Washington Bikes

Washington Bikes

Washington Bikes endorses electoral candidates at all levels of government. Endorsement and support are given to candidates who commit to or have a record of making communities better for people on bikes — through growing local economies, improving health outcomes, or creating safer streets and roadways. Additionally, Washington Bikes makes endorsements of ballot measures which will benefit Washington communities through bolstering transportation choices, supporting outdoor recreation, and working to safely connect neighborhoods and cities.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Non-Partisan

    Dow Constantine

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career. As a state legislator, on the King County Council, and as King County Executive, Constantine has fought for and delivered transportation and transit solutions, action on climate, improvements in public health, and an efficiently run government.

    Under his leadership, King County has expanded Metro transit service, improved oil safety rules, and created one of the best urban forestry programs in the nation. Constantine also led efforts to pass Best Starts for Kids, a model initiative that increases access to healthy food, affordable housing, and public health services for many of King County's most vulnerable children.

    Constantine is now running for a fourth term as King County Executive to build on a pandemic recovery that puts people first and creates inclusive communities. If he is re-elected, one of Constantine's priorities will be to reform the King County Sheriff's Office. During our interview, he expressed his frustration at the challenges of getting answers or reforms out of the current independent sheriff's office. As the county shifts to an executive-appointed sheriff, which voters approved last fall, Constantine said he will push for more transparency and demand that officers wear body cameras.

    In addition, Constantine is hoping to continue and expand his efforts to open more hotels to house homeless residents of King County. He expressed pride in a new zero-emissions, low-income housing development in Renton and hopes to expand that model across the county.

    Constantine has faced some criticism during his tenure around the building of the $242 million King County Youth Detention Center, which voters approved in 2012 and opened in 2018. During the protests for racial justice last summer, Constantine announced his support for transitioning the jail away from holding youth by 2025.

    Constantine has earned overwhelming support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations as well as elected and community leaders. He is the best choice in this race.

    Dow Constantine

    King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career.

    Dow Constantine

    King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Non-Partisan

    Sarah Perry

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Sarah Perry is a small business owner, nonprofit fundraiser, and Democratic activist who is challenging incumbent Kathy Lambert for King County Council in District 3. Perry has years of experience building financial support for nonprofits and universities in the Puget Sound area.

    Perry is running on a platform of supporting small businesses, protecting farmlands and the environment, and improving transportation. In particular, she wants to provide more support for the 40% of the district in unincorporated King County that can't rely on city leadership for investments and infrastructure. In our interview with Perry, she presented a detailed overview of her campaign as a strong advocate for growth management. She wants to promote urban forests, preserve the district's natural areas, usher in alternative energy sources, and improve wastewater and storm runoff in open spaces. Perry also wants to see an equity lens brought to COVID recovery, ensuring that new modes of transit are brought to the district, supporting behavioral health, and assisting those struggling with affordable housing.

    While the King County Council is officially non-partisan, Perry's opponent, longtime Republican Kathy Lambert, has lost touch with this diverse and rapidly changing district. Lambert has voted against transit access for years, including voting to end Seattle's downtown free-ride zone. She also voted against making the county sheriff an appointed position, which was proposed to give the council and county executive more oversight in the wake of protests against police brutality. Lambert was the only "no" vote on the 2019 bill to use state money to fund early learning, post-secondary education, and in-home care providers.

     

    Lambert received broad criticism in early October for a mail piece from her campaign that singled out the only Black member of the King County Council with fear-mongering and divisive language. All six Democrats on the council, as well as King County Executive Dow Constantine, denounced the attack and said it has no place in our public discourse. 

     

    We need to elect leaders who will bring people together to create meaningful change, not tear each other down and divide us with hateful rhetoric. Perry's extensive civic engagement and track record of collaboration has earned her overwhelming support from community leaders and progressive organizations. Vote for Perry for new progressive leadership on the King County Council from District 3.

    Sarah Perry

    Sarah Perry is a small business owner, nonprofit fundraiser, and Democratic activist who is challenging incumbent Kathy Lambert for King County Council in District 3. Perry has years of experience building financial support for nonprofits and universities in the Puget Sound area.

    Sarah Perry

    Sarah Perry is a small business owner, nonprofit fundraiser, and Democratic activist who is challenging incumbent Kathy Lambert for King County Council in District 3. Perry has years of experience building financial support for nonprofits and universities in the Puget Sound area.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

    Borbe is a political newcomer who wants to bring an outside perspective to the Bellevue City Council. His campaign is focused on transportation, affordability, and economic development. He supports building more housing, particularly in Factoria and Crossroads, along with making the transit and transportation investments necessary to reduce traffic congestion. In addition, this would help alleviate a severe shortage of housing for low-income residents of Bellevue. If elected, Borbe would also push to improve transparency on the council by reducing voice votes so Bellevue residents have a record of how their representatives vote.

    Borbe is challenging longtime incumbent Conrad Lee, who is running for re-election to the council position he has served in since 1994. Lee is a Republican who opposed the light rail expansion to the Eastside, which will begin service in 2023. More recently, Lee opposed efforts to expand shelter options for people experiencing homelessness in Bellevue. He is not a progressive choice.

    Bellevue is a rapidly growing and changing city that deserves leaders who are ready to tackle a host of new challenges. Dexter Borbe is the best choice for Bellevue City Council, Position 2.

    Dexter Borbe

    Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

    Dexter Borbe

    Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

  • Endorsed By: APACE, SEIU 775, Sierra Club, Washington Bikes, Washington Conservation Voters , King County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level. She is focused on addressing the needs of Bellevue families by focusing on education, affordable housing, human services for vulnerable community members, and advocating for local parks and public spaces.

