• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

  • The 2nd District covers eastern Prince William County, northern portions of Stafford County, and Quantico. The district tends to lean Democratic, however, recent elections have been narrowly won by Democratic candidates.

    Incumbent Delegate Candi Mundon King obtained her bachelor’s degree in political science from Norfolk State University, where she became a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Outside of the General Assembly, she works in the non-profit sector, making the educational system more accessible and equitable to special needs children. Mundon King and her husband, Josh King, reside in Dumfries with their three children, including a non-verbal autistic teenage daughter.

    Del. Mundon King was elected in January 2021 after a special election to replace former Delegate Jennifer Carroll Foy. During her first legislative session, Del. Mundon King supported legislation that would allow essential workers to be eligible for worker’s compensation if diagnosed with the COVID-19 virus. This same legislation would also require hazard pay and personal protective equipment to essential workers during the pandemic. She supported legislation to prevent maternal mortality by establishing a task force to collect data on maternal health outcomes.

    Del. Mundon King co-patroned the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back, “G3,” Program bill that grants free tuition at community colleges for low- and middle-income Virginians who study in certain fields. She voted for a 5% pay raise for Virginia teachers, hoping to retain quality educators and prevent high turnover, and approved funding to help schools reopen safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to require the state department of education to update its special education and related services to better accommodate students with disabilities.

    Working to make the promise of democracy real for us all, she co-patroned The Voting Rights Act of Virginia. This bill expands on the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 and prohibits discrimination at the polls. Mundon King voted for measures that make voting easier like removing some requirements on absentee and curbside voting and the requirement of a witness signature on absentee ballots in time of an emergency. She also supported the establishment of dropbox locations for voters to return their absentee ballots.

    With sex trafficking on the rise in the 2nd District, Del. Mundon King chose to focus on combating the problem by introducing a bill that would give more rights to victims of sex trafficking and requires the state to identify and better respond to crimes involving sex trafficking. In addition to this, she supported legislation that would allow victims of sex trafficking to have their records expunged as they work to rebuild their lives.

    Mundon King’s opponent is Republican candidate Gina Ciarcia. The wife of a Marine veteran, Ciarcia is centering her campaign as a proponent for school choice and opposes a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. She also does not support the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which requires the state to transition to renewable energy.

    Due to her support of public education, voting rights, and workers’ rights, Del. Candi Mundon King is the most progressive choice for the House of Delegates 2nd District.

    Candi Mundon King

    Incumbent Delegate Candi Mundon King obtained her bachelor’s degree in political science from Norfolk State University, where she became a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

  • The 28th District includes part of Stafford County as well as part of the city of Fredericksburg. The district is highly competitive. Del. Cole won with 52% of the vote in 2019 and lost by less than 100 votes in 2017.

    Incumbent Delegate Joshua Cole is a native of Stafford County. He was raised by a single mother and attended Liberty University. He currently serves as an associate pastor at the Union Bell Baptist Church and was previously president of the Stafford County NAACP. In 2017, he was the first African-American and youngest person to run for the Virginia House to represent the 28th District. After losing by less than 100 votes, he ran again in 2019 and was successfully elected.

    Since his election, Cole has fought to make the 28th District a more just, affordable, and environmentally friendly place to live. He has advocated for policies to improve the lives of women and minorities. Since being elected he has voted to pass the Equal Rights Amendment and protect a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent, including expanding healthcare coverage to include abortions. He also championed legislation to rename Jefferson Davis Highway as Emancipation Highway.

    Cole fights for all working people in Virginia, no matter their income. He voted to raise the minimum wage and make community college tuition-free. He also advocated for increasing the number of affordable housing units in the district while working to address the rising cost of living and rent. He plans to establish rent controls, create a Virginia Housing Tax Credit, increase funding for the Virginia Housing Trust Fund, and promote inclusionary zoning to ensure there are sufficient housing units in the district.

    Cole supported the expansion of Medicaid and hopes to repeal Medicaid work requirements. He also supports Medicare For All. He supports keeping the price of prescriptions down and voted to cap insulin co-payments. Cole advocated for banning the practice of “balanced billing,” also known as surprise billing, where patients are charged with surprise fees. He also plans to work on improving the district’s medical and mental health support for veterans.

