• VOTE NO

    No on Tim Eyman's I-1366

  • Initiative-1366 from Tim Eyman orders the legislature to send a constitutional amendment to the voters next year requiring a two-thirds supermajority vote to close tax loopholes or raise revenue. If legislators refuse, Eyman’s initiative would create an $8 billion hole in our state budget over the next six years by cutting the sales tax by a full 1 percent.

    The timing for I-1366 is very bad. Our state is being fined $100,000 a day for failing to fully fund education, yet Eyman’s initiative would make it nearly impossible to close wasteful corporate tax loopholes or fix our state’s upside down tax system. Not surprisingly, Initiative 1366’s largest donors are big developers and Wall Street interests who have given Eyman hundreds of thousands of dollars to protect their special tax loopholes.

    Eyman proposed nearly the exact same initiative last year and it was broadly criticized. The Spokane Spokesman-Review referred to his previous effort as Eyman’s “worst ever” idea. Others called this initiative “extortion” (Walla Walla Union Bulletin) and “disingenuous” (Everett Herald), saying it is simply a ploy to keep Eyman’s initiative promotion business up and running.

    We oppose I-1366 because it would prevent us from fixing our state’s upside down tax system or fully funding our kids’ schools. Join this broad coalition listed below and vote NO on I-1366.
    Initiative-1366 from Tim Eyman orders the legislature to send a constitutional amendment to the voters next year requiring a two-thirds supermajority vote to close tax loopholes or raise revenue. If legislators refuse, Eyman’s initiative would create an $8 billion hole in our state budget over the next six years by cutting the sales tax by a full 1 percent.

    The timing for I-1366 is very bad. Our state is being fined $100,000 a day for failing to fully fund education, yet Eyman’s initiative would make it nearly impossible to close wasteful corporate tax loopholes or fix our state’s upside down tax system. Not surprisingly, Initiative 1366’s largest donors are big developers and Wall Street interests who have given Eyman hundreds of thousands of dollars to protect their special tax loopholes.

    Eyman proposed nearly the exact same initiative last year and it was broadly criticized. The Spokane Spokesman-Review referred to his previous effort as Eyman’s “worst ever” idea. Others called this initiative “extortion” (Walla Walla Union Bulletin) and “disingenuous” (Everett Herald), saying it is simply a ploy to keep Eyman’s initiative promotion business up and running.

    We oppose I-1366 because it would prevent us from fixing our state’s upside down tax system or fully funding our kids’ schools. Join this broad coalition listed below and vote NO on I-1366.
  • VOTE YES

    Vote Yes on Saving Animals from Extinction

  • Initiative 1401 seeks to help save endangered animals from extinction by making the selling, purchasing, trading, or distributing of animals threatened with extinction punishable by law. From African Elephants to the Javan Tiger, animals are disappearing from our planet at an alarming rate. Passing Initiative 1401 means that our last remaining elephants, rhinos, tigers, lions, cheetahs, leopards, pangolins, marine turtles, sharks, and rays will at least be somewhat protected from the illegal animal trade here in our home state.

    Help save animals facing extinction: vote YES on Initiative 1401.
    Initiative 1401 seeks to help save endangered animals from extinction by making the selling, purchasing, trading, or distributing of animals threatened with extinction punishable by law. From African Elephants to the Javan Tiger, animals are disappearing from our planet at an alarming rate. Passing Initiative 1401 means that our last remaining elephants, rhinos, tigers, lions, cheetahs, leopards, pangolins, marine turtles, sharks, and rays will at least be somewhat protected from the illegal animal trade here in our home state.