    In 2020, Robinson was elected mayor of Bellevue by her fellow council members and has been a moderate voice leading the city. During the COVID-19 crisis, she has focused on addressing food insecurity for community members as well as supporting women and minority-owned businesses with grants. Robinson has supported increasing affordable housing and shelter space, though far more progress is needed in Bellevue and across the region

    Robinson is facing Dr. Gina Johnson, the founder of Vital Mind Body. Johnson's platform emphasizes police funding without mentioning much-needed accountability measures or increased funding for community-based alternatives. In addition, Johnson proposes harsh and punitive measures that fail to address the root of homelessness in Bellevue. Finally, Johnson opposes some of the city's basic COVID-19 protections, which are consistent with CDC recommendations and have helped keep our community safe.

    Robinson is the best choice in the race for Position 6. Given the other competitive races for Bellevue City Council on the ballot, we hope Robinson will have the opportunity to work with a more progressive council and will support a bolder agenda for the city of Bellevue.

    Lynne Robinson

    Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level.

    Lynne Robinson

    Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level.

  • Skip Williams is running unopposed for Bellingham City Council in Ward 4. Williams is a retired music teacher with a long history of activism in the community, including serving on the board of the Mount Baker Theater and Northwest Youth Services. Williams' top priority will be to make progress on affordable housing and homelessness solutions, including supporting the Homeless Outreach Team and affordable housing development. He also wants to address institutional racism, address community-driven policing issues, and protect the area's natural spaces.

    Williams has earned your vote for Bellingham City Council.

    Skip Williams is running unopposed for Bellingham City Council in Ward 4. Williams is a retired music teacher with a long history of activism in the community, including serving on the board of the Mount Baker Theater and Northwest Youth Services. Williams' top priority will be to make progress on affordable housing and homelessness solutions, including supporting the Homeless Outreach Team and affordable housing development. He also wants to address institutional racism, address community-driven policing issues, and protect the area's natural spaces.

    Williams has earned your vote for Bellingham City Council.

    Edwin 'Skip' Williams III

    Skip Williams is running unopposed for Bellingham City Council in Ward 4. Williams is a retired music teacher with a long history of activism in the community, including serving on the board of the Mount Baker Theater and Northwest Youth Services.

  • Endorsed By: UFCW 21, Washington Bikes , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Michael Lilliquist is running for a fourth term on the Bellingham City Council. Outside the council, Lilliquist has been active with the local PTA and other nonprofits, especially focusing on protecting Lake Whatcom.

    During his 12 years on the council, Lilliquist has been a consistent voice for the environment and workers' rights. He is known for his careful attention to detail and thorough approach to policymaking that pushes the council in the right direction. In particular, he worked closely with the Sierra Club to move Puget Sound Energy away from coal power. He also supported a crisis response program to connect 911 calls with mental health professions instead of law enforcement. Unfortunately, Lilliquist opposed the four People First Bellingham ballot measures this year that activists organized to lead the city in a more progressive direction.

    Lilliquist is a good choice if you're looking for experienced leadership to help the city navigate a path forward on multiple challenging issues.

    Incumbent Michael Lilliquist is running for a fourth term on the Bellingham City Council. Outside the council, Lilliquist has been active with the local PTA and other nonprofits, especially focusing on protecting Lake Whatcom.

    During his 12 years on the council, Lilliquist has been a consistent voice for the environment and workers' rights. He is known for his careful attention to detail and thorough approach to policymaking that pushes the council in the right direction. In particular, he worked closely with the Sierra Club to move Puget Sound Energy away from coal power. He also supported a crisis response program to connect 911 calls with mental health professions instead of law enforcement. Unfortunately, Lilliquist opposed the four People First Bellingham ballot measures this year that activists organized to lead the city in a more progressive direction.

    Lilliquist is a good choice if you're looking for experienced leadership to help the city navigate a path forward on multiple challenging issues.

    Michael Lilliquist

    Incumbent Michael Lilliquist is running for a fourth term on the Bellingham City Council. Outside the council, Lilliquist has been active with the local PTA and other nonprofits, especially focusing on protecting Lake Whatcom.

  • Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Her tenure as mayor, which began in 2017, came at a difficult moment in the city's financial history. Washington cities are required by law to produce a balanced budget. With a deficit of $18 million for the city, up from $15 million inherited before her term due to pandemic-related causes, Franklin and the city council cut costs to balance the budget. Their budget closed service locations like the Carl Gipson Senior Center and the Forest Park Swim Center, reduced library hours, and eliminated city-sponsored events like fireworks, the animal farm, and flower festival, along with laying off or voluntary separating from over 130 employees. Disappointingly, despite calls by Black activists to reduce or move funds from the police department budget into more community services, the police budget was not cut like most other departments. Franklin states that the department's body camera program and training efforts are meeting the changes demanded by activists.

    Budget aside, Franklin has worked hard in the pandemic to administer pandemic relief funds and issued a stay-home directive in the early days of the COVID crisis.

    Franklin's opponent is Steve Oss, president of the Everett Transit Union. Oss does not have a website or detailed policy proposals as of mid-October. He states in a local interview that he believes businesses need support and the city's deficit needs to be addressed.

    While Franklin is fairly moderate, her endorsements on both the conservative and progressive ends of the spectrum represent local faith in her second run, and she is the only viable choice in this race.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

  • Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

    Fosse has accomplished much in the community and beyond, especially for environmental causes. She led neighbor volunteers in an education campaign about toxic soil from the Asparco copper smelter, and was awarded $5 million from the Department of Ecology for the environmental justice cleanup of the Delta neighborhood. She was also awarded as Conservation Leader of the Year in 2020 from the Snohomish Conservation District for her work in promoting organic gardening and green pest management.

