Sierra Club

Sierra Club

If you want laws protecting our environment, the only way to get them is to elect good lawmakers. The Washington State Chapter of the Sierra Club interviews candidates running for public office, endorsing those it believes will be environmental leaders. The committee then supports endorsed candidates with funds from Sierra Club Political Action Committees (PAC), either by direct contribution to candidates, or through Sierra Club volunteer-powered campaigns.

County Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Non-Partisan

    Sarah Perry

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Sarah Perry is a small business owner, nonprofit fundraiser, and Democratic activist who is challenging incumbent Kathy Lambert for King County Council in District 3. Perry has years of experience building financial support for nonprofits and universities in the Puget Sound area.

    Perry is running on a platform of supporting small businesses, protecting farmlands and the environment, and improving transportation. In particular, she wants to provide more support for the 40% of the district in unincorporated King County that can't rely on city leadership for investments and infrastructure. In our interview with Perry, she presented a detailed overview of her campaign as a strong advocate for growth management. She wants to promote urban forests, preserve the district's natural areas, usher in alternative energy sources, and improve wastewater and storm runoff in open spaces. Perry also wants to see an equity lens brought to COVID recovery, ensuring that new modes of transit are brought to the district, supporting behavioral health, and assisting those struggling with affordable housing.

    While the King County Council is officially non-partisan, Perry's opponent, longtime Republican Kathy Lambert, has lost touch with this diverse and rapidly changing district. Lambert has voted against transit access for years, including voting to end Seattle's downtown free-ride zone. She also voted against making the county sheriff an appointed position, which was proposed to give the council and county executive more oversight in the wake of protests against police brutality. Lambert was the only "no" vote on the 2019 bill to use state money to fund early learning, post-secondary education, and in-home care providers.

     

    Lambert received broad criticism in early October for a mail piece from her campaign that singled out the only Black member of the King County Council with fear-mongering and divisive language. All six Democrats on the council, as well as King County Executive Dow Constantine, denounced the attack and said it has no place in our public discourse. 

     

    We need to elect leaders who will bring people together to create meaningful change, not tear each other down and divide us with hateful rhetoric. Perry's extensive civic engagement and track record of collaboration has earned her overwhelming support from community leaders and progressive organizations. Vote for Perry for new progressive leadership on the King County Council from District 3.

    Sarah Perry

    Sarah Perry is a small business owner, nonprofit fundraiser, and Democratic activist who is challenging incumbent Kathy Lambert for King County Council in District 3. Perry has years of experience building financial support for nonprofits and universities in the Puget Sound area.

    Sarah Perry

    Sarah Perry is a small business owner, nonprofit fundraiser, and Democratic activist who is challenging incumbent Kathy Lambert for King County Council in District 3. Perry has years of experience building financial support for nonprofits and universities in the Puget Sound area.

  • Incumbent Dave Upthegrove is running to bring his tri-part vision of King County to reality: health, jobs, and justice. He was the first openly gay state representative from outside Seattle in Washington history, and he went on to serve five terms in the Legislature before being elected to the King County Council in 2013.

    Upthegrove has been a good council member and a solid advocate on several fronts in the county. He has been a leading voice on the council for environmental protections and climate action. As the chair of the King County Flood Control District Board of Supervisors, Upthegrove has worked to repair estuaries and has increased funding for repairing salmon habitats. 

    If re-elected, Upthegrove hopes to continue making progress on police accountability by strengthening civilian oversight of the sheriff's office. Overall, Upthegrove has been a reliable vote on many issues but has not been as ambitious on some priorities as Olow plans to be. In particular, he frustrated housing and human service advocates with his opposition to a more ambitious Vets, Seniors, and Human Services Levy in 2017. During our interview, he said he has learned in recent years the value of year-round public engagement, instead of just before a major vote, and this community input has made him more willing to support tax increases if they fund valuable services. He has earned support from both labor and environmental groups in this race.

    Dave Upthegrove

    Incumbent Dave Upthegrove is running to bring his tri-part vision of King County to reality: health, jobs, and justice.

    Dave Upthegrove

    Incumbent Dave Upthegrove is running to bring his tri-part vision of King County to reality: health, jobs, and justice.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term. Last year, Mead chaired the Regional Law & Justice and Human Services committee on the council.

    Mead is a strong progressive who has worked to prohibit discrimination, fight the climate crisis, and secure an energy-independent state for future generations. His campaign priorities include reducing traffic and pollution through transit-oriented development and protecting the county's urban growth areas. In this race, he is supported by many local progressive leaders and our partner organizations.

    Mead faces a challenge from Republican Brenda Carrington. She has a business background in construction and landscaping and lost to Mead in last year's election. Carrington opposes new funding for essential services and disagrees with efforts to redirect some funding to community safety and prevention.

    Mead is the clear choice for Snohomish County Council in District 4.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

    Jared Mead

    Jared Mead is running to retain his seat on the Snohomish County Council in District 4. He previously served in the state Legislature and was appointed to the council in 2020 after Terry Ryan resigned, winning his election in 2020 for the final year of the term.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Washington Conservation Voters, Housing Action Fund , Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, 38th and 44th Legislative District Democrats
  • Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5. Donaghy serves on the board of directors for the Communities of Color Coalition and regularly volunteers to provide emergency services and disaster relief to the Snohomish community.

    Donaghy has spent her professional life advocating for a high quality of life for all Snohomish residents. She is a strong progressive whose campaign priorities include COVID-19 recovery that incorporates community support, housing security, justice reform, and maintaining green space. She is endorsed by many of our partner organizations and a number of progressive elected leaders in this race.

    Low is an outspoken Republican on the council who voted in June against $4 per hour hazard pay for grocery store workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Earlier this spring, he badgered and voted against the appointment of a young woman of color to the Regional Law and Justice Council because he disagreed with some of her social media posts.

    Donaghy would bring a much-needed progressive perspective to the council and is the obvious choice for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

  • Endorsed By: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, Sage Leaders, Sierra Club, SEPAC, Washington Conservation Voters, Housing Action Fund , Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, Snohomish County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Non-Partisan

    Eddy Ury

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally focused nonprofit in the area. As part of this work, Ury played a key role in crafting new rules that will finally protect critical areas at Cherry Point.

    Ury is running on a platform that includes affordable housing, sustainable energy, social justice, accessible government, economic revitalization, public health, and fair elections. He has a strong track record in community leadership and received praise for his work to bring various stakeholders to the table and build consensus.

    Ury is a good choice if you're looking for a candidate who would bring strong new leadership to the council on climate and environmental conservation.

    Eddy Ury

    Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally focused nonprofit in the area.

    Eddy Ury

    Eddy Ury is also running for Whatcom County Council in District 1. Like Galloway, Ury is listed as a member of the county's Climate Impact Advisory Committee. He formerly worked at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, an environmentally focused nonprofit in the area.

  • Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee. Additionally, Donovan has served on the Columbia Neighborhood Association board, the Whatcom County Citizens Election Advisory Commission, and as both a member and board chair of the local Washington Conservation Voters chapter.

    During his time on the council, Donovan’s top priorities have been protecting Lake Whatcom’s ecosystem and budgeting responsibly so that Whatcom can provide human services. If re-elected, he wants to address the housing crisis that hurts the Whatcom community and economy, combat climate change, reduce incarceration rates while investing in diversion and alternatives, and protect clean water coming from Lake Whatcom and other natural waterways.

    Donovan is facing a challenge from Kelley O’Connor, a former first responder and a current health care management student. O’Connor advocates for affordable housing and mental health resources but has not released a detailed campaign to accomplish these goals.

    Todd Donovan is the best choice to represent District 2 on the Whatcom County Council because of his progressive track record and strong support from our progressive partners.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

  • Non-Partisan

    Rebecca Lewis

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

    Lewis' campaign priorities include supporting living wage jobs, updating public utilities, and protecting the environment. As a labor leader, she wants to expand community work agreements, apprenticeships, and prevailing wages. She also wants the county to invest in rural infrastructure with reliable broadband and cell service. Additionally, Lewis states that further development on lakes should be ceased as a way to protect the watershed for 100,000 people in the county.

    Her opponent, incumbent Tyler Byrd, is a board member of the Whatcom Business Alliance. Byrd is a conservative candidate prioritizing the needs of businesses above the local community. He was one of two council members to vote against the 0.1% sales tax to help fund affordable housing. On the environment, he voted against the moratorium on Cherry Point shipping unrefined fossil fuels, despite concerns about the cultural significance for the Lummi Nation and environmental threats. Finally, he voted against a $4 million coronavirus relief package last April.

    Lewis is the clear choice for Whatcom County Council in District 3 to bring progressive, community-minded leadership to the county.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

    Rebecca Lewis

    Rebecca Lewis has worked as an educator in the Sedro-Woolley district for over 20 years and is the president of the Sedro-Woolley Education Association (SWEA) union.

  • Non-Partisan

    Barry Buchanan

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year. He is the chair of the Whatcom County Incarceration Reduction and Prevention Taskforce and is seeking to provide alternatives to booking people for low-level crimes through the LEAD program, which was established in 2019.

