National Organization for Women PAC

National Organization for Women PAC

The National Organization for Women (NOW) is the largest organization of feminist activists in the United States. NOW has 500,000 contributing members and 550 chapters in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Since its founding in 1966, NOW's goal has been to take action to bring about equality for all women. The National Organization for Women (NOW) Federal PAC endorses candidates for the federal elections and the WA State NOW PAC endorses candidates for local and state elections.

National Organization for Women PAC Website

County Races

King County

  • Dr. Shukri Olow is a community organizer running to empower King County residents with the resources they need to thrive. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old. Olow credits the food bank, social workers, and Kent public housing system for helping her find opportunities, and wants to now help meet the needs of those struggling in King County. In discussions with child care providers, immigrants, small business owners, teachers, and others she has identified several ways to meet the needs of those who don't have wealth or political power.

    Olow notes that the biggest driver of homelessness in the region is rent increasing faster than incomes. To beat rising costs, Olow wants to ensure that the county is funding humane, non-congregate shelters to get people out of crisis. She also wants to build supportive housing and a minimum of 37,000 units of housing which would be available to those with the lowest incomes. She wants to reimagine community safety through a public health lens and move towards investments in the community through school partnerships, workforce development, and more. Olow takes seriously the need for everyone to thrive and would work towards free transit, accessible child care and elder care, and more.

    In our interview with Olow, we were impressed by her thoughtfulness, her record, and her tenacity in bringing together many voices and needs for the good of all. In this race between two progressive candidates, we recommend Olow with the support of many of our progressive partners.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is a community organizer running to empower King County residents with the resources they need to thrive. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is a community organizer running to empower King County residents with the resources they need to thrive. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

Port Races

Port of Seattle

  • Incumbent and businesses consultant Ryan Calkins has successfully pushed the port in a more progressive direction during his first term. The current Port of Seattle commissioners have enacted several crucial reforms over the last few years, including ensuring at least a $15 minimum wage for airline catering workers and starting an accelerator mentorship program aimed at increasing access to contracting jobs for women- and minority-owned businesses.

    If re-elected, Calkins states that he will continue to lead on mitigating the environmental impacts of the airport and port operations, promoting living wage jobs, improving immigration policy, and more. He has earned broad support from progressive and Democratic Party organizations.

    His opponent is Norman Sigler, the owner of a consulting firm that focuses on finding diverse executive leadership. He serves as a precinct committee officer and is on the executive board of the King County Democrats Central Committee. Sigler wants to focus the port on environmental and economic justice, stating that he would invest port profits into improving neighboring communities. He states that he would promote a green economy, work to end systemic racism and keep the port honest, but does not have as detailed of a policy agenda. For example, in a forum for Port of Seattle candidates, Sigler stated that he would seek "putting mandates" on cruises and airlines, while Calkins specifically stated that he would support electric aviation, cleaner fuels, and high-speed ground transportation over short flights.

    Calkins has an excellent record on the port and broad support from the progressive community. Calkins is the best choice for Port of Seattle, Position #1.

    Ryan Calkins

    Submitted by stephanie on Tue, 09/28/2021 - 12:40

    Incumbent and businesses consultant Ryan Calkins has successfully pushed the port in a more progressive direction during his first term.

    Ryan Calkins

    Submitted by stephanie on Tue, 09/28/2021 - 12:40

    Incumbent and businesses consultant Ryan Calkins has successfully pushed the port in a more progressive direction during his first term.

  • Hamdi Mohamed is running for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 3 with a visionary agenda for the port that centers the needs of the workers, the environment, and the broader community. Mohamed's family fled Somalia and settled in the SeaTac region when she was 5 years old, with her mother working in the airport. Mohamed now works in the King County Office of Equity and Social Justice as a policy advisor and has helped manage the millions of dollars in COVID-19 relief funds that went to community-based organizations in King County.

    As a resident of SeaTac, Mohamed lives in one of the communities most affected by airport pollution. Given that none of the current commissioners live in South King County, she seeks to bridge the gap between port policy and lived experience. She wants to expand the port's efforts to transition from fossil fuels to clean energy and restore habitats for salmon and orcas. Through greater direct partnership with workers, Mohamed wants to protect unions, provide pandemic relief, and prioritize workplace health.

    In our interview with Mohamed, we were incredibly impressed by her drive to improve the lives of those who work and live near the port. One recent example of her accomplishment was her work with Beyoncé and Tina Knowles to provide free coronavirus testing and supplies to local organizations and working with the King County Immigrant and Refugee Commission to center language access in COVID-19 relief.