    Fosse wants to harness her environmental experience into a campaign that centers the wellness and quality of life of Everett residents. Her priorities include working on equitable COVID recovery, pushing the city forward on sustainability, and leading on housing solutions.

    We lean towards Fosse for Everett City Council, District 1.

    Mary Fosse

    Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

    Mary Fosse

    Mary Fosse works as a legislative aide to state Rep. Emily Wicks and is on the Everett Public Schools Fiscal Advisory Council. She is a former member of the Everett Districting Commission and has served as chair of the Delta Neighborhood Association.

  • Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals. She was the lone no-vote for the "no-sit, no-lie" ordinance that passed this February, which criminalizes sitting or laying on the sidewalk in a roughly 10-block area, a policy which national legal advocacy organizations called "cruel and unusual punishment" for those who will be fined or jailed because they can't afford shelter. She has also voted to provide supportive housing for homeless students.

    If re-elected, Vogeli aims to incentivize more affordable and climate-friendly housing, support much-needed access to the library, advocate for de-escalation and mental health experts to work alongside law enforcement, and push for more sustainable transit. She enjoys strong support from a wide breadth of progressive advocacy organizations, including health care workers, environmental organizations, and labor unions.

    Challenging Vogeli is Tommie Rubatino, a teacher and pastor. His top campaign priorities are addressing homelessness, neighborhood safety, and supporting businesses. However, as of mid-October he does not have detailed policy proposals available on his website, and there is nothing that particularly points to a progressive agenda. His endorsements by Republican elected officials imply that Rubatino would lead from a more conservative angle if elected.

    Vogeli has served the people of Everett well with her progressive vision for the city. We strongly recommend a vote to re-elect Liz Vogeli for Everett City Council in District 4.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 4 includes the neighborhoods of Westmont and Holly.

    Liz Vogeli

    Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals.

    Liz Vogeli

    Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Nigel Herbig is running for re-election to Position 4 on the Kenmore City Council. Herbig has served on the city council since 2014 and was appointed deputy mayor in 2018 and again in 2020. He also works in the state House of Representatives as a legislative assistant.

    During his time on the council, Herbig has worked to improve government transparency and upgrade transportation options and pedestrian safety. He helped develop the Walkways and Waterways projects, which have already added three miles of new bike lanes and sidewalks to Kenmore.

    Recently, Herbig played a lead role in extending Kenmore's eviction ban through January 15, 2021 to ensure that renters can access federal assistance before potentially facing eviction. If re-elected, Herbig plans to continue building progressive momentum in Kenmore towards improving transportation, maintaining affordability, acting on the climate crisis, and making Kenmore a welcoming city for all. He also helped create the Kenmore Cares program that is using federal funding to provide one-time direct cash payments to low-income Kenmore residents.

    Also in this race is Bob Black, a former operating engineer and aviation inspector who has run for Kenmore City Council twice before. Black does not have experience in community leadership, and his campaign website and his statement in the King County Voters Guide are copied directly from his 2015 race in some places. In both past and current statements, Black prioritizes conservative economic policy, emphasizing again and again that he would stop any new revenue-collecting measures while simultaneously promising new infrastructure improvements.

    Nigel Herbig is the clear choice for Kenmore City Council, Position 4.

    Nigel Herbig

    Nigel Herbig is running for re-election to Position 4 on the Kenmore City Council. Herbig has served on the city council since 2014 and was appointed deputy mayor in 2018 and again in 2020. He also works in the state House of Representatives as a legislative assistant.

    Nigel Herbig

    Nigel Herbig is running for re-election to Position 4 on the Kenmore City Council. Herbig has served on the city council since 2014 and was appointed deputy mayor in 2018 and again in 2020. He also works in the state House of Representatives as a legislative assistant.

  • Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks. He also served on the boards of the environmental organizations Futurewise and Spark Northwest.

    First elected to the council in 2013, Arnold has worked hard to improve Kirkland's transportation, sustainability, and inclusiveness. He has supported efforts to strengthen safe routes to schools, improve transit options and reduce congestion, and provide co-responders for mental health calls to the police. Arnold is also a part-time technology consultant at Fuse. He was not involved in this recommendation.

    Arnold has been a thoughtful and innovative leader as Kirkland has grown over the last eight years. He deserves your vote for Kirkland City Council, Position 1.

    Jay Arnold

    Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks.

    Jay Arnold

    Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks.

  • Incumbent Neal Black was elected to his first term on the council in 2019. He serves as a member of the board of trustees for the King County Bar Association, where he works on the Housing Justice Project and other pro-bono civil legal aid programs.

    If re-elected, Black will aim to encourage a greater mix of housing types, encourage economic growth and neighborhoods around transit hubs, and support pandemic recovery for residents and businesses. Some of that work has already begun - the council passed an eviction moratorium through the end of September and is offering assistance to renters, homeowners, and landlords behind on mortgage and rent payments. Black is strongly supported by a long list of progressive elected officials and an impressive variety of organizations that advocate for the environment, affordable housing, and more.

    Challenging Black is Cherese Bourgoin, whose family owns a local salon. She also serves on the board of directors with the Kirkland Chamber of Commerce. Bourgoin states that electing her to the council would add a business advocate to the body. She notes that the unhoused population in Kirkland is growing, but does not offer a specific solution aside from saying she would help people get available services. Entry-level housing is also on her list of priorities, though again she fails to propose a solution to the challenge.

    Black is by far the best choice for Kirkland City Council, Position 5.

    Neal Black

    Incumbent Neal Black was elected to his first term on the council in 2019. He serves as a member of the board of trustees for the King County Bar Association, where he works on the Housing Justice Project and other pro-bono civil legal aid programs.