    Cole has also advocated for critical environmental policies by fighting to preserve the district’s natural resources and environment. He co-sponsored the Virginia Green New Deal Act, which would establish a moratorium on fossil fuel projects and incentivize investment in clean energy. He recognizes that renewable energy is both environmentally and economically beneficial by creating new jobs. He also supported legislation that would set strict regulations on polluters and raise the standards for clean air and water.

    Cole is facing a challenge from Tara Durant (R), an elementary school teacher, Marine wife, and breast cancer survivor. She volunteers and raises money for Habitat for Humanity and United Way. Durant decided to run for office during the Black Lives Matter protests against police violence in 2020. She opposes affordable healthcare and believes taxpayer money should fund private schools through school voucher programs.

    Due to his support of affordable healthcare, the environment, affordable housing, and working families, Del. Joshua Cole is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 28th District.

    Joshua Cole

    Incumbent Delegate Joshua Cole is a native of Stafford County. He was raised by a single mother and attended Liberty University. He currently serves as an associate pastor at the Union Bell Baptist Church and was previously president of the Stafford County NAACP.
  • Virginia’s 88th District includes parts of the counties of Stafford, Spotsylvania, and Fauquier, and the city of Fredericksburg. Voter trends show that the district is strongly Republican. Del. Cole won the 2019 election with over 55% of the vote.

    Kecia Evans was born in New Jersey and moved to Virginia with her family when her father was stationed here. She earned a master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a law degree from Regent University. She works for an agency that advocates for indigent adults and juveniles. She and her husband live in Stafford County with their four children. This is Evans’ first time running for political office.

    As someone who works in the criminal justice field, Evans supports initiatives to reform Virginia’s criminal justice system. Before her campaign, Evans led the Legal Redress and Criminal Justice Committee for the Stafford Branch of the NAACP. Evans believes that our criminal justice system’s focus on punitive measures is not making our communities safer. She wants to reduce mass incarceration by introducing legislation that promotes crime prevention, systems of care, and intervention. She also supports expunging the records of non-violent offenders.

    Evans believes access to affordable, quality healthcare is a human right. She wants to expand Medicaid more so that affordable healthcare is available to more Virginians. If elected, Evans hopes to prioritize legislation that addresses disparities in access to coverage across racial, geographic, and gender identities. She will push for lower insurance premiums and lowering the cost of prescription drugs. Evans is a supporter of reproductive rights and quality reproductive healthcare.

    Evans supports increased funding for Virginia’s public education system. She believes that teachers should be paid above the national average to prevent high turnover and Virginia should have universal pre-K. She wants to address Virginia’s educator shortage, repair failing infrastructure, and reduce classroom sizes. Evans also plans to make sure that special education and mental health programs are fully funded so that all students in our schools are receiving the best opportunities.

    If elected, Evans hopes to push for policies so that all Virginians have access to quality jobs and economic opportunities. Her goal is to support legislation that creates more workforce and skills-training programs to prepare Virginians for in-demand jobs. She wants to work towards ensuring small businesses are protected and able to thrive against larger corporations. She also wants businesses that provide employment opportunities to veterans, military families, and people with disabilities.

    Evans is running against Republican candidate Philip Scott and Libertarian candidate Timothy Lewis. Scott is a business owner and supports creating deliberate barriers to voting access. He opposes common-sense measures meant to keep communities safe from gun violence. Lewis is a veteran who wants to use taxpayer money to fund private education and opposes gun violence prevention measures.

    Due to her support of criminal justice reform, access to affordable healthcare, public education, and working families, Kecia Evans is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Kecia Evans

    Kecia Evans was born in New Jersey and moved to Virginia with her family when her father was stationed here. She earned a master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a law degree from Regent University. She works for an agency that advocates for indigent adults and juveniles.

District Offices

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below county races on your ballot.

  • Monica Gary grew up in Fairfax County and is a pastor at New Wine Community Church. While raising her son as a single parent, she worked as a exotic dancer and experienced domestic trafficking before meeting her current husband, a marine. She then earned her degree in theology at the John Leland Center for Theological Studies and is currently studying for her Master of Divinity. She and her husband live with their seven children in Stafford County.