    Help save animals facing extinction: vote YES on Initiative 1401.
  • Endorsed By: Washington Conservation Voters, Sierra Club , Humane Voters of Washington, Conservation Northwest, Audubon Washington
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote "Maintain" on Tax Advisory Vote No. 10

  • Legislators voted nearly unanimously for new oil train safety regulations, including directing some oil taxes to help pay for oil-train spill response. Senate Bill 1449 passed the legislature 141 to 1 with 5 excused. Thanks to a Tim Eyman initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Vote to "maintain" this measure.
    Legislators voted nearly unanimously for new oil train safety regulations, including directing some oil taxes to help pay for oil-train spill response. Senate Bill 1449 passed the legislature 141 to 1 with 5 excused. Thanks to a Tim Eyman initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Vote to "maintain" this measure.
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote "Maintain" on Tax Advisory Vote No. 11

  • A bipartisan majority of legislators came together earlier this year to clarify that the marijuana excise tax should also apply to medical marijuana sales. There are a number of progressives who disagree with this tax, but unfortunately, the time to lobby against it was during the 2014 legislative session. Senate Bill 5052 passed the legislature 101 to 44 with 2 excused. Per Eyman’s initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Even if 100 percent of voters rejected this advisory measure, it would remain a tax, as Eyman's advisory votes are purely intended to push an anti-tax message. Vote to "maintain" this measure, and push back against Eyman's anti-tax message.
    A bipartisan majority of legislators came together earlier this year to clarify that the marijuana excise tax should also apply to medical marijuana sales. There are a number of progressives who disagree with this tax, but unfortunately, the time to lobby against it was during the 2014 legislative session. Senate Bill 5052 passed the legislature 101 to 44 with 2 excused. Per Eyman’s initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Even if 100 percent of voters rejected this advisory measure, it would remain a tax, as Eyman's advisory votes are purely intended to push an anti-tax message. Vote to "maintain" this measure, and push back against Eyman's anti-tax message.
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote "Maintain" on Tax Advisory Vote No. 12

  • A broad majority of legislators voted for a comprehensive transportation bill to improve state and local roads, transit, bike paths, and pedestrian walkways. The package was funded with a small increase in the gas tax. Senate Bill 5987 passed the legislature 91 to 51 with 5 excused. While we were not thrilled with some aspects of the final transportation package, we still recommend a non-binding vote to "maintain" this measure. Per Eyman’s initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Vote to “maintain” this measure.
    A broad majority of legislators voted for a comprehensive transportation bill to improve state and local roads, transit, bike paths, and pedestrian walkways. The package was funded with a small increase in the gas tax. Senate Bill 5987 passed the legislature 91 to 51 with 5 excused. While we were not thrilled with some aspects of the final transportation package, we still recommend a non-binding vote to "maintain" this measure. Per Eyman’s initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Vote to “maintain” this measure.
  • VOTE MAINTAINED

    Vote "Maintain" on Tax Advisory Vote No. 13

  • A large majority of legislators voted to close $150 million in unnecessary tax loopholes in order to generate revenue for education funding. This legislation, Senate Bill 6138, passed the legislature 95 to 48 with 4 excused. Per Eyman’s initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Vote to "maintain" this important measure.
    A large majority of legislators voted to close $150 million in unnecessary tax loopholes in order to generate revenue for education funding. This legislation, Senate Bill 6138, passed the legislature 95 to 48 with 4 excused. Per Eyman’s initiative, the state legislature is required to submit any bill it passes that closes tax loopholes or raises revenue to a non-binding advisory vote. Vote to "maintain" this important measure.
  • VOTE REJECTED

    Reject Proposition No. 2015-1: Wrong Jail Plan

  • This is the wrong plan with the wrong priorities. Whatcom County’s current jail needs replacement, but we want a smart public safety strategy that prevents crime and doesn’t simply lock up people afterwards. This misguided plan uses up our entire public safety tax capacity for 30 years, yet it doesn't include funding for smart and cost-efficient choices like mental health services, substance abuse treatment, diversion programs, and other effective alternatives to jail. All of these programs are less expensive, more racially equitable, and more effective at improving public safety than costly new jails. Voters should reject Proposition 2015-1 and send a message to the County Executive to work with the council and return with a more comprehensive and cost-effective proposal with more stable funding.
    This is the wrong plan with the wrong priorities. Whatcom County’s current jail needs replacement, but we want a smart public safety strategy that prevents crime and doesn’t simply lock up people afterwards. This misguided plan uses up our entire public safety tax capacity for 30 years, yet it doesn't include funding for smart and cost-efficient choices like mental health services, substance abuse treatment, diversion programs, and other effective alternatives to jail. All of these programs are less expensive, more racially equitable, and more effective at improving public safety than costly new jails. Voters should reject Proposition 2015-1 and send a message to the County Executive to work with the council and return with a more comprehensive and cost-effective proposal with more stable funding.
  • VOTE REJECTED