    Neal Black

    Incumbent Neal Black was elected to his first term on the council in 2019. He serves as a member of the board of trustees for the King County Bar Association, where he works on the Housing Justice Project and other pro-bono civil legal aid programs.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Washington Bikes , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Jon Pascal is running unopposed for re-election to Position 7 on the Kirkland City Council. As a former transportation commissioner and Kirkland planning commissioner, Pascal has worked on the city's Transportation Master Plan and other infrastructure improvements.

    In his next term, Pascal hopes to continue investing in small traffic safety projects and transit options. He will also prioritize maintaining and expanding recreation opportunities in the city's parks, overseeing additional fire and emergency services, and supporting affordable housing.

    Jon Pascal

    Jon Pascal is running unopposed for re-election to Position 7 on the Kirkland City Council. As a former transportation commissioner and Kirkland planning commissioner, Pascal has worked on the city's Transportation Master Plan and other infrastructure improvements.

    Jon Pascal

    Jon Pascal is running unopposed for re-election to Position 7 on the Kirkland City Council. As a former transportation commissioner and Kirkland planning commissioner, Pascal has worked on the city's Transportation Master Plan and other infrastructure improvements.

  • Small business owner Daniel Becker is running for Mercer Island City Council to improve community outreach and ensure all voices on the island are represented.

    He's running on a forward-looking platform that includes pushing the city to act on climate change and improving transit connections with the future light rail station. Becker critiques the council for reducing counseling services for students during the pandemic and he wants to ensure that a stable funding source is identified to restore the service. He also wants to incentivize more restaurants and retail shops in the city center.

    Becker is challenging incumbent Salim Nice. Nice, the former deputy mayor, is the president and CEO of a health care financial consulting company. He was elected to the council in 2017 in an unopposed race after serving by appointment. Nice voted seven months ago to prohibit people from camping or sleeping in cars, which means police will shuttle anyone experiencing homelessness off the island to shelters in neighboring cities. Violation of the law could result in a misdemeanor crime of up to 90 days in prison or a $1,000 fine. Local, off-island shelters have expressed concern that the council did not notify them of the new rule, and there is not enough space to accommodate those in need.

    While we appreciate that Nice and the council revisited their prohibition of camping in September, with additional resources to potentially go to local shelters, we believe Becker will make stronger pushes for progressive policy on the council.

    Daniel Becker is the best choice for Mercer Island City Council, Position 2.

    Small business owner Daniel Becker is running for Mercer Island City Council to improve community outreach and ensure all voices on the island are represented.

    He's running on a forward-looking platform that includes pushing the city to act on climate change and improving transit connections with the future light rail station. Becker critiques the council for reducing counseling services for students during the pandemic and he wants to ensure that a stable funding source is identified to restore the service. He also wants to incentivize more restaurants and retail shops in the city center.

    Becker is challenging incumbent Salim Nice. Nice, the former deputy mayor, is the president and CEO of a health care financial consulting company. He was elected to the council in 2017 in an unopposed race after serving by appointment. Nice voted seven months ago to prohibit people from camping or sleeping in cars, which means police will shuttle anyone experiencing homelessness off the island to shelters in neighboring cities. Violation of the law could result in a misdemeanor crime of up to 90 days in prison or a $1,000 fine. Local, off-island shelters have expressed concern that the council did not notify them of the new rule, and there is not enough space to accommodate those in need.

    While we appreciate that Nice and the council revisited their prohibition of camping in September, with additional resources to potentially go to local shelters, we believe Becker will make stronger pushes for progressive policy on the council.

    Daniel Becker is the best choice for Mercer Island City Council, Position 2.

    Daniel Becker

    Small business owner Daniel Becker is running for Mercer Island City Council to improve community outreach and ensure all voices on the island are represented.

  • Endorsed By: Washington Bikes
  • Incumbent Steve Fields is running for re-election on a progressive platform that puts climate action and careful city planning at the forefront. Outside of the council, Fields owns a local coffee shop and is an umpire in youth sports. Prior to joining the council, he worked in King County government for more than 10 years. 

    In his first term, Fields points to the city council's declaration of a climate emergency as a sign of progress. He hopes to move forward with sustainability policies that protect water quality and parks and promote energy-efficient buildings. He also wants to see the city update the downtown urban design code, stating that the process is out of date. As Marymoor Village and Overlake are developed, Fields says he aims to see more community involvement to improve the appeal and function of new development.

    If re-elected, Fields would continue to be an outspoken proponent of progressive reforms, with a focus on climate action and sustainable design changes. During our interview, Fields reaffirmed his commitment to the Health through Housing initiative, despite some controversy around his recent statement. He also reiterated his commitment to meeting with all residents and groups in the community, regardless of their viewpoint. 

    Incumbent Steve Fields is running for re-election on a progressive platform that puts climate action and careful city planning at the forefront. Outside of the council, Fields owns a local coffee shop and is an umpire in youth sports. Prior to joining the council, he worked in King County government for more than 10 years. 

    In his first term, Fields points to the city council's declaration of a climate emergency as a sign of progress. He hopes to move forward with sustainability policies that protect water quality and parks and promote energy-efficient buildings. He also wants to see the city update the downtown urban design code, stating that the process is out of date. As Marymoor Village and Overlake are developed, Fields says he aims to see more community involvement to improve the appeal and function of new development.

    If re-elected, Fields would continue to be an outspoken proponent of progressive reforms, with a focus on climate action and sustainable design changes. During our interview, Fields reaffirmed his commitment to the Health through Housing initiative, despite some controversy around his recent statement. He also reiterated his commitment to meeting with all residents and groups in the community, regardless of their viewpoint. 

