• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

  • The 34th District includes parts of Fairfax and Loudoun counties and is strongly Democratic. Murphy received 58% of the vote in 2019.

    Incumbent Delegate Kathleen Murphy has represented the 34th District since 2015. Murphy received her bachelor's degree from American University. She has served as senior advisor for international trade issues at the Department of Commerce, as well as senior staff for Texas Congressman Charlie Wilson. Kathleen helped found Salute Our Services, to connect service members to their families, and Kids Serve Too, which supports children in military families. She lives in McLean with her husband and four children.

    Murphy lost her brother to gun violence and is dedicated to keeping our communities safe from gun violence. She supports banning military grade weapons, believing they should only be used in combat. She voted to pass background checks on gun purchases and end the gun show loophole, which allows for gun purchases without a background check at gun shows. In the General Assembly, she started the Gun Violence Prevention Caucus with Senator Adam Ebbin and co-chaired the Safe Virginia Initiative, a group focused on decreasing gun violence in the state.

    Murphy is also dedicated to ensuring women’s rights are fully protected by the legislature. She was co-patron of the Equal Rights Amendment in Virginia. She has served as an advocate against the passage of bills that limit women’s health care options. She supports abortion access and voted to expand health insurance coverage to include abortions. She also supports policies that will help women and people with children participate in the workforce, including affordable childcare, sufficient health coverage, and paid family and medical leave.

    Del. Murphy has also fought to ensure every child in Virginia has access to high-quality education. She voted in favor of raising teacher pay and is working to ensure schools are well-funded and prepared to safely reopen in the fall. She also supports funding for full-day kindergarten and early childhood education. She also wants to ensure Virginians are able to afford higher education and will work to stop tuition increases at public colleges and universities. She would also like to expand access to community college, which are critical for workforce development.

    Murphy is facing a challenge from Gary Pan (R), a local business leader. Pan serves as the CEO of Panacea Consulting, Inc. Pan opposes measures aimed at keeping our communities safe from gun violence. He also supports maintaining Virginia’s right-to-work law, which weakens the rights of workers by preventing them from forming unions.

    Due to her support for gun violence prevention, affordable health coverage, abortion access, and public education, Delegate Murphy is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 34th District.

    Kathleen Murphy

    Incumbent Delegate Kathleen Murphy has represented the 34th District since 2015. Murphy received her bachelor's degree from American University.
  • The 35th District encompasses Fairfax County. Voting trends for the district show that the area is strongly Democratic. Keam has won a majority of the elections unopposed, however, he still won his 2013 seat against Republican candidate Luse with over 60% of the votes.

    After winning his first election in 2009, incumbent Delegate Mark Keam was the first Asian immigrant and Korean American elected to the General Assembly. He earned his law degree from the University of California Hastings College of Law. He and his wife, Alex, currently reside in Vienna with their two children. Delegate Keam currently serves as the vice-chair of the Finance Committee and is a member of the Courts of Justice, Labor and Commerce, and Education committees.

    While in office, Del. Keam has been a staunch advocate for the environment. In 2020, he voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which will get the state to 100% renewable energy by 2050. Del. Keam patroned a bill that creates the Virginia Electric Vehicle Grant Fund, allowing schools and other entities in the Commonwealth to get state support as they replace vehicles that utilize fossil fuels with electric vehicles. He also supported a bill that would promote environmental justice in Virginia by requiring companies to conduct community outreach when applying for permits with potential environmental impacts.

    Del. Keam has worked to pass legislation to protect the Commonwealth’s diversity. Earlier this year, he helped create the Virginia Asian American and Pacific Islander Caucus, in order to advocate for the community during a rise in anti-Asian hate crimes. The delegate also co-patroned a bill that recognizes racism as a public health crisis in Virginia. In 2020, he voted to grant in-state tuition to undocumented students and co-patroned legislation to give driving privileges to undocumented drivers in the Commonwealth.

    Keam works to make the promise of democracy real for us all by making our elections more accessible. He supported legislation that extends voter registration deadlines in the case of the online registration system’s failure. The delegate voted for legislation that makes Virginia’s absentee voting system more accessible and a bill that extended early voting. He also voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits voter discrimination in the Commonwealth.

    Keam supported two important pieces of legislation to boost the lives of working families across Virginia. The first allows for changes to the Child Care Subsidy Program, making it easier for families to qualify for assistance. The second piece of legislation expands eligibility for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to people studying in postsecondary education programs. Keam also voted to increase Virginia’s minimum wage.

    Del. Keam is facing a challenge from Kevin McGrath, a former CIA agent. He lives in Vienna with his wife and three kids. McGarth opposes efforts to make our elections free and accessible by expanding voting access. He is against common-sense gun violence prevention to make our communities safe, criminal justice reforms that prevent the mass incarceration of people, and government efforts to protect communities from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Due to his support of Virginia working families, the environment, expansion of voting rights, and the Commonwealth’s ethnic minorities, Del. Keam is the most progressive choice for the 35th district.

    Mark Keam

    After winning his first election in 2009, incumbent Delegate Mark Keam was the first Asian immigrant and Korean American elected to the General Assembly. He earned his law degree from the University of California Hastings College of Law.
  • The 36th District comprises part of Fairfax County. Voting trends for the district show that the area is strongly Democratic. Delegate Plum has held the seat for 40 years, running unopposed during several elections.

    Incumbent Delegate Ken Plum has represented the 36th District for 40 years. He worked at Fairfax County Public Schools for nearly 30 years as a teacher and school administrator. He attended Old Dominion University and later his Master of Education for the University of Virginia. He and his wife raised four kids together. Plum has won numerous awards for his work in the transportation, education, and healthcare fields, and for his civic and economic leadership.