    Buchanan supports both the Whatcom Crisis Stabilization Center and East Whatcom Regional Resource Center, which serve those experiencing mental health crises and hunger. He has also worked in previous terms in office to ban fracking and protect the environment. In this race, Buchanan is prioritizing public safety by investing in community alternatives to policing and by reducing the number of people who end up in the criminal justice system when having mental health crises. His platform is very progressive.

    Kamal Bhachu works as a senior maintenance engineer at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center and as a firearms instructor. His platform states that he would address affordable housing and living wage jobs, but doesn't offer enough policy details to evaluate and his campaign has been spotlighted by a conservative publication. His solution for addressing mental health and addiction in regards to people experiencing homelessness is to bring back programs like D.A.R.E. in schools, which doesn't go nearly far enough to help those suffering now, and doesn't address those who are unsheltered for non-addiction reasons.

    Buchanan is the best choice for Whatcom County Council, At-Large Position A.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year.

    Barry Buchanan

    Navy veteran and current council chair Barry Buchanan has served one term on the Bellingham City Council and two on the Whatcom County Council. Buchanan has been a solid vote on the county council, especially through the difficulties of last year.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Evergreen Future
  • City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012 and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017. Outside of his work on the council, Walters is the planning and community development director for the Samish Nation and works with the Skagit Land Trust.

    Walters' platform includes affordable housing, high-quality public services and infrastructure, and making Anacortes an inclusive town for all that maintains its unique charm. During his time on the council, Walters helped to develop the Anacortes municipal fiber network, which is now under construction. He also started the council’s first committee on housing and community services. Despite serving a city with two large oil refineries, Walters understands the importance of environmental protections for the natural ecosystem and Anacortes residents alike. If elected mayor, Walters will use his experience in office to implement a community-focused agenda.

    Walters is running against fellow council member Matt Miller. Miller is in his second term on the council and served as the mayor pro tem from 2018 to 2020. He is a veteran and business owner running on a more conservative platform including criminalizing Anacortes residents experiencing homelessness and prioritizing business interests above community needs.

    Walters is the best choice for mayor of Anacortes because of his progressive vision and his support from partner organizations.

    Ryan Walters

    City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012 and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017.

    Ryan Walters

    City Councilmember Ryan Walters is running for mayor of Anacortes. Walters has been on the city council since 2012 and served as the mayor pro tem from 2016 to 2017.

  • Amanda Hubik is running for Position 4 on the Anacortes City Council. She currently works as a legislative assistant to Democratic state Representative Alex Ramel and was recently appointed a commissioner of the Anacortes Housing Authority. Previously, she was the director of marketing and promotions for the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce.

    Hubik is running on a progressive platform focused on building affordable, workforce housing, establishing environmental protections, and supporting small businesses, especially through COVID recovery. She wants to bring Anacortes residents together to make community-minded policies and shape council decisions. In this race, Hubik has earned the endorsement of the local Democrats as well as many progressive elected officials.

    Her opponent is Jeff Graf, a Navy veteran who now works for a local aerospace manufacturing company. He has served on the Planning Commission since being appointed in 2017. Graf’s platform includes cutting government services apart from policing, prioritizing business interests, and increasing funding for police.

    Amanda Hubik is the most progressive choice in this race and deserves your vote for Anacortes City Council, Position 4.

    Amanda Hubik

    Amanda Hubik is running for Position 4 on the Anacortes City Council. She currently works as a legislative assistant to Democratic state Representative Alex Ramel and was recently appointed a commissioner of the Anacortes Housing Authority.

    Amanda Hubik

    Amanda Hubik is running for Position 4 on the Anacortes City Council. She currently works as a legislative assistant to Democratic state Representative Alex Ramel and was recently appointed a commissioner of the Anacortes Housing Authority.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

    Borbe is a political newcomer who wants to bring an outside perspective to the Bellevue City Council. His campaign is focused on transportation, affordability, and economic development. He supports building more housing, particularly in Factoria and Crossroads, along with making the transit and transportation investments necessary to reduce traffic congestion. In addition, this would help alleviate a severe shortage of housing for low-income residents of Bellevue. If elected, Borbe would also push to improve transparency on the council by reducing voice votes so Bellevue residents have a record of how their representatives vote.

    Borbe is challenging longtime incumbent Conrad Lee, who is running for re-election to the council position he has served in since 1994. Lee is a Republican who opposed the light rail expansion to the Eastside, which will begin service in 2023. More recently, Lee opposed efforts to expand shelter options for people experiencing homelessness in Bellevue. He is not a progressive choice.

    Bellevue is a rapidly growing and changing city that deserves leaders who are ready to tackle a host of new challenges. Dexter Borbe is the best choice for Bellevue City Council, Position 2.

    Dexter Borbe

    Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

    Dexter Borbe

    Small business owner and former renewable energy executive Dexter Borbe is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 2. Born in the Phillippines, he moved to the U.S. to earn his MBA at MIT before going on to work at several technology companies.

  • Endorsed By: APACE, SEIU 775, Sierra Club, Washington Bikes, Washington Conservation Voters , King County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Retired software engineer and philanthropist Ruth Lipscomb is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 4. She has served on the boards of many nonprofit organizations, including Fuse Washington, the Progress Alliance of Washington, Washington Women For Choice PAC, and others.

    Her vision for Bellevue includes protecting the environment by reducing the city's greenhouse gas emissions and prioritizing bringing stronger public transit, walkable neighborhoods, and safe biking routes to Bellevue. Lipscomb wants to use her background in technology to increase transparency in government and will work to improve affordability and safety for all Bellevue families.

    Lipscomb is facing conservative deputy mayor Jared Nieuwenhuis. Nieuwenhuis recently voted against important housing affordability legislation because he wanted yet another taxpayer-funded study that would kick the can down the road. Nieuwenhuis has also displayed a disappointing lack of leadership on the issue of police accountability and racial justice during council meetings over the last year.

    The Bellevue City Council is currently narrowly divided along political and ideological lines. Electing Lipscomb is the key to creating a progressive governing majority that could pursue a more ambitious agenda on issues like housing affordability, climate change, and reducing traffic congestion.

    Lipscomb’s track record of community engagement, progressive values, and strong support from our partner organizations make her the clear choice for Bellevue City Council, Position 4.

    Ruth Lipscomb

    Retired software engineer and philanthropist Ruth Lipscomb is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 4. She has served on the boards of many nonprofit organizations, including Fuse Washington, the Progress Alliance of Washington, Washington Women For Choice PAC, and others.

    Ruth Lipscomb

    Retired software engineer and philanthropist Ruth Lipscomb is running for Bellevue City Council, Position 4. She has served on the boards of many nonprofit organizations, including Fuse Washington, the Progress Alliance of Washington, Washington Women For Choice PAC, and others.

  • Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level. She is focused on addressing the needs of Bellevue families by focusing on education, affordable housing, human services for vulnerable community members, and advocating for local parks and public spaces.

    In 2020, Robinson was elected mayor of Bellevue by her fellow council members and has been a moderate voice leading the city. During the COVID-19 crisis, she has focused on addressing food insecurity for community members as well as supporting women and minority-owned businesses with grants. Robinson has supported increasing affordable housing and shelter space, though far more progress is needed in Bellevue and across the region

    Robinson is facing Dr. Gina Johnson, the founder of Vital Mind Body. Johnson's platform emphasizes police funding without mentioning much-needed accountability measures or increased funding for community-based alternatives. In addition, Johnson proposes harsh and punitive measures that fail to address the root of homelessness in Bellevue. Finally, Johnson opposes some of the city's basic COVID-19 protections, which are consistent with CDC recommendations and have helped keep our community safe.

    Robinson is the best choice in the race for Position 6. Given the other competitive races for Bellevue City Council on the ballot, we hope Robinson will have the opportunity to work with a more progressive council and will support a bolder agenda for the city of Bellevue.

    Lynne Robinson

    Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level.

    Lynne Robinson

    Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level.

  • Incumbent Michael Lilliquist is running for a fourth term on the Bellingham City Council. Outside the council, Lilliquist has been active with the local PTA and other nonprofits, especially focusing on protecting Lake Whatcom.

    During his 12 years on the council, Lilliquist has been a consistent voice for the environment and workers' rights. He is known for his careful attention to detail and thorough approach to policymaking that pushes the council in the right direction. In particular, he worked closely with the Sierra Club to move Puget Sound Energy away from coal power. He also supported a crisis response program to connect 911 calls with mental health professions instead of law enforcement. Unfortunately, Lilliquist opposed the four People First Bellingham ballot measures this year that activists organized to lead the city in a more progressive direction.

    Lilliquist is a good choice if you're looking for experienced leadership to help the city navigate a path forward on multiple challenging issues.

    Incumbent Michael Lilliquist is running for a fourth term on the Bellingham City Council. Outside the council, Lilliquist has been active with the local PTA and other nonprofits, especially focusing on protecting Lake Whatcom.

