• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.
  • The 28th District includes part of Stafford County as well as part of the city of Fredericksburg. The district is highly competitive. Del. Cole won with 52% of the vote in 2019 and lost by less than 100 votes in 2017.

    Incumbent Delegate Joshua Cole is a native of Stafford County. He was raised by a single mother and attended Liberty University. He currently serves as an associate pastor at the Union Bell Baptist Church and was previously president of the Stafford County NAACP. In 2017, he was the first African-American and youngest person to run for the Virginia House to represent the 28th District. After losing by less than 100 votes, he ran again in 2019 and was successfully elected.

    Since his election, Cole has fought to make the 28th District a more just, affordable, and environmentally friendly place to live. He has advocated for policies to improve the lives of women and minorities. Since being elected he has voted to pass the Equal Rights Amendment and protect a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent, including expanding healthcare coverage to include abortions. He also championed legislation to rename Jefferson Davis Highway as Emancipation Highway.

    Cole fights for all working people in Virginia, no matter their income. He voted to raise the minimum wage and make community college tuition-free. He also advocated for increasing the number of affordable housing units in the district while working to address the rising cost of living and rent. He plans to establish rent controls, create a Virginia Housing Tax Credit, increase funding for the Virginia Housing Trust Fund, and promote inclusionary zoning to ensure there are sufficient housing units in the district.

    Cole supported the expansion of Medicaid and hopes to repeal Medicaid work requirements. He also supports Medicare For All. He supports keeping the price of prescriptions down and voted to cap insulin co-payments. Cole advocated for banning the practice of “balanced billing,” also known as surprise billing, where patients are charged with surprise fees. He also plans to work on improving the district’s medical and mental health support for veterans.

    Cole has also advocated for critical environmental policies by fighting to preserve the district’s natural resources and environment. He co-sponsored the Virginia Green New Deal Act, which would establish a moratorium on fossil fuel projects and incentivize investment in clean energy. He recognizes that renewable energy is both environmentally and economically beneficial by creating new jobs. He also supported legislation that would set strict regulations on polluters and raise the standards for clean air and water.

    Cole is facing a challenge from Tara Durant (R), an elementary school teacher, Marine wife, and breast cancer survivor. She volunteers and raises money for Habitat for Humanity and United Way. Durant decided to run for office during the Black Lives Matter protests against police violence in 2020. She opposes affordable healthcare and believes taxpayer money should fund private schools through school voucher programs.

    Due to his support of affordable healthcare, the environment, affordable housing, and working families, Del. Joshua Cole is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 28th District.

    Joshua Cole

    Incumbent Delegate Joshua Cole is a native of Stafford County. He was raised by a single mother and attended Liberty University. He currently serves as an associate pastor at the Union Bell Baptist Church and was previously president of the Stafford County NAACP.
  • Monica Gary grew up in Fairfax County and is a pastor at New Wine Community Church. While raising her son as a single parent, she worked as a exotic dancer and experienced domestic trafficking before meeting her current husband, a marine. She then earned her degree in theology at the John Leland Center for Theological Studies and is currently studying for her Master of Divinity. She and her husband live with their seven children in Stafford County.

    All of Gary’s children attend Stafford County Public Schools, so she understands the feelings of local parents. Additionally, as a child, Gary received free school lunch, as well as access to uniforms, field trips, and musical instruments from her school, so she understands the critical role schools play in uplifting children. She supports pay raises for teachers and staff so that they can afford to live in the area they teach. She also supports new investment in school buildings so that children are able to attend schools that aren’t overcrowded and receive teacher attention.

    Gary is in favor of criminal justice reform that will promote the fair treatment of all Stafford residents. She has put out a statement in solidarity with Isaiah Brown, who was shot multiple times by police in Spotsylvania County. She believes increased accountability for police officers who abuse their power should be the bare minimum of criminal justice reform. Additionally, as a survivor of human trafficking, Gary is involved with a local anti-trafficking task force and has spoken as an advocate at multiple anti-trafficking events.