    Mohamed is running against incumbent Stephanie Bowman, who has served on the commission since 2013. Bowman is proud of the port commission's progress on many fronts, including expanding youth job training opportunities in partnership with Seattle Public Schools, making stormwater improvements, and developing a noise insulation program for homes close to the airport. She states that one of her most important accomplishments was tripling the number of interns, many of which were youth of color from marginalized communities. If re-elected, Bowman would focus on improving economic opportunity at the port for all, including union members, women-owned businesses, lower-income workers, and more.

    However, we were extremely disappointed when Bowman voted in 2015 to allow Shell Oil to base its arctic drilling operations in Seattle. In addition, she voted to use taxpayer money to file a legal challenge against SeaTac's $15 per hour minimum wage. In our interview with Bowman this year, she stated that she had been on the commission for less than six months before the wage increase vote, and believed that the council did not have the regulatory authority to make the change. On the Shell vote, she said that the commission was not transparent enough about it and that she would rather have ships come to Seattle ports where the environmental standards are the highest.

    We believe Mohamed would be a stronger leader for progress at the port and would bring much-needed representation to the commission for South King County communities. We strongly support Hamdi Mohamed for her dedication to the community, her progressive agenda, and her backing by progressive organizations.

    Hamdi Mohamed

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Hamdi Mohamed is running for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 3 with a visionary agenda for the port that centers the needs of the workers, the environment, and the broader community.

    Hamdi Mohamed

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Hamdi Mohamed is running for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 3 with a visionary agenda for the port that centers the needs of the workers, the environment, and the broader community.

  • Toshiko Hasegawa is running for Port of Seattle, Position 4 to center the experiences of port workers and nearby communities in building a more equitable future for the port. She is the executive director of the Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs (CAPAA), which advises the governor, state agencies, and the state legislature on issues affecting Asian American communities. If either she or fellow candidate Hamdi Mohamed are elected, it will be the first time a woman of color has ever served on the Seattle Port Commission.

    As executive director of CAPAA, Hasegawa and the rest of the commission helped support small businesses during the pandemic, provide relief to community-based organizations, and create a language access plan so that residents could access critical information. In our interview, Hasegawa spoke to how she wanted to expand and apply those equity processes to the port. She supports mental health care and paid family leave for workers, ongoing training, and apprenticeships programs, especially for women and people of color, who have been historically underrepresented in port employment. Hasegawa also wants to see an airport cities advisory group permanently established as the economy continues to rebuild and recover from the pandemic.

    On environmental issues, Hasegawa would be an advocate for the port assisting in the construction of high-speed rail to cut down on short flights to nearby cities like Portland or Bellingham. She also wants to meaningfully engage the community in climate justice, including the tribes, and explore the possibility of using solar and wind at the port.

    We join a compelling majority of progressive organizations in recommending Hasegawa to help usher in a new generation of leadership and for her inclusive vision for the future of the port. 

    Toshiko Grace Hasegawa

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Toshiko Hasegawa is running for Port of Seattle, Position 4 to center the experiences of port workers and nearby communities in building a more equitable future for the port.

    Toshiko Grace Hasegawa

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Toshiko Hasegawa is running for Port of Seattle, Position 4 to center the experiences of port workers and nearby communities in building a more equitable future for the port.

Port of Tacoma

  • Mary Bacon is running for Port of Tacoma, Commissioner Position 4. Bacon is an environmental scientist, health physicist, and veteran. She served as the elected president of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers (IFPTE) Local 12 where she advocated for workers’ rights during multiple successful contract negotiations.

    If elected, Bacon hopes to address traffic congestion in and around the port, help foster greater economic growth, and ensure environmental stewardship that protects the unique estuarine ecosystem. She would prioritize science-backed climate policy and wants to see ports along the coast working together. Bacon has been endorsed by the Washington Conservation Voters, which sets her apart from her opponent despite listing similar platforms on their websites.

    Incumbent commissioner Don Meyer is running to retain the Position 4 seat he assumed after first being elected in 2010. Before that, Meyer served as the deputy director of the Port of Tacoma and the executive director of the Foss Waterway Development Authority. If re-elected, he wants to continue pursuing a more conservative agenda focused on modernizing terminals and waterways, but also intends to limit revenue, putting many improvements beyond reach.

    Mary Bacon is the best choice in this race to improve the port’s environment policies and advocate for the workers who keep Tacoma’s port running.