    All of Gary’s children attend Stafford County Public Schools, so she understands the feelings of local parents. Additionally, as a child, Gary received free school lunch, as well as access to uniforms, field trips, and musical instruments from her school, so she understands the critical role schools play in uplifting children. She supports pay raises for teachers and staff so that they can afford to live in the area they teach. She also supports new investment in school buildings so that children are able to attend schools that aren’t overcrowded and receive teacher attention.

    Gary is in favor of criminal justice reform that will promote the fair treatment of all Stafford residents. She has put out a statement in solidarity with Isaiah Brown, who was shot multiple times by police in Spotsylvania County. She believes increased accountability for police officers who abuse their power should be the bare minimum of criminal justice reform. Additionally, as a survivor of human trafficking, Gary is involved with a local anti-trafficking task force and has spoken as an advocate at multiple anti-trafficking events.

    Gary understands the urgency of the climate crisis and advocates for protecting the environment. Recently, she spent months fighting to address the flooding on Brooke Road, which was caused by recent deforestation allowed by rezoning. She successfully organized and advocated for the board of supervisors to invest millions of dollars in updating the road. She supports efforts to get federal funding for a coastal resiliency plan as well as preservation efforts for the Chesapeake Bay.

    Gary has worked to promote equity in Stafford County. She supports expanding access to voting, particularly allowing for early voting on Sunday, so that all residents can have their voices heard. Additionally, she helped lead the effort to honor enslaved individuals in the signage at Government Island. She also helped establish a multicultural coalition in Stafford County between local churches. The organization was later implemented county-wide by the board of supervisors to serve as an opportunity for community members to discuss issues of equity and discrimination.

    Gary is challenging Paul Milde III, who served as Aquia district supervisor from 2006 to 2017. He opposes expanding access to affordable healthcare including Medicaid expansion. Additionally, he opposes common-sense gun violence prevention legislation and is a lifetime member of the NRA. He does not believe the rich and wealthy should have to pay their fair share of taxes.

    Due to her support for public education, criminal justice reform, the environment, and equity, Gary is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Monica L Gary

    Monica Gary grew up in Fairfax County and is a pastor at New Wine Community Church. While raising her son as a single parent, she worked as a exotic dancer and experienced domestic trafficking before meeting her current husband, a marine.

    Monica L Gary

    Monica Gary grew up in Fairfax County and is a pastor at New Wine Community Church. While raising her son as a single parent, she worked as a exotic dancer and experienced domestic trafficking before meeting her current husband, a marine.
  • Maya Guy is the mother of five Stafford County Public School students and a community activist running to represent the Aquia District on the school board. Guy is heavily involved in the schools as a volunteer, serving on school advisory committees, and the Parent Teacher Associations at three local schools. She is also the education chairperson for Stafford County’s branch of the NAACP. Additionally, she has served on the superintendent’s Equity Diversity Opportunity Advisory Committee.

    Guy is a strong advocate for racial equity in local schools and beyond. As a member of the Stafford branch of the NAACP, she participated in Black Lives Matter protests in 2020. She also supported the effort to remove a large confederate flag that was visible from I-95. She sees redistricting as an area where Stafford County can improve equity. In 2019, she spoke out at school board meetings on the issue after the district’s elementary schools were redistricted to be more racially segregated. If elected, Guy will work to ensure students attend diverse schools with equal access to resources.

    Additionally, Guy has served on a committee that advises the school board on equity and the opportunity gap. Her work with the committee has focused on district procedures, practices, and professional development. The committee has worked to implement policy changes, including hiring more diverse teachers and staff, changing entrance requirements for special programs like the gifted program to be more equitable, and implementing professional development for staff on equity-related issues.

    One of Guy’s top priorities is addressing the issue of teacher retention. She believes the district needs to address how individuals who are not trained to be teachers are serving as substitute teachers. She wants to address the district’s vacancies and hire more teachers to reduce class sizes overall. She understands that student success increases when the district hires enough high-quality teachers. She supports increased funding for staff, particularly the district’s school bus drivers and other transportation staff.