    During his 12 years on the council, Lilliquist has been a consistent voice for the environment and workers' rights. He is known for his careful attention to detail and thorough approach to policymaking that pushes the council in the right direction. In particular, he worked closely with the Sierra Club to move Puget Sound Energy away from coal power. He also supported a crisis response program to connect 911 calls with mental health professions instead of law enforcement. Unfortunately, Lilliquist opposed the four People First Bellingham ballot measures this year that activists organized to lead the city in a more progressive direction.

    Lilliquist is a good choice if you're looking for experienced leadership to help the city navigate a path forward on multiple challenging issues.

    Michael Lilliquist

    Incumbent Michael Lilliquist is running for a fourth term on the Bellingham City Council. Outside the council, Lilliquist has been active with the local PTA and other nonprofits, especially focusing on protecting Lake Whatcom.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring the needs of the community, especially historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy. If elected, she states that she would be the first Black person to serve on the Bellingham City Council.

    In our interview with Martens, she emphasized the need for the city to fortify outreach from city hall, whether it be to struggling local businesses or residents having a difficult time. One of her top priorities would be to address homelessness in the city by making strong investments in rapid re-housing, easy access shelters, and permanent shelters. She supports Councilmember Hammill's proposed 0.1% sales tax for housing because it will save the city money by reducing unnecessary jail time and emergency responses. On police reform, Martens supports shifting police away from responding to jobs they aren't trained to do, like dealing with mental health crises, and investing more in diversion programs.

    Martens is one of the people working to found the Whatcom Racial Equity Commission, a joint effort between city and county to hold policy conversations and propose solutions to the challenges that Black, Indigenous, and other community members face. If elected, she is dedicated to continuing to hold conversations to build trust between residents and city hall.

    Her opponent is financial advisor Russ Whidbee, who states that he will take a moderate approach to policymaking on the council. On housing, Whidbee would not go as far as Martin's approach to updating zoning and allowing for more housing types. Instead, he states that his focus would be on seeking out grants and public and private partnerships with banks and developers to increase affordable housing. Whidbee would seek to increase the transparency of the police department with the use of body cameras, create a citizen-led oversight panel with police membership, and encourage more de-escalation training.

    Martens' bold vision and backing from progressive organizations make her the best choice in this race.

    Kristina Michele Martens

    Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring the needs of the community, especially historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy.

    Kristina Michele Martens

    Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring the needs of the community, especially historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy.

  • Endorsed By: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School. She is also a parent to three children on the autism spectrum whom she homeschools.

    Alderks is running on a detailed platform that includes generating equitable small business growth, investing in affordable housing to lessen the growing wealth gap in Bothell, and building an environmentally sustainable future for the area through the COVID recovery. As a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell, Alderks has already begun advancing equity in her community. If elected, she wants to expand the RADAR (Response Awareness, De-escalation, and Referral) program, which helps Bothell police respond to health emergencies without the use of force.

    Also in this race is incumbent Rosemary McAuliffe, a longtime Democratic elected official who was elected to the city council in 2017 after serving as a state senator for over a decade. Before that, she spent 14 years on the Northshore School Board. As of mid-October, McAuliffe has not yet shared a detailed platform in this race but mentioned that she wants to support small businesses through recovery from the pandemic.

    With strong progressive values and partner support, Alderks is the best choice in this race for Position 3 on Bothell’s city council.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

    Jenne Alderks

    Planning commissioner Jenne Alderks is running for Bothell City Council, Position 3. Alderks is a small business owner offering birth and postpartum doula services, and she recently earned a public policy and administration certification from Harvard Kennedy School.

  • Matt Kuehn is running for Bothell City Council, Position 5. He serves as Rep. Davina Duerr's legislative aide and previously worked for Sen. Guy Palumbo. His platform includes expanding the park and trail systems, creating more walkable neighborhoods, and increasing affordable housing. Kuehn also wants to reduce traffic congestion and expand bike infrastructure.

    Kuehn is running against Ben Mahnkey. He is an Amazon employee running on a platform that praises law enforcement without offering any mention of increased community accountability or reform. He also fails to offer solutions for how to fund essential services in Bothell that everyone relies on.

    Kuehn is the best choice in the race for Bothell City Council, Position 5.

    Matt Kuehn

    Matt Kuehn is running for Bothell City Council, Position 5. He serves as Rep. Davina Duerr's legislative aide and previously worked for Sen. Guy Palumbo. His platform includes expanding the park and trail systems, creating more walkable neighborhoods, and increasing affordable housing.

    Matt Kuehn

    Matt Kuehn is running for Bothell City Council, Position 5. He serves as Rep. Davina Duerr's legislative aide and previously worked for Sen. Guy Palumbo. His platform includes expanding the park and trail systems, creating more walkable neighborhoods, and increasing affordable housing.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Her tenure as mayor, which began in 2017, came at a difficult moment in the city's financial history. Washington cities are required by law to produce a balanced budget. With a deficit of $18 million for the city, up from $15 million inherited before her term due to pandemic-related causes, Franklin and the city council cut costs to balance the budget. Their budget closed service locations like the Carl Gipson Senior Center and the Forest Park Swim Center, reduced library hours, and eliminated city-sponsored events like fireworks, the animal farm, and flower festival, along with laying off or voluntary separating from over 130 employees. Disappointingly, despite calls by Black activists to reduce or move funds from the police department budget into more community services, the police budget was not cut like most other departments. Franklin states that the department's body camera program and training efforts are meeting the changes demanded by activists.

    Budget aside, Franklin has worked hard in the pandemic to administer pandemic relief funds and issued a stay-home directive in the early days of the COVID crisis.

    Franklin's opponent is Steve Oss, president of the Everett Transit Union. Oss does not have a website or detailed policy proposals as of mid-October. He states in a local interview that he believes businesses need support and the city's deficit needs to be addressed.

    While Franklin is fairly moderate, her endorsements on both the conservative and progressive ends of the spectrum represent local faith in her second run, and she is the only viable choice in this race.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

    Cassie Franklin

    Incumbent Cassie Franklin was the first woman ever to be elected mayor of Everett. Before becoming mayor, Franklin was an Everett City Council member and served in a number of organizations and programs addressing homelessness.

  • Paul Roberts was first elected to the council in 2006 and is now running for his fifth term in office. Because the new District 1 will contain so many of the city's water resources, we believe it's important to elect a candidate from this district who will focus on the environment and conservation.

    Roberts has had a long career in public service. He currently serves as chair of the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency Board and vice chair on the board of Sound Transit. He also works with the Association of Washington Cities on climate change and sustainability. It won't surprise voters that one of Roberts' goals if re-elected will be reducing the city's greenhouse gas emissions and supporting green economic development. He also wants see more moderate- and low-income housing to alleviate the crisis in both homelessness and the overall lack of affordable options. Roberts joined fellow Everett City Council member Liz Vogeli as the two council members who were in favor of supportive housing for students experiencing homelessness and their families, though he later supported the no-sit, no-lie policy that criminalized homelessness in a 10-block area in north Everett.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 1 includes northwest Everett, all of the Delta and Riverside neighborhoods, the northeast half of Bayside, and a small area of the westernmost part of Port Gardner. It also includes the port, Navy base, Snohomish River, and Port Gardner Bay.

    Paul Roberts

    Paul Roberts was first elected to the council in 2006 and is now running for his fifth term in office.

    Paul Roberts

    Paul Roberts was first elected to the council in 2006 and is now running for his fifth term in office.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Paula Rhyne is currently working as a legislative aide for Snohomish County Council member Megan Dunn. She has also worked on the King County Council for Rod Dembowski and then-council member Bob Ferguson. Her campaign is driven by a desire to pilot the city towards more affordable housing, stronger environmental protections, and an economic recovery that leaves no one behind.

    Rhyne says that she will focus on supporting business owners through this phase of the pandemic, including preparing for more remote work and online shopping. She states that when the eviction moratorium ends, the city will need greater access to affordable and middle-income housing, and wants the council to incentivize the development of more moderate multi-family housing developments. She is a staunch supporter of investing in the community before punitive law enforcement measures. On one hand, that means providing police officers with more support staff to respond to nonviolent calls. That also means preventing crime, including nonviolent crimes caused by poverty, before they happen. Education and a focus on housing those without homes are two other core components of her campaign. Rhyne is committed to instituting equity-driven decision making and has centered her campaign around working together to improve the city.

    Voters in District 2 have two good choices when it comes to picking a council member this year. We lean towards Rhyne for her progressive agenda and her support from our partners.

    Paula Denise Rhyne

    Paula Rhyne is currently working as a legislative aide for Snohomish County Council member Megan Dunn. She has also worked on the King County Council for Rod Dembowski and then-council member Bob Ferguson.

    Paula Denise Rhyne

    Paula Rhyne is currently working as a legislative aide for Snohomish County Council member Megan Dunn. She has also worked on the King County Council for Rod Dembowski and then-council member Bob Ferguson.

  • Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3. He worked as a firefighter for more than three decades and has served on various boards in the community and at the state level, including as a board member of the Snohomish County Red Cross and on Washington's Council of Fire Fighters. He currently works for Snohomish County Treasurer Brian Sullivan and as an associate faculty member at Everett Community College.

    Schwab states that the police and fire departments should be fully staffed and funded. He notes that Everett has one of the highest rates of COVID infections in the state, and supports expanding paid sick leave and family leave. He also supports fast-tracking the light rail system to stimulate economic development downtown and along Evergreen Way, promoting housing density, and improving citywide energy efficiency among other considerations.

    Schwab is running against Lacey Sauvageau, a 911 dispatcher for Snohomish County. She previously ran as a Democrat against now Rep. Emily Wicks in the 38th Legislative District. Her campaign website is not accessible as of mid-October and detailed policy proposals are not available. Sauvageau's official voters' guide statement outlines her priorities as securing affordable housing, empowering the police, eliminating "wasteful spending," and supporting mental health for people experiencing homelessness.

    Given that the city cut nearly every department aside from law enforcement in the last few months, we would like to see Schwab's policies on law enforcement evolve into a model that prioritizes investing more into human services. Nevertheless, Schwab is the best candidate in this race.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 3 includes all of Boulevard Bluffs, Harborview Seahurst Glenhaven, View Ridge-Madison, Evergreen, and the southernmost tip of South Forest Park.

    Don Schwab

    Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3.

    Don Schwab

    Retired firefighter Don Schwab is running for Everett City Council in District 3.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals. She was the lone no-vote for the "no-sit, no-lie" ordinance that passed this February, which criminalizes sitting or laying on the sidewalk in a roughly 10-block area, a policy which national legal advocacy organizations called "cruel and unusual punishment" for those who will be fined or jailed because they can't afford shelter. She has also voted to provide supportive housing for homeless students.

    If re-elected, Vogeli aims to incentivize more affordable and climate-friendly housing, support much-needed access to the library, advocate for de-escalation and mental health experts to work alongside law enforcement, and push for more sustainable transit. She enjoys strong support from a wide breadth of progressive advocacy organizations, including health care workers, environmental organizations, and labor unions.

    Challenging Vogeli is Tommie Rubatino, a teacher and pastor. His top campaign priorities are addressing homelessness, neighborhood safety, and supporting businesses. However, as of mid-October he does not have detailed policy proposals available on his website, and there is nothing that particularly points to a progressive agenda. His endorsements by Republican elected officials imply that Rubatino would lead from a more conservative angle if elected.

    Vogeli has served the people of Everett well with her progressive vision for the city. We strongly recommend a vote to re-elect Liz Vogeli for Everett City Council in District 4.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 4 includes the neighborhoods of Westmont and Holly.

    Liz Vogeli

    Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals.

    Liz Vogeli

    Incumbent Liz Vogeli has been a dedicated and passionate advocate for the residents of Everett since her election to the council in 2018. She is one of the most progressive members of the council, and sometimes the sole vote on important proposals.

  • Demi Chatters is an education advocate who has spent over a decade working to bring inclusive and quality education to public school students. She is deeply embedded in the community as a member of the Snohomish Human Rights Commission and Evergreen Middle School Equity Team. She also serves on the board for Seattle Suns, a youth sports organization that focuses on youth experiencing poverty, and is a committee member for LGBTQ organization NOLOSE.

    If elected, Chatters wants to advocate for an equitable and sustainable recovery from COVID that benefits everyone in the city. To that end, she will prioritize infrastructure investments, work on sustainable business development, and champion workers' rights through fair collective bargaining. She notes that the increasing struggle of residents to secure housing should be met with additional services in the form of mental health care, encouraging more housing options, and moving the unsheltered towards more housing options. Specifically for District 5, Chatters wants to see the completion of the Silver Lake trail, reinforced road stability, and opportunities for parks within neighborhoods.

    Chatters is running against Ben Zarlingo, a communications technology consultant and a leadership member of the Silver Lake Neighborhood Association. He intends to address the city's enormous $16.5 million deficit with a somewhat inconsistent strategy of avoiding cuts to services and revenue increases through taxes while leaning more on welcoming new businesses. Zarlingo's other priorities include pairing housing and mental health treatment for people experiencing homelessness and supporting family services like the Baker Heights project.

    Demi Chatters has the support of several local progressive officials and is committed to building an Everett that supports working families. She is by far the best choice in this race.

    A note for Everett voters: this is the first election using the new redistricted map adopted last year. District 5 includes parts of the neighborhoods of Twin Creeks, Westmont, Cascade View, and Pinehurst Beverly Park, as well as all of Silver Creek.

    Demi Chatters

    Demi Chatters is an education advocate who has spent over a decade working to bring inclusive and quality education to public school students. She is deeply embedded in the community as a member of the Snohomish Human Rights Commission and Evergreen Middle School Equity Team.

    Demi Chatters

    Demi Chatters is an education advocate who has spent over a decade working to bring inclusive and quality education to public school students. She is deeply embedded in the community as a member of the Snohomish Human Rights Commission and Evergreen Middle School Equity Team.

  • Incumbent Kate Bishop is running to retain her seat in Position 6 on the Ferndale City Council. First elected in 2017, Bishop is the current mayor pro tem and chairs the Finance and Administration committee. She has also worked as a social worker for over a decade. Bishop serves as a board member for the Ferndale Community Service Cooperative and helped to establish the Ferndale Utilities Fund there.

    On the council, Bishop created the Equity Advisory Board as well as the North Whatcom Poverty Task Force, which works to assess the needs of the community in the areas of housing and food insecurity, housing affordability, and income inequality. If re-elected, she wants to continue working to keep Ferndale affordable and she would invest in social services, business support, and infrastructure updates. Bishop has been endorsed by the Whatcom County Democrats in this race.

    Bishop faces a challenge from Robert Pinkley, who owns a restaurant in downtown Ferndale. Pinkley previously worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce and ran unsuccessfully for Ferndale mayor in 2019. Now, he is campaigning on a more Republican platform to represent downtown and prioritize business interests above community needs.

    Kate Bishop will continue fighting for community solutions. She deserves your vote for Ferndale City Council, Position 6.

    Kate Bishop

    Incumbent Kate Bishop is running to retain her seat in Position 6 on the Ferndale City Council. First elected in 2017, Bishop is the current mayor pro tem and chairs the Finance and Administration committee. She has also worked as a social worker for over a decade.

    Kate Bishop

    Incumbent Kate Bishop is running to retain her seat in Position 6 on the Ferndale City Council. First elected in 2017, Bishop is the current mayor pro tem and chairs the Finance and Administration committee. She has also worked as a social worker for over a decade.

  • Maralise Fegan is running to retain her seat in Position 7 on the Ferndale City Council. Fegan first joined the council in January of this year when she was appointed to fill the vacancy left by Ramon Llanos. She works as an immigration paralegal with Boundary Bay Law and serves as an adjunct faculty and advisor in paralegal studies at Whatcom Community College.

    If retained, Fegan wants to center the community's needs by making Ferndale more affordable while attracting new businesses and creating new jobs. Fegan would also seek to handle growth responsibly and invest in infrastructure updates to keep the community safe. She supports bold action on affordable housing, especially as the eviction moratorium lifts, as well as accessible broadband access. In this race, Fegan has earned endorsements from local progressive organizations.

    Former mayor and pastor Jon Mutchler is challenging Fegan for Position 7. He served on the city council himself from 2010 to 2015 and then served one term as mayor from 2016 to 2019. In 2019, Mutchler was found guilty of an ethics violation when he displayed personal campaign materials at City Hall. He is running a more conservative campaign to advocate for cutting social services and promoting fear-based public safety ideas. Mutchler lists affordability as a top priority, but unfortunately, his solution is just to decrease costs for developers instead of addressing the roots of the housing crisis.

    Fegan is the best choice in this race. She deserves your vote for Ferndale City Council, Position 7.

    Maralise Fegan

    Maralise Fegan is running to retain her seat in Position 7 on the Ferndale City Council. Fegan first joined the council in January of this year when she was appointed to fill the vacancy left by Ramon Llanos.

    Maralise Fegan

    Maralise Fegan is running to retain her seat in Position 7 on the Ferndale City Council. Fegan first joined the council in January of this year when she was appointed to fill the vacancy left by Ramon Llanos.

  • Mary Lou Pauly is running unopposed for re-election to be mayor of Issaquah. Pauly was elected mayor in 2018 and previously served as deputy city council president and as vice-chair of the Eastside Fire and Rescue Board. As mayor, she has worked to balance growth with protecting Issaquah's environment and championed vaccine accessibility for everyone. Pauly's top priorities for her re-election campaign are increased transportation and mobility, as well as environmentally-friendly practices and public safety.

    Pauly has earned another term as mayor of Issaquah.

