatorial election to 8% of votes cast in the last county executive election, when turnout is often much lower.

    Vote to “Yes” to approve Whatcom County, Proposition 13 to strengthen democracy at the county level.

    Proposition 13 would make it easier for local voters to make their voices heard and participate in the local democratic process through ballot measures.

    Whatcom County has an unusually high threshold for signatures that makes it nearly impossible for residents to put an initiative on the ballot. The Whatcom County Council passed Ordinance 2021-032 in May to reduce the number of signatures required for county ballot measures. If passed, Proposition 13 would implement this ordinance and bring the number of signatures for ballot measures in line with similar counties across the state. Specifically, it would change the signature requirement from 8% of votes cast in the last gubernatorial election to 8% of votes cast in the last county executive election, when turnout is often much lower.

    Vote to “Yes” to approve Whatcom County, Proposition 13 to strengthen democracy at the county level.

  • Non-Partisan

    Kaylee Galloway

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee. She has worked as a legislative assistant in the state House of Representatives, and as a staff assistant and community liaison in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.

    If elected, Galloway will push forward on the county's critical affordable housing needs and focus on restoring water quality for both salmon populations and Whatcom communities, which includes supporting the reduction of pollution runoff. She wants to address sustainability in infrastructure, transit, and other public needs through the lens of climate justice, which to her means considering the needs of communities of color and those with lower incomes who are disproportionately impacted by pollution and health disparities.

    Kaylee is a good choice if you're looking for someone who will prioritize affordable housing and environmental conservation.

    Kaylee Galloway

    Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee.

    Kaylee Galloway

    Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee.

  • Apoyadas Por: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, SEIU Locals 775, 925, and 1199, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Northwest Washington Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Bellingham/Whatcom County Firefighters (IAFF Local 16), Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Non-Partisan

    Eddy Ury

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally focused nonprofit in the area. As part of this work, Ury played a key role in crafting new rules that will finally protect critical areas at Cherry Point.

    Ury is running on a platform that includes affordable housing, sustainable energy, social justice, accessible government, economic revitalization, public health, and fair elections. He has a strong track record in community leadership and received praise for his work to bring various stakeholders to the table and build consensus.

    Ury is a good choice if you're looking for a candidate who would bring strong new leadership to the council on climate and environmental conservation.

    Eddy Ury

    Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally focused nonprofit in the area.

    Eddy Ury

    Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally focused nonprofit in the area.

  • Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee. Additionally, Donovan has served on the Columbia Neighborhood Association board, the Whatcom County Citizens Election Advisory Commission, and as both a member and board chair of the local Washington Conservation Voters chapter.

    During his time on the council, Donovan’s top priorities have been protecting Lake Whatcom’s ecosystem and budgeting responsibly so that Whatcom can provide human services. If re-elected, he wants to address the housing crisis that hurts the Whatcom community and economy, combat climate change, reduce incarceration rates while investing in diversion and alternatives, and protect clean water coming from Lake Whatcom and other natural waterways.

    Donovan is facing a challenge from Kelley O’Connor, a former first responder and a current health care management student. O’Connor advocates for affordable housing and mental health resources but has not released a detailed campaign to accomplish these goals.

    Todd Donovan is the best choice to represent District 2 on the Whatcom County Council because of his progressive track record and strong support from our progressive partners.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

  • Non-Partisan

    Rebecca Lewis

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

    Lewis' campaign priorities include supporting living wage jobs, updating public utilities, and protecting the environment. As a labor leader, she wants to expand community work agreements, apprenticeships, and prevailing wages. She also wants the county to invest in rural infrastructure with reliable broadband and cell service. Additionally, Lewis states that further development on lakes should be ceased as a way to protect the watershed for 100,000 people in the county.

    Her opponent, incumbent Tyler Byrd, is a board member of the Whatcom Business Alliance. Byrd is a conservative candidate prioritizing the needs of businesses above the local community. He was one of two council members to vote against the 0.1% sales tax to help fund affordable housing. On the environment, he voted against the moratorium on Cherry Point shipping unrefined fossil fuels, despite concerns about the cultural significance for the Lummi Nation and environmental threats. Finally, he voted against a $4 million coronavirus relief package last April.

    Lewis is the clear choice for Whatcom County Council in District 3 to bring progressive, community-minded leadership to the county.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

  • Non-Partisan

    Barry Buchanan

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year. He is the chair of the Whatcom County Incarceration Reduction and Prevention Taskforce and is seeking to provide alternatives to booking people for low-level crimes through the LEAD program, which was established in 2019.

