UFCW 21

UFCW 21

United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 21 is the largest private-sector union in Washington, with over 43,000 members working in grocery store, retail, health care, meat processing and other industry jobs. UFCW 21 represents more retail and grocery employees and more professional and technical health care employees than any other union in the state.

UFCW 21 Website

Countywide Races

King County

  • Non-Partisan

    Dow Constantine

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career. As a state legislator, on the King County Council, and as King County Executive, Constantine has fought for and delivered transportation and transit solutions, action on climate, improvements in public health, and an efficiently run government.

    Under his leadership, King County has expanded Metro transit service, improved oil safety rules, and created one of the best urban forestry programs in the nation. Constantine also led efforts to pass Best Starts for Kids, a model initiative that increases access to healthy food, affordable housing, and public health services for many of King County's most vulnerable children.

    Constantine is now running for a fourth term as King County Executive to build on a pandemic recovery that puts people first and creates inclusive communities. If he is re-elected, one of Constantine's priorities will be to reform the King County Sheriff's Office. During our interview, he expressed his frustration at the challenges of getting answers or reforms out of the current independent sheriff's office. As the county shifts to an executive-appointed sheriff, which voters approved last fall, Constantine said he will push for more transparency and demand that officers wear body cameras.

    In addition, Constantine is hoping to continue and expand his efforts to open more hotels to house homeless residents of King County. He expressed pride in a new zero-emissions, low-income housing development in Renton and hopes to expand that model across the county.

    Constantine has faced some criticism during his tenure around the building of the $242 million King County Youth Detention Center, which voters approved in 2012 and opened in 2018. During the protests for racial justice last summer, Constantine announced his support for transitioning the jail away from holding youth by 2025.

    Constantine has earned overwhelming support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations as well as elected and community leaders. He is the best choice in this race.

    Dow Constantine

    King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career.

    Dow Constantine

    King County Executive Dow Constantine has been a strong and effective leader for economic justice, workers, and climate action throughout his career.

County Council Races

King County Council

  • Incumbent Rod Dembowski is an attorney who has represented District 1 since 2013. He has served in county affairs in several capacities, including as a pro bono counsel for the King County Superior Court, policy analyst in the county executive's office, and special prosecuting attorney.

    If re-elected, Dembowski will continue working on sustainable human services funding, protecting the wild areas of the Puget Sound region, and looking for sustainable transit funding that improves transportation options. He also wants to expand housing with an eye on reducing commute times and increasing affordability for workers and families. While on the council, Dembowski has sponsored several progressive reforms, including giving grocery workers hazard pay in the pandemic and moving to make the sheriff an appointed position through the council and an advisory committee.

    Challenging Dembowski is Kenmore resident and first-time candidate Sally Caverzan. According to her LinkedIn, she has worked as a long-term care social worker and is passionate about the environment. Her official voters' guide statement says that she would support instituting term limits for politicians, expanding mental health and addiction care with the creation of a King County regional treatment facility, and increasing supportive and permanent housing.

    Dembowski has earned broad support from elected officials, reproductive health and environmental organizations, labor unions, and many more. We recommend Dembowski for King County Council in District 1 because of his proven track record of progressive leadership.

    Rod Dembowski

    Incumbent Rod Dembowski is an attorney who has represented District 1 since 2013. He has served in county affairs in several capacities, including as a pro bono counsel for the King County Superior Court, policy analyst in the county executive's office, and special prosecuting attorney.

    Rod Dembowski

    Incumbent Rod Dembowski is an attorney who has represented District 1 since 2013. He has served in county affairs in several capacities, including as a pro bono counsel for the King County Superior Court, policy analyst in the county executive's office, and special prosecuting attorney.

  • Incumbent Dave Upthegrove is running to bring his tri-part vision of King County to reality: health, jobs, and justice. He was the first openly gay state representative from outside Seattle in Washington history, and he went on to serve five terms in the Legislature before being elected to the King County Council in 2013.

    Upthegrove has been a good council member and a solid advocate on several fronts in the county. He has been a leading voice on the council for environmental protections and climate action. As the chair of the King County Flood Control District Board of Supervisors, Upthegrove has worked to repair estuaries and has increased funding for repairing salmon habitats. 

    If re-elected, Upthegrove hopes to continue making progress on police accountability by strengthening civilian oversight of the sheriff's office. Overall, Upthegrove has been a reliable vote on many issues but has not been as ambitious on some priorities as Olow plans to be. In particular, he frustrated housing and human service advocates with his opposition to a more ambitious Vets, Seniors, and Human Services Levy in 2017. During our interview, he said he has learned in recent years the value of year-round public engagement, instead of just before a major vote, and this community input has made him more willing to support tax increases if they fund valuable services. He has earned support from both labor and environmental groups in this race.

    Dave Upthegrove

    Incumbent Dave Upthegrove is running to bring his tri-part vision of King County to reality: health, jobs, and justice.

    Dave Upthegrove

    Incumbent Dave Upthegrove is running to bring his tri-part vision of King County to reality: health, jobs, and justice.

  • Non-Partisan

    Kim-Khanh Van

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Kim-Khanh Van is a current Renton City Council member who is running for King County Council in District 9 to bring her experience and dedication to the county. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her doctorate and become an attorney. Van credits the community for her successes and wants to provide families and residents with healthy, livable communities that include child care access and infrastructure maintenance. Outside of her work on the city council, Van serves in a multitude of organizations, including as a PTA president, a volunteer attorney with the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, and the co-founder of AAPI Against Hate.

    Van has demonstrated that she is willing to take tough public votes on behalf of the most vulnerable in the community. She was one of only two members of the Renton City Council who voted to maintain the Red Lion Hotel as a source of housing for residents experiencing homelessness. In our interview, we were impressed with her in-depth knowledge about the issue and her desire to lead as a consensus and coalition builder at the county level. She wants to do more to educate voters on the economic and social benefits of providing supportive, stable housing early, rather than jailing people experiencing homelessness.

    Van has done much advocacy work for marginalized communities. She understands the struggles that the Black, Latino, and Asian-Pacific Islander communities have faced historically and in the present, and vows to continue to stand with residents to make the county a place of opportunity for all.

    Her opponent is Republican incumbent Reagan Dunn, who has served on the council since he was appointed and later elected to the position in 2005. Before that, he worked as a federal prosecutor appointed by President George W. Bush and was the national coordinator of a Department of Justice program that increases policing in neighborhoods. Dunn challenged Bob Ferguson in the 2012 race for attorney general and lost.

    On the council, Dunn has been a consistent voice opposing the progressive reforms proposed by the rest of the council. In March, Dunn was the lone vote against giving grocery store workers $4 per hour hazard pay for their service on the front lines of the pandemic. In addition, Dunn was a vocal opponent of streamlining homelessness services between Seattle and King County. Instead, he proposed spending $1 million of taxpayer money on bus tickets to send people experiencing homelessness to other states, another shortsighted proposal that failed to address the root causes of the issue. In this campaign, he has emphasized his prosecutorial background and longstanding support of law enforcement without talking about how to increase accountability for law enforcement.

    Van's strong experience and progressive values make her the best choice for King County Council in District 9.