    Vote to REJECT Proposition 1: No county-wide elections

  • Whatcom County is divided into three County Council districts. Each councilmember must run in their local district during the primary and then countywide in the general election. Proposition 1 would establish district-only voting, meaning councilmembers will no longer be accountable to the entire county. It’s highly concerning that supporters of district-only elections have explicitly said that approving Amendment 1 is necessary to approve permits for the coal export terminal in Whatcom County. Voters should stop big coal’s attempt to rig the system and reject Proposition 1.
    Whatcom County is divided into three County Council districts. Each councilmember must run in their local district during the primary and then countywide in the general election. Proposition 1 would establish district-only voting, meaning councilmembers will no longer be accountable to the entire county. It’s highly concerning that supporters of district-only elections have explicitly said that approving Amendment 1 is necessary to approve permits for the coal export terminal in Whatcom County. Voters should stop big coal’s attempt to rig the system and reject Proposition 1.
  • VOTE REJECTED

    Vote to REJECT Whatcom Proposition 2: Extreme charter amendment

  • Proposition 2 requires a unanimous vote to propose amendments to the charter. Both the U.S. and Washington state constitutions only require a two-thirds vote, and this unreasonably high barrier would give a single person veto power over the changing needs of the entire county. To preserve the council’s ability to serve the entire county, voters should reject Proposition 2.
    Proposition 2 requires a unanimous vote to propose amendments to the charter. Both the U.S. and Washington state constitutions only require a two-thirds vote, and this unreasonably high barrier would give a single person veto power over the changing needs of the entire county. To preserve the council’s ability to serve the entire county, voters should reject Proposition 2.
  • VOTE REJECTED

    Vote to REJECT Proposition 3: Extreme election reform

  • Proposition 3 is another requirement for a unanimous vote to propose amendments to the charter, in this case for amendments that specifically deal with how the county council is elected. A unanimous vote is an unworkably high bar and ties the hands of the council to responsibly serve the county. Like Proposition 2, this would also give a single person veto power. Voters should reject Proposition 3.
    Proposition 3 is another requirement for a unanimous vote to propose amendments to the charter, in this case for amendments that specifically deal with how the county council is elected. A unanimous vote is an unworkably high bar and ties the hands of the council to responsibly serve the county. Like Proposition 2, this would also give a single person veto power. Voters should reject Proposition 3.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    APPROVE Whatcom County Charter Proposition No. 4: Increased words explaining county initiatives

  • This amendment would increase the number of words allowed in county initiatives to 40 words, and ensure that ballot measures are worded so that a “yes” vote is a vote in favor of the proposal. This would make Whatcom County’s standards more consistent with Washington state laws. This amendment was supported unanimously by the Charter Review Commission. Voters should approve Proposition 4.
    This amendment would increase the number of words allowed in county initiatives to 40 words, and ensure that ballot measures are worded so that a “yes” vote is a vote in favor of the proposal. This would make Whatcom County’s standards more consistent with Washington state laws. This amendment was supported unanimously by the Charter Review Commission. Voters should approve Proposition 4.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    APPROVE Whatcom County Charter Proposition No. 5: Lower the signatures required to qualify an initiative

  • This amendment would lower the number of required signatures to qualify an initiative or measure for the county ballot. Whatcom’s charter currently requires almost double the signatures the state requires in order to qualify a citizen initiative. This presents a high barrier, and has resulted in almost no initiatives in the county. Voters should approve Proposition 5 to ensure citizens may exercise their constitutional right to propose initiatives in the future.
    This amendment would lower the number of required signatures to qualify an initiative or measure for the county ballot. Whatcom’s charter currently requires almost double the signatures the state requires in order to qualify a citizen initiative. This presents a high barrier, and has resulted in almost no initiatives in the county. Voters should approve Proposition 5 to ensure citizens may exercise their constitutional right to propose initiatives in the future.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    APPROVE Whatcom County Charter Proposition No. 6: Lower the signatures required to qualify a charter amendment