    During the 2021 legislative session, Plum supported many efforts to reform Virginia’s criminal justice system. Plum served as a chief co-patron for legislation that abolished the death penalty in Virginia. Plum also voted for marijuana legalization, citing the benefits it would have on minority communities hit hardest by past legislation. Now that recreational marijuana is legal, Del. Plum wants to focus on bringing equity to communities ravaged by the Drug War.

    An advocate for the environment, Del. Plum has sponsored legislation aimed at eliminating plastic waste in the Commonwealth this past legislative session, like a bill that prohibits the use of white foam food containers often used for take-out items in restaurants. Additionally, he sponsored legislation that better regulates the recycling industry. In 2020, Plum voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which requires polluting utility monopolies to transition to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

    Plum supports legislation that makes communities in the Commonwealth safe from gun violence. In 2020, he successfully sponsored a bill that requires universal background checks for all gun purchases and transfers. He also supports extreme risk orders that keep guns out of the hands of people deemed a safety hazard for themselves or others and limiting the sale of certain types of weapons and ammunition, and waiting periods for purchases.

    Plum is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Matthew Lang, a retired Navy veteran, currently working as an international security specialist. Lang opposes holding police accountable for violence inflicted on communities and the right of Virginia teachers to unionize. He is also against government efforts to keep communities healthy and safe during the pandemic.

    Due to his support of the environment, gun violence prevention, and criminal justice reform, Delegate Ken Plum is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Ken Plum

    Incumbent Delegate Ken Plum has represented the 36th District for 40 years. He worked at Fairfax County Public Schools for nearly 30 years as a teacher and school administrator. He attended Old Dominion University and later his Master of Education for the University of Virginia.
  • The 37th District is comprised of part of Fairfax County and Fairfax City. Voting trends for the district show that the area is strongly Democratic. Del. Bulova ran unopposed in the 2017 and 2019 general elections.

    Incumbent Delegate David Bulova has represented the 37th District since 2006. He and his wife, Gretchen, live in Fairfax County with their three children. He received his Master of Public Administration and Policy from Virginia Tech and is a graduate of the Sorensen Institute of Political Leadership at the University of Virginia. When not in session, Bulova works as a project manager for a local company, helping local governments and industries comply with state and federal environmental regulations.

    Bulova’s educational priorities include issues such as reducing class sizes, retaining and recruiting qualified teachers. As a member of the House of Delegates Education Committee, he worked to reform Virginia’s Standards of Learning and successfully introduced legislation in 2017 that promotes career and technical education opportunities. In 2020, he also sponsored the Early Childhood Care and Education Act that would work to improve early childhood education. He voted for a 5% pay increase for teachers in 2021.

    Bulova considers it his responsibility to fight for the environment and renewable energy sources. He successfully sponsored legislation aimed at eliminating waste and toxins in our water and protecting it from agricultural runoff. Bulova was recognized by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Virginia League of Conservation Voters for championing the environment. In 2020, he sponsored the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the state to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

    Bulova prioritizes making access to healthcare affordable to all Virginians. Bulova cast a crucial vote in expanding Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians in 2018. He voted to lower the cost of prescription medicine by capping the cost of insulin at $50. He also voted to create a state-run health insurance marketplace exchange. The exchange would focus mostly on enrolling uninsured or underinsured residents who aren’t covered by an employer-provided health plan.

    Del. Bulova is a strong supporter of equality throughout the Commonwealth. He voted for the Virginia Values Act, which prohibits discrimination in employment and housing along the lines of sexual orientation and gender identity. He also supported Virginia’s ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in 2019. He also supports abortion access, voting to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers in 2020. He supported making health insurance plans with abortion coverage available on the state marketplace exchange.

    Bulova is being challenged by Republican candidate Kenny Meteiver, an Army veteran. Meteiver opposes raising the minimum wage and abortion access. He supports creating barriers to voting access in our fair and free elections. He opposes efforts to safely reopen our schools during the pandemic and making our schools inclusive of its LGBTQ students.

    Due to his support of the environment, public education, healthcare, abortion access and equality, Delegate David Bulova is the most progressive choice in this race.

    David Bulova

    Incumbent Delegate David Bulova has represented the 37th District since 2006. He and his wife, Gretchen, live in Fairfax County with their three children.
  • The 38th District comprises part of Fairfax County. Voting trends for the district show that the area is strongly Democratic. Democratic candidates consistently earn at least 60% of the vote across elections.

    Incumbent Delegate Kaye Kory was first elected to the seat in 2009 and serves as chair of the Counties, Cities, and Towns Committee. She is also a member of the Finance, Labor and Commerce, and Public Safety committees. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the Miami University of Ohio and has done graduate work in public policy at the University of Iowa and George Mason University. She and her husband Ross have three children together.

    Kory wants to ensure all Virginians have access to clean water and air. She supports the Green New Deal Act which aims to combat the effects of climate change in Virginia while boosting the economy with the creation of green jobs. During the 2021 session, Del. Kory successfully sponsored a bill that helps low-income residents pay their power bills by capping fees at a percentage of their income. Kory voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020.

    Kory chairs the Women’s Reproductive Health Care Caucus, a group that works to ensure access to comprehensive health care and protect reproductive rights. In 2020, she voted for the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. In 2021, she voted for legislation aimed at reducing maternal mortality in Virginia by establishing a task force that collects maternal health data to help guide the state in improving maternal care. She also supported repealing medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers and making abortion coverage available on the state’s healthcare exchange.

    Kory supports criminal justice reform. In 2020, she introduced the Virginia Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act, a law that provides for better treatment of incarcerated people who are parents or are pregnant by requiring improved training for correctional officers and placing incarcerated parents in facilities close to their children. She voted for legislation that aimed at reducing policing violence by banning the use of neck restraints and prohibiting no-knock search warrants. She also supported marijuana legalization.