    Mary Bacon

    Submitted by alexwhite on Tue, 09/28/2021 - 12:40

    Mary Bacon is running for Port of Tacoma, Commissioner Position 4. Bacon is an environmental scientist, health physicist, and veteran.

    Mary Bacon

    Submitted by alexwhite on Tue, 09/28/2021 - 12:40

    Mary Bacon is running for Port of Tacoma, Commissioner Position 4. Bacon is an environmental scientist, health physicist, and veteran.

City Races

City of Seattle

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities. González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, she is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    The biggest divergence between Harrell and González's platforms is the candidates' short-term plans for how to help people experiencing homelessness. The crux of the problem, which experts and agencies have stated time and time again, is the lack of shelters with services to help people stay housed. The city has about 4,000 unsheltered people, and while there are about 1,300 affordable housing units and 400 additional shelter spaces coming soon, it is not enough. González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She would also make it a key focus to increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to child care access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts to increase health and safety. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

City of Bothell

  • Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy. Currently, she works as a co-chair on Bothell’s Anti-Racist Communities team and is a parent member of the Northshore School District's Ethnic Studies pilot program. As a Harvard Business School graduate and a Vietnamese American from an immigrant family, Tran wants to bring her unique perspective to create community-driven solutions that make Bothell a more equitable place.

    Tran believes housing and food are human rights and would work on policies to address housing and food insecurity in Bothell. She wants to expand the RADAR program, a de-escalation initiative with Bothell police that seeks to avoid the use of force when responding to people with behavioral health issues or developmental disabilities. She would also look into investing in other community-based public safety initiatives. Tran is committed to supporting Bothell’s small business community and wants to provide grants and career pathways for business owners who are people of color, women, veterans, and LGBTQ+.

    Tran is challenging incumbent council member and current deputy mayor Jeanne Zornes, a moderate Republican who has been in office since 2017. Zornes is also a substitute teacher for Northshore public schools and a freelance photographer. She is campaigning to build up Bothell's business sector and increase law enforcement funding rather than invest in community alternatives. Despite claiming to run a completely nonpartisan race, Zornes has endorsed other conservatives this year.

    Tran will bring strong, progressive leadership to the council. She deserves your vote for Bothell City Council, Position 1.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

  • Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School. She is also a parent to three children on the autism spectrum whom she homeschools.

    Alderks is running on a detailed platform that includes generating equitable small business growth, investing in affordable housing to lessen the growing wealth gap in Bothell, and building an environmentally sustainable future for the area through the COVID recovery. As a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell, Alderks has already begun advancing equity in her community. If elected, she wants to expand the RADAR (Response Awareness, De-escalation, and Referral) program, which helps Bothell police respond to health emergencies without the use of force.

    Also in this race is incumbent Rosemary McAuliffe, a longtime Democratic elected official who was elected to the city council in 2017 after serving as a state senator for over a decade. Before that, she spent 14 years on the Northshore School Board. As of mid-October, McAuliffe has not yet shared a detailed platform in this race but mentioned that she wants to support small businesses through recovery from the pandemic.

    With strong progressive values and partner support, Alderks is the best choice in this race for Position 3 on Bothell’s city council.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

City of Edmonds

  • Evergreen Future
  • Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board. She has extensive community leadership experience including working for the Edmonds Senior Center, Edmonds Chamber of Commerce, and the Edmonds Sister City Commission.

    In this campaign, Crank is prioritizing housing affordability, transparent and responsive government, thoughtful growth, and public safety initiatives to reduce gun violence. She has proposed green building practices and constructing mixed-use developments to make sure that Edmonds can grow while remaining committed to environmental sustainability and economic diversity. Crank is running a strong campaign and has earned endorsements from progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Crank is running against incumbent council member Kristiana Johnson. First elected in 2012, Johnson has made environmental protections a focus of her time on the council. Unfortunately, she sent a racially insensitive email last year regarding federal grants for white-owned and Asian-owned businesses that drew criticism from her fellow council members. She has since apologized, but the situation raises concerns about her ability to engage an equity lens and to serve all Edmonds residents.

    Alicia Crank is the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Position 1 on the Edmonds City Council.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

City of Federal Way

  • Gregory Baruso is running for re-election to Federal Way City Council, Position 2. Baruso is a firefighter and the president of the Citizens for Federal Way Schools. He also served on the city's Diversity Commission for 12 years.

