SEIU Local 925

SEIU Local 925

SEIU Local 925 unites 17,000 education and public service workers across Washington including child care providers, university employees, and school district staff. Our members meet with candidates, review their records, and recommend those who will support working families.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

  • Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee. Additionally, Donovan has served on the Columbia Neighborhood Association board, the Whatcom County Citizens Election Advisory Commission, and as both a member and board chair of the local Washington Conservation Voters chapter.

    During his time on the council, Donovan’s top priorities have been protecting Lake Whatcom’s ecosystem and budgeting responsibly so that Whatcom can provide human services. If re-elected, he wants to address the housing crisis that hurts the Whatcom community and economy, combat climate change, reduce incarceration rates while investing in diversion and alternatives, and protect clean water coming from Lake Whatcom and other natural waterways.

    Donovan is facing a challenge from Kelley O’Connor, a former first responder and a current health care management student. O’Connor advocates for affordable housing and mental health resources but has not released a detailed campaign to accomplish these goals.

    Todd Donovan is the best choice to represent District 2 on the Whatcom County Council because of his progressive track record and strong support from our progressive partners.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

    Todd Donovan

    Incumbent Todd Donovan is running for re-election to Whatcom County Council in District 2. Donovan is a professor of state and local government at Western Washington University. He first joined the county council in 2016 and currently chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

City Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Incumbent Larry Brown is running unopposed for re-election to Auburn City Council, Position 6. He is the president of the Washington State Labor Council and serves on the Valley Regional Fire Authority governing board. Brown has been a strong advocate for workers and supports increasing wages in Washington. In his second term, he will advocate for more public transit, transitional housing for people experiencing homelessness, and growing the local manufacturing sector.

    Brown deserves your vote for Auburn City Council, Position 6.

    Incumbent Larry Brown is running unopposed for re-election to Auburn City Council, Position 6. He is the president of the Washington State Labor Council and serves on the Valley Regional Fire Authority governing board. Brown has been a strong advocate for workers and supports increasing wages in Washington. In his second term, he will advocate for more public transit, transitional housing for people experiencing homelessness, and growing the local manufacturing sector.

    Brown deserves your vote for Auburn City Council, Position 6.

    Larry Brown

    Incumbent Larry Brown is running unopposed for re-election to Auburn City Council, Position 6. He is the president of the Washington State Labor Council and serves on the Valley Regional Fire Authority governing board.

  • Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level. She is focused on addressing the needs of Bellevue families by focusing on education, affordable housing, human services for vulnerable community members, and advocating for local parks and public spaces.

    In 2020, Robinson was elected mayor of Bellevue by her fellow council members and has been a moderate voice leading the city. During the COVID-19 crisis, she has focused on addressing food insecurity for community members as well as supporting women and minority-owned businesses with grants. Robinson has supported increasing affordable housing and shelter space, though far more progress is needed in Bellevue and across the region

    Robinson is facing Dr. Gina Johnson, the founder of Vital Mind Body. Johnson's platform emphasizes police funding without mentioning much-needed accountability measures or increased funding for community-based alternatives. In addition, Johnson proposes harsh and punitive measures that fail to address the root of homelessness in Bellevue. Finally, Johnson opposes some of the city's basic COVID-19 protections, which are consistent with CDC recommendations and have helped keep our community safe.

    Robinson is the best choice in the race for Position 6. Given the other competitive races for Bellevue City Council on the ballot, we hope Robinson will have the opportunity to work with a more progressive council and will support a bolder agenda for the city of Bellevue.

    Lynne Robinson

    Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level.

    Lynne Robinson

    Lynne Robinson is running for re-election to Bellevue City Council, Position 6. Since joining in 2014, Robinson has prioritized supporting small businesses, increasing responsible development, and protecting the environment at the local level.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring the needs of the community, especially historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy. If elected, she states that she would be the first Black person to serve on the Bellingham City Council.

    In our interview with Martens, she emphasized the need for the city to fortify outreach from city hall, whether it be to struggling local businesses or residents having a difficult time. One of her top priorities would be to address homelessness in the city by making strong investments in rapid re-housing, easy access shelters, and permanent shelters. She supports Councilmember Hammill's proposed 0.1% sales tax for housing because it will save the city money by reducing unnecessary jail time and emergency responses. On police reform, Martens supports shifting police away from responding to jobs they aren't trained to do, like dealing with mental health crises, and investing more in diversion programs.

    Martens is one of the people working to found the Whatcom Racial Equity Commission, a joint effort between city and county to hold policy conversations and propose solutions to the challenges that Black, Indigenous, and other community members face. If elected, she is dedicated to continuing to hold conversations to build trust between residents and city hall.

    Her opponent is financial advisor Russ Whidbee, who states that he will take a moderate approach to policymaking on the council. On housing, Whidbee would not go as far as Martin's approach to updating zoning and allowing for more housing types. Instead, he states that his focus would be on seeking out grants and public and private partnerships with banks and developers to increase affordable housing. Whidbee would seek to increase the transparency of the police department with the use of body cameras, create a citizen-led oversight panel with police membership, and encourage more de-escalation training.

    Martens' bold vision and backing from progressive organizations make her the best choice in this race.

    Kristina Michele Martens

    Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring the needs of the community, especially historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy.

    Kristina Michele Martens

    Kristina Michele Martens is a real estate agent, local activist, and former radio host who is running to bring the needs of the community, especially historically underserved communities, to the forefront of policy.

  • Endorsed By: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club, Teamsters Joint Council 28, UFCW 21 , Alliance for Gun Responsibility
  • Soleil Lewis is a special education teacher and community leader running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7. Her campaign priorities include increasing government transparency, promoting civic engagement and education, expanding employment opportunities for youth, and improving neighborhood infrastructure. She wants to see the city expand online access to public meetings and improve language resources, alongside greater participation by the city in regional government.

    If elected, Lewis also wants to create an airport committee, which would evaluate the impact of the Sea-Tac Airport on Des Moines residents. Additionally, Lewis works with Seattle King County and Vancouver NAACP on issues of diversity and inclusion and is excited to represent new voices on the city council as an African- and Haitian-American woman.

    Lewis is challenging incumbent council member and deputy mayor Matt Mahoney. First elected in 2017, Mahoney has worked on a number of council committees including Municipal Facilities, Public Safety/Emergency Management, and Transportation. He is running for re-election on a more conservative platform of increased development and funding for law enforcement.

    We recommend Lewis for Position 7 because of her progressive values and strong support from our partners and local leaders.

    Soleil Lewis

    Soleil Lewis is a special education teacher and community leader running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7.

    Soleil Lewis

    Soleil Lewis is a special education teacher and community leader running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7.

  • Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes. In her time on the council, she has been a voice for all members of the community and worked to prioritize housing affordability as well as economic development and recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Also in this race is Jack Walsh, a former newspaper reporter who currently owns a local ice cream business. Walsh led advisory vote campaigns to keep marijuana businesses out of Federal Way. His campaign platform includes a refusal to consider investing in community safety alternatives as well as damaging misinformation about people experiencing homelessness.

    Craft is the obvious choice in the race for Federal Way City Council, Position 5.

    Leandra Craft

    Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes.

    Leandra Craft

    Leandra Craft is running to retain her seat on Federal Way City Council in Position 5. She was appointed to the council in October 2020 and is a King County deputy prosecuting attorney. Craft focuses her work as an attorney on alternatives to incarceration and prosecuting hate crimes.

  • Barbara de Michele is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 3. She was elected to the city council in 2019. De Michele previously served on the Issaquah School District Board of Directors, including twice as board president, and spent 12 years on the Issaquah Arts Commission. In her time on the council, de Michele has focused her efforts on increasing affordability in the area, improving transit and roads, and helping local human service providers and nonprofits handle community needs. De Michele's detailed campaign platform prioritizes affordable housing, increased mobility options for residents and workers, and recognizing Issaquah as a welcoming community.

    De Michele is running unopposed and deserves your vote for Issaquah City Council, Position 3.

    Barbara de Michele is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 3. She was elected to the city council in 2019. De Michele previously served on the Issaquah School District Board of Directors, including twice as board president, and spent 12 years on the Issaquah Arts Commission. In her time on the council, de Michele has focused her efforts on increasing affordability in the area, improving transit and roads, and helping local human service providers and nonprofits handle community needs. De Michele's detailed campaign platform prioritizes affordable housing, increased mobility options for residents and workers, and recognizing Issaquah as a welcoming community.

    De Michele is running unopposed and deserves your vote for Issaquah City Council, Position 3.

    Barbara de Michele

    Barbara de Michele is running for re-election to Issaquah City Council, Position 3. She was elected to the city council in 2019.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club
  • Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance. She has also served families and children in the community as a gang prevention specialist and caseworker in Seattle and as the liaison for African-American families for Seattle Public Schools. In addition, she has been a board member of several organizations, including the Rainier Valley Food Bank and the UW School of Social Work Communities in Action Initiative.

    If she is elected, Bennett will bring the same energy she has for community service to the council. She has a long list of priorities, including supporting businesses as they recover from the pandemic, subsidizing child care, and providing options for elder care. On housing, Bennett's policies include providing wraparound services and transitional housing for those struggling with homelessness, addressing the legacy of redlining, and incentivizing housing for residents with middle-to-low incomes. She wants to redefine the role of law enforcement, providing more accountability for bad actors and hiring unarmed public workers who can provide social services for mental health calls.

    Bennett is challenging Mayor Dana Ralph, who has served on the city council since 2012 and as mayor of Kent since 2018. She has served in many regional organizations, including as past president of the Sound Cities Association Transportation Policy Board and as vice chair of the South King Housing & Homelessness Partners Board. Ralph points to many completed and ongoing projects in Kent as signs of her and the council's leadership, including securing funding for the light rail expansion to Kent, continuing the trash-clearing Mill Creek Canyon Revitalization Project, and investing in pandemic relief, from vaccination sites to employment retention programs.

    However, Ralph has also fought against measures to help the homeless. She sued the county when a temporary shelter was set up in a former Kent motel, which was aimed at helping houseless people recover from sickness. In addition, Ralph joined with Police Chief Rafael Padilla to raise concerns about recently passed laws that increase accountability for law enforcement. At a forum in August, community members accused Ralph of stoking fear in the community by making false claims about the impact of the new laws.

    Bennett is the best choice in this race to bring new progressive leadership to Kent.

    Dawn Bennett

    Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance.

    Dawn Bennett

    Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance.

  • Incumbent Satwinder Kaur is running unopposed for her current seat on the Kent City Council in Position 2. Kaur serves in many community and advocacy organizations, including the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency Advisory Council, King County Domestic Violence Regional Task Force, and the Kentwood PTSA. Since her election in 2018, Kaur has pushed for racial justice trainings and a strategic plan on equity for the city as well as more funding for human services.

    Kaur has earned another term on the Kent City Council.

    Satwinder Kaur

    Incumbent Satwinder Kaur is running unopposed for her current seat on the Kent City Council in Position 2.

    Satwinder Kaur

    Incumbent Satwinder Kaur is running unopposed for her current seat on the Kent City Council in Position 2.

  • Incumbent Brenda Fincher is running for re-election to Kent City Council, Position 6 to continue her work on economic recovery and affordable housing. Fincher has served on the council since 2014, and in that time has voted to approve funds for youth mental health and supported community discussion on providing a mental health co-response model to law enforcement. She states that if re-elected, she will build on current renter protections, advocate for businesses owned by people of color, and work to ensure that housing stays affordable for working families.

    She is running against Larry Hussey. Hussey does not have a campaign website available, but his candidate announcement states that the city needs more motels and that he is anti-marijuana.

    Fincher is by far the best choice in this race.

    Brenda Fincher

    Incumbent Brenda Fincher is running for re-election to Kent City Council, Position 6 to continue her work on economic recovery and affordable housing.

    Brenda Fincher

    Incumbent Brenda Fincher is running for re-election to Kent City Council, Position 6 to continue her work on economic recovery and affordable housing.

  • Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks. He also served on the boards of the environmental organizations Futurewise and Spark Northwest.

    First elected to the council in 2013, Arnold has worked hard to improve Kirkland's transportation, sustainability, and inclusiveness. He has supported efforts to strengthen safe routes to schools, improve transit options and reduce congestion, and provide co-responders for mental health calls to the police. Arnold is also a part-time technology consultant at Fuse. He was not involved in this recommendation.

    Arnold has been a thoughtful and innovative leader as Kirkland has grown over the last eight years. He deserves your vote for Kirkland City Council, Position 1.

    Jay Arnold

    Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks.

    Jay Arnold

    Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold is running unopposed for re-election to Kirkland City Council, Position 1. Prior to joining the city council, Arnold served on the Kirkland Planning Commission for five years and co-chaired the campaign to provide dedicated funding for Kirkland parks.

  • Incumbent Iris Carias is running for re-election to the Mount Vernon City Council, representing Ward 1 in Position 2. Carias joined the council in 2018 where she has worked to improve representation in city government and lift all Mount Vernon voices. Carias’ background is in social services, caregiving, and community leadership. Outside of the council, she works as a liaison for the school district’s Migrant Education Program.

    When the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated Mount Vernon’s housing crisis, Carias worked with the rest of the council to direct funds to rental assistance, emergency housing, and other housing resources. If re-elected, she would continue advocating for community needs and public services, including more affordable housing policy and updates to transportation infrastructure like the North 30th traffic light and the widening of College Way under I-5.

    Carias faces a challenge from Daniel Downs, a senior planner for Skagit County, He emphasizes pouring money into helping businesses recover but wants to cut social services that Mount Vernon community members have relied on more than ever during the pandemic. Unfortunately, Downs lacks a detailed campaign platform and website as of early October.

    Iris Carias is the best choice in this race and deserves re-election for Mount Vernon City Council, Ward 1, Position 1 to continue bringing progressive leadership to the city.

    Incumbent Iris Carias is running for re-election to the Mount Vernon City Council, representing Ward 1 in Position 2. Carias joined the council in 2018 where she has worked to improve representation in city government and lift all Mount Vernon voices. Carias’ background is in social services, caregiving, and community leadership. Outside of the council, she works as a liaison for the school district’s Migrant Education Program.

    When the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated Mount Vernon’s housing crisis, Carias worked with the rest of the council to direct funds to rental assistance, emergency housing, and other housing resources. If re-elected, she would continue advocating for community needs and public services, including more affordable housing policy and updates to transportation infrastructure like the North 30th traffic light and the widening of College Way under I-5.

    Carias faces a challenge from Daniel Downs, a senior planner for Skagit County, He emphasizes pouring money into helping businesses recover but wants to cut social services that Mount Vernon community members have relied on more than ever during the pandemic. Unfortunately, Downs lacks a detailed campaign platform and website as of early October.

    Iris Carias is the best choice in this race and deserves re-election for Mount Vernon City Council, Ward 1, Position 1 to continue bringing progressive leadership to the city.

    Iris Carias

    Incumbent Iris Carias is running for re-election to the Mount Vernon City Council, representing Ward 1 in Position 2. Carias joined the council in 2018 where she has worked to improve representation in city government and lift all Mount Vernon voices.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Local 925, UFCW 21
  • Evergreen Future
  • Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton. She is currently an adjunct faculty member at Seattle University's Criminal Justice Department, where her coursework incorporates a racial equity lens. Previously, she worked at the state's Department of Children, Youth, and Families at Echo Glen's Children's Center, counseling and providing treatment plans for struggling youth. She has also worked at Youthsource, where she engaged young people who had dropped out of school.