    Steve Fields

    Incumbent Steve Fields is running for re-election on a progressive platform that puts climate action and careful city planning at the forefront. Outside of the council, Fields owns a local coffee shop and is an umpire in youth sports.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Washington Bikes , King County Democrats, 48th Legislative District Democrats
  • Incumbent Dr. Jeralee Anderson was first elected to the Redmond City Council in 2017. She is the president and co-founder of Greenroads International, which rates and advocates for sustainable transportation infrastructure. She has also been recognized for her achievements at the state and national level, working on the Gov. Inslee-appointed Washington State Public Works Board, as an alternate on the King County Regional Transit Committee, and on the Cascade Water Alliance board of directors.

    Anderson's re-election campaign is focused on climate action, improving infrastructure, and economic justice. She is committed to implementing the city's climate goals by 2030 and wants to expand the tree canopy. Anderson will prioritize reduce housing costs and rents so that seniors aren't displaced and first responders can live in the community they serve. In addition, she supports expanding mental health response services and focusing development around transit hubs.

    Anderson faces a challenge from AT&T program manager Tara Van Niman. Her platform emphasizes the need to take local action on climate change, improve community engagement, and promote smart growth that accommodates the influx of people moving to Redmond. Van Niman has earned the endorsement of some local leaders like Sen. Manka Dhingra and Reps. Roger Goodman and Larry Springer.

    Anderson's thoughtful platform and strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations make her the best choice in this race.

    Incumbent Dr. Jeralee Anderson was first elected to the Redmond City Council in 2017. She is the president and co-founder of Greenroads International, which rates and advocates for sustainable transportation infrastructure. She has also been recognized for her achievements at the state and national level, working on the Gov. Inslee-appointed Washington State Public Works Board, as an alternate on the King County Regional Transit Committee, and on the Cascade Water Alliance board of directors.

    Anderson's re-election campaign is focused on climate action, improving infrastructure, and economic justice. She is committed to implementing the city's climate goals by 2030 and wants to expand the tree canopy. Anderson will prioritize reduce housing costs and rents so that seniors aren't displaced and first responders can live in the community they serve. In addition, she supports expanding mental health response services and focusing development around transit hubs.

    Anderson faces a challenge from AT&T program manager Tara Van Niman. Her platform emphasizes the need to take local action on climate change, improve community engagement, and promote smart growth that accommodates the influx of people moving to Redmond. Van Niman has earned the endorsement of some local leaders like Sen. Manka Dhingra and Reps. Roger Goodman and Larry Springer.

    Anderson's thoughtful platform and strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations make her the best choice in this race.

    Jeralee Anderson

    Incumbent Dr. Jeralee Anderson was first elected to the Redmond City Council in 2017. She is the president and co-founder of Greenroads International, which rates and advocates for sustainable transportation infrastructure.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton. She is currently an adjunct faculty member at Seattle University's Criminal Justice Department, where her coursework incorporates a racial equity lens. Previously, she worked at the state's Department of Children, Youth, and Families at Echo Glen's Children's Center, counseling and providing treatment plans for struggling youth. She has also worked at Youthsource, where she engaged young people who had dropped out of school.

    As a social services advocate, Rivera wants to prioritize updating Renton's Community Needs Assessment for Human Services, which would help provide the community access to food, shelter, and living wage jobs. She also wants to update Renton's 2011 Clean Economy Strategy, bringing it in line with today's standards on clean water, air, and reduced pollution. Additionally, Rivera will work hard to provide low-cost job training and emphasize the need for affordable and mixed-income housing.

    Her opponent, Ben Johnson, runs a small IT business and has worked with the North Renton streets project, as well as serving on the City of Renton Airport Committee. His priorities include funding the police and fire departments, making neighborhoods attractive, and ensuring that Renton expands its transportation options through Sound Transit and the state department of transportation.

    Rivera has overwhelming support from progressive organizations across the spectrum, from unions to housing advocates to educators. Her dedication to the community and progressive and bold vision for the city earns her our recommendation for Renton City Council, Position 2.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

  • Sammamish City Council Position 3 candidate Nazir Harb Michel is a qualitative researcher at a tech company that enables immigrants to send remittances to their families. Michel is a Lebanese- and Mexican-American Muslim and earned a doctorate degree in Arabic Linguistics, which he has used to be a community advocate to oppose Islamophobia. Additionally, Michel volunteers as a representative for King County Democrats and is a board member of Washington’s Truman Scholars Association.

    Michel’s platform is focused on celebrating diversity, improving the city's walkability, adhering to environmentally sustainable codes, service-oriented budget decisions, and equitable access to resources like internet and laptops until COVID restrictions lift. He wants to bring the entire community together to make Sammamish a better place for everyone to live, and to do this he believes in the principles of open dialogue and community engagement. 

    Incumbent mayor Karen Moran is also in this race to retain the seat she was elected to in 2017. Before joining the council, Moran served as the commissioner and board president of Sammamish Plateau Water and Sewer District. She is running a reactionary campaign against smart growth and lacks a platform outside of the issue.

    Nazir Harb Michel is the best choice for Position 3 and will bring progressive leadership to the Sammamish City Council.

    Nazir Harb Michel

    Sammamish City Council Position 3 candidate Nazir Harb Michel is a qualitative researcher at a tech company that enables immigrants to send remittances to their families.

    Nazir Harb Michel

    Sammamish City Council Position 3 candidate Nazir Harb Michel is a qualitative researcher at a tech company that enables immigrants to send remittances to their families.