    Kim-Khanh Van

    Kim-Khanh Van is a current Renton City Council member who is running for King County Council in District 9 to bring her experience and dedication to the county. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her doctorate and become an attorney.

    Kim-Khanh Van

    Kim-Khanh Van is a current Renton City Council member who is running for King County Council in District 9 to bring her experience and dedication to the county. After her family escaped Vietnam as refugees and settled in King County, she went on to earn her doctorate and become an attorney.

Whatcom County Council

  • Non-Partisan

    Kaylee Galloway

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee. She has worked as a legislative assistant in the state House of Representatives, and as a staff assistant and community liaison in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.

    If elected, Galloway will push forward on the county's critical affordable housing needs and focus on restoring water quality for both salmon populations and Whatcom communities, which includes supporting the reduction of pollution runoff. She wants to address sustainability in infrastructure, transit, and other public needs through the lens of climate justice, which to her means considering the needs of communities of color and those with lower incomes who are disproportionately impacted by pollution and health disparities.

    Kaylee is a good choice if you're looking for someone who will prioritize affordable housing and environmental conservation.

    Kaylee Galloway

    Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee.

    Kaylee Galloway

    Kaylee Galloway is running for Whatcom County Council to bring affordability and environmental considerations to the forefront. She is a member of the Whatcom County Climate Impact Advisory Committee.

  • Endorsed By: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, SEIU Locals 775, 925, and 1199, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Northwest Washington Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Bellingham/Whatcom County Firefighters (IAFF Local 16), Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee. Additionally, Donovan has served on the Columbia Neighborhood Association board, the Whatcom County Citizens Election Advisory Commission, and as both a member and board chair of the local Washington Conservation Voters chapter.

    During his time on the council, Donovan’s top priorities have been protecting Lake Whatcom’s ecosystem and budgeting responsibly so that Whatcom can provide human services. If re-elected, he wants to address the housing crisis that hurts the Whatcom community and economy, combat climate change, reduce incarceration rates while investing in diversion and alternatives, and protect clean water coming from Lake Whatcom and other natural waterways.

    Donovan is facing a challenge from Kelley O’Connor, a former first responder and a current health care management student. O’Connor advocates for affordable housing and mental health resources but has not released a detailed campaign to accomplish these goals.

    Todd Donovan is the best choice to represent District 2 on the Whatcom County Council because of his progressive track record and strong support from our progressive partners.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

  • Non-Partisan

    Rebecca Lewis

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

    Lewis' campaign priorities include supporting living wage jobs, updating public utilities, and protecting the environment. As a labor leader, she wants to expand community work agreements, apprenticeships, and prevailing wages. She also wants the county to invest in rural infrastructure with reliable broadband and cell service. Additionally, Lewis states that further development on lakes should be ceased as a way to protect the watershed for 100,000 people in the county.

    Her opponent, incumbent Tyler Byrd, is a board member of the Whatcom Business Alliance. Byrd is a conservative candidate prioritizing the needs of businesses above the local community. He was one of two council members to vote against the 0.1% sales tax to help fund affordable housing. On the environment, he voted against the moratorium on Cherry Point shipping unrefined fossil fuels, despite concerns about the cultural significance for the Lummi Nation and environmental threats. Finally, he voted against a $4 million coronavirus relief package last April.

    Lewis is the clear choice for Whatcom County Council in District 3 to bring progressive, community-minded leadership to the county.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

  • Non-Partisan

    Barry Buchanan

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year. He is the chair of the Whatcom County Incarceration Reduction and Prevention Taskforce and is seeking to provide alternatives to booking people for low-level crimes through the LEAD program, which was established in 2019.

    Buchanan supports both the Whatcom Crisis Stabilization Center and East Whatcom Regional Resource Center, which serve those experiencing mental health crises and hunger. He has also worked in previous terms in office to ban fracking and protect the environment. In this race, Buchanan is prioritizing public safety by investing in community alternatives to policing and by reducing the number of people who end up in the criminal justice system when having mental health crises. His platform is very progressive.

    Kamal Bhachu works as a senior maintenance engineer at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center and as a firearms instructor. His platform states that he would address affordable housing and living wage jobs, but doesn't offer enough policy details to evaluate and his campaign has been spotlighted by a conservative publication. His solution for addressing mental health and addiction in regards to people experiencing homelessness is to bring back programs like D.A.R.E. in schools, which doesn't go nearly far enough to help those suffering now, and doesn't address those who are unsheltered for non-addiction reasons.

    Buchanan is the best choice for Whatcom County Council, At-Large Position A.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year.

Snohomish County Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term. Last year, Mead chaired the Regional Law & Justice and Human Services committee on the council.

    Mead is a strong progressive who has worked to prohibit discrimination, fight the climate crisis, and secure an energy-independent state for future generations. His campaign priorities include reducing traffic and pollution through transit-oriented development and protecting the county's urban growth areas. In this race, he is supported by many local progressive leaders and our partner organizations.

    Mead faces a challenge from Republican Brenda Carrington. She has a business background in construction and landscaping and lost to Mead in last year's election. Carrington opposes new funding for essential services and disagrees with efforts to redirect some funding to community safety and prevention.

    Mead is the clear choice for Snohomish County Council in District 4.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Washington Conservation Voters, Housing Action Fund , Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, 38th and 44th Legislative District Democrats

Mayoral Races

Seattle Mayor

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities. González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, she is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    The biggest divergence between Harrell and González's platforms is the candidates' short-term plans for how to help people experiencing homelessness. The crux of the problem, which experts and agencies have stated time and time again, is the lack of shelters with services to help people stay housed. The city has about 4,000 unsheltered people, and while there are about 1,300 affordable housing units and 400 additional shelter spaces coming soon, it is not enough. González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She would also make it a key focus to increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to child care access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts to increase health and safety. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

Kent Mayor

  • Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance. She has also served families and children in the community as a gang prevention specialist and caseworker in Seattle and as the liaison for African-American families for Seattle Public Schools. In addition, she has been a board member of several organizations, including the Rainier Valley Food Bank and the UW School of Social Work Communities in Action Initiative.

    If she is elected, Bennett will bring the same energy she has for community service to the council. She has a long list of priorities, including supporting businesses as they recover from the pandemic, subsidizing child care, and providing options for elder care. On housing, Bennett's policies include providing wraparound services and transitional housing for those struggling with homelessness, addressing the legacy of redlining, and incentivizing housing for residents with middle-to-low incomes. She wants to redefine the role of law enforcement, providing more accountability for bad actors and hiring unarmed public workers who can provide social services for mental health calls.

    Bennett is challenging Mayor Dana Ralph, who has served on the city council since 2012 and as mayor of Kent since 2018. She has served in many regional organizations, including as past president of the Sound Cities Association Transportation Policy Board and as vice chair of the South King Housing & Homelessness Partners Board. Ralph points to many completed and ongoing projects in Kent as signs of her and the council's leadership, including securing funding for the light rail expansion to Kent, continuing the trash-clearing Mill Creek Canyon Revitalization Project, and investing in pandemic relief, from vaccination sites to employment retention programs.