  • This amendment would lower the required signatures to qualify a charter amendment for the county ballot. The charter currently requires that 1 in 5 voters in the last gubernatorial election sign a petition to propose amendments, which is an extremely high threshold. Voters should approve Proposition 6 to reduce this requirement to 15% of voters, which is still a strong threshold.
    This amendment would lower the required signatures to qualify a charter amendment for the county ballot. The charter currently requires that 1 in 5 voters in the last gubernatorial election sign a petition to propose amendments, which is an extremely high threshold. Voters should approve Proposition 6 to reduce this requirement to 15% of voters, which is still a strong threshold.
  • VOTE REJECTED

    REJECT Whatcom County Charter Proposition No. 7: Term limits

  • This amendment would institute term limits for the positions of county executive and county council. Building policy expertise and productive relationships to pass good legislation is a skill, and term limits can throw out good lawmakers. County executives and council members already face election every four years, and Whatcom voters can make the choice if their county representatives are doing good work. Voters should reject Proposition 7.
    This amendment would institute term limits for the positions of county executive and county council. Building policy expertise and productive relationships to pass good legislation is a skill, and term limits can throw out good lawmakers. County executives and council members already face election every four years, and Whatcom voters can make the choice if their county representatives are doing good work. Voters should reject Proposition 7.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    APPROVE Whatcom County Charter Proposition No. 8: Expand the districting committee

  • This amendment would change the composition of the districting committee that redraws county council districts after the Census. Presently, the Committee is functionally comprised of two Democrats, two Republicans, and a fifth member chosen by those four. This amendment would expand representation to smaller parties who still receive significant support in major elections, and could help the Committee act in a less partisan and more representative way. Voters should approve Proposition 8.
    This amendment would change the composition of the districting committee that redraws county council districts after the Census. Presently, the Committee is functionally comprised of two Democrats, two Republicans, and a fifth member chosen by those four. This amendment would expand representation to smaller parties who still receive significant support in major elections, and could help the Committee act in a less partisan and more representative way. Voters should approve Proposition 8.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    APPROVE Whatcom County Proposition 9: Better council representation

  • Whatcom County is currently divided into three districts, with parts of Bellingham included in each district. Since these three districts were adopted, the population of Whatcom County has doubled. Proposition 9 would create five districts and two at-large positions to better serve all the diverse needs of the county. Whatcom County voters would choose one district councilmember and two at-large members, ensuring a balance of district attentiveness and county-wide consideration. Voters should approve Proposition 9’s sensible updates to the charter.
    Whatcom County is currently divided into three districts, with parts of Bellingham included in each district. Since these three districts were adopted, the population of Whatcom County has doubled. Proposition 9 would create five districts and two at-large positions to better serve all the diverse needs of the county. Whatcom County voters would choose one district councilmember and two at-large members, ensuring a balance of district attentiveness and county-wide consideration. Voters should approve Proposition 9’s sensible updates to the charter.
  • VOTE APPROVED

    Vote to APPROVE Proposition 10: Higher standard for charter amendments

  • Voters should approve Proposition 10 to bring proposed amendments from the Charter Review Commission in line with the state and federal standards by requiring a two-thirds majority for charter amendments. Under the commission elected in 2014, many amendments were proposed with a simple majority largely along partisan lines. Charter amendments, which are like constitutional amendments for the county, should require a higher standard. Voters should approve Proposition 10.
    Voters should approve Proposition 10 to bring proposed amendments from the Charter Review Commission in line with the state and federal standards by requiring a two-thirds majority for charter amendments. Under the commission elected in 2014, many amendments were proposed with a simple majority largely along partisan lines. Charter amendments, which are like constitutional amendments for the county, should require a higher standard. Voters should approve Proposition 10.
  • Todd Donovan is a Western Washington University professor of political science who is running for Whatcom County Council, District 1. He is currently a member of the Whatcom Charter Review Commission and also the Chair of the Washington Conservation Voters in Whatcom County, where he advocates for clean water and a safe place to call home.

    Also running in this race is conservative Bruce Ayers, the former Whatcom Republican Party chair. Donovan is the best choice.

    Todd Donovan

    Todd Donovan is a Western Washington University professor of political science who is running for Whatcom County Council, District 1.

    Todd Donovan

    Todd Donovan is a Western Washington University professor of political science who is running for Whatcom County Council, District 1.

  • Satpal Sidhu is a small business owner and former dean of Bellingham Technical College who has called Whatcom County home for almost 30 years. He was appointed to the council in March, and has supported redistricting the council into five districts to improve representation of specific communities in Whatcom County. His opponent, Kathy Kershner, has been supported by conservative interests. Satpal Sidhu is the best choice in this race.

    Satpal Sidhu

    Satpal Sidhu is a small business owner and former dean of Bellingham Technical College who has called Whatcom County home for almost 30 years.

    Satpal Sidhu

    Satpal Sidhu is a small business owner and former dean of Bellingham Technical College who has called Whatcom County home for almost 30 years.

  • Endorsed By: Washington Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, Planned Parenthood Alliance Advocates , Bellingham/Whatcom Firefighters, NW Central Labor Council, Teamsters Local 231
  • Bobby Briscoe is an independent commercial fisherman who will bring more than four decades of experience to the Port of Bellingham. As Port Commissioner, he would focus on creating family-wage jobs by improving port infrastructure and recruiting new tenants, and has received support from labor unions and environmentalists. His opponent, Gary Jensen, is a Ferndale business owner who has been a leading proponent of the coal terminal.

    Due to his support from our progressive partners and commitment to clean energy jobs, Briscoe is your best choice in this race.

    Robert (Bobby) Briscoe

    Submitted by sara on Wed, 10/07/2015 - 17:14

    Bobby Briscoe is an independent commercial fisherman who will bring more than four decades of experience to the Port of Bellingham.

    Robert (Bobby) Briscoe

    Submitted by sara on Wed, 10/07/2015 - 17:14

    Bobby Briscoe is an independent commercial fisherman who will bring more than four decades of experience to the Port of Bellingham.

  • Endorsed By: Washington Conservation Voters , Bellingham/Whatcom Freifighters, NW WA Central Labor Council, Teamsters Union

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • April Barker is a small business owner and 16-year resident of Bellingham running for Bellingham City Council, Ward 1. Barker also works as a paraeducator in the Bellingham schools and serves as the chairwoman for the Bellingham Airport Advisory Committee. She is running to safeguard Bellingham’s environment and neighborhoods through smart growth and job creation. Barker is running unopposed and would be a good addition to the Council.

    April Barker

    April Barker is a small business owner and 16-year resident of Bellingham running for Bellingham City Council, Ward 1. Barker also works as a paraeducator in the Bellingham schools and serves as the chairwoman for the Bellingham Airport Advisory Committee.

    April Barker

    April Barker is a small business owner and 16-year resident of Bellingham running for Bellingham City Council, Ward 1. Barker also works as a paraeducator in the Bellingham schools and serves as the chairwoman for the Bellingham Airport Advisory Committee.

  • Roxanne Murphy is running for re-election to the Bellingham City Council, At-Large. Murphy is the Youth Director of the Nooksack Tribe, of which she is a member, and serves on the board of the Whatcom Transit Authority. Murphy would continue to work on protecting Bellingham’s environment, drinking water, and parks and recreation areas. Murphy is running unopposed and deserves a second term.

    Roxanne Murphy

    Roxanne Murphy is running for re-election to the Bellingham City Council, At-Large. Murphy is the Youth Director of the Nooksack Tribe, of which she is a member, and serves on the board of the Whatcom Transit Authority.

    Roxanne Murphy

    Roxanne Murphy is running for re-election to the Bellingham City Council, At-Large. Murphy is the Youth Director of the Nooksack Tribe, of which she is a member, and serves on the board of the Whatcom Transit Authority.