  • Karen Howe is running for Sammamish City Council, Position 7. Howe is a leader in both private and nonprofit sector work, where she serves as president for SammamishFriends.org, which focuses on local sustainability efforts. She has also been a business manager in marketing. Howe has experience in public service through appointed positions on the King County Children and Youth Advisory Board as well as the Prescription Drug Assistance Foundation.

    Howe is running on a progressive platform that includes affordable housing for all Sammamish residents, climate action to protect the local ecosystem, and investing in city infrastructure updates. If elected, she also wants to create more direct communication between residents and members of city government, including introducing participatory budgeting to address the city’s falling revenue.

    Howe is running against Melanie Kelsey, who works in finance at Microsoft. Kelsey wants to focus on the budget if elected, but she won’t say whether she would cut services or increase public revenue to cover existing programs. She also lists infrastructure, environmental protection, affordable housing, and public safety as her top issues but offers vague policy suggestions to address them.

    We recommend Karen Howe in this race because of her support from our partners as well as her clear commitment to progressive values. She is the best choice for Position 7 on the Sammamish City Council.

    Karen Howe

    Karen Howe is running for Sammamish City Council, Position 7. Howe is a leader in both private and nonprofit sector work, where she serves as president for SammamishFriends.org, which focuses on local sustainability efforts. She has also been a business manager in marketing.

    Karen Howe

    Karen Howe is running for Sammamish City Council, Position 7. Howe is a leader in both private and nonprofit sector work, where she serves as president for SammamishFriends.org, which focuses on local sustainability efforts. She has also been a business manager in marketing.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities. González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, she is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    The biggest divergence between Harrell and González's platforms is the candidates' short-term plans for how to help people experiencing homelessness. The crux of the problem, which experts and agencies have stated time and time again, is the lack of shelters with services to help people stay housed. The city has about 4,000 unsheltered people, and while there are about 1,300 affordable housing units and 400 additional shelter spaces coming soon, it is not enough. González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She would also make it a key focus to increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to child care access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts to increase health and safety. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Bruce Harrell is a lawyer who served on the Seattle City Council from 2007 to 2019. As a Black and Japanese American candidate who has worked in both the public and private sector, Harrell's campaign is focused on rebuilding relationships in city hall and in the community.

    Harrell’s approach to addressing homelessness is overly reliant on private charity and nonprofit partnerships with the city. While well-intentioned, it's unlikely that charitable donations could close the huge gap in funding needed housing and services. He would create a program where residents could make tax-deductible donations to support homelessness outreach and would lead a campaign to increase philanthropic support for supportive housing.

    Harrell stated in a candidate forum that he would sweep encampments from parks by January or February, but doesn't address the current reality that such sweeps simply push people elsewhere given the lack of housing options. He has promised there will be "consequences" if people are offered housing and don't take it, despite the fact that available housing can accommodate only a fraction of the city's homeless population.

    Harrell is critical of the movement to redirect police funding into other strategies to promote community safety but does support increasing funding for non-law enforcement community wellness efforts. Especially compared to González's thoughtful plan, his approach seems more limited and personality-based. He stated that he would lead the Seattle Police Department in a culture change. The former council member intends to personally hire officers looking to be “change agents” and will not be afraid to critique officers. Harrell says that he will use data from the Race and Data Initiative to address discrimination in housing, policing, and more. Compared with González's plan, Harrell's proposal would lead to relatively modest reforms to policing in Seattle.

    Similar to his plan on housing, Harrell intends to seek the support of foundations and the private sector to make health service programs more affordable. While he supports focusing development around light rail stations, he has not made any commitments on changing the zoning for affordable housing.

    Like González, Harrell has served on the city council but he does not have a track record of being a force for change. His risky reliance on unstable private funding for affordable housing and homelessness and his personality-driven approach to police reform would be insufficient to solve two of the city's biggest challenges.

    Bruce Harrell

    Bruce Harrell is a lawyer who served on the Seattle City Council from 2007 to 2019. As a Black and Japanese American candidate who has worked in both the public and private sector, Harrell's campaign is focused on rebuilding relationships in city hall and in the community.

    Bruce Harrell

    Bruce Harrell is a lawyer who served on the Seattle City Council from 2007 to 2019. As a Black and Japanese American candidate who has worked in both the public and private sector, Harrell's campaign is focused on rebuilding relationships in city hall and in the community.

  • Endorsed By: Washington Bikes , Seattle Fire Fighters - IAFF Local 27
  • Evergreen Future
  • Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Mosqueda was first elected in 2017 and has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation that will fund affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, Mosqueda supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her campaign priorities include addressing our housing crisis with greater urgency, including re-zoning housing across Seattle, as well as providing assistance to renters and investing in health citywide.

    Mosqueda is running against Kenneth Wilson, the manager of an engineering company. Wilson's platform is not progressive and does not reflect the community's priorities. His voter's guide statement includes comments about public safety and policing that indicate he would not support reinvestment in community safety alternatives. He is also dismissive of evidence-based solutions for our affordable housing crisis.

    Mosqueda is a strong progressive and the clear choice for Seattle City Council, Position 8.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center. Oliver is an exceptionally progressive advocate who is incredibly dedicated to creating systemic change focused on the needs of communities of color and low-income Seattleites. They also serve as executive director of Creative Justice and is a member of coalitions like Decriminalize Seattle, Free Them All WA, and No New Youth Jail.

    Their forward-looking platform is centered around economic, social, racial, and environmental justice. Oliver's top priorities include expanding affordable housing, redirecting some police funding to make investments in communities, and bringing a Green New Deal to Seattle. If elected, Oliver would pursue policies to give everyone the opportunity to thrive, including preparing for extreme weather driven by climate change season that disproportionately impacts Black, brown, and Indigenous communities, and providing municipal broadband for all.

