Latino PAC

Latino PAC

The Latino Political Action Committee of Washington is a progressive organization of Latinos that was formed in 2005. Since its formation, the Latino PAC has screened and endorsed several state and city candidates. The Latino PAC is led by local Latino leaders and offers individuals and contributors an opportunity to work on advancing the political power and well being of all Latinos in Washington State.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities. González is a Seattle City Council member and the current council president. As one of the city’s leaders through times of prosperity and times of hardship, she is committed to making the city of Seattle a place where all can thrive. The unanimous vote to make her the city council president in early 2020 speaks to her ability to lead collaboratively and make bold progressive change.

    The biggest divergence between Harrell and González's platforms is the candidates' short-term plans for how to help people experiencing homelessness. The crux of the problem, which experts and agencies have stated time and time again, is the lack of shelters with services to help people stay housed. The city has about 4,000 unsheltered people, and while there are about 1,300 affordable housing units and 400 additional shelter spaces coming soon, it is not enough. González would focus on building short- and long-term housing because the city needs to triple permanent affordable housing to meet everyone’s needs. She pledges to quickly scale up Seattle’s shelter system from the mayor’s office, which would include options such as tiny villages and leveraging hotels and motels. She would also make it a key focus to increase permanent, supportive housing and include additional funds for mental, behavioral, and substance use services.

    Equitable economic recovery from COVID is a high priority for the councilmember. She vows to make sure that neighborhood small businesses, many of which are owned by people of color, receive equitable shares of recovery assistance. Other parts of her agenda seek to meet the needs of working families. For example, she wants to raise standards in the gig economy by ending sub-minimum wages and establish incentives for employee ownership in businesses. Improvements to child care access, bike and pedestrian paths, and building on renter protections round out some of her other priorities for improving the lives of everyone in the community.

    González has played a lead role in existing police reform efforts by pivoting some law enforcement funding to community-led efforts to increase health and safety. She believes that as mayor, she could do even more to reverse the legacy of harm of police violence in the city, especially for communities of color and in communities with lower-than-average incomes. In our interview, González noted that Seattle’s police guild has disproportionate power at the negotiating table when it comes to holding officers accountable. The mayor has much more leverage than the council in negotiating a better contract, and if she is elected she will push harder than Mayor Durkan to increase accountability for officers and the department.

    On issues of the climate, González wants to partner with Seattle for A Green New Deal to revitalize and expand the local green economy. She states that by actively retrofitting homes and modernizing industrial infrastructure, we can provide thousands of stable, high-quality jobs in the city.

    González’s experience leaves her well-positioned to hit the ground running. Her advocacy and support for workers has earned her the trust of many labor unions and advocacy groups. She has a track record of working well with her colleagues to build consensus on the city’s most pressing issues. For her support for our partners and her forward-thinking platform, we recommend González for mayor of Seattle.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

    Lorena González

    Born and raised in a migrant farm working family in central Washington, Lorena González has a background as an award-winning civil rights attorney that provides a foundation for her advocacy for working families and marginalized communities.

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Evergreen Future
  • Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Mosqueda was first elected in 2017 and has distinguished herself as a progressive leader on the Seattle City Council. She sponsored the Jumpstart Seattle legislation that will fund affordable housing through a tax on high earners at large corporations. In addition, Mosqueda supported efforts to expand paid sick leave and establish minimum wages for gig and other workers who have often been left behind in our economy. Her campaign priorities include addressing our housing crisis with greater urgency, including re-zoning housing across Seattle, as well as providing assistance to renters and investing in health citywide.

    Mosqueda is running against Kenneth Wilson, the manager of an engineering company. Wilson's platform is not progressive and does not reflect the community's priorities. His voter's guide statement includes comments about public safety and policing that indicate he would not support reinvestment in community safety alternatives. He is also dismissive of evidence-based solutions for our affordable housing crisis.

    Mosqueda is a strong progressive and the clear choice for Seattle City Council, Position 8.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.

    Teresa Mosqueda

    Teresa Mosqueda is running for re-election to Seattle City Council, Position 8. Previously, Mosqueda worked at the Washington State Labor Council as a political campaigns director and served on the board of Fuse Washington.