    As a long-time educator, Kory advocates for equitable education and more funding for public schools. During the 2020 session, she voted for legislation that requires the state department of education to develop culturally relevant and inclusive education practices. She voted for a 5% pay raise for Virginia teachers and supported increased funding for the state’s English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. She supported granting in-state tuition to undocumented students in 2020 and expanding their eligibility for state financial aid in 2021.

    Del. Kory is being challenged by Republican candidate Tom Pafford. He opposes gun violence prevention measures that keep our communities safe. He supports using taxpayer money to fund private schools through school voucher programs and keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, which prevents workers from forming unions. He opposes policies to make our schools welcoming and inclusive of LGBTQ students.

    Due to her support of criminal justice reform, abortion access, public education, and the environment, Delegate Kaye Kory is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Kaye Kory

    Incumbent Delegate Kaye Kory was first elected to the seat in 2009 and serves as chair of the Counties, Cities, and Towns Committee. She is also a member of the Finance, Labor and Commerce, and Public Safety committees.
  • The 39th District comprises part of Fairfax County. Voting trends for the district show that the area is strongly Democratic. During the 2019 election, Del. Watts won with over 68% of the vote.

    Incumbent Delegate Vivian Watts is the longest-serving woman in the Virginia House, holding the 39th District seat since 1996. A dedicated public servant, Watts’ career includes serving as the Virginia Secretary of Transportation and working at the U.S. Advisory for Intergovernmental Relations. She has received numerous accolades and awards for her service. She’s a member of the House of Delegates Finance, Rules, Courts of Justice, and Transportation committees. She and her husband, Dave, have two children.

    Twenty-five years into her career as a delegate, Watts continues to fight for quality education for Virginia children. She voted for a 5% pay raise for Virginia teachers in 2021 to retain qualified teachers in the Commonwealth. The delegate also supports making secondary education more affordable by increasing state funding for institutions of higher learning. In 2020, she voted to freeze tuition at Virginia’s public universities and colleges. She also believes that Virginians saddled with student loan debt need more protections and voted for the Borrowers’ Bill of Rights in 2020, which requires more oversight of student loan servicers.

    Watts supports legislation that protects the environment and invests in clean energy. She wants to modernize the state’s power grid with solar energy and offshore wind power infrastructure. She also believes that boosting public transit options will get cars off the road and help reduce air pollution. In 2020, she was given a 100% score by the Virginia League of Conservation Voters. Watts voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the state to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

    Watts wants to increase access to affordable healthcare while protecting reproductive rights in the Commonwealth. She voted for Medicaid expansion in 2018, which granted 400,000 Virginians access to affordable health coverage. She supported capping the cost of insulin to $50. She voted to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers in 2020 and supported making abortion coverage available on the state’s health insurance exchange. She voted to boost the state’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine in 2021.

    As a member of the House Transportation Committee, Watts understands the transportation needs of her district and worked throughout her career to address them. She supports raising state revenue to increase transportation funding to Northern Virginia to build better and safer roads, decrease traffic congestion, and boost public transit options. She wants to make roads more friendly to pedestrians and cyclists and have a guaranteed source of revenue for Northern Virginia’s transportation needs.

    Watts is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Maureen Brody, a county resident who volunteers for different churches and schools. Brody supports creating deliberate barriers aimed at limiting access to our fair and free elections. Brody opposes abortion access and the legalization of marijuana. She is also against government efforts to keep communities safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Due to her support of public education, the environment, access to affordable healthcare, and funding of Virginia’s transportation system, Delegate Vivian Watts is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Vivian Watts

    Incumbent Delegate Vivian Watts is the longest-serving woman in the Virginia House, holding the 39th District seat since 1996. A dedicated public servant, Watts’ career includes serving as the Virginia Secretary of Transportation and working at the U.S. Advisory for Intergovernmental Relations.

  • Virginia’s 40th District includes parts of Fairfax and Prince William counties. Voting trends show that this district is very competitive. Del. Dan Helmer narrowly defeated former Delegate Tim Hugo in 2019.

    Incumbent Delegate Dan Helmer was first elected in 2019. The son of an immigrant and the grandson of Holocaust survivors, Helmer graduated from West Point Military Academy in 2003. He is a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and was also deployed to South Korea. Currently a member of the Army Reserve, Helmer runs a small business where he helps veterans access healthcare. Helmer lives in Fairfax County with his wife and two sons.

    As the husband of a public school teacher, Helmer wants to increase funding for Virginia’s education system. He supports raising teacher salaries to prevent turnover, reducing classroom size, allocating more resources to our educators and students to better set them up for success. In 2021, he voted for providing additional resources to students and parents in kindergarten through third grade who are struggling with reading. He also supported giving additional funding to Virginia schools so that they can reopen safely during the pandemic.

    Helmer believes that climate change is the greatest threat that Virginians are facing and wants to guarantee access to clean water and air. He understands that Virginians need to reduce their carbon footprint and find more sustainable energy sources. He believes that part of doing this involves an immediate stop to the construction of new pipelines and fracking. Helmer was a chief co-patron of the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits Virginia to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

    Helmer is an advocate for reproductive rights, believing that Virginians should have the right to decide when and whether to become a parent. The delegate has supported legislation that would provide access to reproductive healthcare that includes cancer screenings, birth control, and safe and legal abortions. In 2020, he voted to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion care providers. He supported making abortion coverage available on the state health insurance exchange in 2021.

    Helmer supports making the promise of democracy real for us all by ensuring that our elections are free and accessible. He voted for same-day voter registration and making absentee voting easier by providing for prepaid postage on ballots, eliminating the need for a witness signature, and establishing no-excuse absentee voting in the Commonwealth. Helmer also supported extending early voting and the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits voter discrimination at the polls.

    Delegate Helmer is being challenged by Republican candidate Harold Pyon, a retired Army veteran. Pyon wants to use taxpayer money to support private education, supports the construction of pipelines carrying fracked gas, and wants to make it hard for Virginia workers to form unions by keeping its right-to-work laws in place.

    Due to his support of public education, abortion access, the environment, and voting access, Delegate Dan Helmer is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Dan Helmer

    Incumbent Delegate Dan Helmer was first elected in 2019. The son of an immigrant and the grandson of Holocaust survivors, Helmer graduated from West Point Military Academy in 2003. He is a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and was also deployed to South Korea.

  • Virginia’s 41st District includes part of Fairfax County. Voting trends show that this district is strongly Democratic. Speaker Filler-Corn also defeated her challenger in 2019, with over 70% of the vote.

    Incumbent Delegate Eileen Filler-Corn has represented the 40th District since 2010. In 2020, she was appointed Speaker of the House of Delegates, making her the first woman to hold the position. Prior to her election to the House of Delegates, she helped organize the Million Mom March in 2010 to protest gun violence. Speaker Filler-Corn served in the administrations of Governors Mark Warner and Tim Kaine. She and her husband live in Springfield where they raised their two children.

    As a parent of former Fairfax County Public School students, Filler-Corn understands the need for increased funding for K-12 education in Virginia and has committed herself to improving Virginia's public education system. In 2021, she voted for a 5% raise for public school teachers. Past legislation of hers has involved making higher education more affordable. This year, she sponsored the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back “G3” Program which makes community college more affordable to qualifying low-and middle-income students who study in certain fields.

    Filler-Corn has prioritized addressing the many transportation issues that exist in Northern Virginia during her time in office while serving on the House Transportation Committee and Joint Commission on Transportation Accountability. In 2020, she sponsored the Omnibus Transportation Bill, a monumental piece of legislation that overhauled the transportation funding system in Virginia and supported vital transportation infrastructure projects. She has also pushed for improved funding of the two Virginia Railway Express (VRE) stations in her district.

    A champion of women’s rights, Speaker Filler-Corn successfully pushed for the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment during her first year as leader of the House of Delegates. She supports abortion access and in 2020, she voted for the Reproductive Health Protection Act, which repealed medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion access. She supported making abortion coverage available on the state health insurance exchange this year. Speaker Filler-Corn is also committed to protecting and supporting victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, and human trafficking.

    Filler-Corn believes that at the core of a strong community is a strong economy. In 2020, she voted to raise the minimum wage in Virginia. In 2015, she sponsored the Virginia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, which allowed for people with disabilities to open tax-free savings accounts. She also voted for Medicaid expansion in 2018, which provided affordable health coverage to 500,000 Virginians while bringing in federal money and jobs to the Commonwealth.

    Speaker Filler-Corn is facing a challenge from Republican candidate John Wolfe. Wolfe unsuccessfully ran for this seat in 2003 and 2019. Wolfe also unsuccessfully sought election for Virginia’s 11th Congressional District in 2016. No campaign website exists for Wolfe and as of the publication of this voters guide, Wolfe had only raised $100 in his campaign for office.

    Due to her support of increased transportation funding and infrastructure, public education, women’s rights, abortion access, and Virginia working families, Speaker Filler-Corn is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Eileen Filler-Corn

    Incumbent Delegate Eileen Filler-Corn has represented the 40th District since 2010. In 2020, she was appointed Speaker of the House of Delegates, making her the first woman to hold the position.
  • Virginia’s 42nd District includes part of Fairfax County. Voting trends show that this district leans Democratic. Delegate Tran has been able to win her last two elections by more than a 10% margin.

    Incumbent Delegate Tran was first elected in 2017. She was born in Vietnam and immigrated to the U.S. following the Vietnam War. Tran graduated from Duke University and obtained her Master of Social Work from the University of Michigan. She worked for 12 years at the U.S Department of Labor. She and her husband live in West Springfield with their five children. Since her election in 2017, Delegate Tran has had 29 of her bills passed into law.

    As the mother of five and president of her local Parent and Teachers’ Association, Tran understands the challenges facing Virginia’s public education system and wants to improve funding for schools. She supports universal pre-K. In 2021, she voted for a 5% raise for teachers so that Virginia can retain a talented workforce, address teacher shortages, and prevent turnover. She also voted for increased funding so that schools can reopen safely during the pandemic.

    Tran supports abortion access and reproductive rights. She believes that medical decisions should be made by a person and their doctor, not politicians. She voted to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers in 2020 and provide abortion coverage on the state health insurance exchange in 2021. She supported offering a 12 month supply of birth control under state Medicaid plans. Tran also voted to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment in 2020.

    Tran’s parents were able to seek asylum in the United States when she was a young child and she understands many issues faced by immigrants and refugees today. In 2020, Tran successfully sponsored legislation to allow undocumented drivers privileges in the Commonwealth and carried legislation to protect the private information of undocumented drivers the following year. She also voted to grant in-state tuition to undocumented students in 2020 and expand eligibility for state financial aid for undocumented students in 2021.

    Tran believes the state legislature must take urgent action to address climate change in Virginia. She opposes fracking and offshore oil drilling and wants to update our power grid so that it depends more on solar power and offshore wind energy. She voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050. She sponsored legislation this year to hold polluting utilities accountable by making sure they are charging customers fair prices.

    Tran is facing a challenge from Republican Ed McGovern, a retired federal employee. McGovern supports using taxpayer money to fund private education opportunities like school voucher programs and opposes holding police accountable for the violence they inflict on communities. He is also against government efforts to keep our communities safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Due to her support of public education, immigrant rights, abortion access, and the environment, Del. Kathy Tran is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Kathy Tran

    Incumbent Delegate Tran was first elected in 2017. She was born in Vietnam and immigrated to the U.S. following the Vietnam War. Tran graduated from Duke University and obtained her Master of Social Work from the University of Michigan. She worked for 12 years at the U.S Department of Labor.
  • Virginia’s 43rd District includes part of Fairfax County. Voting trends show that this district is strongly Democratic. Incumbent Del. Sickles won the 2019 general election with a margin of over 57%.

    The son of a longtime federal worker, incumbent Delegate Mark Sickles was born in Arlington and has represented the 43rd District since 2004. From 2011 to 2014, he served as the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Clemson University and two master’s degrees from Georgia Tech. Sickles has worked in government relations for 27 years, specializing in congressional affairs. Sickles is an openly gay member of the House and currently lives in Huntington.

    Sickles supports policies that make Virginia welcoming and inclusive for all of its residents and voted for the 2020 Virginia Values Act, which made Virginia the first state in the South to prohibit discrimination against the LGBTQ community in housing, employment, public spaces, and credit applications. He carried legislation to expand the Virginia Values Act to protect people with disabilities. He also voted to repeal Virginia’s constitutional ban on gay marriage and advocated for efforts to help workers find accountability when experiencing workplace harassment and sexual harassment.

    Sickles supports making healthcare affordable and accessible to all Virginians and voted to expand Medicaid in 2018. He successfully sponsored legislation to establish a state-run health insurance marketplace, which helps uninsured or underinsured residents who aren’t covered by an employer-provided health plan to get affordable coverage. He voted to cap the price of insulin at $50 and fought to make abortion coverage available on health insurance plans offered on the state marketplace.

    Sickles wants to make the promise of democracy real for us all by expanding voter access to the ballot box. In 2020, he voted to extend early voting in Virginia and establish no-excuse absentee voting. He voted to keep people safe and healthy at the polls during the pandemic by removing the requirement for a witness signature on absentee ballots during an emergency and establishing dropbox voting locations in localities. He also supported the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits voter discrimination at the polls.

    Sickles is an advocate of criminal justice reform. In 2021, he voted to abolish the death penalty in Virginia, making it the first state in the South to do so. The delegate supported a bill that authorizes the expungement of criminal records for certain convictions. Sickles voted to legalize marijuana and wants to hold police accountable for the violence they inflict on communities by ending qualified immunity, a practice that shields police officers from civil lawsuits for violating people’s civil rights.

    Sickles is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Brenton Hammond, a former member of the U.S. Secret Service. Hammond wants to use taxpayer money to fund private school education with initiatives like school voucher programs. He also supports creating deliberate barriers to voting access meant to limit participation in our fair and free elections.

    Due to his support of Virginia’s LGBTQ community, access to affordable healthcare, criminal justice reform, and voting access, Delegate Mark Sickles is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Mark Sickles

    The son of a longtime federal worker, incumbent Delegate Mark Sickles was born in Arlington and has represented the 43rd District since 2004. From 2011 to 2014, he served as the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus.
  • Virginia’s 44th District includes part of Fairfax County. Voting trends show that this district is strongly Democratic. In the 2019 general election, Del. Krizek won with over 70% of the vote.

    Incumbent Delegate Paul Krizek has represented the 44th District since 2016 and was born in Mount Vernon. Krizek holds degrees from the University of Virginia and the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University. He was a staff member of former Congressman Jim Moran and worked on several Democratic campaigns. When not in session, Krizek serves as the executive director of a nonprofit organization that helps Native American youth. Krizek and his family reside in Mount Vernon.

    Krizek understands the urgency of tackling the climate crisis in the Commonwealth. He advocates funding renewable energy grant programs and incentives that will help develop greener businesses and technology. He supported Virginia joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), an initiative aimed at reducing carbon emissions. He successfully sponsored legislation that increases the transparency and efficiency of Virginia Land Conservation Projects. He voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits Virginia to 100% clean energy by 2050.

    Krizek supports making healthcare affordable and accessible to all Virginians, voting to expand Medicaid in 2018. He voted for legislation to establish a state-run health insurance marketplace, which helps uninsured or underinsured residents who aren’t covered by an employer-provided health plan to get affordable coverage. He voted to cap the price of insulin at $50 and supported making abortion coverage available on health insurance plans offered on the state marketplace. The delegate also worked on legislation that would remove the age cap on autism spectrum-related health insurance coverage, allowing more families access to autism care.

    Krizek supports Virginia’s public education system and wants to increase funding for our schools. He voted for a 5% raise for Virginia teachers and increased funding so schools can safely reopen during the pandemic. He also voted to freeze tuition at Virginia public colleges and universities. Krizek successfully carried legislation creating the Grow Your Own Teacher Pilot Program to provide scholarships to low-income high school seniors willing to teach in high-need public schools for at least four years.

    Krizek supports policies that make Virginia welcoming and inclusive for all of its residents and voted for the 2020 Virginia Values Act, which made Virginia the first state in the South to prohibit discrimination against the LGBTQ community in housing, employment, public spaces, and credit applications. He also voted to repeal Virginia’s constitutional ban on gay marriage. He supported Virginia’s ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex.

    Krizek is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Richard Hayden, a lawyer. Hayden opposes abortion access and the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. He is also against increased funding of public transit and widening roads to ease traffic congestion. Hayden supports the “Men’s March,” which plans to protest a Planned Parenthood facility in Baltimore.