    Mary Lou Pauly is running unopposed for re-election to be mayor of Issaquah. Pauly was elected mayor in 2018 and previously served as deputy city council president and as vice-chair of the Eastside Fire and Rescue Board. As mayor, she has worked to balance growth with protecting Issaquah's environment and championed vaccine accessibility for everyone. Pauly's top priorities for her re-election campaign are increased transportation and mobility, as well as environmentally-friendly practices and public safety.

    Pauly has earned another term as mayor of Issaquah.

    Mary Lou Pauly

    Mary Lou Pauly is running unopposed for re-election to be mayor of Issaquah. Pauly was elected mayor in 2018 and previously served as deputy city council president and as vice-chair of the Eastside Fire and Rescue Board.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Barbara de Michele is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 3. She was elected to the city council in 2019. De Michele previously served on the Issaquah School District Board of Directors, including twice as board president, and spent 12 years on the Issaquah Arts Commission. In her time on the council, de Michele has focused her efforts on increasing affordability in the area, improving transit and roads, and helping local human service providers and nonprofits handle community needs. De Michele's detailed campaign platform prioritizes affordable housing, increased mobility options for residents and workers, and recognizing Issaquah as a welcoming community.

    De Michele is running unopposed and deserves your vote for Issaquah City Council, Position 3.

    Barbara de Michele is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 3. She was elected to the city council in 2019. De Michele previously served on the Issaquah School District Board of Directors, including twice as board president, and spent 12 years on the Issaquah Arts Commission. In her time on the council, de Michele has focused her efforts on increasing affordability in the area, improving transit and roads, and helping local human service providers and nonprofits handle community needs. De Michele's detailed campaign platform prioritizes affordable housing, increased mobility options for residents and workers, and recognizing Issaquah as a welcoming community.

    De Michele is running unopposed and deserves your vote for Issaquah City Council, Position 3.

    Barbara de Michele

    Barbara de Michele is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 3. She was elected to the city council in 2019.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club
  • Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks. He also served on the boards of the environmental organizations Futurewise and Spark Northwest.

    First elected to the council in 2013, Arnold has worked hard to improve Kirkland's transportation, sustainability, and inclusiveness. He has supported efforts to strengthen safe routes to schools, improve transit options and reduce congestion, and provide co-responders for mental health calls to the police. Arnold is also a part-time technology consultant at Fuse. He was not involved in this recommendation.

    Arnold has been a thoughtful and innovative leader as Kirkland has grown over the last eight years. He deserves your vote for Kirkland City Council, Position 1.

    Jay Arnold

    Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks.

    Jay Arnold

    Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks.

  • Incumbent Neal Black was elected to his first term on the council in 2019. He serves as a member of the board of trustees for the King County Bar Association, where he works on the Housing Justice Project and other pro-bono civil legal aid programs.

    If re-elected, Black will aim to encourage a greater mix of housing types, encourage economic growth and neighborhoods around transit hubs, and support pandemic recovery for residents and businesses. Some of that work has already begun - the council passed an eviction moratorium through the end of September and is offering assistance to renters, homeowners, and landlords behind on mortgage and rent payments. Black is strongly supported by a long list of progressive elected officials and an impressive variety of organizations that advocate for the environment, affordable housing, and more.

    Challenging Black is Cherese Bourgoin, whose family owns a local salon. She also serves on the board of directors with the Kirkland Chamber of Commerce. Bourgoin states that electing her to the council would add a business advocate to the body. She notes that the unhoused population in Kirkland is growing, but does not offer a specific solution aside from saying she would help people get available services. Entry-level housing is also on her list of priorities, though again she fails to propose a solution to the challenge.

    Black is by far the best choice for Kirkland City Council, Position 5.

    Neal Black

    Incumbent Neal Black was elected to his first term on the council in 2019. He serves as a member of the board of trustees for the King County Bar Association, where he works on the Housing Justice Project and other pro-bono civil legal aid programs.

    Neal Black

    Incumbent Neal Black was elected to his first term on the council in 2019. He serves as a member of the board of trustees for the King County Bar Association, where he works on the Housing Justice Project and other pro-bono civil legal aid programs.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Washington Bikes , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Jon Pascal is running unopposed for re-election to Position 7 on the Kirkland City Council. As a former transportation commissioner and Kirkland planning commissioner, Pascal has worked on the city's Transportation Master Plan and other infrastructure improvements.

    In his next term, Pascal hopes to continue investing in small traffic safety projects and transit options. He will also prioritize maintaining and expanding recreation opportunities in the city's parks, overseeing additional fire and emergency services, and supporting affordable housing.

    Jon Pascal

    Jon Pascal is running unopposed for re-election to Position 7 on the Kirkland City Council. As a former transportation commissioner and Kirkland planning commissioner, Pascal has worked on the city's Transportation Master Plan and other infrastructure improvements.

    Jon Pascal

    Jon Pascal is running unopposed for re-election to Position 7 on the Kirkland City Council. As a former transportation commissioner and Kirkland planning commissioner, Pascal has worked on the city's Transportation Master Plan and other infrastructure improvements.

  • Robin Vazquez is a Lacey Planning Commissioner running for Lacey City Council, Position 4. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable housing and providing more public transit and transportation choices. As a member of the commission, Vazquez has supported increasing the housing supply in Lacey to match the need for more affordable options. She mentions that as a certified instructor for teaching English as a second language and as a Community Emergency Response Team member, she wants to develop a city language access plan and multilingual disaster preparation.

    Vazquez is running against Emma McSharry, who said her frustrations with the state's COVID regulations and homelessness spurred her to run for office. Her Facebook states that her three priorities include fiscal responsibility, supporting businesses, and cleanliness, though more detailed policies are not available on her website. This snapshot of her potential agenda, along with endorsements by the police officer's guild and Republican elected officials, indicate she would likely pursue a moderate to conservative agenda if elected.

    Vazquez has earned the support of several members of the current city council, as well as a large number of city councilmembers from neighboring cities and progressive members of the state legislature. Vazquez is by far the best choice in this race.

    Robin Vazquez

    Robin Vazquez is a Lacey Planning Commissioner running for Lacey City Council, Position 4. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable housing and providing more public transit and transportation choices.

    Robin Vazquez

    Robin Vazquez is a Lacey Planning Commissioner running for Lacey City Council, Position 4. Her priorities include increasing access to affordable housing and providing more public transit and transportation choices.

  • Michael Steadman is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council, Position 6. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and owner of a commercial leasing company.

    Steadman is running to use his experience as a small business owner to help Lacey recover economically from the COVID-19 pandemic. Last year, Steadman ran as a Democrat for Thurston County Commissioner, a campaign in which he promoted tackling water quality issues, improving alternative criminal justice options, and improving mental health services.
    Michael Steadman is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council, Position 6. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and owner of a commercial leasing company.

    Steadman is running to use his experience as a small business owner to help Lacey recover economically from the COVID-19 pandemic. Last year, Steadman ran as a Democrat for Thurston County Commissioner, a campaign in which he promoted tackling water quality issues, improving alternative criminal justice options, and improving mental health services.

    Michael Steadman

    Michael Steadman is running unopposed for re-election to the Lacey City Council, Position 6. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and owner of a commercial leasing company.
  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Carolyn Cox was elected in 2018 and is serving her first term as a councilmember for Position 7. She represents the city in several organizations, including as chair of the Intercity Transit Authority, on the Thurston County Regional Housing Council, and on the Thurston Climate Mitigation Steering Committee. Cox is now running for mayor to bring these issues to the forefront in a combined local and regional approach to continue to improve the lives of residents.

    Cox notes that there is not enough housing to meet the needs of residents, especially the unsheltered. She wants to continue working with the housing council to build more lower-cost housing. The council also just unanimously approved the creation of mobile outreach teams, who will work with police to contact and help those who are homeless or in crisis. She supports the creation and expansion of bike lanes, safe pedestrian walkways, and public transit. As the city begins to recover from the pandemic, Cox states that the $1 million grant fund to small businesses is just the first step in making sure that residents and establishments get back on their feet.

    Cox faces a challenge from Felix Peguero-Reyes, a U.S. Army veteran who now works as a financial advisor. He has not released a detailed platform but states he wants to focus on economic development and safety. He has been endorsed by some conservative business groups and Republican elected officials.

    Cox has earned an impressive set of progressive endorsements because of her track record on the council and detailed platform. Cox is the clear choice for Lacey City Council, Position 7.

    Carolyn Cox was elected in 2018 and is serving her first term as a councilmember for Position 7. She represents the city in several organizations, including as chair of the Intercity Transit Authority, on the Thurston County Regional Housing Council, and on the Thurston Climate Mitigation Steering Committee. Cox is now running for mayor to bring these issues to the forefront in a combined local and regional approach to continue to improve the lives of residents.

    Cox notes that there is not enough housing to meet the needs of residents, especially the unsheltered. She wants to continue working with the housing council to build more lower-cost housing. The council also just unanimously approved the creation of mobile outreach teams, who will work with police to contact and help those who are homeless or in crisis. She supports the creation and expansion of bike lanes, safe pedestrian walkways, and public transit. As the city begins to recover from the pandemic, Cox states that the $1 million grant fund to small businesses is just the first step in making sure that residents and establishments get back on their feet.