    Guy also prioritizes transparency in budgeting so that parents and staff are able to know exactly where their tax dollars are going. She would like to improve the school board’s relationship with the board of supervisors so that the revenue process would go more smoothly. She would like the school board to have increased autonomy over its budget. She would like to model the process off of neighboring counties, such as Prince William County, where the board of supervisors automatically transfers revenue to the school board, no questions asked.

    Guy is running against David Fauth, an engineer for a data analytics firm and a long-time Stafford County resident. His priorities include building a new school to address overcrowding, reducing staff turnover, and building community at schools. He would also like to address the transportation problems facing the district. He opposes the use of the Virginia Mathematics Pathways Initiative.

    Due to her support for equity, teacher retention, and transparency, Guy is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Maya P. Guy

    Maya Guy is the mother of five Stafford County Public School students and a community activist running to represent the Aquia District on the school board.

    Maya P. Guy

    Maya Guy is the mother of five Stafford County Public School students and a community activist running to represent the Aquia District on the school board.
  • Sandy Cole is running to represent the Falmouth District on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. Cole’s family has lived in the Stafford area for over 100 years, with Cole herself graduating from Stafford Senior High School. She earned a master’s degree in operations management and works as a manager in the hospitality industry. She also serves as a caregiver for her mother and brother. She is the mother of Delegate Joshua Cole, who represents the area in the House of Delegates.

    One of Cole’s top priorities is education. She would like to see an increase in teacher salaries in order to improve teachers’ quality of life and reduce rates of turnover in staff. Additionally, she would like to invest in new school infrastructure and improve existing buildings, so that all Stafford County students have a safe and supportive learning environment. Cole would also prioritize lowering the student to teacher ratio so that it meets the state average.

    As Stafford grows, Cole hopes to ensure funding for public safety grows with it to address problems with chronic turnover and low pay. She recognizes the award-winning efforts of Stafford’s Emergency Management Services, which was honored by Governor Ralph Northam for its efforts to assist county residents during the pandemic. She supports competitive pay for first responders so that the area’s police, fire, and EMS departments are able to be fully-staffed and retain high-quality employees.

    In order to address the area’s transportation issues, Cole supports the creation of a regional transportation authority. This authority would help fund improvements to transportation infrastructure in order to address problems like flooding, traffic, decaying roads. A regional transportation authority will also help assure proper management of public transportation and better distribution of state and federal operating assistance while having the power to raise revenues for investing in transportation infrastructure.

    Cole is running against an incumbent member of the board of supervisors, Meg Bohmke, who has served on the board since 2013 and previously served on the Stafford County School Board. Bohmke does not support keeping our communities safe by enacting common sense measures aimed at preventing gun violence. She believes businesses should not pay their fair share of taxes and supports the reduction of regulations on businesses.

    Due to her support for public education, funding for transportation, and public safety, Cole is the most progressive choice for this seat.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Sandy S. Cole

    Sandy Cole is running to represent the Falmouth District on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. Cole’s family has lived in the Stafford area for over 100 years, with Cole herself graduating from Stafford Senior High School.

    Sandy S. Cole

    Sandy Cole is running to represent the Falmouth District on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. Cole’s family has lived in the Stafford area for over 100 years, with Cole herself graduating from Stafford Senior High School.
  • Incumbent School Board Member Sarah Breedin Chase is running for reelection to her seat representing the Falmouth District on the Stafford County School Board. Chase has served on the school board since 2018. After earning her doctorate, she was a professor at University of Mary Washington and later at St. Mary's College. Her three children all attended Stafford County Public Schools. Her two oldest daughters graduated from Stafford High School and her son is a current student there.

    Chase prioritizes ensuring the district retains high quality teachers. This includes raising teacher pay and ensuring competitive benefits. She understands that teachers are the basis of the district’s educational quality and are critical to student achievement. As a university professor, she understands how teachers play a critical role in instilling not only skills for learning, but also a love of learning in students. Additionally, this year, she supported the budget that gives all school district employees a minimum 5% raise, with some teachers receiving up to 9% raises.