    Due to his support of the environment, public education, access to affordable healthcare, and equality, Delegate Paul Krizek is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Paul Krizek

    Incumbent Delegate Paul Krizek has represented the 44th District since 2016 and was born in Mount Vernon. Krizek holds degrees from the University of Virginia and the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University.
  • Virginia’s 45th District includes part of the city of Alexandria, and parts of Arlington and Fairfax counties. Voting trends show that this district is strongly Democratic. Bennett-Parker was able to beat former incumbent Mark Levine for the Democratic nomination. Levine had represented the district since 2016.

    Elizabeth Bennett-Parker is the vice mayor of Alexandria and was the youngest woman elected to Alexandria’s city council. She attended Cornell University and the University of London. She serves on Alexandria’s community criminal justice board and commission on employment. She also runs a small business that targets food insecurity and co-leads a nonprofit job training and personal development program for underserved women. She and her husband live in Alexandria with their two rescue pets.

    As a city council member, Bennett-Parker expanded access to early childhood education by securing additional funding and supporting zoning changes to increase the number of education facilities in the city. As a delegate, she hopes to continue her work to develop quality early care and equity-focused education by reducing classroom size, improving outdated facilities, and giving schools new learning materials. She supports raising teacher pay and advancing universal school meal programs that deliver healthy food to Virginia students.

    Bennett-Parker wants to boost Virginia working families by guaranteeing paid family and medical leave so that people don’t have to choose between a paycheck or taking care of a loved one or themselves if they are sick. She plans to raise revenue for the state by making sure that the huge corporations and millionaires and billionaires that have benefited from our community are paying their fair share too. She also wants to ensure that minorities and women are prioritized in opportunities for new businesses.

    Bennett-Parker understands the urgency of the climate crisis and sponsored a resolution on the Alexandria City Council calling the climate crisis an emergency. She worked to ensure that all new construction in the city has zero carbon emissions and that property owners have access to tools to make energy improvements. She will ensure the just transition to 100% renewable energy in the Commonwealth guarantees that communities’ rights and livelihoods are protected when shifting to sustainable energy production.

    As chair of the Virginia Railway Express, Bennett-Paker is aware of the region’s transportation needs. Bennet-Parker wants to modernize and expand transportation infrastructure in Northern Virginia so that people have more options and mobility. Bennett-Parker also recognizes that the district suffers from an affordable housing crisis. As a city council member, she voted to increase funding for affordable housing and expand the number of affordable housing units. Climate change has made flooding issues worse for her district and Bennett-Parker will work with the General Assembly to secure more funding for stormwater infrastructure in the district.

    Bennett-Parker is running against Republican candidate J.D. Maddox, a veteran, and former federal employee. Maddox opposes efforts to stop the school-to-prison pipeline by removing police officers from schools. He is also against collective bargaining rights for municipal employees, which allows workers to negotiate salaries with their employers as a union.

    Due to her support of public education, the environment, Virginia working families, and improved transportation infrastructure, Elizabeth Bennett-Parker is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Elizabeth Bennett-Parker

    Elizabeth Bennett-Parker is the vice mayor of Alexandria and was the youngest woman elected to Alexandria’s city council. She attended Cornell University and the University of London. She serves on Alexandria’s community criminal justice board and commission on employment.
  • The 47th District encompasses part of Arlington County. The district is strongly Democratic with Del. Hope receiving more than 75% of the vote since 2011. Hope has held the seat since 2009.

    Incumbent Delegate Patrick Hope has represented the 47th District in the House of Delegates since 2009. He is a healthcare attorney who received his law degree from the Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law. Before practicing law, Hope was a congressional staffer for several years. As an attorney, he worked with various healthcare organizations to increase access and affordability for patients. He has lived in the Buckingham community of Arlington with his wife and three daughters since 2000.

    With three kids in Arlington Public Schools, Hope has served as a dedicated advocate for public education. In 2021, he voted in favor of a 5% pay raise for teachers. During the pandemic, he advocated for increased funding to help schools reopen safely and increased counselors and nurses. Hope received a 100% rating for his voting record from the Virginia Education Association. He also advocated for kids’ mental health in schools, carrying legislation to allow excused absences in public schools for mental health.

    Hope also serves as the chair of the Joint Commission on Health Care, which is a bi-partisan group working to make healthcare affordable and accessible to all Virginians. He voted in favor of Medicaid expansion in 2018, which granted affordable health coverage to 400,000 Virginians. He voted to expand Medicaid coverage to include dental insurance in 2021. He voted to cap the cost of insulin to $50 per month and to expand insurance coverage to include abortions.

    Hope understands the urgency of the climate crisis and has voted to support environmental protections in the state. He voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits Virginia to 100% clean energy by 2050. He supported the passage of a bill to require the production of low-emission and electric vehicles. He also helped create the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas to preserve Virginia’s natural environment for future generations. He received multiple 100% ratings from the Sierra Club and the Virginia League of Conservation Voters during his time in office.

    Hope has introduced common sense gun violence prevention legislation. Serving as chair of the House Public and Safety Committee, he has passed bills to introduce universal background checks and require gun owners to report lost or stolen firearms. He helped pass a bill to establish a one-handgun-purchase-a-month rule and increased penalties for leaving firearms unsecured in environments where they may endanger children. Additionally, he supported a successful bill to prevent individuals convicted of domestic violence offenses from owning guns.

    Hope has also advocated for criminal justice reforms while in office. He strongly opposes the use of solitary confinement and the construction of for-profit private prisons in the Commonwealth. He is working to introduce a mechanism of independent oversight in Virginia’s correctional centers, such as a prison Ombudsman, as Virginia is the only state without one. In 2021, he helped pass a bill that eliminated “child support” payments charged to the parents of incarcerated youths. He also advocated for reducing crowding in prisons during COVID-19, vaccinations for incarcerated people, and the reintroduction of visiting hours during the pandemic.

    Hope is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Laura Hall, who opposes common sense measures aimed at keeping our communities safe from gun violence. She also refuses to acknowledge the results of 2020’s fair and free federal election. A website for Hall’s campaign was not created and no other information about Hall’s candidacy was available at the time of this guide’s publication.

    Due to his support of affordable healthcare, criminal justice reform, gun violence prevention, and public education, Delegate Patrick Hope is the most progressive candidate for Virginia’s 47th District.

    Patrick Hope

    Incumbent Delegate Patrick Hope has represented the 47th District in the House of Delegates since 2009. He is a healthcare attorney who received his law degree from the Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law. Before practicing law, Hope was a congressional staffer for several years.
  • The 48th District includes parts of Arlington and Fairfax counties. The district is strongly Democratic. Del. Sullivan has run unopposed in every general election and Senator Tim Kaine won the district with 76% of the vote in 2018.

    Delegate Richard “Rip” Sullivan, Jr. has represented the 48th District since 2015. Sullivan grew up attending public schools in Northern Virginia, then received his bachelor’s degree from Amherst College and law degree from the University of Virginia. He is currently a partner in the law firm Bean Kinney & Korman. In the House, he is chair of the House Democratic Caucus, working alongside the House speaker and majority leader. He and his wife have four children and three grandchildren.

    Sullivan is dedicated to boosting economic opportunities for working Virginia families. In 2020, he voted to raise the minimum wage and for a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which extends basic labor protections to domestic workers and ensures they earn at least a minimum wage. He supports protecting tenant rights in the Commonwealth. He voted for the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back “G3” Program which makes community college more affordable to qualifying low-and middle-income students who study in certain fields.


    Sullivan recognizes how wind, solar, and other forms of clean energy are important to not only addressing climate change but creating jobs. Sullivan patroned Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which commits Virginia to 100% renewable energy by 2050. He sponsored legislation to upgrade Virginia’s transportation system to introduce electric vehicles by creating a series of bills to establish an electric vehicle grant program, rebates for purchasing electric vehicles, and building infrastructure to support electric vehicles, such as charging stations.

    Sullivan has also advocated for LGBTQ+ individuals in Virginia. He was critical to strengthening laws around hate crimes based on sexual orientation or gender identity. In 2019, he was the author of Jacob’s Law, which increased surrogacy rights for all couples and individuals in Virginia, regardless of marital status or sexual orientation. In 2020, he supported the passage of the Virginia Values Act, which increased protections from discrimination for LGBTQ+ individuals. He also voted to repeal Virginia’s constitutional ban on gay marriage.

    Sullivan also supported criminal justice reforms to make Virginia communities safe and more equitable. In 2021, he voted to abolish the death penalty, as well as legalize marijuana. He also advocates for keeping our communities safe by passing common sense measures to prevent gun violence, including introducing a one-handgun-a-month purchase limit and universal background checks. He also supports extreme risk orders, which allows law enforcement to remove firearms from those deemed to be a serious risk to themself or others.

    Delegate Sullivan is being challenged by Republican Edward Monroe, an educator for 19 years, who has served in the U.S. Peace Corps. Monroe is running his campaign on putting values back into politics. Monroe supports investing in public education, protecting the environment and diversifying the Commonwealth’s sources of energy.

    Due to his advocacy for Virginia working families, the environment, gun violence prevention and equality, Delegate Sullivan is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 48th District.

    Rip Sullivan

    Delegate Richard “Rip” Sullivan, Jr. has represented the 48th District since 2015. Sullivan grew up attending public schools in Northern Virginia, then received his bachelor’s degree from Amherst College and law degree from the University of Virginia.
  • The 49th District includes parts of Arlington and Fairfax counties. It is strongly Democratic. Del. Lopez has consistently received more than 75% of the vote in previous elections.

    Delegate Lopez has represented the 49th District since 2012 and has advocated for progressive causes his entire career. The son of an undocumented father from Venezuela, Lopez attended Vassar College and Tulane University Law School. He served as an appointee in the Obama administration and in Senator Tim Kaine’s office. In the House of Delegates, he serves as the Majority Whip of the Virginia House Democratic Caucus. He currently lives with his wife and two sons in Arlington.

    As the founder and co-chair of the Virginia Latino Caucus, Del. Lopez is a dedicated advocate for immigrant rights. He was critical to the passage of the Virginia Dream Act and the Virginia Equity in Financial Aid Act, which expanded in-state college tuition and financial aid to all Virginia students, regardless of immigration status. He also helped pass legislation allowing undocumented Virginians to receive IDs and driver privilege cards. During the 2021 legislative session, Lopez carried legislation to expand emergency Medicaid to undocumented immigrants so that they could receive testing, treatment, and vaccination for COVID-19.

    Lopez also fights to ensure Virginia remains affordable for people to live in and a great place to work. He created the Virginia Affordable Housing Trust Fund, which has been critical to preventing evictions and providing rental assistance for families, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. He voted for legislation strengthening the rights of tenants and to increase Virginia’s minimum wage. He supports protecting workers’ rights by repealing Virginia’s right-to-work laws, which undermine the strength of unions, and voted for collective bargaining rights for Virginia public employees.

    Lopez works to expand environmental protections and options for renewable energy in Virginia, serving as the founder and co-chair of the Virginia Environment and Renewable Energy Caucus. He helped pass the Virginia Clean Economy Act and the Solar Freedom Act, which are critical to moving the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy. He helped pass the Virginia Green Jobs Tax Credit, incentivizing job creation in renewable energy and electric vehicles. He worked to increase funding for the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund and the Agricultural Best Management Practices program which work to reduce pollution in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Del. Lopez also advocates for making the promise of democracy real for us all by expanding voting access to all Virginia voters. He voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits discrimination at the polls. He helped expand access to absentee voting and passed legislation that allows 16 and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote. He voted to extend early voting in Virginia and remove the requirement for an excuse to cast an absentee ballot. He supports voting rights restoration for returning citizens.