    Cox faces a challenge from Felix Peguero-Reyes, a U.S. Army veteran who now works as a financial advisor. He has not released a detailed platform but states he wants to focus on economic development and safety. He has been endorsed by some conservative business groups and Republican elected officials.

    Cox has earned an impressive set of progressive endorsements because of her track record on the council and detailed platform. Cox is the clear choice for Lacey City Council, Position 7.

    Carolyn Cox

    Carolyn Cox was elected in 2018 and is serving her first term as a councilmember for Position 7.

  • Joseph Jensen is running for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7. Jensen is a consultant for technology companies and serves as the chairman of the Technology Committees for both the 44th Legislative District Democrats and the Snohomish County Democrats. Jensen lives in Lake Stevens with his wife, who manages the city’s Farmers Market.

    Jensen is running to build a better Lake Stevens community for all. Among his campaign priorities are investing in infrastructure, caretaking of public green spaces, and making broadband more widely accessible. Jensen wants to work to make ​​local government more accountable, transparent, and accessible to community members. Earlier this year, he used his platform to share scientific information about the vaccines and encourage Lake Stevens residents to get vaccinated. In this race, Jensen has the support of some of our partner organizations and progressive leaders.

    Jensen is challenging incumbent council member Marcus Tageant, a Marine veteran with a property management business. Now the council president, he was first elected to this position in 2009 and unsuccessfully ran for mayor in 2015. He is running on a more conservative platform that doesn't reflect the changing needs of the rapidly growing community.

    Jensen is the best choice for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7.

    Joseph Jensen

    Joseph Jensen is running for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7. Jensen is a consultant for technology companies and serves as the chairman of the Technology Committees for both the 44th Legislative District Democrats and the Snohomish County Democrats.

    Joseph Jensen

    Joseph Jensen is running for Lake Stevens City Council, Position 7. Jensen is a consultant for technology companies and serves as the chairman of the Technology Committees for both the 44th Legislative District Democrats and the Snohomish County Democrats.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Incumbent Stephanie Vignal is running for re-election for Position 2 on the Mill Creek City Council. Vignal first joined the council when she was appointed in 2019 and was then elected in 2020 to complete the rest of the term. During this time, she was elected by her fellow council members to serve as the mayor pro tem. Previously, Vignal served on the Parks and Recreation board. She has worked in the private sector in property management and small business financial management.

    In office, Vignal has spearheaded bridging communication between city and state policymakers and serves as the council liaison with the Alliance of Housing Affordability. If re-elected, she wants to invest in public green spaces and city infrastructure, work on making Mill Creek as inclusive as possible, and focus on positive economic development as the state looks forward towards life post-pandemic. Vignal has received a number of endorsements from key progressive leaders and organizations, both locally and statewide.

    Challenging Vignal in this race is Nicholas Swett, a Republican precinct committee officer. Swett lacks a campaign website and detailed platform as of mid-October.

    Vignal is by far the best choice in this race and deserves your vote for Mill Creek City Council, Position 2.

    Stephanie Vignal

    Incumbent Stephanie Vignal is running for re-election for Position 2 on the Mill Creek City Council. Vignal first joined the council when she was appointed in 2019 and was then elected in 2020 to complete the rest of the term.

    Stephanie Vignal

    Incumbent Stephanie Vignal is running for re-election for Position 2 on the Mill Creek City Council. Vignal first joined the council when she was appointed in 2019 and was then elected in 2020 to complete the rest of the term.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Benjamin Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek City Council in 2020 and is now running to retain his seat in Position 3. Before joining the council, Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek Arts & Beautification Board, and then later both the Mill Creek Blvd Sub-Area Project Advisory Committee and the Snohomish County Planning Commission. Outside of public service, he worked as an engineer with Boeing.

    Enhancing public spaces with an eye for beauty and inclusion has always been a focus for Briles. One of his early government projects was featuring local high schoolers’ art traffic-signal box wraps. To continue building community and bettering Mill Creek, Briles wants to strategically manage growth, expand city services, plan ahead for traffic and city service needs, and maintain Mill Creek’s unique character. In this race, he has earned the endorsements of a number of local progressive leaders.

    Conservative challenger and Boeing manager Connie Allison is also in this race. Allison wants to cut social services and opposes affordable housing for Mill Creek.

    Benjamin Briles is the clear choice for Mill Creek City Council, Position 3.

    Benjamin Briles

    Benjamin Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek City Council in 2020 and is now running to retain his seat in Position 3.

    Benjamin Briles

    Benjamin Briles was first appointed to the Mill Creek City Council in 2020 and is now running to retain his seat in Position 3.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Evergreen Future
  • Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020. Outside of public service, she works with nonprofits and foundations on communications and project management to build change.

    If elected, Duque wants to expand and protect public green spaces, foster responsive and transparent government, ensure economic recovery for Mill Creek businesses, and be smart about city growth. Duque began to actualize some of these goals during her time on the Parks and Recreation Board, where she worked on the opening of Exploration Park and the updates to Heron Park. In this race, Duque has earned an impressive slate of endorsements from progressive leaders and Democratic organizations.

    Duque is facing incumbent council member Adam Morgan. He first joined the council after being appointed in 2020 to fill the spot left vacant by Mike Todd. Morgan is running on a conservative platform that doesn't represent the people of Mill Creek. If re-elected, Morgan would reduce funding for essential services that support local families and keep our community safe.

    We recommend Melissa Duque for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6 because of her progressive support and her strong community focus.

    Melissa Duque

    Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020.

    Melissa Duque

    Melissa Duque is running for Mill Creek City Council, Position 6. Duque has been a member of the Mill Creek Park and Recreation Board since 2018 and has served as board chair since 2020.

  • Endorsed By: Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , Latino Progress, 44th Legislative District Democrats
  • Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013. Outside of public service, she owns her own small business and volunteers as a member of the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County board.

    Gregerson is running a very progressive campaign based on economic recovery, community growth, and safety for all. If re-elected, she wants to continue the public investment in the local economy following the more than $400,000 previously distributed in small business grants. Gregerson also wants to improve the waterfront promenade and upgrade the Harbour Reach Corridor, for which she has secured state funding. She has earned the support of many local organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Former mayor Joe Marine is challenging Gregerson on a more conservative platform that emphasizes exclusionary housing policy and cutting community services. Marine was mayor from 2006 until 2012, and served on the city council from 1998 to 2000 and again from 2020 until the present.

    Jennifer Gregerson is the obvious choice in this race for Mukilteo mayor and she deserves your vote to keep bringing progressive values to city hall.

    Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013. Outside of public service, she owns her own small business and volunteers as a member of the Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County board.

    Gregerson is running a very progressive campaign based on economic recovery, community growth, and safety for all. If re-elected, she wants to continue the public investment in the local economy following the more than $400,000 previously distributed in small business grants. Gregerson also wants to improve the waterfront promenade and upgrade the Harbour Reach Corridor, for which she has secured state funding. She has earned the support of many local organizations and progressive elected officials.

    Former mayor Joe Marine is challenging Gregerson on a more conservative platform that emphasizes exclusionary housing policy and cutting community services. Marine was mayor from 2006 until 2012, and served on the city council from 1998 to 2000 and again from 2020 until the present.

    Jennifer Gregerson is the obvious choice in this race for Mukilteo mayor and she deserves your vote to keep bringing progressive values to city hall.

    Jennifer Gregerson

    Incumbent mayor Jennifer Gregerson is running for re-election for mayor of Mukilteo. Gregerson was first elected mayor in 2013 at which time she became Mukilteo’s first female mayor. Before that, Gregerson served as a city council member from 2004 until 2013.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. The council member wants to see public safety reimagined through the input of the community, and wants to see first responders and diverse community members included as part of the city's public safety decision-making process. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    She is running against Robbi Kesler, the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis, and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County. In the primary, Kesler's initial answers on homelessness in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy, with an overemphasis on private property. Kesler has since significantly expanded her platform, providing more details on her plans to address homelessness, handle waterfront development, and support collective bargaining. However, Huynh's solid track record on the council and support from the progressive community still makes her the best choice in this race.

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature. She is a former equity and social justice coordinator at the Washington State Department of Corrections, where she aimed to reduce recidivism and is a former Olympia planning commissioner. She is the only person of color currently serving on the council as well as the youngest member of the council.

    Huỳnh's priorities include helping small businesses recover from the pandemic, working with local arts organizations, expanding affordable housing, and improving transportation for all. The council member wants to see public safety reimagined through the input of the community, and wants to see first responders and diverse community members included as part of the city's public safety decision-making process. She is endorsed by a wide slate of state senators, elected officials, city council members, unions, and other progressive organizations.