    Chase advocates for transparency and smart spending by the school board. She understands how frustrating it was to witness the board’s previous financial mismanagement and will work to increase transparency and ensure tax dollars are being used for their intended purpose. She was the only board member to vote against an investment in school infrastructure, arguing it did not put enough money into neglected southern Stafford schools. Additionally, as the only incumbent board member running for reelection, Chase believes her experience will be helpful as the board brings on three new members and hires a new superintendent.

    Ensuring every student is equipped with the skills they need for their next step after graduation is Chase’s top priority. She hopes to expand accessible options for both special education and gifted education, reducing the current levels of red tape, so that every student has access to an educational path that fits their needs. With the passage of this year's budget, she advocated for further funding for the district’s social workers, as she is concerned about being able to maintain their salaries when the district runs out of federal COVID-19 relief funding.

    Chase has also supported diversity and inclusion on the school board. Chase called for the board to reevaluate schools’ relationships with Student Resource Officers. She particularly emphasized the need to be able to reassign officers if there are concerns about their conduct. Chase also supported expanding protections for discrimination. She voted in favor of including sexual orientation and gender identity in protected categories, giving students more options for legal protection.

    Chase is running unopposed, however, her support for student achievement, transparency, and diversity make her a progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Sarah Breedin Chase

    Incumbent School Board Member Sarah Breedin Chase is running for reelection to her seat representing the Falmouth District on the Stafford County School Board. Chase has served on the school board since 2018.

    Sarah Breedin Chase

    Incumbent School Board Member Sarah Breedin Chase is running for reelection to her seat representing the Falmouth District on the Stafford County School Board. Chase has served on the school board since 2018.
  • Pamela Yeung, the current representative of the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County School Board, is running to represent the district on the board of supervisors. She attended Johns Hopkins University for graduate school and is currently enrolled in a doctoral program for leadership and organizational change at Baylor University. She works as a technology and healthcare consultant and has served on the school board since 2017. She raised four children, all of whom attended Stafford County public schools.

    One of Yeung’s top priorities is improving the county’s infrastructure. She is a strong advocate for accessible transportation, making Stafford County’s transportation system more efficient, and ensuring all growth is eco-friendly and sustainable. As a school board member, Yeung initiated a study to improve the efficiency of school buses to decrease the time students spent in traffic and money spent on transportation costs. She also served on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors' Telecommunications Advisory Committee, which worked to increase broadband Internet in Stafford County, a critical step to ensuring all citizens have access to jobs and educational opportunities.

    Yeung is passionate about government transparency and civic involvement. She wants to ensure citizens have access to board meetings and understand the decisions the board is making, including how tax dollars are spent and budgets decided. While on the school board, she ensured teachers and school support staff received raises every single year. Yeung ran for school board because of her enthusiasm for participating in local politics and hopes it inspires others to do the same.

    As a school board member, Yeung worked to help the board reflect the diversity of the Stafford community. She worked to have the board implement new policies to increase the number of diverse teachers, social workers, and counselors in public schools. Additionally, she helped reintroduce foreign language classes in schools. In 2020 and 2021, she helped plan and run a Juneteenth event in Stafford in order to help educate the Stafford community about the holiday. If elected to the Board of Supervisors, she would like to see increased investment into recreational and cultural opportunities.

    Yeung also upheld and introduced equitable policies in Stafford Public Schools. She successfully advocated for the school board to readdress its relationship with student resource officers (SROs). She worked to build trust between students and SROs as well as implement new policies to allow school resource officers to be reassigned if there are concerns about their behavior. Yeung also supported policies to protect transgender students in Stafford County schools by voting in favor of a school board policy to add sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of categories protected from discrimination.

    Yeung is running against independent candidate Barton “Bart” Randall, a​​ Navy veteran who represents the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County Planning Commission. Randall opposes government efforts to safely reopen our public schools such as mask requirements. He supports policies to make Stafford an attractive destination by introducing new retail and commercial opportunities.