    As a social services advocate, Rivera wants to prioritize updating Renton's Community Needs Assessment for Human Services, which would help provide the community access to food, shelter, and living wage jobs. She also wants to update Renton's 2011 Clean Economy Strategy, bringing it in line with today's standards on clean water, air, and reduced pollution. Additionally, Rivera will work hard to provide low-cost job training and emphasize the need for affordable and mixed-income housing.

    Her opponent, Ben Johnson, runs a small IT business and has worked with the North Renton streets project, as well as serving on the City of Renton Airport Committee. His priorities include funding the police and fire departments, making neighborhoods attractive, and ensuring that Renton expands its transportation options through Sound Transit and the state department of transportation.

    Rivera has overwhelming support from progressive organizations across the spectrum, from unions to housing advocates to educators. Her dedication to the community and progressive and bold vision for the city earns her our recommendation for Renton City Council, Position 2.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

  • Incumbent Ruth Pérez is running unopposed for Renton City Council, Position 6. She was appointed to the council in 2014, and then elected again in 2015 and 2017. Pérez also served as council president in 2020. She worked in state government for Governor Gary Locke promoting trade and economic development. Pérez also helped expand Spanish-language education programs during her 10 years working for the Consulate of Mexico in Seattle.

    Her campaign platform is focused on expanding access to affordable housing, continuing to build a strong economy, reducing crime and homelessness, and tackling the city’s transportation issues. As to her successes on the council, Pérez points to her efforts as a council member to lobby legislators on including Renton projects in the 2015 transportation package.

    We were disappointed to see Pérez oppose local efforts to expand supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness. We hope that she will take a more inclusive and forward-looking approach to this critical issue in her next term. Though she is more moderate, we recommend Ruth Pérez for re-election to Position 6 on the Renton City Council.

    Incumbent Ruth Pérez is running unopposed for Renton City Council, Position 6. She was appointed to the council in 2014, and then elected again in 2015 and 2017. Pérez also served as council president in 2020. She worked in state government for Governor Gary Locke promoting trade and economic development. Pérez also helped expand Spanish-language education programs during her 10 years working for the Consulate of Mexico in Seattle.

    Her campaign platform is focused on expanding access to affordable housing, continuing to build a strong economy, reducing crime and homelessness, and tackling the city’s transportation issues. As to her successes on the council, Pérez points to her efforts as a council member to lobby legislators on including Renton projects in the 2015 transportation package.

    We were disappointed to see Pérez oppose local efforts to expand supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness. We hope that she will take a more inclusive and forward-looking approach to this critical issue in her next term. Though she is more moderate, we recommend Ruth Pérez for re-election to Position 6 on the Renton City Council.

    Ruth Pérez

    Incumbent Ruth Pérez is running unopposed for Renton City Council, Position 6. She was appointed to the council in 2014, and then elected again in 2015 and 2017. Pérez also served as council president in 2020.

  • Endorsed By: SEIU Local 925
  • This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

    Thomas-Kennedy is a managing partner in her own practice and she has volunteered with the National Lawyers Guild, completed pro bono defense work for local organizers, and worked extensively as a public defender.

    There are many reasons to vote for Thomas-Kennedy. First, she is campaigning for common-sense justice reforms aimed at focusing on serious harms and crime prevention while stepping away from prosecuting people for poverty and mental illness. Second, her opponent switched parties to join Donald Trump’s party and run for lieutenant governor as a Republican in 2020. Third, Fox News and Tucker Carlson are attacking her for challenging their racist, conservative myths about reducing crime.

    As a public defender, Thomas-Kennedy has witnessed many people get caught in the criminal legal system because of a lack of supportive social services. She wants to focus on using services to prevent crime by addressing the root causes and keep people from being entangled in the justice system. By emphasizing prevention, taxpayers improve safety and save money on law enforcement and the criminal justice system, which are by far the biggest costs of city and county governments.

    There has been controversy about her use of the term abolition and some ill-advised tweets she posted after getting tear-gassed with her daughter during last year's protests. Although we don't condone her tweets, conservatives are drumming up fearful messaging about Thomas-Kennedy to distract us from the need for new approaches to fixing a failing system with urgent problems. In our interview, she defined abolition in a very sensible way as a slow process of building up the community so that we don’t need to rely on police, courts, and prisons as the catch-all solution for so many social issues.

    If elected, Thomas-Kennedy wants to build a victim advocate unit and end qualified immunity in order to hold the police accountable. She also proposes strengthening the civil unit of the office in order to fight wage theft, take exploitive corporate landlords to court, and hold fossil fuel companies accountable for environmental harm which affects us all.

    Thomas-Kennedy's opponent is Republican Ann Davison. Last year, Davison ran for lieutenant governor because she wanted to serve as a check on the Democrats in Olympia. Thankfully, Davison lost that primary election and Democratic lawmakers passed the most ambitious progressive agenda in decades this spring.

    Davison is now running for Seattle city attorney echoing many of the same conservative Republican talking points from her previous campaign. Her divisive platform demonizes those experiencing homelessness and she doesn’t believe additional funding is needed to connect people with housing or services. During debates and in her campaign literature, she has displayed a lack of understanding about the role of the city attorney and how the office functions.

    Thomas-Kennedy has faced misleading attacks from Fox News and right-wing radio hosts during this campaign. During our interview, she displayed a strong understanding of both the city attorney's office and the criminal justice system. We believe Thomas-Kennedy is the best choice for Seattle city attorney because of her experience representing marginalized Seattleites, her strong support from progressive advocates, and her commitment to pursuing justice for all Seattleites.

    Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

    Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

  • Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

    Rumbaugh wants to tackle challenges like air and water pollution and decrease our reliance on fossil fuels without impacting the local economy or jobs in the area. Her campaign is emphasizing resetting the economy as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, bringing more affordable housing to Tacoma, and prioritizing frontline workers and their families. Rumbaugh is also a passionate advocate for people with disabilities and has pledged to listen and push the city to become inclusive. Her platform includes a commitment to public education and ensuring that all schools receive equitable funding, regardless of neighborhood or zip code. 

    Rumbaugh is a good choice for Tacoma City Council, Position 2 if you are looking for a moderate candidate who is focused on boosting the local economy.

    Sarah Rumbaugh

    Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

    Sarah Rumbaugh

    Sarah Rumbaugh owns a consulting business and serves on the Tacoma Human Rights Commission. She previously worked as a city planner for Kent and with the Housing Equity Task Force helping to develop the Home in Tacoma Project.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years. She chairs the Community Vitality and Safety Committee and is a member of groups including the Parks Policy Board and Opioid Prevention Taskforce.

    In her time on the council, Ushka supported apprenticeship programs by changing labor codes to make these programs more accessible. If she's re-elected, Ushka wants to do more to fight racial inequalities in health, housing, education, employment, and law enforcement. She states that she will continue to work for more flexible federal funding for housing and shelters, including low-barrier shelters with fewer barriers to entry for the city's unhoused population. Ushka also feels the city needs to increase zoning density where suitable to address the housing deficit and provide additional resources for responding to mental health crises.

    Also in this race is Israel James McKinney. McKinney has worked for Boeing and Xfinity and currently works for Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services. His platform includes prioritizing education, supporting police reform and accountability, and reducing the gap in affordable housing.

    Our local council was disappointed with some of Ushka's interview answers, including her support for moving the migrant detention center to the Nalley Valley. However, Ushka’s support from local progressive groups and our partner organizations makes her the best choice in the race for Tacoma City Council, Position 4.

    Catherine Ushka

    Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years.

    Catherine Ushka

    Catherine Ushka is running for re-election to Tacoma City Council, Position 4. Ushka was first elected to the council in 2017 and previously served on the Tacoma School Board for eight years.

  • Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents. The Tukwila Civil Service commissioner has also worked on the Community Oriented Policing Citizens Advisory Board, both of which provide civilian oversight of the city's police department. Sharp plans to harness that experience to increase accountability and reforms for law enforcement. He says that as a working dad, he would also advocate for affordable housing and better transit access. He wants to see equitable recovery from the worst of the pandemic that targets vulnerable communities like seniors and people of color. Sharp has tremendous support from labor unions as well as local and Democratic elected officials.

    Tosh Sharp

    Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents.

    Tosh Sharp

    Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Kim Harless is a program manager at a paint recycling nonprofit and a Clark County Review commissioner. She has served in several roles oriented towards feeding the community, including as the president of Slow Food Southwest Washington, vice president of Urban Abundance, and treasurer of Clark County Food System. She also worked for nearly a decade as an environmental operations specialist with Clark County planning recycling systems, providing oversight on contracts.

    Harless states that as an Indigenous and Chicana single mother, she intends to center equity in both her campaign and her tenure on council if elected. She will lead with housing-first solutions to the homelessness crisis, which means securing shelter for people so that they can safely address any health, social, or economic issues they may be facing. In our interview with Harless, she said she wanted to provide technical expertise on creating a much more robust climate action plan. She believes police reform should be intentional and focused, and that emergency services should evolve so that a more diverse suite of services is available for residents who call 911 for disputes or mental health crises. Harless emphasized that, overall, city government must address the needs of marginalized communities so that Vancouver is truly welcoming and healthy for all.

    Her opponent is John Blom, a real estate broker and former Clark County council member from District 3. On the county council, Blom served as a fairly moderate voice in his first term, which he ran for as a Republican; he later ran with no party preference. He serves on the board of directors for the Boys and Girls Club of Southwest Washington and The Historic Trust.

    Blom acknowledges that the homelessness crisis is entangled with many other issues, including lack of mental health services, surging costs of living, medical emergencies, and job loss. He also states that law enforcement should provide more options for alternative responses for those who need help with behavioral or mental health. While Blom mentions that the best way to ensure public safety is to provide educational and economic opportunities for people to thrive, he is not specific about whether that would include shifting funding into community-based services.

    Harless has worked hard to bring together the government and public to work on issues that the community cares about most. Harless' forward-thinking agenda and support from a wide range of organizations make her the best choice in this race. We recommend Harless in this race for her fresh perspective, strong progressive values, and the technical expertise she could bring to the city council.

    Kim Harless

    Kim Harless is a program manager at a paint recycling nonprofit and a Clark County Review commissioner.

    Kim Harless

    Kim Harless is a program manager at a paint recycling nonprofit and a Clark County Review commissioner.

  • Endorsed By: The Washington Bus, SEIU 775, SEIU Local 925, Sierra Club, Washington Conservation Voters , League of United Latin American Citizens SW WA Council 4713, Sunrise Movement of SW WA
  • Evergreen Future
  • Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov. Inslee as a commissioner for Washington State Parks and Recreation and serves as a board member of the Clark County Volunteer Lawyers Program, which provides law clinics for underserved communities.

    Perez's campaign is focused on improving life for all residents of Vancouver. She wants to incentivize mixed-income communities that have access to public transportation, and create bold solutions for affordable housing that bring the unsheltered community, service providers, and developers to the table. She believes that investing in communities of color can strengthen the entire city, and she would focus on removing discriminatory language in housing deeds, center living wage jobs, and look to help small businesses recover post-pandemic.

    She is running against David Gellatly. He is the former chair of the Clark County Republican Party and is now a member of the party's executive board. He states that his top priorities would be homelessness and supporting businesses in the city. Gellatly was cited last year as one of the organizers of pro-Trump rallies in Vancouver during protests and after the shooting of Kevin E. Peterson, Jr. As the head of a conservative activist group, Gellatly is likely to continue to push regressive policies on the council on social and racial justice, environmental reform, and more.

    Perez has worked tirelessly both professionally and on a volunteer basis to bring community-oriented solutions to Vancouver. She deserves your vote for Vancouver City Council, Position 3.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.