    Oliver is running against Sara Nelson, who co-founded and owns Fremont Brewing. She wants to bring her experience as a small business owner to the council and refocus the city on delivering basic services. Nelson does not support increasing investments in homelessness services and affordable housing, despite clear evidence from outside studies that the city's funding has been inadequate. She also opposes redirecting funds from the police department into community-based alternatives for public safety.

    The Seattle City Council has a track record of crafting innovative solutions to some of the most important issues facing our community. From groundbreaking minimum wage and sick leave requirements to empowering workers with predictable schedules and hazard pay to pushing for bold action on climate and making the wealthy pay their share, the city council has worked to build a stronger and more inclusive city.

    As we tackle big challenges with homelessness, police violence, climate change, and pandemic recovery, it's not the time to elect a cautious, business-oriented candidate who doesn't appear to be a catalyst for progressive change. Oliver is the clear choice in this race for Seattle City Council, Position 9.

    Nikkita Oliver

    Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center.

    Nikkita Oliver

    Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Zack Zappone is running for Spokane City Council, District 3, Position 2. Zappone is a local high school English teacher. He previously challenged Republican Rep. Mike Volz in the 6th Legislative District and narrowly lost.

    Zappone's campaign priorities include ensuring everyone has the training they need to enter the workforce, a housing-first approach to homelessness, worker protections, and creating a more equitable tax system for lower-income residents. He highlights his experience in logistics through his volunteer work with the Spokane Food Fighters, who are delivering meals during the coronavirus crisis. He supports expanded protections for renters, incentivizing more housing density, and demilitarizing the police.

    His opponent in this race is Mike Lish, a conservative fast food restaurant owner. Notably, conservative developers and realtors are pouring lots of money into this race to get Lish elected. Lish's campaign platform is not detailed but is focused on supporting funding for police officers instead of looking at investing in effective community services that make our community safer for everyone. While he claims he wants to address the affordable housing crisis, Lish does not have a detailed strategy to bring more housing to Spokane.

    Zappone is the best choice for Spokane City Council, District 3, Position 2.

    Zack Zappone

    Zack Zappone is running for Spokane City Council, District 3, Position 2. Zappone is a local high school English teacher. He previously challenged Republican Rep. Mike Volz in the 6th Legislative District and narrowly lost.

    Zack Zappone

    Zack Zappone is running for Spokane City Council, District 3, Position 2. Zappone is a local high school English teacher. He previously challenged Republican Rep. Mike Volz in the 6th Legislative District and narrowly lost.

  • Victoria Woodards is running for re-election to be the mayor of Tacoma. She had a long track record of public service before becoming mayor in 2017. Woodards supports working families and is committed to maintaining safe and healthy neighborhoods across Tacoma. She also crucially understands the importance of addressing institutional racism and has a demonstrated history of working within communities of color and building diverse coalitions to address the problems facing Tacoma. In her time on the Tacoma City Council, Woodards worked on establishing Tacoma’s Office of Equity and Human Rights.

    While Woodards previously supported the proposal to build a highly polluting liquefied natural gas facility in Tacoma because it would have created jobs, she has since emphasized she does not support any new fossil fuel facilities in the Tideflats.

    Woodards faces a challenge from Steve Haverly, a first-time candidate who works in construction and land management. Haverly does not have a detailed campaign platform. While he claims to be nonpartisan, what little campaign information he does have available demonstrates his priorities would not align with what Tacoma's communities need as we come together to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Woodards has earned broad support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations and numerous elected officials. Woodards is the best choice for mayor of Tacoma.

    Victoria Woodards

    Victoria Woodards is running for re-election to be the mayor of Tacoma. She had a long track record of public service before becoming mayor in 2017. Woodards supports working families and is committed to maintaining safe and healthy neighborhoods across Tacoma.

    Victoria Woodards

    Victoria Woodards is running for re-election to be the mayor of Tacoma. She had a long track record of public service before becoming mayor in 2017. Woodards supports working families and is committed to maintaining safe and healthy neighborhoods across Tacoma.

  • Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

    Rumbaugh wants to tackle challenges like air and water pollution and decrease our reliance on fossil fuels without impacting the local economy or jobs in the area. Her campaign is emphasizing resetting the economy as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, bringing more affordable housing to Tacoma, and prioritizing frontline workers and their families. Rumbaugh is also a passionate advocate for people with disabilities and has pledged to listen and push the city to become inclusive. Her platform includes a commitment to public education and ensuring that all schools receive equitable funding, regardless of neighborhood or zip code. 

    Rumbaugh is a good choice for Tacoma City Council, Position 2 if you are looking for a moderate candidate who is focused on boosting the local economy.

    Sarah Rumbaugh

    Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

    Sarah Rumbaugh

    Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years. She chairs the Community Vitality and Safety Committee and is a member of groups including the Parks Policy Board and Opioid Prevention Taskforce.

    In her time on the council, Ushka supported apprenticeship programs by changing labor codes to make these programs more accessible. If she's re-elected, Ushka wants to do more to fight racial inequalities in health, housing, education, employment, and law enforcement. She states that she will continue to work for more flexible federal funding for housing and shelters, including low-barrier shelters with fewer barriers to entry for the city's unhoused population. Ushka also feels the city needs to increase zoning density where suitable to address the housing deficit and provide additional resources for responding to mental health crises.

    Also in this race is Israel James McKinney. McKinney has worked for Boeing and Xfinity and currently works for Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services. His platform includes prioritizing education, supporting police reform and accountability, and reducing the gap in affordable housing.

    Our local council was disappointed with some of Ushka's interview answers, including her support for moving the migrant detention center to the Nalley Valley. However, Ushka’s support from local progressive groups and our partner organizations makes her the best choice in the race for Tacoma City Council, Position 4.