    However, Ralph has also fought against measures to help the homeless. She sued the county when a temporary shelter was set up in a former Kent motel, which was aimed at helping houseless people recover from sickness. In addition, Ralph joined with Police Chief Rafael Padilla to raise concerns about recently passed laws that increase accountability for law enforcement. At a forum in August, community members accused Ralph of stoking fear in the community by making false claims about the impact of the new laws.

    Bennett is the best choice in this race to bring new progressive leadership to Kent.

    Dawn Bennett

    Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance.

    Dawn Bennett

    Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance.

Everett Mayor

  • Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Her tenure as mayor, which began in 2017, came at a difficult moment in the city's financial history. Washington cities are required by law to produce a balanced budget. With a deficit of $18 million for the city, up from $15 million inherited before her term due to pandemic-related causes, Franklin and the city council cut costs to balance the budget. Their budget closed service locations like the Carl Gipson Senior Center and the Forest Park Swim Center, reduced library hours, and eliminated city-sponsored events like fireworks, the animal farm, and flower festival, along with laying off or voluntary separating from over 130 employees. Disappointingly, despite calls by Black activists to reduce or move funds from the police department budget into more community services, the police budget was not cut like most other departments. Franklin states that the department's body camera program and training efforts are meeting the changes demanded by activists.

    Budget aside, Franklin has worked hard in the pandemic to administer pandemic relief funds and issued a stay-home directive in the early days of the COVID crisis.

    Franklin's opponent is Steve Oss, president of the Everett Transit Union. Oss does not have a website or detailed policy proposals as of mid-October. He states in a local interview that he believes businesses need support and the city's deficit needs to be addressed.

    While Franklin is fairly moderate, her endorsements on both the conservative and progressive ends of the spectrum represent local faith in her second run, and she is the only viable choice in this race.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

Federal Way Mayor

  • Jim Ferrell is running for re-election to mayor of Federal Way. Before becoming mayor, he served on the city council from 2003 to 2013 and as a senior deputy prosecutor for King County. Ferrell's priorities for another term include protecting the environment, investing in working families, and supporting local businesses. He has worked to support moving people experiencing homelessness into shelters and housing and hopes to enhance the city's parks as Federal Way prepares for Light Rail.

    Also in this race is Mark Greene, a perennial candidate who has previously run for the Washington state House of Representatives, Congress, lieutenant governor, and elections director of King County. He does not have a coherent campaign platform or relevant experience. Greene states he does not support reproductive justice and does not appear to believe in COVID-19.

    Ferrell is the better choice in the race for mayor of Federal Way.

    Jim Ferrell is running for re-election to mayor of Federal Way. Before becoming mayor, he served on the city council from 2003 to 2013 and as a senior deputy prosecutor for King County. Ferrell's priorities for another term include protecting the environment, investing in working families, and supporting local businesses. He has worked to support moving people experiencing homelessness into shelters and housing and hopes to enhance the city's parks as Federal Way prepares for Light Rail.

    Also in this race is Mark Greene, a perennial candidate who has previously run for the Washington state House of Representatives, Congress, lieutenant governor, and elections director of King County. He does not have a coherent campaign platform or relevant experience. Greene states he does not support reproductive justice and does not appear to believe in COVID-19.

    Ferrell is the better choice in the race for mayor of Federal Way.

    Jim Ferrell

    Jim Ferrell is running for re-election to mayor of Federal Way. Before becoming mayor, he served on the city council from 2003 to 2013 and as a senior deputy prosecutor for King County.

Anacortes Mayor

  • Evergreen Future
  • City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012 and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017. Outside of his work on the council, Walters is the planning and community development director for the Samish Nation and works with the Skagit Land Trust.

    Walters' platform includes affordable housing, high-quality public services and infrastructure, and making Anacortes an inclusive town for all that maintains its unique charm. During his time on the council, Walters helped to develop the Anacortes municipal fiber network, which is now under construction. He also started the council’s first committee on housing and community services. Despite serving a city with two large oil refineries, Walters understands the importance of environmental protections for the natural ecosystem and Anacortes residents alike. If elected mayor, Walters will use his experience in office to implement a community-focused agenda.

    Walters is running against fellow council member Matt Miller. Miller is in his second term on the council and served as the mayor pro tem from 2018 to 2020. He is a veteran and business owner running on a more conservative platform including criminalizing Anacortes residents experiencing homelessness and prioritizing business interests above community needs.

    Walters is the best choice for mayor of Anacortes because of his progressive vision and his support from partner organizations.

    Ryan Walters

    City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012 and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017.

    Ryan Walters

    City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012 and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017.

City Attorney Races

Seattle City Attorney

  • This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

    Thomas-Kennedy is a managing partner in her own practice and she has volunteered with the National Lawyers Guild, completed pro bono defense work for local organizers, and worked extensively as a public defender.

    There are many reasons to vote for Thomas-Kennedy. First, she is campaigning for common-sense justice reforms aimed at focusing on serious harms and crime prevention while stepping away from prosecuting people for poverty and mental illness. Second, her opponent switched parties to join Donald Trump’s party and run for lieutenant governor as a Republican in 2020. Third, Fox News and Tucker Carlson are attacking her for challenging their racist, conservative myths about reducing crime.

    As a public defender, Thomas-Kennedy has witnessed many people get caught in the criminal legal system because of a lack of supportive social services. She wants to focus on using services to prevent crime by addressing the root causes and keep people from being entangled in the justice system. By emphasizing prevention, taxpayers improve safety and save money on law enforcement and the criminal justice system, which are by far the biggest costs of city and county governments.

    There has been controversy about her use of the term abolition and some ill-advised tweets she posted after getting tear-gassed with her daughter during last year's protests. Although we don't condone her tweets, conservatives are drumming up fearful messaging about Thomas-Kennedy to distract us from the need for new approaches to fixing a failing system with urgent problems. In our interview, she defined abolition in a very sensible way as a slow process of building up the community so that we don’t need to rely on police, courts, and prisons as the catch-all solution for so many social issues.

    If elected, Thomas-Kennedy wants to build a victim advocate unit and end qualified immunity in order to hold the police accountable. She also proposes strengthening the civil unit of the office in order to fight wage theft, take exploitive corporate landlords to court, and hold fossil fuel companies accountable for environmental harm which affects us all.

    Thomas-Kennedy's opponent is Republican Ann Davison. Last year, Davison ran for lieutenant governor because she wanted to serve as a check on the Democrats in Olympia. Thankfully, Davison lost that primary election and Democratic lawmakers passed the most ambitious progressive agenda in decades this spring.

    Davison is now running for Seattle city attorney echoing many of the same conservative Republican talking points from her previous campaign. Her divisive platform demonizes those experiencing homelessness and she doesn’t believe additional funding is needed to connect people with housing or services. During debates and in her campaign literature, she has displayed a lack of understanding about the role of the city attorney and how the office functions.

    Thomas-Kennedy has faced misleading attacks from Fox News and right-wing radio hosts during this campaign. During our interview, she displayed a strong understanding of both the city attorney's office and the criminal justice system. We believe Thomas-Kennedy is the best choice for Seattle city attorney because of her experience representing marginalized Seattleites, her strong support from progressive advocates, and her commitment to pursuing justice for all Seattleites.

    Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

    Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

City Council Races

Mount Vernon City Council

  • Incumbent Iris Carias is running for re-election to the Mount Vernon City Council, representing Ward 1 in Position 2. Carias joined the council in 2018 where she has worked to improve representation in city government and lift all Mount Vernon voices. Carias’ background is in social services, caregiving, and community leadership. Outside of the council, she works as a liaison for the school district’s Migrant Education Program.

    When the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated Mount Vernon’s housing crisis, Carias worked with the rest of the council to direct funds to rental assistance, emergency housing, and other housing resources. If re-elected, she would continue advocating for community needs and public services, including more affordable housing policy and updates to transportation infrastructure like the North 30th traffic light and the widening of College Way under I-5.

    Carias faces a challenge from Daniel Downs, a senior planner for Skagit County, He emphasizes pouring money into helping businesses recover but wants to cut social services that Mount Vernon community members have relied on more than ever during the pandemic. Unfortunately, Downs lacks a detailed campaign platform and website as of early October.

    Iris Carias is the best choice in this race and deserves re-election for Mount Vernon City Council, Ward 1, Position 1 to continue bringing progressive leadership to the city.

    Incumbent Iris Carias is running for re-election to the Mount Vernon City Council, representing Ward 1 in Position 2. Carias joined the council in 2018 where she has worked to improve representation in city government and lift all Mount Vernon voices. Carias’ background is in social services, caregiving, and community leadership. Outside of the council, she works as a liaison for the school district’s Migrant Education Program.

    When the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated Mount Vernon’s housing crisis, Carias worked with the rest of the council to direct funds to rental assistance, emergency housing, and other housing resources. If re-elected, she would continue advocating for community needs and public services, including more affordable housing policy and updates to transportation infrastructure like the North 30th traffic light and the widening of College Way under I-5.

    Carias faces a challenge from Daniel Downs, a senior planner for Skagit County, He emphasizes pouring money into helping businesses recover but wants to cut social services that Mount Vernon community members have relied on more than ever during the pandemic. Unfortunately, Downs lacks a detailed campaign platform and website as of early October.

    Iris Carias is the best choice in this race and deserves re-election for Mount Vernon City Council, Ward 1, Position 1 to continue bringing progressive leadership to the city.

    Iris Carias

    Incumbent Iris Carias is running for re-election to the Mount Vernon City Council, representing Ward 1 in Position 2. Carias joined the council in 2018 where she has worked to improve representation in city government and lift all Mount Vernon voices.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Local 925, UFCW 21
  • Incumbent Richard Brocksmith is running for Mount Vernon City Council in the At-Large Position. Brocksmith first joined the council in 2018, having served on the city’s planning commission before that. He was appointed to the Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission in 2020 and serves on the board of the Mount Vernon Public Schools Foundation. Brocksmith is also the executive director of the Skagit Watershed Council.

    Brocksmith is running on a platform that emphasizes housing, infrastructure, economic development, and public green space. He has a 2- to 3-year plan to expand housing options for multiple income levels in order to address housing insecurity that many Mount Vernon residents face. Brocksmith wants to invest in community development including the Library Commons project, street and wastewater treatment plant enhancements, and utilizing the Local Fiscal Recovery for local parks and trails.

    Challenging Brocksmith in this race is Larry Carpenter, a retired business owner. Carpenter previously served as president of the Master Marine Services and is a current commissioner with the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission. His campaign has been backed by the county Republicans and he doesn’t have a campaign platform or website as of mid-October, including being unresponsive to local requests for interviews.

    We recommend Richard Brocksmith for the at-large position on the Mount Vernon City Council because of his community-centered platform and his progressive support in this race from elected officials and local organizations.

    Richard Brocksmith

    Incumbent Richard Brocksmith is running for Mount Vernon City Council in the At-Large Position. Brocksmith first joined the council in 2018, having served on the city’s planning commission before that.

    Richard Brocksmith

    Incumbent Richard Brocksmith is running for Mount Vernon City Council in the At-Large Position. Brocksmith first joined the council in 2018, having served on the city’s planning commission before that.

Burien City Council

  • Hugo Garcia

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Hugo Garcia is running for Burien City Council, Position 1. Garcia, whose family immigrated from Mexico more than 30 years ago, states that he learned the values of resilience and tenacity at an early age by watching his father wait tables to support their family of five. If elected, he intends to bring the experience of working families to the forefront.

    Garcia is a member of the Burien Planning Commission and chair of the Burien Economic Development Partnership (BEDP). His platform includes housing for all and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic that will equitably and sustainably lift up all Burien residents and help local businesses come back stronger. In addition, Garcia is committed to keeping Burien affordable so that working families can continue to live in the community and thrive.

    Garcia is facing Martin Barrett, who owns a corporate gift supplier. Barrett is vilifying community members who want to discuss community-based alternatives to public safety. He states that he wants Burien to be a “wealth generator" without providing details. While Barrett's platform does address the need for more affordable housing, he wants to rely on developers to solve the problem rather than making changes to zoning laws and seeking other innovative solutions.

    Garcia is the clear choice for Burien City Council, Position 1.

    Hugo Garcia

    Hugo Garcia is running for Burien City Council, Position 1. Garcia, whose family immigrated from Mexico more than 30 years ago, states that he learned the values of resilience and tenacity at an early age by watching his father wait tables to support their family of five.

    Hugo Garcia

    Hugo Garcia is running for Burien City Council, Position 1. Garcia, whose family immigrated from Mexico more than 30 years ago, states that he learned the values of resilience and tenacity at an early age by watching his father wait tables to support their family of five.

  • Mayor Jimmy Matta is running for re-election to Burien City Council, Position 3. Matta is the founder of Ahora Construction and serves on the Burien Airport Committee, Soundside Alliance Policy Committee, and Latino Civic Alliance Board. He was first elected in 2018 and has a deep understanding of the struggles that working families face. His family immigrated to the U.S. from Guatemala, and by the time he was a teenager, Matta had dropped out of high school to support his family. He later started his construction business and went on to become a representative for the Carpenters Union for over 20 years.

    As mayor, Matta worked during the early years of the Trump administration to pass a resolution making sure immigrant communities know they are welcome in Burien. Recently, Matta joined a majority of the council voting in favor of expanding affordable housing in downtown Burien. The new building will include units set aside for Burien residents and veterans.

    Matta is facing a challenge from Mark Dorsey. Dorsey is running on a divisive and conservative platform that scapegoats homeless residents. He opposes the downtown affordable housing project and uses a campaign slogan of "Burien first," which echos the worst of our recent political leadership.

    Matta is the clear choice for Burien City Council, Position 3.

    Jimmy Matta

    Mayor Jimmy Matta is running for re-election to Burien City Council, Position 3. Matta is the founder of Ahora Construction and serves on the Burien Airport Committee, Soundside Alliance Policy Committee, and Latino Civic Alliance Board.

    Jimmy Matta

    Mayor Jimmy Matta is running for re-election to Burien City Council, Position 3. Matta is the founder of Ahora Construction and serves on the Burien Airport Committee, Soundside Alliance Policy Committee, and Latino Civic Alliance Board.