    Due to her support for infrastructure, transparency and accountability, public education, and inclusive policies, Pamela Yeung is the most progressive choice in this election.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    R. Pamela Yeung

    Pamela Yeung, the current representative of the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County School Board, is running to represent the district on the board of supervisors.

    R. Pamela Yeung

    Pamela Yeung, the current representative of the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County School Board, is running to represent the district on the board of supervisors.
  • Wanda Blackwell is an Army veteran and educator running to represent the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County School Board. While in the military, Blackwell attended Troy State University, where she received a Master of Public Administration, with a concentration in criminal justice. Following her retirement from the armed forces, she served as an adjunct faculty member at Central Texas College and as a life-skills facilitator at Rappahannock Regional Jail. Her daughter is a graduate of Stafford County schools.

    One of Blackwell’s top priorities is ensuring student achievement. She would like to determine the levels of educational deficit caused by the pandemic and work to properly allocate resources to address them. Additionally, Blackwell supports limiting the number of standardized tests taken by Stafford County students. She believes shifting away from standardized tests will allow teachers to better prepare students for the modern workforce or any path they may choose. She believes more critical life skills, such as personal finance, should be taught in schools.

    Blackwell is concerned with overcrowding and understaffing, noting several schools in the district are already considered over capacity. She believes the rate of growth in the district will lead to further overcrowding causing staff departures and redistricting. To increase quality teacher retention, Blackwell advocates for better investment into teacher pay and benefits. She also supports increasing the teacher-to-student ratio to reduce the number of children being redistricted.

    Blackwell has made the district’s transportation problems a top priority for her campaign because parents and students alike are concerned about how much time students spend on school buses during the day. She understands that having reliable, efficient transportation to and from school reduces the burden on parents and reduces worries overall. She would like to invest in research about how to decrease time spent on buses and reduce overcrowding on buses.

    Additionally, Blackwell would like to improve the Stafford school community by boosting opportunities for parent involvement. She believes that education starts at home and would like to increase communication with parents and provide opportunities for them to share their opinions when decisions are made. Blackwell would also work to repair the school board’s relationship with the county board of supervisors to ensure schools are receiving proper funding and the organizations are aligned in their missions and execution.

    Blackwell is running against Maureen L. Siegmund, who works as the director of external relations for a government affairs firm and has three children attending Stafford County schools. Siegmund is a supporter of Glenn Youngkin’s campaign for Governor and does not support government efforts to safely reopen schools during the pandemic.

    Due to her support for addressing overcrowding, improved transportation, and raising teacher pay, Blackwell is the most progressive choice for this seat.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Wanda D. Blackwell

    Wanda Blackwell is an Army veteran and educator running to represent the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County School Board. While in the military, Blackwell attended Troy State University, where she received a Master of Public Administration, with a concentration in criminal justice.

    Wanda D. Blackwell

    Wanda Blackwell is an Army veteran and educator running to represent the Garrisonville District on the Stafford County School Board. While in the military, Blackwell attended Troy State University, where she received a Master of Public Administration, with a concentration in criminal justice.
  • Keith Jones is a Democrat running to represent the Hartwood District on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. A native of Detroit, he worked as a probation officer and customs inspector before joining the U.S. Secret Service, serving across the country, overseas, and on the presidential and vice-presidential details. Since retiring from the Secret Service, he works as an investigator on money laundering issues. He lives with his wife in Stafford and has two adult children.

    Jones plans to prioritize educational funding to ensure Stafford County is supporting every student’s education. He would like to increase school budgets, particularly to raise teacher salaries. Additionally, he would prioritize school safety and infrastructure. He would like to ensure Stafford County students are receiving the highest quality of educational resources so that they are better prepared to participate in the workforce. He would also like to expand access to the Internet and broadband so that all students have equal access to educational opportunities.

    Jones hopes to boost the county’s economy by strengthening the relationship between public and private institutions. He prioritizes citizen involvement in government and would like to ensure that citizens and small business owners have plenty of opportunities to engage in government activities. He particularly emphasizes open board meetings and utilizing Zoom and phone conferencing until safe public meetings can be held. Jones also understands that farming is a critical aspect of business in Stafford and wants to focus on supporting farms and protecting land and natural water resources.

