M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO

M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO

The M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, is the central body of labor organizations in King County, Washington. The core responsibilities of the M. L. King County Labor Council are to assist workers and their unions in the struggle for social and economic justice; support efforts to organize and bargain fair contracts; lobby, endorse and involve working people in the political process; advocate and support laws that protect working people; support community services outreach work; and unite with community allies who are also struggling for justice.

M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO Website

Congress

1st Congressional District

7th Congressional District

State Legislature

45th Legislative District

30th Legislative District

Superior Court Races

King County Superior Court

  • Cathy Moore is a trial lawyer with six years experience on the King County Superior Court presiding in family, juvenile, and mental illness courts. Moore approaches the world with a strong racial and social justice lens, and has done an impressive amount of free legal work for those who cannot afford an attorney. She has been endorsed by a number of progressive legislators and shares a King County Labor Council endorsement as well as numerous Democratic district endorsements with Eric Newman.

    Cathy Moore

    Cathy Moore is a trial lawyer with six years experience on the King County Superior Court presiding in family, juvenile, and mental illness courts.

    Cathy Moore

    Cathy Moore is a trial lawyer with six years experience on the King County Superior Court presiding in family, juvenile, and mental illness courts.

  • Eric Newman is another good choice for King County Superior Court Position 44. Newman is a veteran and trial lawyer who has served for three years on the King County District Court as a judge presiding over hearings and trials in criminal and civil cases. He has also volunteered at El Centro de la Raza for a legal clinic that serves immigrants and as a bus driver for a women's shelter. He shares many Democratic district endorsements and the King County Labor Council endorsement with Moore.

    Also in this race is Jackson Schmidt, an attorney who has spent many years doing pro bono work for the Pike Place Market but has not received the same level of endorsements from partners. We lean toward Moore as she would bring a new perspective to a bench dominated by male judges.

    Eric Newman

    Eric Newman is another good choice for King County Superior Court Position 44. Newman is a veteran and trial lawyer who has served for three years on the King County District Court as a judge presiding over hearings and trials in criminal and civil cases.

    Eric Newman

    Eric Newman is another good choice for King County Superior Court Position 44. Newman is a veteran and trial lawyer who has served for three years on the King County District Court as a judge presiding over hearings and trials in criminal and civil cases.

City Ballot Measures

Seattle Initiative #123

  • VOTE NO

    Vote NO on Initiative 123

  • When the 2001 earthquake shook Seattle, it left us with a crumbling, dangerous Alaskan Way Viaduct and a heavily damaged seawall. After many years of public input, environmental review, and a transparent budgeting process, city and community leaders came together and agreed on a Waterfront Seattle plan to rebuild the seawall and create a public waterfront that connects new parks, bike and pedestrian paths, and access to Elliott Bay.

    The elevated park created by Initiative 123 directly conflicts with that waterfront plan and the public process that created it. Additionally, the initiative's details have caused serious concern with everyone from the League of Women Voters to labor unions to the AIA Architectural Group of Seattle. There is no defined funding source for I-123, though it says the city's general fund will cover it--putting at risk more critical budgeted items like affordable housing and bike and pedestrian safety. It also forms an unelected board called the “Downtown Waterfront Preservation and Development Authority” to develop a plan that the City will then be legally obligated to pay for, no matter what the cost.

    Vote NO on Initiative 123.
    When the 2001 earthquake shook Seattle, it left us with a crumbling, dangerous Alaskan Way Viaduct and a heavily damaged seawall. After many years of public input, environmental review, and a transparent budgeting process, city and community leaders came together and agreed on a Waterfront Seattle plan to rebuild the seawall and create a public waterfront that connects new parks, bike and pedestrian paths, and access to Elliott Bay.

    The elevated park created by Initiative 123 directly conflicts with that waterfront plan and the public process that created it. Additionally, the initiative's details have caused serious concern with everyone from the League of Women Voters to labor unions to the AIA Architectural Group of Seattle. There is no defined funding source for I-123, though it says the city's general fund will cover it--putting at risk more critical budgeted items like affordable housing and bike and pedestrian safety. It also forms an unelected board called the “Downtown Waterfront Preservation and Development Authority” to develop a plan that the City will then be legally obligated to pay for, no matter what the cost.

    Vote NO on Initiative 123.
  • Endorsed By: Fuse, M. L. King County Labor Council, AFL-CIO, The Stranger , League of Women Voters of Seattle-King County

Seattle City Proposition #1

  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Proposition 1

  • Seattle is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, which is pushing rent and real estate prices higher every month. As a result, many working families, seniors, and young people are struggling to keep a roof over their head. Many are forced to live far away from where they work - making traffic worse - or leave Seattle altogether just to afford their rent. We must do better.

    Seattle's Proposition 1 is $290 million replacement and expansion of the existing affordable housing levy that would cost the average homeowner $122 per year. This critically important proposition would build 2,150 new affordable apartments and provide emergency rental help for 4,500 families on the brink of being homeless. Vote YES on Proposition 1 to ensure Seattle remains a place where working people, seniors, and young people can afford to live!
    Seattle is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, which is pushing rent and real estate prices higher every month. As a result, many working families, seniors, and young people are struggling to keep a roof over their head. Many are forced to live far away from where they work - making traffic worse - or leave Seattle altogether just to afford their rent. We must do better.

    Seattle's Proposition 1 is $290 million replacement and expansion of the existing affordable housing levy that would cost the average homeowner $122 per year. This critically important proposition would build 2,150 new affordable apartments and provide emergency rental help for 4,500 families on the brink of being homeless. Vote YES on Proposition 1 to ensure Seattle remains a place where working people, seniors, and young people can afford to live!