  • Sarah Moore

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Sarah Moore is running for Burien City Council, Position 5. Moore serves as vice-chair of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board and co-founded ACLU Burien People Power. Her work experience includes more than 20 years at the Pacific Science Center and managing a quarantine site with King County during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Moore's platform includes ensuring affordable housing for everyone through partnerships with other cities, state and county agencies, and nonprofit organizations and addressing causes of crime through distributing much-needed resources to Burien's communities. She also wants to prioritize environmental issues, including reducing polluted stormwater that runs into Puget Sound and providing lots of outdoor, walkable spaces.

    Moore is facing small business owner Alex Simkus. He's running for city council to ensure entities like the Port of Seattle, the Department of Transportation, and King County Metro are held accountable for what he perceives as poor taxing and spending decisions. While his platform mentions increasing access to affordable housing and making utilities more affordable, Simkus does not bring the same level of detail to the campaign as Moore.

    Moore is the best choice for Burien City Council, Position 5.

    Sarah Moore

    Sarah Moore is running for Burien City Council, Position 5. Moore serves as vice-chair of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board and co-founded ACLU Burien People Power.

    Sarah Moore

    Sarah Moore is running for Burien City Council, Position 5. Moore serves as vice-chair of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board and co-founded ACLU Burien People Power.

  • Deputy Mayor Krystal Marx is running for re-election to Burien City Council, Position 7. She is currently the executive director of Seattle Pride and previously worked for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Washington.

    First elected in 2017, Marx has been a consistent progressive voice on the council. She takes a housing-first approach to homelessness, which prioritizes getting people in crisis into stable housing, and has worked to pass a range of tenant protections to keep people in their homes. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Marx voted in favor of $5 per hour hazard pay for front-line workers like grocery store employees. Recently, she joined her colleagues supporting an expansion of affordable housing in downtown Burien that includes units designated for Burien residents and veterans.

    Marx faces sales associate Stephanie Mora. Her platform is conservative and she blames outsiders and nearby cities for local problems rather than offering solutions for Burien. Mora is also running to repeal the local ordinance allowing critical social services to be built in the city, leaving residents in need to fend for themselves.

    Marx is the best choice in the race for Burien City Council, Position 7.

    Krystal Marx

    Deputy Mayor Krystal Marx is running for re-election to Burien City Council, Position 7. She is currently the executive director of Seattle Pride and previously worked for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Washington.

    Krystal Marx

    Deputy Mayor Krystal Marx is running for re-election to Burien City Council, Position 7. She is currently the executive director of Seattle Pride and previously worked for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Washington.

Renton City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Joe Todd is running for Renton City Council, Position 1 to bring new solutions and community perspectives to city hall. He currently works as the King County Deputy Chief Technology Officer.

    In our interview with Todd, we were impressed by his thorough knowledge of city affairs and his dedication to serving the community. Todd pointed out that the city cannot reasonably solve the issue of homelessness on its own, and that a regional approach and improved relationship with the county would create better outcomes for all residents. He wants to use his technological expertise to help law enforcement track the issues they are responding to so the city can allocate resources most effectively. Todd also wants to launch something similar to the CAHOOTS program in Eugene, OR, which can dispatch trained caseworkers instead of police officers to help those experiencing mental health challenges. He supports both thorough police training and redirecting some funding from policing to human services to build stronger communities and prevent crime.

    Todd is running against James Alberson. Alberson has served as a Renton planning commissioner since April 2020 and is a former board chairman of the Chamber of Commerce. Alberson states that if elected, he will prioritize ensuring a strong business climate, reducing homelessness, and increasing housing affordability, among other priorities. However, in our interview with Alberson, we were disappointed that part of this proposal to address homelessness was mandatory participation in city programs. This focus on putting people in jail or building a new regional facility is a costly proposal that fails to address the root causes of homelessness and further isolates people from their support networks.

    Todd's in-depth insight and commitment to Renton would be an incredible benefit to the city. We enthusiastically recommend Joe Todd for Renton City Council, Position 1.

    Joe Todd

    Joe Todd is running for Renton City Council, Position 1 to bring new solutions and community perspectives to city hall. He currently works as the King County Deputy Chief Technology Officer.

    Joe Todd

    Joe Todd is running for Renton City Council, Position 1 to bring new solutions and community perspectives to city hall. He currently works as the King County Deputy Chief Technology Officer.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton. She is currently an adjunct faculty member at Seattle University's Criminal Justice Department, where her coursework incorporates a racial equity lens. Previously, she worked at the state's Department of Children, Youth, and Families at Echo Glen's Children's Center, counseling and providing treatment plans for struggling youth. She has also worked at Youthsource, where she engaged young people who had dropped out of school.

    As a social services advocate, Rivera wants to prioritize updating Renton's Community Needs Assessment for Human Services, which would help provide the community access to food, shelter, and living wage jobs. She also wants to update Renton's 2011 Clean Economy Strategy, bringing it in line with today's standards on clean water, air, and reduced pollution. Additionally, Rivera will work hard to provide low-cost job training and emphasize the need for affordable and mixed-income housing.

    Her opponent, Ben Johnson, runs a small IT business and has worked with the North Renton streets project, as well as serving on the City of Renton Airport Committee. His priorities include funding the police and fire departments, making neighborhoods attractive, and ensuring that Renton expands its transportation options through Sound Transit and the state department of transportation.

    Rivera has overwhelming support from progressive organizations across the spectrum, from unions to housing advocates to educators. Her dedication to the community and progressive and bold vision for the city earns her our recommendation for Renton City Council, Position 2.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

Bothell City Council

  • Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy. Currently, she works as a co-chair on Bothell’s Anti-Racist Communities team and is a parent member of the Northshore School District's Ethnic Studies pilot program. As a Harvard Business School graduate and a Vietnamese American from an immigrant family, Tran wants to bring her unique perspective to create community-driven solutions that make Bothell a more equitable place.

    Tran believes housing and food are human rights and would work on policies to address housing and food insecurity in Bothell. She wants to expand the RADAR program, a de-escalation initiative with Bothell police that seeks to avoid the use of force when responding to people with behavioral health issues or developmental disabilities. She would also look into investing in other community-based public safety initiatives. Tran is committed to supporting Bothell’s small business community and wants to provide grants and career pathways for business owners who are people of color, women, veterans, and LGBTQ+.

    Tran is challenging incumbent council member and current deputy mayor Jeanne Zornes, a moderate Republican who has been in office since 2017. Zornes is also a substitute teacher for Northshore public schools and a freelance photographer. She is campaigning to build up Bothell's business sector and increase law enforcement funding rather than invest in community alternatives. Despite claiming to run a completely nonpartisan race, Zornes has endorsed other conservatives this year.

    Tran will bring strong, progressive leadership to the council. She deserves your vote for Bothell City Council, Position 1.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

  • Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School. She is also a parent to three children on the autism spectrum whom she homeschools.

    Alderks is running on a detailed platform that includes generating equitable small business growth, investing in affordable housing to lessen the growing wealth gap in Bothell, and building an environmentally sustainable future for the area through the COVID recovery. As a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell, Alderks has already begun advancing equity in her community. If elected, she wants to expand the RADAR (Response Awareness, De-escalation, and Referral) program, which helps Bothell police respond to health emergencies without the use of force.

    Also in this race is incumbent Rosemary McAuliffe, a longtime Democratic elected official who was elected to the city council in 2017 after serving as a state senator for over a decade. Before that, she spent 14 years on the Northshore School Board. As of mid-October, McAuliffe has not yet shared a detailed platform in this race but mentioned that she wants to support small businesses through recovery from the pandemic.

    With strong progressive values and partner support, Alderks is the best choice in this race for Position 3 on Bothell’s city council.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

Edmonds City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board. She has extensive community leadership experience including working for the Edmonds Senior Center, Edmonds Chamber of Commerce, and the Edmonds Sister City Commission.

    In this campaign, Crank is prioritizing housing affordability, transparent and responsive government, thoughtful growth, and public safety initiatives to reduce gun violence. She has proposed green building practices and constructing mixed-use developments to make sure that Edmonds can grow while remaining committed to environmental sustainability and economic diversity. Crank is running a strong campaign and has earned endorsements from progressive elected officials and organizations.

    Crank is running against incumbent council member Kristiana Johnson. First elected in 2012, Johnson has made environmental protections a focus of her time on the council. Unfortunately, she sent a racially insensitive email last year regarding federal grants for white-owned and Asian-owned businesses that drew criticism from her fellow council members. She has since apologized, but the situation raises concerns about her ability to engage an equity lens and to serve all Edmonds residents.

    Alicia Crank is the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Position 1 on the Edmonds City Council.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

    Alicia Crank

    Alicia Crank is running for Edmonds City Council, Position 1. Crank currently works as the chief development officer at a local nonprofit and serves as the vice-chair of the Edmonds Planning Board.

  • Adrienne Fraley-Monillas is running for re-election to Edmonds City Council, Position 3. Fraley-Monillas serves as president of the Snohomish County Health District, volunteers at the Edmonds Senior Center, and works on the city’s Diversity Commission, of which she was a founding member.

    In her three terms as a council member, she has proven her commitment to health care opportunities for everyone and protecting the environment. Fraley-Monillas has supported achieving sanctuary city status through Edmonds' Safe City Resolution, developing public green spaces, and investing in infrastructure to keep Edmonds safe. Going forward, updating Highway 99 and advancing diversity and equity in Edmonds remain her long-term priorities. She is endorsed by a wide range of progressive leaders and organizations in this race.

    Challenging Fraley-Monillas is Neil Tibbott, the executive director of a Christian leadership organization. Tibbott’s campaign emphasizes an exclusionary housing policy that would make Edmonds less affordable. He claims he wants to bring “political climate change” to the city council, which would mean cutting community programs and slowing progress on issues facing Edmonds residents.

    Fraley-Monillas is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote for Edmonds City Council, Position 3.

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas is running for re-election to Edmonds City Council, Position 3. Fraley-Monillas serves as president of the Snohomish County Health District, volunteers at the Edmonds Senior Center, and works on the city’s Diversity Commission, of which she was a founding member.

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas

    Adrienne Fraley-Monillas is running for re-election to Edmonds City Council, Position 3. Fraley-Monillas serves as president of the Snohomish County Health District, volunteers at the Edmonds Senior Center, and works on the city’s Diversity Commission, of which she was a founding member.

  • Endorsed By: Fuse, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, SEIU 775, SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Tukwila City Council

  • Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents. The Tukwila Civil Service commissioner has also worked on the Community Oriented Policing Citizens Advisory Board, both of which provide civilian oversight of the city's police department. Sharp plans to harness that experience to increase accountability and reforms for law enforcement. He says that as a working dad, he would also advocate for affordable housing and better transit access. He wants to see equitable recovery from the worst of the pandemic that targets vulnerable communities like seniors and people of color. Sharp has tremendous support from labor unions as well as local and Democratic elected officials.

    Tosh Sharp

    Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents.

    Tosh Sharp

    Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents.

Tacoma City Council

  • Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

    Rumbaugh wants to tackle challenges like air and water pollution and decrease our reliance on fossil fuels without impacting the local economy or jobs in the area. Her campaign is emphasizing resetting the economy as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, bringing more affordable housing to Tacoma, and prioritizing frontline workers and their families. Rumbaugh is also a passionate advocate for people with disabilities and has pledged to listen and push the city to become inclusive. Her platform includes a commitment to public education and ensuring that all schools receive equitable funding, regardless of neighborhood or zip code. 

    Rumbaugh is a good choice for Tacoma City Council, Position 2 if you are looking for a moderate candidate who is focused on boosting the local economy.

    Sarah Rumbaugh

    Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

    Sarah Rumbaugh

    Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Anne Artman is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 5. She is the founder and executive director of the Tacoma Recovery Center and previously served as the program manager of the Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center.

    Artman's campaign priorities include dealing with the affordable housing and homelessness crises, increasing behavioral health and social services, bringing more women-, Black-, brown-, and Indigenous-owned businesses to the community, and supporting Tacoma’s existing small businesses. She is also emphasizing social and racial justice and will work for more accountability, transparency, and equitable opportunities for all communities. Artman has been endorsed by progressive leaders like House Speaker Laurie Jinkins and Rep. Melanie Morgan and groups including the Stonewall Democrats and the National Women’s Political Caucus.

    Artman is an exciting leader who has earned strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partners, as well as progressive elected and community leaders. Artman is the best choice in the race for Tacoma City Council, Position 5.

    Anne Artman

    Anne Artman is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 5. She is the founder and executive director of the Tacoma Recovery Center and previously served as the program manager of the Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center.

    Anne Artman

    Anne Artman is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 5. She is the founder and executive director of the Tacoma Recovery Center and previously served as the program manager of the Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center.

  • Kiara Daniels is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 6. She is a small business owner and former Fuse fellow with strong progressive values. Daniels' campaign platform includes a holistic response to public health emergencies like COVID-19 by providing financial support to vulnerable families, workers, small businesses, and all others who have been severely impacted. She wants to invest in after-school programs for students and fight for seniors and other community members to have the stable housing and resources they need. Daniels is very involved in the Tacoma community and would bring a great progressive perspective to the city council.

    Also in this race is Brett Johnson, a business owner and member of the Sound Transit Citizen Oversight Panel. He previously ran for city council in 2019 and has expressed support for a radical policy of "gifting" everyone a single "lifetime discretionary abortion." Johnson is neither progressive nor qualified for this role.

    Daniels is the clear choice for Tacoma City Council, Position 6.

    Kiara Daniels

    Kiara Daniels is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 6. She is a small business owner and former Fuse fellow with strong progressive values.

    Kiara Daniels

    Kiara Daniels is running for Tacoma City Council, Position 6. She is a small business owner and former Fuse fellow with strong progressive values.

SeaTac City Council

  • Jake Simpson is an organizer and cook who is running for SeaTac City Council, Position 2. He is running to make SeaTac a city that welcomes everyone and serves all people equally. Simpson is dedicated to working with employers to find outcomes that benefit both workers and businesses.

    Simpson is running against incumbent Stan Tombs. Tombs is conservative and re-joined the council in June 2020 after Councilmember Amina Ahmed passed away. He previously served as vice-chair of the SeaTac Planning Commission. Tombs said upon rejoining that he would be a placeholder until the next election but is now running for re-election.

    Tombs claims he has a commitment to affordable housing and robust community services, but his actions are divisive and he votes with the more conservative bloc of the council against funding these services. He voted in December 2020 to eliminate funding from immigrant and refugee services. He also voted to not fund children and family services, medical equipment and guardianship for adults with developmental disabilities, or YMCA programming, all while boasting of doubling the number of police. None of these actions speak to the compassionate service for all that Tombs advertises. 

    Simpson will bring needed progressive change to the SeaTac City Council. We recommend Simpson for SeaTac for City Council, Position 2.

    Jake Simpson

    Jake Simpson is an organizer and cook who is running for SeaTac City Council, Position 2. He is running to make SeaTac a city that welcomes everyone and serves all people equally. Simpson is dedicated to working with employers to find outcomes that benefit both workers and businesses.

    Jake Simpson

    Jake Simpson is an organizer and cook who is running for SeaTac City Council, Position 2. He is running to make SeaTac a city that welcomes everyone and serves all people equally. Simpson is dedicated to working with employers to find outcomes that benefit both workers and businesses.

Olympia City Council

  • Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. The council member wants to see public safety reimagined through the input of the community, and wants to see first responders and diverse community members included as part of the city's public safety decision-making process. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    She is running against Robbi Kesler, the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis, and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County. In the primary, Kesler's initial answers on homelessness in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy, with an overemphasis on private property. Kesler has since significantly expanded her platform, providing more details on her plans to address homelessness, handle waterfront development, and support collective bargaining. However, Huynh's solid track record on the council and support from the progressive community still makes her the best choice in this race.

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. The council member wants to see public safety reimagined through the input of the community, and wants to see first responders and diverse community members included as part of the city's public safety decision-making process. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    She is running against Robbi Kesler, the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis, and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County. In the primary, Kesler's initial answers on homelessness in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy, with an overemphasis on private property. Kesler has since significantly expanded her platform, providing more details on her plans to address homelessness, handle waterfront development, and support collective bargaining. However, Huynh's solid track record on the council and support from the progressive community still makes her the best choice in this race.

    Yến Huỳnh

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature.

  • Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union. Currently, he works as a paraeducator at South Sound High School.

    Gilman's top three campaign priorities are protecting the city's environment and natural spaces, engaging residents in city planning, and encouraging a sense of cooperation in the community. While on the council, Gilman has been an advocate for affordability requirements on tax-incentivized development, which keeps more homes and apartments affordable for all. He also worked to pass renter protections for people falling behind on payments due to COVID. Gilman and the council have also supported reverting Capitol Lake back to an estuary to support salmon populations.

    His opponent is Candace Mercer, who says that she is a 'progressive' who voted for Donald Trump. Much of her writing focuses on her decision to embrace right-wing advocates and ideals. Her secondary focus is on homelessness and addiction, with a stronger focus on the latter, though the measures she suggests are largely punitive. Mercer states that the city should aggressively prosecute drug dealing and sex work, build privatized urban campsites, and push for substance abstinence.

    Gilman's agenda is far more comprehensive and actually progressive, addressing the city's biggest issues at the source with services that help struggling families and prevent people from falling into poverty in the first place. Clark Gilman is the best choice for Olympia City Council, Position 4.

    Clark Gilman

    Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union.

    Clark Gilman

    Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union.

  • Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

    Parshley is seeking a second term on the council to continue her work on climate, economic recovery, and more. During her time on the council, Parshley has supported the council's vote for grocery stores with more than 250 employees to provide hazard pay to workers during the pandemic. Parshley sponsored an ordinance banning the retail sale of dogs and cats in the city limits. She also joined the unanimous vote of her colleagues on the council banning the use of chemical weapons on demonstrators last summer.

    The two candidates in this race represent a philosophical divide in local and national politics on the left. Parshley has led a steady response to community demands that some activists have decried as incrementalism. On the other side, Reed feels a serious urgency to shake up the council and address issues like police violence immediately that some leaders have called unrealistic.

    Parshley has won endorsements from current members of the city council and other elected officials, as well as several Democratic groups and unions.

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Olympia Firefighters (IAFF L468), UFCW Local 367, Boeing Machinists IAM District 751
  • Evergreen Future
  • Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

    Payne wants to see the city acknowledge systemic racism and support the use of an equity lens in its policymaking. On housing and homelessness, Payne states that expanded transitional and permanent supportive housing will help alleviate the crisis while providing COVID relief for small businesses and rent stabilization for commercial tenants will aid the city's economic recovery.

    He also supports additional funding for body cameras, social services, mental health, addiction programs, and the city's crisis response unit. In his interview, he stated that his opinion on defunding the police was nuanced and that the city should focus on true reform, justice, and accountability.

    Payne states that if elected, he would be the first Black man to ever serve on the city council. He says that his experience as a gay, Black, former military member would bring the voice of marginalized people to the table.

    He is running against retired Air Force member and former firefighter Corey Gauny, who works as a management analyst for the state's Department of Licensing. The only issue listed in detail on his site is around homelessness. Gauny says that he would tackle the issues by providing resources around behavioral health, but does not address key issues like affordable housing or the need to provide shelter for the hundreds of people who sleep on the streets every night. He also mentions that he wants to focus on a vision of the city that centers businesses. Gauny is also using a Republican consultant, which further indicates he would bring a more conservative voice to the council.

    Payne is the best choice in this race.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Cooper and the city council have passed several significant pieces of legislation that benefit the community. Notably, he supported the Olympia Home Fund to build new supportive permanent housing, provided funding for struggling businesses and families during the pandemic, and created a regional climate plan with neighboring cities. If re-elected, Cooper states that he will focus on housing and economic recovery, twin crises that affect everyone in the community, as well as continuing conversations on criminal justice reform.

    Cooper faces a challenge from conservative Spence Weigand, an Olympia-based realtor. His three listed campaign priorities include addressing homelessness, housing, and improving the business climate. While his site doesn't go into specifics on these as of mid-October, he repeats false and misleading claims about people experiencing homelessness in Thurston County. He also criticizes efforts to clean up and supply sanitation at encampments and wants to see increased law enforcement presence and new mental health facilities. On the matter of affordable housing, he is a supporter of zoning reform on single-family zoning, as well as projects like the 478-unit West Bay Yards project, while disclosing that his real estate firm is involved in the Hardel property.

    Cooper is backed by a significant number of unions, including the Lacey and Olympia firefighters' unions and United Food and Commercial Workers Local 367, as well as by Lt. Gov. Denny Heck and a large number of county and city elected officials. His track record on the council and strong support from our partners and local leaders make him the best choice in this race.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

Federal Way City Council

  • Gregory Baruso is running for re-election to Federal Way City Council, Position 2. Baruso is a firefighter and the president of the Citizens for Federal Way Schools. He also served on the city's Diversity Commission for 12 years.

    Baruso was appointed to the city council in March 2020 and serves as the chair of the Land Use and Transportation Committee. He has worked to balance the city's budget, support local recovery from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and sponsored several initiatives to help end racial discrimination. Baruso is emphasizing helping both people and local businesses recover from the impacts of COVID-19 in his re-election campaign.

    Baruso is facing Erica Norton, a local business owner. She previously served as chairperson for the Pierce County Corrections Committee as well as the Federal Way Homelessness Coalition. Her platform is not progressive and emphasizes funding for the police instead of looking at investing in community services that would be more effective at keeping our community safe. Norton's campaign website includes complaints about the state's COVID-19 safety measures, which were instrumental in saving countless lives.

    Baruso is the best choice for Federal Way City Council, Position 2.

    Gregory Baruso

    Gregory Baruso is running for re-election to Federal Way City Council, Position 2. Baruso is a firefighter and the president of the Citizens for Federal Way Schools. He also served on the city's Diversity Commission for 12 years.

    Gregory Baruso

    Gregory Baruso is running for re-election to Federal Way City Council, Position 2. Baruso is a firefighter and the president of the Citizens for Federal Way Schools. He also served on the city's Diversity Commission for 12 years.

  • Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes. In her time on the council, she has been a voice for all members of the community and worked to prioritize housing affordability as well as economic development and recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Also in this race is Jack Walsh, a former newspaper reporter who currently owns a local ice cream business. Walsh led advisory vote campaigns to keep marijuana businesses out of Federal Way. His campaign platform includes a refusal to consider investing in community safety alternatives as well as damaging misinformation about people experiencing homelessness.

    Craft is the obvious choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 5.

    Leandra Craft

    Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes.

    Leandra Craft

    Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her master's degree in business and data analytics. Seam wants to use her experience in risk management and analytics to ensure community members can remain financially stable or regain financial stability, disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline, create a climate action plan to increase sustainability and minimize Federal Way's carbon footprint, and be a voice for the marginalized and disadvantaged communities.

    Seam is facing Jack Dovey. Dovey is a former mayor and council member in Federal Way. He is currently a marketing manager for GPSLockbox whose campaign website is not functional as of mid-October. Dovey's campaign platform is thin and does not prioritize issues the community has been calling for, including reforms to the local approach to public safety.

    Seam is the best choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 6.

    Renae Seam

    Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her master's degree in business and data analytics.

    Renae Seam

    Renae Seam is running for Federal Way City Council, Position 6. She works for Boeing Employees Credit Union utilizing her master's degree in business and data analytics.

Kent City Council

  • Clifford Cawthon is an activist, educator, and freelance journalist who has advocated for years for progressive causes. He works as an adjunct professor at Bellevue College and as the pro-housing coalition strategy manager at the Sightline Institute. In line with his history as a social justice advocate, Cawthon has organized and led campaigns for low-wage workers and for funding the Kent-Des Moines light rail station. He has also served on the Renters Commission in Seattle.

    Cawthon wants to bring his years of experience to city hall to improve life for everyone in Kent. He wants to start by strengthening renter protections and expanding low-income and "missing middle" housing options. He also wants to provide more security for residents by expanding the city's food banks and creating year-round farmers markets. Cawthon believes the city could do more to develop its infrastructure and would advocate for public broadband and transit centers in each neighborhood. He rounds out his progressive vision for the city by promising that residents, especially those from communities of color who are often left out of planning decisions, will be able to provide more input in city issues, including the creation of a civilian oversight committee for law enforcement.

    Cawthon is challenging incumbent Toni Troutner, who also serves as chair of the Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority Governance board. Troutner was also elected council president in 2019.

    One of the biggest differences between the candidates is in the handling of the budget and law enforcement. Troutner supported the 2018 proposal to increase utility taxes to hire more police officers, which voters solidly rejected. In addition, she was satisfied with this year's budgeting process, which devoted 60 percent of the city budget to law enforcement. Cawthon, on the other hand, believes that the city needs to invest more in community needs rather than reactive and punitive policing. Cawthon wants to fund more mental health and behavioral specialists to help address mental crises and domestic violence incidents, while Troutner falsely stated that crime happens because there isn't enough prosecution.

    We recommend Cawthon for a progressive vision for Kent.

    Clifford Cawthon

    Clifford Cawthon is an activist, educator, and freelance journalist who has advocated for years for progressive causes. He works as an adjunct professor at Bellevue College and as the pro-housing coalition strategy manager at the Sightline Institute.

    Clifford Cawthon

    Clifford Cawthon is an activist, educator, and freelance journalist who has advocated for years for progressive causes. He works as an adjunct professor at Bellevue College and as the pro-housing coalition strategy manager at the Sightline Institute.

Anacortes City Council

  • Amanda Hubik is running for Position 4 on the Anacortes City Council. She currently works as a legislative assistant to Democratic state Representative Alex Ramel and was recently appointed a commissioner of the Anacortes Housing Authority. Previously, she was the director of marketing and promotions for the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce.

    Hubik is running on a progressive platform focused on building affordable, workforce housing, establishing environmental protections, and supporting small businesses, especially through COVID recovery. She wants to bring Anacortes residents together to make community-minded policies and shape council decisions. In this race, Hubik has earned the endorsement of the local Democrats as well as many progressive elected officials.

    Her opponent is Jeff Graf, a Navy veteran who now works for a local aerospace manufacturing company. He has served on the Planning Commission since being appointed in 2017. Graf’s platform includes cutting government services apart from policing, prioritizing business interests, and increasing funding for police.

    Amanda Hubik is the most progressive choice in this race and deserves your vote for Anacortes City Council, Position 4.

    Amanda Hubik

    Amanda Hubik is running for Position 4 on the Anacortes City Council. She currently works as a legislative assistant to Democratic state Representative Alex Ramel and was recently appointed a commissioner of the Anacortes Housing Authority.

    Amanda Hubik

    Amanda Hubik is running for Position 4 on the Anacortes City Council. She currently works as a legislative assistant to Democratic state Representative Alex Ramel and was recently appointed a commissioner of the Anacortes Housing Authority.

Seattle City Council

  • Evergreen Future
  • Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Mosqueda was first elected in 2017 and has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation that will fund affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, Mosqueda supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her campaign priorities include addressing our housing crisis with greater urgency, including re-zoning housing across Seattle, as well as providing assistance to renters and investing in health citywide.

    Mosqueda is running against Kenneth Wilson, the manager of an engineering company. Wilson's platform is not progressive and does not reflect the community's priorities. His voter's guide statement includes comments about public safety and policing that indicate he would not support reinvestment in community safety alternatives. He is also dismissive of evidence-based solutions for our affordable housing crisis.

    Mosqueda is a strong progressive and the clear choice for Seattle City Council, Position 8.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center. Oliver is an exceptionally progressive advocate who is incredibly dedicated to creating systemic change focused on the needs of communities of color and low-income Seattleites. They also serve as executive director of Creative Justice and is a member of coalitions like Decriminalize Seattle, Free Them All WA, and No New Youth Jail.

    Their forward-looking platform is centered around economic, social, racial, and environmental justice. Oliver's top priorities include expanding affordable housing, redirecting some police funding to make investments in communities, and bringing a Green New Deal to Seattle. If elected, Oliver would pursue policies to give everyone the opportunity to thrive, including preparing for extreme weather driven by climate change season that disproportionately impacts Black, brown, and Indigenous communities, and providing municipal broadband for all.

    Oliver is running against Sara Nelson, who co-founded and owns Fremont Brewing. She wants to bring her experience as a small business owner to the council and refocus the city on de