    Jones hopes to redirect funding in the district to ease transportation issues. He would like to further the work the board of supervisors has been doing to eliminate road congestion and decrease the overall number of traffic-related accidents, injuries, and death. Additionally, he would work with the Virginia Department of Transportation and Youth Driver Task Force to ensure the area receives proper funding for road maintenance. He would also like to ensure public transportation options are available and safe for all who need them.

    Jones also understands the board can play a critical role in promoting equality in Stafford County. He would like to increase government collaboration with organizations that support the elderly and individuals with disabilities. He wants to boost funding to county services like affordable housing and support for mental health issues. Additionally, he would like to see criminal justice reforms that ensure the district's residents are treated fairly and equally at all levels of the criminal justice system.

    Keith Jones is running against Darrell English, a Republican and veteran of the Stafford County Sheriff’s Office. He currently serves on the Stafford County Planning Commission. His platform includes protecting public safety through increased staffing and resources for the county’s law enforcement. English is also a supporter of Glenn Youngkin’s campaign for Governor.

    Due to his support for funding education, government transparency, and equity, Jones is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Keith Jones

    Keith Jones is a Democrat running to represent the Hartwood District on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. A native of Detroit, he worked as a probation officer and customs inspector before joining the U.S.

    Keith Jones

    Keith Jones is a Democrat running to represent the Hartwood District on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. A native of Detroit, he worked as a probation officer and customs inspector before joining the U.S.
  • Marc Broklawski is a father and computer scientist running to represent the Hartwood District on the Stafford County School Board. Born and raised in New York, Broklawski received his master’s degree in computer science and engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. After graduate school, he moved to Virginia to begin his career as a civilian computer scientist for the United States Navy. He lives with his wife, a public school teacher, and children in Stafford.

    One of Broklawski’s top priorities is ensuring proper funding for schools and raising the per-pupil funding level. He points to underfunding as a cause for the district's high student-to-teacher ratio and would like to raise the budget contributions from the board of supervisors up to the local average, or higher. This would allow increased salaries across the board for teachers, administrators, and other staff. He emphasizes how increasing pay will greatly help address the district’s teacher shortage, allowing for reduced class sizes. He would also like to invest in more counselors and social workers to support students’ mental health needs.

    Broklawski also prioritizes investment into school resources and infrastructure. He will work to ensure every teacher has access to the resources necessary to make their classroom conducive to learning. On infrastructure, he is particularly concerned with repairs to school buildings. He prioritizes repairs to ventilation systems in order to improve air quality, which is critical to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 and to keep children with asthma and allergies safe from mold.

    Broklawski does not support excessive standardized testing, taking issue with “teaching to the test.” He believes teachers are often limited by testing requirements. Broklawski also believes that recess is critical to childhood development and encourages access to unstructured recess time. Broklawski would also like to ensure the course offerings at each school are equitable and students at every school have access to accelerated learning and diverse course options. This includes ensuring that special education students have access to the support they need.

    Broklawski also hopes to ensure Stafford County students are all properly prepared for working in the 21st century. He values Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs and college programs equally and will work to ensure Stafford County graduates are prepared for every path following graduation. He hopes to build community partnerships to expand access to apprenticeship programs and trades for students. Broklawski also advocates for expanded access to broadband, emphasizing the technological inequities in rural areas.

    Broklawski is running against Alyssa D. Halstead. Halstead has posted on social media that she does not support COVID-19 vaccinations. She also opposes government efforts to safely reopen schools during the pandemic. Halstead opposes teacher unions and believes that people migrate to the U.S. to take advantage of public assistance programs.

    Due to his support for investment into school infrastructure and teachers, decreasing standardized testing, and increasing opportunities for higher education, Broklawski is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Marc K. Broklawski

    Marc Broklawski is a father and computer scientist running to represent the Hartwood District on the Stafford County School Board. Born and raised in New York, Broklawski received his master’s degree in computer science and engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

    Marc K. Broklawski

    Marc Broklawski is a father and computer scientist running to represent the Hartwood District on the Stafford County School Board. Born and raised in New York, Broklawski received his master’s degree in computer science and engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo.