Sage Leaders

Sage Leaders

Sage Leaders cultivates deep democracy in Washington state by developing Black, Indigenous, and People of Color community leaders for civic and elected leadership. Our long-term goal is to build governments reflective of our communities, with the power to influence, lead, and govern within a Just Transition framework. 

Sage Leaders Website

County Races

King County

  • Non-Partisan

    Joe Nguyen

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Sen. Joe Nguyen was elected to the Washington state Senate in 2018 and has worked as a senior program manager at Microsoft since 2013. His parents were refugees from Vietnam who came to White Center, where Nguyen was born and raised.

    During Nguyen's time in the Legislature, he has been an advocate for Washington's families and equality, including playing a leadership role in fully funding the Working Families Tax Credit. In addition, he co-sponsored legislation to require anti-racism and equity training in public schools.

    Nguyen is running for county executive to implement sweeping actions on the affordable housing crisis, to reform the criminal justice system with deep changes and accountability, and to make the state's economy work for everyone, not just the wealthiest people. In particular, Nguyen has proposed to make all transit services free to improve access and increase ridership. He also wants to leverage the new Regional Homelessness Authority to significantly scale up the building of affordable housing.

    Nguyen has the support of elected leaders including state Reps. Kirsten Harris-Talley and David Hackney as well as state Sen. Bob Hasegawa and Treasurer Mike Pellicciotti. Nguyen is a progressive choice if you're looking for new leadership in the executive's office who will prioritize racial justice and systemic change.

    Joe Nguyen

    Sen. Joe Nguyen was elected to the Washington state Senate in 2018 and has worked as a senior program manager at Microsoft since 2013. His parents were refugees from Vietnam who came to White Center, where Nguyen was born and raised.

    Joe Nguyen

    Sen. Joe Nguyen was elected to the Washington state Senate in 2018 and has worked as a senior program manager at Microsoft since 2013. His parents were refugees from Vietnam who came to White Center, where Nguyen was born and raised.

  • Dr. Shukri Olow is a community organizer running to empower King County residents with the resources they need to thrive. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old. Olow credits the food bank, social workers, and Kent public housing system for helping her find opportunities, and wants to now help meet the needs of those struggling in King County. In discussions with child care providers, immigrants, small business owners, teachers, and others she has identified several ways to meet the needs of those who don't have wealth or political power.

    Olow notes that the biggest driver of homelessness in the region is rent increasing faster than incomes. To beat rising costs, Olow wants to ensure that the county is funding humane, non-congregate shelters to get people out of crisis. She also wants to build supportive housing and a minimum of 37,000 units of housing which would be available to those with the lowest incomes. She wants to reimagine community safety through a public health lens and move towards investments in the community through school partnerships, workforce development, and more. Olow takes seriously the need for everyone to thrive and would work towards free transit, accessible child care and elder care, and more.

    In our interview with Olow, we were impressed by her thoughtfulness, her record, and her tenacity in bringing together many voices and needs for the good of all. In this race between two progressive candidates, we recommend Olow with the support of many of our progressive partners.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is a community organizer running to empower King County residents with the resources they need to thrive. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

    Shukri Olow

    Dr. Shukri Olow is a community organizer running to empower King County residents with the resources they need to thrive. As a child, Olow's family fled civil war in Somalia and spent six years in a refugee camp before finally settling in Kent when she was 10 years old.

Snohomish County

  • Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5. Donaghy serves on the board of directors for the Communities of Color Coalition and regularly volunteers to provide emergency services and disaster relief to the Snohomish community.

    Donaghy has spent her professional life advocating for a high quality of life for all Snohomish residents. She is a strong progressive whose campaign priorities include COVID-19 recovery that incorporates community support, housing security, justice reform, and maintaining green space. She is endorsed by many of our partner organizations and a number of progressive elected leaders in this race.

    Low is an outspoken Republican on the council who voted in June against $4 per hour hazard pay for grocery store workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Earlier this spring, he badgered and voted against the appointment of a young woman of color to the Regional Law and Justice Council because he disagreed with some of her social media posts.

    Donaghy would bring a much-needed progressive perspective to the council and is the obvious choice for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

    Brandy Donaghy

    Brandy Donaghy is a community organizer and Navy veteran who is challenging incumbent Councilmember Sam Low for Snohomish County Council in District 5.

  • Endorsed By: NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates, Sage Leaders, Sierra Club, SEPAC, Washington Conservation Voters, Housing Action Fund , Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, Snohomish County Democrats, Alliance for Gun Responsibility

Port Races

Port of Seattle

  • Hamdi Mohamed is running for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 3 with a visionary agenda for the port that centers the needs of the workers, the environment, and the broader community. Mohamed's family fled Somalia and settled in the SeaTac region when she was 5 years old, with her mother working in the airport. Mohamed now works in the King County Office of Equity and Social Justice as a policy advisor and has helped manage the millions of dollars in COVID-19 relief funds that went to community-based organizations in King County.

    As a resident of SeaTac, Mohamed lives in one of the communities most affected by airport pollution. Given that none of the current commissioners live in South King County, she seeks to bridge the gap between port policy and lived experience. She wants to expand the port's efforts to transition from fossil fuels to clean energy and restore habitats for salmon and orcas. Through greater direct partnership with workers, Mohamed wants to protect unions, provide pandemic relief, and prioritize workplace health.

    In our interview with Mohamed, we were incredibly impressed by her drive to improve the lives of those who work and live near the port. One recent example of her accomplishment was her work with Beyoncé and Tina Knowles to provide free coronavirus testing and supplies to local organizations and working with the King County Immigrant and Refugee Commission to center language access in COVID-19 relief.

    Mohamed is running against incumbent Stephanie Bowman, who has served on the commission since 2013. Bowman is proud of the port commission's progress on many fronts, including expanding youth job training opportunities in partnership with Seattle Public Schools, making stormwater improvements, and developing a noise insulation program for homes close to the airport. She states that one of her most important accomplishments was tripling the number of interns, many of which were youth of color from marginalized communities. If re-elected, Bowman would focus on improving economic opportunity at the port for all, including union members, women-owned businesses, lower-income workers, and more.

    However, we were extremely disappointed when Bowman voted in 2015 to allow Shell Oil to base its arctic drilling operations in Seattle. In addition, she voted to use taxpayer money to file a legal challenge against SeaTac's $15 per hour minimum wage. In our interview with Bowman this year, she stated that she had been on the commission for less than six months before the wage increase vote, and believed that the council did not have the regulatory authority to make the change. On the Shell vote, she said that the commission was not transparent enough about it and that she would rather have ships come to Seattle ports where the environmental standards are the highest.

    We believe Mohamed would be a stronger leader for progress at the port and would bring much-needed representation to the commission for South King County communities. We strongly support Hamdi Mohamed for her dedication to the community, her progressive agenda, and her backing by progressive organizations.

    Hamdi Mohamed

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Hamdi Mohamed is running for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 3 with a visionary agenda for the port that centers the needs of the workers, the environment, and the broader community.

    Hamdi Mohamed

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Hamdi Mohamed is running for Seattle Port Commissioner, Position 3 with a visionary agenda for the port that centers the needs of the workers, the environment, and the broader community.

  • Toshiko Hasegawa is running for Port of Seattle, Position 4 to center the experiences of port workers and nearby communities in building a more equitable future for the port. She is the executive director of the Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs (CAPAA), which advises the governor, state agencies, and the state legislature on issues affecting Asian American communities. If either she or fellow candidate Hamdi Mohamed are elected, it will be the first time a woman of color has ever served on the Seattle Port Commission.

    As executive director of CAPAA, Hasegawa and the rest of the commission helped support small businesses during the pandemic, provide relief to community-based organizations, and create a language access plan so that residents could access critical information. In our interview, Hasegawa spoke to how she wanted to expand and apply those equity processes to the port. She supports mental health care and paid family leave for workers, ongoing training, and apprenticeships programs, especially for women and people of color, who have been historically underrepresented in port employment. Hasegawa also wants to see an airport cities advisory group permanently established as the economy continues to rebuild and recover from the pandemic.

    On environmental issues, Hasegawa would be an advocate for the port assisting in the construction of high-speed rail to cut down on short flights to nearby cities like Portland or Bellingham. She also wants to meaningfully engage the community in climate justice, including the tribes, and explore the possibility of using solar and wind at the port.

    We join a compelling majority of progressive organizations in recommending Hasegawa to help usher in a new generation of leadership and for her inclusive vision for the future of the port. 

    Toshiko Grace Hasegawa

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Toshiko Hasegawa is running for Port of Seattle, Position 4 to center the experiences of port workers and nearby communities in building a more equitable future for the port.

    Toshiko Grace Hasegawa

    Submitted by stephanie on Mon, 09/27/2021 - 17:20

    Toshiko Hasegawa is running for Port of Seattle, Position 4 to center the experiences of port workers and nearby communities in building a more equitable future for the port.

City Races

City of Seattle

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities. González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, she is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    The biggest divergence between Harrell and González's platforms is the candidates' short-term plans for how to help people experiencing homelessness. The crux of the problem, which experts and agencies have stated time and time again, is the lack of shelters with services to help people stay housed. The city has about 4,000 unsheltered people, and while there are about 1,300 affordable housing units and 400 additional shelter spaces coming soon, it is not enough. González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She would also make it a key focus to increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to child care access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts to increase health and safety. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

  • This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

    Thomas-Kennedy is a managing partner in her own practice and she has volunteered with the National Lawyers Guild, completed pro bono defense work for local organizers, and worked extensively as a public defender.

    There are many reasons to vote for Thomas-Kennedy. First, she is campaigning for common-sense justice reforms aimed at focusing on serious harms and crime prevention while stepping away from prosecuting people for poverty and mental illness. Second, her opponent switched parties to join Donald Trump’s party and run for lieutenant governor as a Republican in 2020. Third, Fox News and Tucker Carlson are attacking her for challenging their racist, conservative myths about reducing crime.

    As a public defender, Thomas-Kennedy has witnessed many people get caught in the criminal legal system because of a lack of supportive social services. She wants to focus on using services to prevent crime by addressing the root causes and keep people from being entangled in the justice system. By emphasizing prevention, taxpayers improve safety and save money on law enforcement and the criminal justice system, which are by far the biggest costs of city and county governments.

    There has been controversy about her use of the term abolition and some ill-advised tweets she posted after getting tear-gassed with her daughter during last year's protests. Although we don't condone her tweets, conservatives are drumming up fearful messaging about Thomas-Kennedy to distract us from the need for new approaches to fixing a failing system with urgent problems. In our interview, she defined abolition in a very sensible way as a slow process of building up the community so that we don’t need to rely on police, courts, and prisons as the catch-all solution for so many social issues.

    If elected, Thomas-Kennedy wants to build a victim advocate unit and end qualified immunity in order to hold the police accountable. She also proposes strengthening the civil unit of the office in order to fight wage theft, take exploitive corporate landlords to court, and hold fossil fuel companies accountable for environmental harm which affects us all.

    Thomas-Kennedy's opponent is Republican Ann Davison. Last year, Davison ran for lieutenant governor because she wanted to serve as a check on the Democrats in Olympia. Thankfully, Davison lost that primary election and Democratic lawmakers passed the most ambitious progressive agenda in decades this spring.

    Davison is now running for Seattle city attorney echoing many of the same conservative Republican talking points from her previous campaign. Her divisive platform demonizes those experiencing homelessness and she doesn’t believe additional funding is needed to connect people with housing or services. During debates and in her campaign literature, she has displayed a lack of understanding about the role of the city attorney and how the office functions.

    Thomas-Kennedy has faced misleading attacks from Fox News and right-wing radio hosts during this campaign. During our interview, she displayed a strong understanding of both the city attorney's office and the criminal justice system. We believe Thomas-Kennedy is the best choice for Seattle city attorney because of her experience representing marginalized Seattleites, her strong support from progressive advocates, and her commitment to pursuing justice for all Seattleites.

    Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

    Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

    Submitted by alexwhite on Wed, 09/29/2021 - 15:56

    This is a complicated race for Seattle voters with two controversial candidates. After evaluating the candidates carefully, we believe that public defender Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is clearly the better choice.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Mosqueda was first elected in 2017 and has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation that will fund affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, Mosqueda supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her campaign priorities include addressing our housing crisis with greater urgency, including re-zoning housing across Seattle, as well as providing assistance to renters and investing in health citywide.

    Mosqueda is running against Kenneth Wilson, the manager of an engineering company. Wilson's platform is not progressive and does not reflect the community's priorities. His voter's guide statement includes comments about public safety and policing that indicate he would not support reinvestment in community safety alternatives. He is also dismissive of evidence-based solutions for our affordable housing crisis.

    Mosqueda is a strong progressive and the clear choice for Seattle City Council, Position 8.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center. Oliver is an exceptionally progressive advocate who is incredibly dedicated to creating systemic change focused on the needs of communities of color and low-income Seattleites. They also serve as executive director of Creative Justice and is a member of coalitions like Decriminalize Seattle, Free Them All WA, and No New Youth Jail.

    Their forward-looking platform is centered around economic, social, racial, and environmental justice. Oliver's top priorities include expanding affordable housing, redirecting some police funding to make investments in communities, and bringing a Green New Deal to Seattle. If elected, Oliver would pursue policies to give everyone the opportunity to thrive, including preparing for extreme weather driven by climate change season that disproportionately impacts Black, brown, and Indigenous communities, and providing municipal broadband for all.

    Oliver is running against Sara Nelson, who co-founded and owns Fremont Brewing. She wants to bring her experience as a small business owner to the council and refocus the city on delivering basic services. Nelson does not support increasing investments in homelessness services and affordable housing, despite clear evidence from outside studies that the city's funding has been inadequate. She also opposes redirecting funds from the police department into community-based alternatives for public safety.

    The Seattle City Council has a track record of crafting innovative solutions to some of the most important issues facing our community. From groundbreaking minimum wage and sick leave requirements to empowering workers with predictable schedules and hazard pay to pushing for bold action on climate and making the wealthy pay their share, the city council has worked to build a stronger and more inclusive city.

    As we tackle big challenges with homelessness, police violence, climate change, and pandemic recovery, it's not the time to elect a cautious, business-oriented candidate who doesn't appear to be a catalyst for progressive change. Oliver is the clear choice in this race for Seattle City Council, Position 9.

    Nikkita Oliver

    Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center.

    Nikkita Oliver

    Lawyer and community activist Nikkita Oliver is running for Seattle City Council, Position 9. Oliver, who uses they/them pronouns, works with numerous local groups including Urban Impact, the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, and the Union Gospel Mission’s Youth Reach Out Center.

City of Kent

  • Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance. She has also served families and children in the community as a gang prevention specialist and caseworker in Seattle and as the liaison for African-American families for Seattle Public Schools. In addition, she has been a board member of several organizations, including the Rainier Valley Food Bank and the UW School of Social Work Communities in Action Initiative.

    If she is elected, Bennett will bring the same energy she has for community service to the council. She has a long list of priorities, including supporting businesses as they recover from the pandemic, subsidizing child care, and providing options for elder care. On housing, Bennett's policies include providing wraparound services and transitional housing for those struggling with homelessness, addressing the legacy of redlining, and incentivizing housing for residents with middle-to-low incomes. She wants to redefine the role of law enforcement, providing more accountability for bad actors and hiring unarmed public workers who can provide social services for mental health calls.

    Bennett is challenging Mayor Dana Ralph, who has served on the city council since 2012 and as mayor of Kent since 2018. She has served in many regional organizations, including as past president of the Sound Cities Association Transportation Policy Board and as vice chair of the South King Housing & Homelessness Partners Board. Ralph points to many completed and ongoing projects in Kent as signs of her and the council's leadership, including securing funding for the light rail expansion to Kent, continuing the trash-clearing Mill Creek Canyon Revitalization Project, and investing in pandemic relief, from vaccination sites to employment retention programs.

    However, Ralph has also fought against measures to help the homeless. She sued the county when a temporary shelter was set up in a former Kent motel, which was aimed at helping houseless people recover from sickness. In addition, Ralph joined with Police Chief Rafael Padilla to raise concerns about recently passed laws that increase accountability for law enforcement. At a forum in August, community members accused Ralph of stoking fear in the community by making false claims about the impact of the new laws.

    Bennett is the best choice in this race to bring new progressive leadership to Kent.

    Dawn Bennett

    Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance.

    Dawn Bennett

    Dawn Bennett is an education advocate and the vice president of Paramount Duty, a grassroots group which seeks to fully fund education in Washington. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Multicultural Education Rights Alliance.

  • Clifford Cawthon is an activist, educator, and freelance journalist who has advocated for years for progressive causes. He works as an adjunct professor at Bellevue College and as the pro-housing coalition strategy manager at the Sightline Institute. In line with his history as a social justice advocate, Cawthon has organized and led campaigns for low-wage workers and for funding the Kent-Des Moines light rail station. He has also served on the Renters Commission in Seattle.

    Cawthon wants to bring his years of experience to city hall to improve life for everyone in Kent. He wants to start by strengthening renter protections and expanding low-income and "missing middle" housing options. He also wants to provide more security for residents by expanding the city's food banks and creating year-round farmers markets. Cawthon believes the city could do more to develop its infrastructure and would advocate for public broadband and transit centers in each neighborhood. He rounds out his progressive vision for the city by promising that residents, especially those from communities of color who are often left out of planning decisions, will be able to provide more input in city issues, including the creation of a civilian oversight committee for law enforcement.

    Cawthon is challenging incumbent Toni Troutner, who also serves as chair of the Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority Governance board. Troutner was also elected council president in 2019.

    One of the biggest differences between the candidates is in the handling of the budget and law enforcement. Troutner supported the 2018 proposal to increase utility taxes to hire more police officers, which voters solidly rejected. In addition, she was satisfied with this year's budgeting process, which devoted 60 percent of the city budget to law enforcement. Cawthon, on the other hand, believes that the city needs to invest more in community needs rather than reactive and punitive policing. Cawthon wants to fund more mental health and behavioral specialists to help address mental crises and domestic violence incidents, while Troutner falsely stated that crime happens because there isn't enough prosecution.

    We recommend Cawthon for a progressive vision for Kent.

    Clifford Cawthon

    Clifford Cawthon is an activist, educator, and freelance journalist who has advocated for years for progressive causes. He works as an adjunct professor at Bellevue College and as the pro-housing coalition strategy manager at the Sightline Institute.

    Clifford Cawthon

    Clifford Cawthon is an activist, educator, and freelance journalist who has advocated for years for progressive causes. He works as an adjunct professor at Bellevue College and as the pro-housing coalition strategy manager at the Sightline Institute.

City of Burien

  • Hugo Garcia

    Evergreen Future
    Evergreen Future
  • Hugo Garcia is running for Burien City Council, Position 1. Garcia, whose family immigrated from Mexico more than 30 years ago, states that he learned the values of resilience and tenacity at an early age by watching his father wait tables to support their family of five. If elected, he intends to bring the experience of working families to the forefront.

    Garcia is a member of the Burien Planning Commission and chair of the Burien Economic Development Partnership (BEDP). His platform includes housing for all and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic that will equitably and sustainably lift up all Burien residents and help local businesses come back stronger. In addition, Garcia is committed to keeping Burien affordable so that working families can continue to live in the community and thrive.

    Garcia is facing Martin Barrett, who owns a corporate gift supplier. Barrett is vilifying community members who want to discuss community-based alternatives to public safety. He states that he wants Burien to be a “wealth generator" without providing details. While Barrett's platform does address the need for more affordable housing, he wants to rely on developers to solve the problem rather than making changes to zoning laws and seeking other innovative solutions.

    Garcia is the clear choice for Burien City Council, Position 1.

    Hugo Garcia

    Hugo Garcia is running for Burien City Council, Position 1. Garcia, whose family immigrated from Mexico more than 30 years ago, states that he learned the values of resilience and tenacity at an early age by watching his father wait tables to support their family of five.

    Hugo Garcia

    Hugo Garcia is running for Burien City Council, Position 1. Garcia, whose family immigrated from Mexico more than 30 years ago, states that he learned the values of resilience and tenacity at an early age by watching his father wait tables to support their family of five.

City of Renton

  • Evergreen Future
  • Joe Todd is running for Renton City Council, Position 1 to bring new solutions and community perspectives to city hall. He currently works as the King County Deputy Chief Technology Officer.

    In our interview with Todd, we were impressed by his thorough knowledge of city affairs and his dedication to serving the community. Todd pointed out that the city cannot reasonably solve the issue of homelessness on its own, and that a regional approach and improved relationship with the county would create better outcomes for all residents. He wants to use his technological expertise to help law enforcement track the issues they are responding to so the city can allocate resources most effectively. Todd also wants to launch something similar to the CAHOOTS program in Eugene, OR, which can dispatch trained caseworkers instead of police officers to help those experiencing mental health challenges. He supports both thorough police training and redirecting some funding from policing to human services to build stronger communities and prevent crime.

    Todd is running against James Alberson. Alberson has served as a Renton planning commissioner since April 2020 and is a former board chairman of the Chamber of Commerce. Alberson states that if elected, he will prioritize ensuring a strong business climate, reducing homelessness, and increasing housing affordability, among other priorities. However, in our interview with Alberson, we were disappointed that part of this proposal to address homelessness was mandatory participation in city programs. This focus on putting people in jail or building a new regional facility is a costly proposal that fails to address the root causes of homelessness and further isolates people from their support networks.

    Todd's in-depth insight and commitment to Renton would be an incredible benefit to the city. We enthusiastically recommend Joe Todd for Renton City Council, Position 1.

    Joe Todd

    Joe Todd is running for Renton City Council, Position 1 to bring new solutions and community perspectives to city hall. He currently works as the King County Deputy Chief Technology Officer.

    Joe Todd

    Joe Todd is running for Renton City Council, Position 1 to bring new solutions and community perspectives to city hall. He currently works as the King County Deputy Chief Technology Officer.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton. She is currently an adjunct faculty member at Seattle University's Criminal Justice Department, where her coursework incorporates a racial equity lens. Previously, she worked at the state's Department of Children, Youth, and Families at Echo Glen's Children's Center, counseling and providing treatment plans for struggling youth. She has also worked at Youthsource, where she engaged young people who had dropped out of school.

    As a social services advocate, Rivera wants to prioritize updating Renton's Community Needs Assessment for Human Services, which would help provide the community access to food, shelter, and living wage jobs. She also wants to update Renton's 2011 Clean Economy Strategy, bringing it in line with today's standards on clean water, air, and reduced pollution. Additionally, Rivera will work hard to provide low-cost job training and emphasize the need for affordable and mixed-income housing.

    Her opponent, Ben Johnson, runs a small IT business and has worked with the North Renton streets project, as well as serving on the City of Renton Airport Committee. His priorities include funding the police and fire departments, making neighborhoods attractive, and ensuring that Renton expands its transportation options through Sound Transit and the state department of transportation.

    Rivera has overwhelming support from progressive organizations across the spectrum, from unions to housing advocates to educators. Her dedication to the community and progressive and bold vision for the city earns her our recommendation for Renton City Council, Position 2.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

    Carmen Rivera

    Carmen Rivera is running for Renton City Council, Position 2 to leverage her professional background in social services for the people of Renton.

City of Bothell

  • Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy. Currently, she works as a co-chair on Bothell’s Anti-Racist Communities team and is a parent member of the Northshore School District's Ethnic Studies pilot program. As a Harvard Business School graduate and a Vietnamese American from an immigrant family, Tran wants to bring her unique perspective to create community-driven solutions that make Bothell a more equitable place.

    Tran believes housing and food are human rights and would work on policies to address housing and food insecurity in Bothell. She wants to expand the RADAR program, a de-escalation initiative with Bothell police that seeks to avoid the use of force when responding to people with behavioral health issues or developmental disabilities. She would also look into investing in other community-based public safety initiatives. Tran is committed to supporting Bothell’s small business community and wants to provide grants and career pathways for business owners who are people of color, women, veterans, and LGBTQ+.

    Tran is challenging incumbent council member and current deputy mayor Jeanne Zornes, a moderate Republican who has been in office since 2017. Zornes is also a substitute teacher for Northshore public schools and a freelance photographer. She is campaigning to build up Bothell's business sector and increase law enforcement funding rather than invest in community alternatives. Despite claiming to run a completely nonpartisan race, Zornes has endorsed other conservatives this year.

    Tran will bring strong, progressive leadership to the council. She deserves your vote for Bothell City Council, Position 1.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

    Han Tran

    Han Tran is running for Position 1 on the Bothell City Council. Tran works in tech product development and has a background in community advocacy.

  • Community organizer Rami Al-Kabra is running for Bothell City Council, Position 7. Al-Kabra serves as a member of the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board and a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell. As a Palestinian Muslim, he has been a strong community advocate and has founded both the Washington chapter of the largest Islamic civil rights organization in the nation (CAIR) and the Islamic Center of Bothell. In 2020, he helped to organize the March for Black Lives in Bothell when 200 residents showed up to call for systemic change.

    In this race, Al-Kabra is running to bring sustainable and equitable progress to Bothell. His platform includes green city planning, budget reform, amplifying human services, and small business support. Specifically, he wants to advance housing affordability projects with eco-friendly building practices in order to make Bothell more sustainable and more affordable at the same time. He also wants to bring more constituent voices into discussions about the budget to ensure that the funds are being used in the best interest of the community.

    Al-Kabra is running against Beca Nistrian, who owns a Bothell coffee shop and writes children’s books. Her social media presence leans more conservative and she is supporting other conservative candidates this year. 

    Rami Al-Kabra deserves your vote for Bothell City Council, Position 7 to make Bothell a place where all residents can thrive.

    Rami Al-Kabra

    Community organizer Rami Al-Kabra is running for Bothell City Council, Position 7. Al-Kabra serves as a member of the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board and a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell.

    Rami Al-Kabra

    Community organizer Rami Al-Kabra is running for Bothell City Council, Position 7. Al-Kabra serves as a member of the Bothell Landmark Preservation Board and a co-chair with Anti-Racist Communities: Bothell.

  • Endorsed By: OneAmerica Votes, Sage Leaders, Housing Action Fund, Civic Alliance for a Progressive Economy (CAPE) Rating: 5 stars , King and Snohomish County Democrats, Snohomish & Island County Labor Council, Alliance for Gun Responsibility

City of Tukwila

  • Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents. The Tukwila Civil Service commissioner has also worked on the Community Oriented Policing Citizens Advisory Board, both of which provide civilian oversight of the city's police department. Sharp plans to harness that experience to increase accountability and reforms for law enforcement. He says that as a working dad, he would also advocate for affordable housing and better transit access. He wants to see equitable recovery from the worst of the pandemic that targets vulnerable communities like seniors and people of color. Sharp has tremendous support from labor unions as well as local and Democratic elected officials.

    Tosh Sharp

    Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents.

    Tosh Sharp

    Tosh Sharp is a union journeyman lineman who is running for Position 1 to make Tukwila more affordable for residents.

  • Mohamed Abdi is a graduating student of the University of Washington who is running to build a more equitable Tukwila. Abdi says his close ties to the community were strengthened during his filming of a documentary about last year's protests for racial justice and the enduring struggle for equality.

    Abdi wants to build off that momentum by working to bring more affordable housing options to Tukwila. He also believes that public safety should be centered on community wellbeing rather than criminalization and punitive measures, and he wants to see more accountability for law enforcement as well as more limited use of force. His campaign, which promises to work with everyone regardless of race or socioeconomic background, has been supported by local Democratic groups as well as progressive organizations.

    As of September 20, Mohamed's opponent James Kerner does not have a campaign website available. However, his official voter's guide statement says that he is a stay-at-home dad, and includes a hodgepodge of backward conservative talking points, including removing masking in schools and pushing to cut voter-approved local school funding.

    Tukwila needs leaders who are motivated to uplift and work with community members rather than divide it. We recommend Mohamed Abdi to bring inclusive, progressive leadership to Position 5 on the Tukwila City Council.

    Mohamed Abdi

    Mohamed Abdi is a graduating student of the University of Washington who is running to build a more equitable Tukwila.

    Mohamed Abdi

    Mohamed Abdi is a graduating student of the University of Washington who is running to build a more equitable Tukwila.

City of Vancouver

  • Evergreen Future
  • Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov. Inslee as a commissioner for Washington State Parks and Recreation and serves as a board member of the Clark County Volunteer Lawyers Program, which provides law clinics for underserved communities.

    Perez's campaign is focused on improving life for all residents of Vancouver. She wants to incentivize mixed-income communities that have access to public transportation, and create bold solutions for affordable housing that bring the unsheltered community, service providers, and developers to the table. She believes that investing in communities of color can strengthen the entire city, and she would focus on removing discriminatory language in housing deeds, center living wage jobs, and look to help small businesses recover post-pandemic.

    She is running against David Gellatly. He is the former chair of the Clark County Republican Party and is now a member of the party's executive board. He states that his top priorities would be homelessness and supporting businesses in the city. Gellatly was cited last year as one of the organizers of pro-Trump rallies in Vancouver during protests and after the shooting of Kevin E. Peterson, Jr. As the head of a conservative activist group, Gellatly is likely to continue to push regressive policies on the council on social and racial justice, environmental reform, and more.

    Perez has worked tirelessly both professionally and on a volunteer basis to bring community-oriented solutions to Vancouver. She deserves your vote for Vancouver City Council, Position 3.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.

    Diana Perez

    Diana Perez is the founder of the local League of United Latin American Citizens. Perez has been highly active and awarded in the community for her civil rights and policy work. She was appointed by Gov.

City of SeaTac

City of Des Moines

  • Soleil Lewis is a special education teacher and community leader running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7. Her campaign priorities include increasing government transparency, promoting civic engagement and education, expanding employment opportunities for youth, and improving neighborhood infrastructure. She wants to see the city expand online access to public meetings and improve language resources, alongside greater participation by the city in regional government.

    If elected, Lewis also wants to create an airport committee, which would evaluate the impact of the Sea-Tac Airport on Des Moines residents. Additionally, Lewis works with Seattle King County and Vancouver NAACP on issues of diversity and inclusion and is excited to represent new voices on the city council as an African- and Haitian-American woman.

    Lewis is challenging incumbent council member and deputy mayor Matt Mahoney. First elected in 2017, Mahoney has worked on a number of council committees including Municipal Facilities, Public Safety/Emergency Management, and Transportation. He is running for re-election on a more conservative platform of increased development and funding for law enforcement.

    We recommend Lewis for Position 7 because of her progressive values and strong support from our partners and local leaders.

    Soleil Lewis

    Soleil Lewis is a special education teacher and community leader running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7.

    Soleil Lewis

    Soleil Lewis is a special education teacher and community leader running for Des Moines City Council, Position 7.

City of Spokane

  • Evergreen Future
  • Naghmana Sherazi is running for Spokane City Council, District 1, Position 2. Since immigrating from Pakistan, Sherazi has become very active in the local community. She is a member of the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane, Refugee Connections of Spokane, and Greater Spokane Progress.

    Sherazi is running to increase representation and investment in Northeast Spokane and to push for stronger police reform. She wants to empower the city's Ombudsman's Office to hold police officers accountable and improve safety for all residents. In addition, she would like to shift some 911 responses to mental health crisis responders instead of armed police officers. Sherazi supports extending the eviction moratorium and increasing affordable housing options in Spokane. 

    Sherazi is facing Jonathan Bingle, a small business owner running on a conservative platform. Conservative developers and realtors are spending record amounts to elect him and he is endorsed by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and other local Republicans. His campaign priorities are focused on helping businesses and supporting the police, instead of looking at investing in community services that would be more effective and keep our community safer.

    Sherazi would be a strong addition to the city council and is the best choice for Spokane City Council, District 1, Position 2.

    Naghmana Sherazi

    Naghmana Sherazi is running for Spokane City Council, District 1, Position 2. Since immigrating from Pakistan, Sherazi has become very active in the local community.

    Naghmana Sherazi

    Naghmana Sherazi is running for Spokane City Council, District 1, Position 2. Since immigrating from Pakistan, Sherazi has become very active in the local community.

City of Bellingham

  • Eve Smason-Marcus is a musician and educator running for Bellingham City Council in Ward 6. Smason-Marcus, who uses they/she pronouns, has been an active volunteer in the community, including with the Bellingham Unity Committee and as a board member of the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force.

    They're running on a bold progressive platform of affordable housing, racial and environmental justice, and community safety. Smason-Marcus believes housing is a human right and they support stopping sweeps, increasing dense zoning downtown, and expanding home-ownership options through land trusts and co-housing options. They also want to protect the environment for future generations by improving stormwater management and pushing Bellingham toward electrification by retrofitting older buildings. On housing, climate, and other issues, Smason-Marcus wants to look to other progressive cities for innovative policy solutions that could help move Bellingham forward.

    Smason-Marcus is a good choice if you're looking for new leadership that will push the Bellingham City Council to the left on important issues facing the city.

    Eve Smason-Marcus is a musician and educator running for Bellingham City Council in Ward 6. Smason-Marcus, who uses they/she pronouns, has been an active volunteer in the community, including with the Bellingham Unity Committee and as a board member of the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force.

    They're running on a bold progressive platform of affordable housing, racial and environmental justice, and community safety. Smason-Marcus believes housing is a human right and they support stopping sweeps, increasing dense zoning downtown, and expanding home-ownership options through land trusts and co-housing options. They also want to protect the environment for future generations by improving stormwater management and pushing Bellingham toward electrification by retrofitting older buildings. On housing, climate, and other issues, Smason-Marcus wants to look to other progressive cities for innovative policy solutions that could help move Bellingham forward.

    Smason-Marcus is a good choice if you're looking for new leadership that will push the Bellingham City Council to the left on important issues facing the city.

    Eve Smason-Marcus

    Eve Smason-Marcus is a musician and educator running for Bellingham City Council in Ward 6. Smason-Marcus, who uses they/she pronouns, has been an active volunteer in the community, including with the Bellingham Unity Committee and as a board member of the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force.