    Catherine Ushka

    Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years.

    Catherine Ushka

    Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years.

  • Incumbent De'Sean Quinn is a capital program manager at King County Metro. He volunteers in several capacities, including on the board of conservation organizations Forterra and as a member of the Strong Communities Fund.

    Quinn has led the community on one of those most pressing issues of the last year - police accountability. Quinn serves on the state's Criminal Justice Commission and has made a point of speaking out about the murder of George Floyd and the need to make systematic changes to law enforcement. Over the past five years, use-of-force by the Tukwila Police Department has dropped by nearly 80 percent as de-escalation training increased, and specifically in Tukwila, community representatives review every use of force.

    If re-elected, Quinn wants to continue the progress and create an opportunity fund to build resident coalitions to address safety and infrastructure needs. In addition, he supports rent and landlord assistance for those struggling in the pandemic, improving broadband access, diversifying transportation infrastructure, and continuing to support small businesses.

    Opposing Quinn is Jay Stark, who is running as an independent. He volunteers for the Tukwila Community Oriented Policing Citizen’s Advisory Board and was the third-place finisher in last year's three-person race for Position 1 in Legislative District 11. As of late September, Stark has not added any specific policy priorities to his website, but his official voter's guide statement for 2020 says that he is concerned with bureaucracy and regulations on businesses.

    Quinn has served the community well and has earned your vote for Tukwila City Council, Position 7.

    De'Sean Quinn

    Incumbent De'Sean Quinn is a capital program manager at King County Metro. He volunteers in several capacities, including on the board of conservation organizations Forterra and as a member of the Strong Communities Fund.

    De'Sean Quinn

    Incumbent De'Sean Quinn is a capital program manager at King County Metro. He volunteers in several capacities, including on the board of conservation organizations Forterra and as a member of the Strong Communities Fund.

  • Incumbent Erik Paulsen was unanimously appointed to the council in 2019. He served for several years on the Vancouver Planning Commission before his appointment, including five years as chair of the commission. He also served as a member of the Vancouver Affordable Housing Task Force and Southwest Clean Air Agency.

    Noting that housing affordability is a critical issue as demand outpaces supply, Paulsen believes the city should assist with strategies to provide housing at all income levels. He also supports investing in infrastructure to make Vancouver safer for cyclists and pedestrians.

    Paulsen is running against Kara Tess, who has served as president of her former home owner's association and now serves as a board member of her current HOA. Her public campaign site does not currently have many priorities listed, and her interview with our local council reflected some uncertainty about what the city council can do. The Columbian has also reported that Tess is not currently campaigning actively, and has possibly dropped out of the race. She states that the city should invest more in mental health and addiction resources, education to reduce the consumption of red meat and other carbon emission contributors, and said that she is running to listen to everyone and make the community a better place.

    Paulsen is the best choice for Vancouver City Council, Position 2.

    Erik Paulsen

    Incumbent Erik Paulsen was unanimously appointed to the council in 2019. He served for several years on the Vancouver Planning Commission before his appointment, including five years as chair of the commission.

    Erik Paulsen

    Incumbent Erik Paulsen was unanimously appointed to the council in 2019. He served for several years on the Vancouver Planning Commission before his appointment, including five years as chair of the commission.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov. Inslee as a commissioner for Washington State Parks and Recreation and serves as a board member of the Clark County Volunteer Lawyers Program, which provides law clinics for underserved communities.

    Perez's campaign is focused on improving life for all residents of Vancouver. She wants to incentivize mixed-income communities that have access to public transportation, and create bold solutions for affordable housing that bring the unsheltered community, service providers, and developers to the table. She believes that investing in communities of color can strengthen the entire city, and she would focus on removing discriminatory language in housing deeds, center living wage jobs, and look to help small businesses recover post-pandemic.

    She is running against David Gellatly. He is the former chair of the Clark County Republican Party and is now a member of the party's executive board. He states that his top priorities would be homelessness and supporting businesses in the city. Gellatly was cited last year as one of the organizers of pro-Trump rallies in Vancouver during protests and after the shooting of Kevin E. Peterson, Jr. As the head of a conservative activist group, Gellatly is likely to continue to push regressive policies on the council on social and racial justice, environmental reform, and more.

    Perez has worked tirelessly both professionally and on a volunteer basis to bring community-oriented solutions to Vancouver. She deserves your vote for Vancouver City Council, Position 3.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Danny Herrera is a public school teacher who is running to utilize his experience in education and racial justice on the city council. He has served in the community in several roles, including as a member of NAACP Yakima Branch, as a youth room tutor at YMCA Downtown, and as co-founder of the College Success Foundation Yakima Alumni Board. Herrera was lauded by our endorsing partners as a committed educator who has clear knowledge about the importance of reforming the state tax code so that everyone benefits, not just the wealthy. He is ready to join the council as an advocate for community investment in safer infrastructure, youth programming, and equitable economic growth.

    Herrera is running against Edgar Hernandez, who does not currently have a website as of mid-October. Some of the goals listed in his candidate literature include addressing the drug crisis and homelessness, though he does not expand on what policies he might put in place. However, Hernandez is endorsed by a right-wing organization whose priorities include removing historical discussions about race and history from schools and perpetuating fraudulent claims about rigged 2020 elections.

    For his dedication to improving the lives of youths and his support from our Progressive Voters Guide partners, we recommend Danny Herrera in this race.

    Danny Herrera

    Danny Herrera is a public school teacher who is running to utilize his experience in education and racial justice on the city council.

    Danny Herrera

    Danny Herrera is a public school teacher who is running to utilize his experience in education and racial justice on the city council.