    Gary understands the urgency of the climate crisis and advocates for protecting the environment. Recently, she spent months fighting to address the flooding on Brooke Road, which was caused by recent deforestation allowed by rezoning. She successfully organized and advocated for the board of supervisors to invest millions of dollars in updating the road. She supports efforts to get federal funding for a coastal resiliency plan as well as preservation efforts for the Chesapeake Bay.

    Gary has worked to promote equity in Stafford County. She supports expanding access to voting, particularly allowing for early voting on Sunday, so that all residents can have their voices heard. Additionally, she helped lead the effort to honor enslaved individuals in the signage at Government Island. She also helped establish a multicultural coalition in Stafford County between local churches. The organization was later implemented county-wide by the board of supervisors to serve as an opportunity for community members to discuss issues of equity and discrimination.

    Gary is challenging Paul Milde III, who served as Aquia district supervisor from 2006 to 2017. He opposes expanding access to affordable healthcare including Medicaid expansion. Additionally, he opposes common-sense gun violence prevention legislation and is a lifetime member of the NRA. He does not believe the rich and wealthy should have to pay their fair share of taxes.

    Due to her support for public education, criminal justice reform, the environment, and equity, Gary is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Monica L Gary

    Monica Gary grew up in Fairfax County and is a pastor at New Wine Community Church. While raising her son as a single parent, she worked as a exotic dancer and experienced domestic trafficking before meeting her current husband, a marine.

    Monica L Gary

    Monica Gary grew up in Fairfax County and is a pastor at New Wine Community Church. While raising her son as a single parent, she worked as a exotic dancer and experienced domestic trafficking before meeting her current husband, a marine.
  • Maya Guy is the mother of five Stafford County Public School students and a community activist running to represent the Aquia District on the school board. Guy is heavily involved in the schools as a volunteer, serving on school advisory committees, and the Parent Teacher Associations at three local schools. She is also the education chairperson for Stafford County’s branch of the NAACP. Additionally, she has served on the superintendent’s Equity Diversity Opportunity Advisory Committee.

    Guy is a strong advocate for racial equity in local schools and beyond. As a member of the Stafford branch of the NAACP, she participated in Black Lives Matter protests in 2020. She also supported the effort to remove a large confederate flag that was visible from I-95. She sees redistricting as an area where Stafford County can improve equity. In 2019, she spoke out at school board meetings on the issue after the district’s elementary schools were redistricted to be more racially segregated. If elected, Guy will work to ensure students attend diverse schools with equal access to resources.

    Additionally, Guy has served on a committee that advises the school board on equity and the opportunity gap. Her work with the committee has focused on district procedures, practices, and professional development. The committee has worked to implement policy changes, including hiring more diverse teachers and staff, changing entrance requirements for special programs like the gifted program to be more equitable, and implementing professional development for staff on equity-related issues.

    One of Guy’s top priorities is addressing the issue of teacher retention. She believes the district needs to address how individuals who are not trained to be teachers are serving as substitute teachers. She wants to address the district’s vacancies and hire more teachers to reduce class sizes overall. She understands that student success increases when the district hires enough high-quality teachers. She supports increased funding for staff, particularly the district’s school bus drivers and other transportation staff.

    Guy also prioritizes transparency in budgeting so that parents and staff are able to know exactly where their tax dollars are going. She would like to improve the school board’s relationship with the board of supervisors so that the revenue process would go more smoothly. She would like the school board to have increased autonomy over its budget. She would like to model the process off of neighboring counties, such as Prince William County, where the board of supervisors automatically transfers revenue to the school board, no questions asked.

    Guy is running against David Fauth, an engineer for a data analytics firm and a long-time Stafford County resident. His priorities include building a new school to address overcrowding, reducing staff turnover, and building community at schools. He would also like to address the transportation problems facing the district. He opposes the use of the Virginia Mathematics Pathways Initiative.

    Due to her support for equity, teacher retention, and transparency, Guy is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Maya P. Guy

    Maya Guy is the mother of five Stafford County Public School students and a community activist running to represent the Aquia District on the school board.

    Maya P. Guy

    Maya Guy is the mother of five Stafford County Public School students and a community activist running to represent the Aquia District on the school board.