    Buchanan supports both the Whatcom Crisis Stabilization Center and East Whatcom Regional Resource Center, which serve those experiencing mental health crises and hunger. He has also worked in previous terms in office to ban fracking and protect the environment. In this race, Buchanan is prioritizing public safety by investing in community alternatives to policing and by reducing the number of people who end up in the criminal justice system when having mental health crises. His platform is very progressive.

    Kamal Bhachu works as a senior maintenance engineer at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center and as a firearms instructor. His platform states that he would address affordable housing and living wage jobs, but doesn't offer enough policy details to evaluate and his campaign has been spotlighted by a conservative publication. His solution for addressing mental health and addiction in regards to people experiencing homelessness is to bring back programs like D.A.R.E. in schools, which doesn't go nearly far enough to help those suffering now, and doesn't address those who are unsheltered for non-addiction reasons.

    Buchanan is the best choice for Whatcom County Council, At-Large Position A.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year.

  • Incumbent Kate Bishop is running to retain her seat in Position 6 on the Ferndale City Council. First elected in 2017, Bishop is the current mayor pro tem and chairs the Finance and Administration committee. She has also worked as a social worker for over a decade. Bishop serves as a board member for the Ferndale Community Service Cooperative and helped to establish the Ferndale Utilities Fund there.

    On the council, Bishop created the Equity Advisory Board as well as the North Whatcom Poverty Task Force, which works to assess the needs of the community in the areas of housing and food insecurity, housing affordability, and income inequality. If re-elected, she wants to continue working to keep Ferndale affordable and she would invest in social services, business support, and infrastructure updates. Bishop has been endorsed by the Whatcom County Democrats in this race.

    Bishop faces a challenge from Robert Pinkley, who owns a restaurant in downtown Ferndale. Pinkley previously worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce and ran unsuccessfully for Ferndale mayor in 2019. Now, he is campaigning on a more Republican platform to represent downtown and prioritize business interests above community needs.

    Kate Bishop will continue fighting for community solutions. She deserves your vote for Ferndale City Council, Position 6.

    Kate Bishop

    Incumbent Kate Bishop is running to retain her seat in Position 6 on the Ferndale City Council. First elected in 2017, Bishop is the current mayor pro tem and chairs the Finance and Administration committee. She has also worked as a social worker for over a decade.

    Kate Bishop

    Incumbent Kate Bishop is running to retain her seat in Position 6 on the Ferndale City Council. First elected in 2017, Bishop is the current mayor pro tem and chairs the Finance and Administration committee. She has also worked as a social worker for over a decade.

  • Maralise Fegan is running to retain her seat in Position 7 on the Ferndale City Council. Fegan first joined the council in January of this year when she was appointed to fill the vacancy left by Ramon Llanos. She works as an immigration paralegal with Boundary Bay Law and serves as an adjunct faculty and advisor in paralegal studies at Whatcom Community College.

    If retained, Fegan wants to center the community's needs by making Ferndale more affordable while attracting new businesses and creating new jobs. Fegan would also seek to handle growth responsibly and invest in infrastructure updates to keep the community safe. She supports bold action on affordable housing, especially as the eviction moratorium lifts, as well as accessible broadband access. In this race, Fegan has earned endorsements from local progressive organizations.

    Former mayor and pastor Jon Mutchler is challenging Fegan for Position 7. He served on the city council himself from 2010 to 2015 and then served one term as mayor from 2016 to 2019. In 2019, Mutchler was found guilty of an ethics violation when he displayed personal campaign materials at City Hall. He is running a more conservative campaign to advocate for cutting social services and promoting fear-based public safety ideas. Mutchler lists affordability as a top priority, but unfortunately, his solution is just to decrease costs for developers instead of addressing the roots of the housing crisis.

    Fegan is the best choice in this race. She deserves your vote for Ferndale City Council, Position 7.

    Maralise Fegan

    Maralise Fegan is running to retain her seat in Position 7 on the Ferndale City Council. Fegan first joined the council in January of this year when she was appointed to fill the vacancy left by Ramon Llanos.

    Maralise Fegan

    Maralise Fegan is running to retain her seat in Position 7 on the Ferndale City Council. Fegan first joined the council in January of this year when she was appointed to fill the vacancy left by Ramon Llanos.