    Baruso was appointed to the city council in March 2020 and serves as the chair of the Land Use and Transportation Committee. He has worked to balance the city's budget, support local recovery from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and sponsored several initiatives to help end racial discrimination. Baruso is emphasizing helping both people and local businesses recover from the impacts of COVID-19 in his re-election campaign.

    Baruso is facing Erica Norton, a local business owner. She previously served as chairperson for the Pierce County Corrections Committee as well as the Federal Way Homelessness Coalition. Her platform is not progressive and emphasizes funding for the police instead of looking at investing in community services that would be more effective at keeping our community safe. Norton's campaign website includes complaints about the state's COVID-19 safety measures, which were instrumental in saving countless lives.

    Baruso is the best choice for Federal Way City Council, Position 2.

    Gregory Baruso

    Gregory Baruso is running for re-election to Federal Way City Council, Position 2. Baruso is a firefighter and the president of the Citizens for Federal Way Schools. He also served on the city's Diversity Commission for 12 years.

    Gregory Baruso

    Gregory Baruso is running for re-election to Federal Way City Council, Position 2. Baruso is a firefighter and the president of the Citizens for Federal Way Schools. He also served on the city's Diversity Commission for 12 years.

  • Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes. In her time on the council, she has been a voice for all members of the community and worked to prioritize housing affordability as well as economic development and recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Also in this race is Jack Walsh, a former newspaper reporter who currently owns a local ice cream business. Walsh led advisory vote campaigns to keep marijuana businesses out of Federal Way. His campaign platform includes a refusal to consider investing in community safety alternatives as well as damaging misinformation about people experiencing homelessness.

    Craft is the obvious choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 5.

    Leandra Craft

    Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes.

    Leandra Craft

    Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her master's degree in business and data analytics. Seam wants to use her experience in risk management and analytics to ensure community members can remain financially stable or regain financial stability, disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline, create a climate action plan to increase sustainability and minimize Federal Way's carbon footprint, and be a voice for the marginalized and disadvantaged communities.

    Seam is facing Jack Dovey. Dovey is a former mayor and council member in Federal Way. He is currently a marketing manager for GPSLockbox whose campaign website is not functional as of mid-October. Dovey's campaign platform is thin and does not prioritize issues the community has been calling for, including reforms to the local approach to public safety.

    Seam is the best choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 6.

    Renae Seam

    Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her master's degree in business and data analytics.

    Renae Seam

    Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her master's degree in business and data analytics.

City of Olympia

  • Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Cooper and the city council have passed several significant pieces of legislation that benefit the community. Notably, he supported the Olympia Home Fund to build new supportive permanent housing, provided funding for struggling businesses and families during the pandemic, and created a regional climate plan with neighboring cities. If re-elected, Cooper states that he will focus on housing and economic recovery, twin crises that affect everyone in the community, as well as continuing conversations on criminal justice reform.

    Cooper faces a challenge from conservative Spence Weigand, an Olympia-based realtor. His three listed campaign priorities include addressing homelessness, housing, and improving the business climate. While his site doesn't go into specifics on these as of mid-October, he repeats false and misleading claims about people experiencing homelessness in Thurston County. He also criticizes efforts to clean up and supply sanitation at encampments and wants to see increased law enforcement presence and new mental health facilities. On the matter of affordable housing, he is a supporter of zoning reform on single-family zoning, as well as projects like the 478-unit West Bay Yards project, while disclosing that his real estate firm is involved in the Hardel property.

    Cooper is backed by a significant number of unions, including the Lacey and Olympia firefighters' unions and United Food and Commercial Workers Local 367, as well as by Lt. Gov. Denny Heck and a large number of county and city elected officials. His track record on the council and strong support from our partners and local leaders make him the best choice in this race.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

City of Everett

  • Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

    Fosse has accomplished much in the community and beyond, especially for environmental causes. She led neighbor volunteers in an education campaign about toxic soil from the Asparco copper smelter, and was awarded $5 million from the Department of Ecology for the environmental justice cleanup of the Delta neighborhood. She was also awarded as Conservation Leader of the Year in 2020 from the Snohomish Conservation District for her work in promoting organic gardening and green pest management.

    Fosse wants to harness her environmental experience into a campaign that centers the wellness and quality of life of Everett residents. Her priorities include working on equitable COVID recovery, pushing the city forward on sustainability, and leading on housing solutions.

    We lean towards Fosse for Everett City Council, District 1.

    Mary Fosse

    Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

    Mary Fosse

    Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.