    She is running against Robbi Kesler, the former general counsel for the Confederated Tribes of Chehalis, and a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County. In the primary, Kesler's initial answers on homelessness in local interviews did not point to an effective strategy, with an overemphasis on private property. Kesler has since significantly expanded her platform, providing more details on her plans to address homelessness, handle waterfront development, and support collective bargaining. However, Huynh's solid track record on the council and support from the progressive community still makes her the best choice in this race.

    Yến Huỳnh

    Incumbent Yến Huỳnh was appointed to the Position 2 seat in January 2021 after Jessica Bateman left the council to join the state Legislature.

  • Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union. Currently, he works as a paraeducator at South Sound High School.

    Gilman's top three campaign priorities are protecting the city's environment and natural spaces, engaging residents in city planning, and encouraging a sense of cooperation in the community. While on the council, Gilman has been an advocate for affordability requirements on tax-incentivized development, which keeps more homes and apartments affordable for all. He also worked to pass renter protections for people falling behind on payments due to COVID. Gilman and the council have also supported reverting Capitol Lake back to an estuary to support salmon populations.

    His opponent is Candace Mercer, who says that she is a 'progressive' who voted for Donald Trump. Much of her writing focuses on her decision to embrace right-wing advocates and ideals. Her secondary focus is on homelessness and addiction, with a stronger focus on the latter, though the measures she suggests are largely punitive. Mercer states that the city should aggressively prosecute drug dealing and sex work, build privatized urban campsites, and push for substance abstinence.

    Gilman's agenda is far more comprehensive and actually progressive, addressing the city's biggest issues at the source with services that help struggling families and prevent people from falling into poverty in the first place. Clark Gilman is the best choice for Olympia City Council, Position 4.

    Clark Gilman

    Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union.

    Clark Gilman

    Incumbent mayor pro tem Clark Gilman is running for re-election to his seat on the Olympia City Council, where he has served since January 2016. Previously, Gilman worked as a clean energy advocate at Climate Solutions and an organizer for the carpenters union.

  • Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

    Parshley is seeking a second term on the council to continue her work on climate, economic recovery, and more. During her time on the council, Parshley has supported the council's vote for grocery stores with more than 250 employees to provide hazard pay to workers during the pandemic. Parshley sponsored an ordinance banning the retail sale of dogs and cats in the city limits. She also joined the unanimous vote of her colleagues on the council banning the use of chemical weapons on demonstrators last summer.

    The two candidates in this race represent a philosophical divide in local and national politics on the left. Parshley has led a steady response to community demands that some activists have decried as incrementalism. On the other side, Reed feels a serious urgency to shake up the council and address issues like police violence immediately that some leaders have called unrealistic.

    Parshley has won endorsements from current members of the city council and other elected officials, as well as several Democratic groups and unions.

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

    Lisa Parshley

    Elected in 2017, incumbent and veterinary oncologist Lisa Parshley is running for re-election to Olympia City Council, Position 2.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21, Housing Action Fund , Olympia Firefighters (IAFF L468), UFCW Local 367, Boeing Machinists IAM District 751
  • Evergreen Future
  • Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

    Payne wants to see the city acknowledge systemic racism and support the use of an equity lens in its policymaking. On housing and homelessness, Payne states that expanded transitional and permanent supportive housing will help alleviate the crisis while providing COVID relief for small businesses and rent stabilization for commercial tenants will aid the city's economic recovery.

    He also supports additional funding for body cameras, social services, mental health, addiction programs, and the city's crisis response unit. In his interview, he stated that his opinion on defunding the police was nuanced and that the city should focus on true reform, justice, and accountability.

    Payne states that if elected, he would be the first Black man to ever serve on the city council. He says that his experience as a gay, Black, former military member would bring the voice of marginalized people to the table.

    He is running against retired Air Force member and former firefighter Corey Gauny, who works as a management analyst for the state's Department of Licensing. The only issue listed in detail on his site is around homelessness. Gauny says that he would tackle the issues by providing resources around behavioral health, but does not address key issues like affordable housing or the need to provide shelter for the hundreds of people who sleep on the streets every night. He also mentions that he wants to focus on a vision of the city that centers businesses. Gauny is also using a Republican consultant, which further indicates he would bring a more conservative voice to the council.

    Payne is the best choice in this race.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

    Dontae Derrell Payne

    Dontae Payne is a former U.S. Army member and currently works as the deputy district director to Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland. Payne has also worked as the regional representative for the Olympic Peninsula and South Puget Sound to the governor's office.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Cooper and the city council have passed several significant pieces of legislation that benefit the community. Notably, he supported the Olympia Home Fund to build new supportive permanent housing, provided funding for struggling businesses and families during the pandemic, and created a regional climate plan with neighboring cities. If re-elected, Cooper states that he will focus on housing and economic recovery, twin crises that affect everyone in the community, as well as continuing conversations on criminal justice reform.

    Cooper faces a challenge from conservative Spence Weigand, an Olympia-based realtor. His three listed campaign priorities include addressing homelessness, housing, and improving the business climate. While his site doesn't go into specifics on these as of mid-October, he repeats false and misleading claims about people experiencing homelessness in Thurston County. He also criticizes efforts to clean up and supply sanitation at encampments and wants to see increased law enforcement presence and new mental health facilities. On the matter of affordable housing, he is a supporter of zoning reform on single-family zoning, as well as projects like the 478-unit West Bay Yards project, while disclosing that his real estate firm is involved in the Hardel property.

    Cooper is backed by a significant number of unions, including the Lacey and Olympia firefighters' unions and United Food and Commercial Workers Local 367, as well as by Lt. Gov. Denny Heck and a large number of county and city elected officials. His track record on the council and strong support from our partners and local leaders make him the best choice in this race.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

    Jim Cooper

    Incumbent Jim Cooper is a veteran and the CEO of United Ways of the Pacific Northwest. He is also deeply involved in the community as president of the Olympia Metropolitan Parks District, chair of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency Board, and chair of the Regional Housing Council.

  • Incumbent LaTrisha Suggs is running to retain her seat in Port Angeles City Council, Position 1 which she was appointed to in 2019, becoming the first Native American city council member. Suggs is a restoration planner and worked with the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe on the removal of the Elwha River dams, the largest dam removal project in U.S. history. Now, she serves on a number of committees including the Clallam County Marine Resources and the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, looking at environmental impact and community wellbeing.

    Suggs is proud of the council’s recent accomplishments including providing rental, mortgage, and utility support to residents hurt by the pandemic, balancing the budget, and the Rediscovery program, which brings social workers into emergency response work. If re-elected, she wants to address housing insecurity, enhance the commercial district, develop solutions in the childcare crisis, and update city codes.

    Challenging Suggs is Adam Garcia, who works for the Veterans Health Administration doing in-home care. Unfortunately, Garcia wants to cut social services, prioritize business interests, and criminalize Port Angeles residents struggling with addiction and those without stable housing. He is not a progressive candidate.

    LaTrisha Suggs is the best choice in this race. She deserves your vote to continue serving in Position 1 on the Port Angeles City Council.

    LaTrisha Suggs

    Incumbent LaTrisha Suggs is running to retain her seat in Port Angeles City Council, Position 1 which she was appointed to in 2019, becoming the first Native American city council member.

    LaTrisha Suggs

    Incumbent LaTrisha Suggs is running to retain her seat in Port Angeles City Council, Position 1 which she was appointed to in 2019, becoming the first Native American city council member.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Incumbent Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin is running to retain his spot serving Port Angeles in Position 3 on the city council. Schromen-Wawrin was first elected to the council in 2017. Previously, he worked as a science teacher before getting a law degree and practicing constitutional law. Now, in addition to council work, Schromen-Wawrin chairs the Clallam Transit board and serves on the policy committees for the Association of Washington Cities and the Washington Low-Income Housing Alliance.

    During his time on the council, Schromen-Wawrin has worked to increase affordable housing, develop childcare programs, maintain stable utility rates, and support small businesses (especially through the pandemic). Now, he is running to build a local economy that works for everyone, continue to expand affordable housing, and strengthen the council’s communication and transparency. In this race, he earned endorsements from the local Democrats and other progressive organizations.

    His opponent Jena Stamper is running with Clallam County's Independent Advisory Association, a far-right group led by a conspiracy theorist, in order to challenge Schromen-Wawrin’s seat and bring conservative values to the council. The Associated Press covered both Stamper's false claims and the lies pushed by the group, noting that their theories on homelessness are unsubstantiated. She is a chiropractor and business owner. If elected, Stamper wants to prioritize business interests at the cost of community-strengthening social services and making Port Angeles an inclusive place for all to thrive.

    Schromen-Wawrin is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote for Port Angeles City Council, Position 3.

    Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin

    Incumbent Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin is running to retain his spot serving Port Angeles in Position 3 on the city council. Schromen-Wawrin was first elected to the council in 2017. Previously, he worked as a science teacher before getting a law degree and practicing constitutional law.

    Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin

    Incumbent Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin is running to retain his spot serving Port Angeles in Position 3 on the city council. Schromen-Wawrin was first elected to the council in 2017. Previously, he worked as a science teacher before getting a law degree and practicing constitutional law.

  • Joe Colombo is running for Puyallup City Council in District 2 for Position 2. He is an elected precinct committee officer in Pierce County and the founder of Indivisible Puyallup. Colombo serves on the City of Puyallup Design Review & Historic Preservation Board and has worked in IT in project management and facilitation. He brings both community leadership and grassroots political experience to his campaign.

    In this race, Colombo is prioritizing pedestrian safety, affordable housing, economic vitality, equity and diversity, disability accommodations, and community-focused government spending. He has stated that his first objective would be to form an equity and ethics commission to bring Puyallup citizens together to work on making the city better for all residents. Colombo is also focused on public safety and wants to invest in traffic lights, sidewalk maintenance, and community emergency response teams.

    Challenging Colombo is Dennis King, a Puyallup Civil Service Commissioner, real estate agent, and business owner. King is running a reactionary campaign that prioritizes business interests above community needs, aims to cut social services, and promotes divisive policy. One key difference between the candidates is their proposed solution - or lack thereof - to address homelessness. The News Tribune reports that while Colombo wants to sustainably expand services that are already working, like shelters and human services, King repeatedly brought up keeping "Seattle-style politics" out of Puyallup.

    It's important to note that in 2019, Puyallup spent more money on lawyers and legal settlements defending its laws that criminalize homelessness than distributing money to local nonprofits that serve people experiencing homelessness. The city needs solutions, not divisive political rhetoric.

    Joe Colombo is the clear choice in this race and deserves your vote for Position 2 on the Puyallup City Council in District 2.

    Joe Colombo

    Joe Colombo is running for Puyallup City Council in District 2 for Position 2. He is an elected precinct committee officer in Pierce County and the founder of Indivisible Puyallup.

    Joe Colombo

    Joe Colombo is running for Puyallup City Council in District 2 for Position 2. He is an elected precinct committee officer in Pierce County and the founder of Indivisible Puyallup.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club
  • Incumbent Steve Fields is running for re-election on a progressive platform that puts climate action and careful city planning at the forefront. Outside of the council, Fields owns a local coffee shop and is an umpire in youth sports. Prior to joining the council, he worked in King County government for more than 10 years. 

    In his first term, Fields points to the city council's declaration of a climate emergency as a sign of progress. He hopes to move forward with sustainability policies that protect water quality and parks and promote energy-efficient buildings. He also wants to see the city update the downtown urban design code, stating that the process is out of date. As Marymoor Village and Overlake are developed, Fields says he aims to see more community involvement to improve the appeal and function of new development.

    If re-elected, Fields would continue to be an outspoken proponent of progressive reforms, with a focus on climate action and sustainable design changes. During our interview, Fields reaffirmed his commitment to the Health through Housing initiative, despite some controversy around his recent statement. He also reiterated his commitment to meeting with all residents and groups in the community, regardless of their viewpoint. 

    Incumbent Steve Fields is running for re-election on a progressive platform that puts climate action and careful city planning at the forefront. Outside of the council, Fields owns a local coffee shop and is an umpire in youth sports. Prior to joining the council, he worked in King County government for more than 10 years. 

    In his first term, Fields points to the city council's declaration of a climate emergency as a sign of progress. He hopes to move forward with sustainability policies that protect water quality and parks and promote energy-efficient buildings. He also wants to see the city update the downtown urban design code, stating that the process is out of date. As Marymoor Village and Overlake are developed, Fields says he aims to see more community involvement to improve the appeal and function of new development.

    If re-elected, Fields would continue to be an outspoken proponent of progressive reforms, with a focus on climate action and sustainable design changes. During our interview, Fields reaffirmed his commitment to the Health through Housing initiative, despite some controversy around his recent statement. He also reiterated his commitment to meeting with all residents and groups in the community, regardless of their viewpoint. 

    Steve Fields

    Incumbent Steve Fields is running for re-election on a progressive platform that puts climate action and careful city planning at the forefront. Outside of the council, Fields owns a local coffee shop and is an umpire in youth sports.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Washington Bikes , King County Democrats, 48th Legislative District Democrats
  • Evergreen Future
  • Melissa Stuart is running for Redmond City Council, Position 4 to bring her advocacy for the environment and education to the council. She is the Director of Individual Giving at Boys and Girls Club of King County, has served on the board of Zero Waste Washington and South Transit, and as an Eastside Climate Justice Steward with the Alliance for Jobs and Clean Energy. She has also worked at Youth Eastside Services to help provide behavioral healthcare for families.

    She is running against finance analyst Dennis Ellis, who is running a conservative campaign for the seat. He states that public safety - specifically through policing - is the number one essential for a city. Ellis disagrees with the methods that other cities have taken in shifting funding to proactive community services that reduce crime, like health care and youth programming. He states that he will move the conversation away from topics like climate change or walkable infrastructure to making the city a more business-friendly environment, though he does not state exactly how.

    Stuart has been endorsed by several leading Democratic representatives and elected officials. While her campaign platform is not fully fleshed out on her website, her long record of community and professional service speaks to a candidate who is ready to contribute meaningfully to the council.

    Stuart is the best choice for Redmond City Council, Position 4.

    Melissa Stuart

    Melissa Stuart is running for Redmond City Council, Position 4 to bring her advocacy for the environment and education to the council.

    Melissa Stuart

    Melissa Stuart is running for Redmond City Council, Position 4 to bring her advocacy for the environment and education to the council.

  • Endorsed By: Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Incumbent Dr. Jeralee Anderson was first elected to the Redmond City Council in 2017. She is the president and co-founder of Greenroads International, which rates and advocates for sustainable transportation infrastructure. She has also been recognized for her achievements at the state and national level, working on the Gov. Inslee-appointed Washington State Public Works Board, as an alternate on the King County Regional Transit Committee, and on the Cascade Water Alliance board of directors.

    Anderson's re-election campaign is focused on climate action, improving infrastructure, and economic justice. She is committed to implementing the city's climate goals by 2030 and wants to expand the tree canopy. Anderson will prioritize reduce housing costs and rents so that seniors aren't displaced and first responders can live in the community they serve. In addition, she supports expanding mental health response services and focusing development around transit hubs.

    Anderson faces a challenge from AT&T program manager Tara Van Niman. Her platform emphasizes the need to take local action on climate change, improve community engagement, and promote smart growth that accommodates the influx of people moving to Redmond. Van Niman has earned the endorsement of some local leaders like Sen. Manka Dhingra and Reps. Roger Goodman and Larry Springer.

    Anderson's thoughtful platform and strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations make her the best choice in this race.

    Incumbent Dr. Jeralee Anderson was first elected to the Redmond City Council in 2017. She is the president and co-founder of Greenroads International, which rates and advocates for sustainable transportation infrastructure. She has also been recognized for her achievements at the state and national level, working on the Gov. Inslee-appointed Washington State Public Works Board, as an alternate on the King County Regional Transit Committee, and on the Cascade Water Alliance board of directors.

    Anderson's re-election campaign is focused on climate action, improving infrastructure, and economic justice. She is committed to implementing the city's climate goals by 2030 and wants to expand the tree canopy. Anderson will prioritize reduce housing costs and rents so that seniors aren't displaced and first responders can live in the community they serve. In addition, she supports expanding mental health response services and focusing development around transit hubs.

    Anderson faces a challenge from AT&T program manager Tara Van Niman. Her platform emphasizes the need to take local action on climate change, improve community engagement, and promote smart growth that accommodates the influx of people moving to Redmond. Van Niman has earned the endorsement of some local leaders like Sen. Manka Dhingra and Reps. Roger Goodman and Larry Springer.

    Anderson's thoughtful platform and strong support from our Progressive Voters Guide partner organizations make her the best choice in this race.

    Jeralee Anderson

    Incumbent Dr. Jeralee Anderson was first elected to the Redmond City Council in 2017. She is the president and co-founder of Greenroads International, which rates and advocates for sustainable transportation infrastructure.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities. González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, she is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    The biggest divergence between Harrell and González's platforms is the candidates' short-term plans for how to help people experiencing homelessness. The crux of the problem, which experts and agencies have stated time and time again, is the lack of shelters with services to help people stay housed. The city has about 4,000 unsheltered people, and while there are about 1,300 affordable housing units and 400 additional shelter spaces coming soon, it is not enough. González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She would also make it a key focus to increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to child care access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts to increase health and safety. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Mosqueda was first elected in 2017 and has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation that will fund affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, Mosqueda supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her campaign priorities include addressing our housing crisis with greater urgency, including re-zoning housing across Seattle, as well as providing assistance to renters and investing in health citywide.

    Mosqueda is running against Kenneth Wilson, the manager of an engineering company. Wilson's platform is not progressive and does not reflect the community's priorities. His voter's guide statement includes comments about public safety and policing that indicate he would not support reinvestment in community safety alternatives. He is also dismissive of evidence-based solutions for our affordable housing crisis.

    Mosqueda is a strong progressive and the clear choice for Seattle City Council, Position 8.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.