    Del. Lopez is running against Republican Timothy Kilcullen, a law student at George Mason University. He opposes common-sense gun violence prevention legislation as well as a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He also opposes government efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19. He supports creating deliberate barriers to voting that limit participation in our fair and free elections.

    Due to his support of immigrants, working families, the environment, and voting rights, Delegate Lopez is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Alfonso Lopez

    Delegate Lopez has represented the 49th District since 2012 and has advocated for progressive causes his entire career. The son of an undocumented father from Venezuela, Lopez attended Vassar College and Tulane University Law School.
  • The 53rd District encompasses the entirety of Falls Church and part of Fairfax County. The district is strongly Democratic. Del. Simon has rarely had a challenger in the general election and Senator Tim Kaine won the district with 76% of the vote in 2018.

    Incumbent Delegate Marcus Simon is a lifelong resident of Fairfax County who has represented the 53rd District in the House of Delegates since 2014. He earned a bachelor's degree from New York University and earned his law degree from American University. Since obtaining his law degree, he has worked as a real estate attorney and served in the United States Army Judge Advocate General Corps. He currently lives in Fairfax with his wife and two children.

    As chair of the Privileges and Elections Committee, Simon worked to ensure easy and fair access to our elections. In 2020, he helped pass legislation that established no-excuse absentee voting in Virginia. He also helped expand access to satellite voting sites, early voting, and Sunday voting. He supports the restoration of voting rights to returning citizens. He is also a strong advocate for campaign finance reform and has regularly introduced a bill to prohibit campaign funds from being used for personal use, though it has failed to pass the legislature.

    Simon supported marijuana legalization and sees it as beneficial to the economy, healthcare, and criminal justice system. As delegate, he’s worked to ensure all Virginians benefit from marijuana legalization. He advocated to ensure tax revenue from marijuana sales goes to important causes, including public education, substance abuse programs, and public health organizations. He supported legislation establishing the Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Board and Fund, which puts tax money back into communities disproportionately affected by drug enforcement laws.

    Simon has worked to preserve the environment. He voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act to reduce Virginia’s use of fossil fuels. He supported a program to assist school boards in purchasing electric school buses as well as provide a rebate to those who buy electric vehicles. He also supported a requirement for car producers to sell a certain percentage of electric or hybrid cars. He has also worked to make sustainable transportation options safer and easier, such as voting for a bill to require drivers to change lanes when passing bicyclists.

    Simon has advocated for working families as well. He voted for a bill to require certain Virginia businesses to provide paid sick leave to their employees. He also voted to increase the minimum wage and the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which provides protections for employees like nannies and housekeepers. He supported the Virginia Values Act, which protects workers from discrimination based on race, sex, national origin, or sexual orientation.

    Simon is being challenged by Republican Sarah White. She is from Falls Church and works in the service industry, running her own restaurant consultation company. White supports school vouchers, which fund private schools with public money and increase educational inequities. She opposes reforming police or shifting resources away from their budgets to invest in social services.

    Due to his support for voting rights, the environment, criminal justice reform, and working families, Delegate Simon is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 53rd District.

    Marcus Simon

    Incumbent Delegate Marcus Simon is a lifelong resident of Fairfax County who has represented the 53rd District in the House of Delegates since 2014. He earned a bachelor's degree from New York University and earned his law degree from American University.
  • Virginia’s 67th District includes parts of the counties of Fairfax and Loudon. Voting trends show that this district is strongly Democratic. Del. Delaney ran unopposed in 2019.

    Incumbent Delegate Karrie Delaney (D) has represented the 67th District since 2018. The daughter of a U.S. Army veteran, Delaney earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of South Florida. She served on the West Melbourne City Council in Florida before moving to Northern Virginia. She works as the Communications Director of Shared Hope International, a non-profit dedicated to ending sex trafficking. She and her husband live in Fairfax where they are raising two children.

    Delaney wants to boost working families so they can live with dignity in Virginia by supporting innovative economic development to create well-paid jobs. She voted to increase the minimum wage and allow municipal workers collective bargaining rights. She supported keeping protections for tenants during the pandemic in place so that people have more rights to stay in their homes. She also voted for the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which extends standard labor protections to domestic workers and guarantees them a minimum wage.

    As a member of a Parent Teacher Association, Delaney believes that strong, fully-funded schools are the backbone to thriving communities. She voted for a 5% teacher pay raise in 2021 along with additional funding to help schools reopen safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. She advocates for reduced classroom sizes and full-day kindergarten to bolster students’ academic success. She also wants to provide the best resources, textbooks, and supplies to all classrooms in the district.

    Delaney supports protecting the environment and sees the unique opportunity in using the Northern Virginia technology corridor to promote energy independence in the Commonwealth. She successfully sponsored legislation in 2020 to remove restrictions on the production of residential solar energy. She also voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act the same year, which commits Virginia to 100% clean energy by 2050. She advocated for Virginia’s entry into the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative in 2020, which combats climate change and reduces carbon emissions.

    Delany believes in guaranteeing access to quality, affordable health insurance to all Virginians. She voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians in 2018 and supported establishing a state-run health insurance marketplace, which helps uninsured or underinsured residents who aren’t covered by an employer-provided health plan to get affordable coverage. She has worked to lower drug costs, voting to cap the price of insulin in 2020. She also supports abortion access and voted to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers.

    Delaney is facing a challenge from Robert Frizzelle (R), a U.S. Air Force veteran who is currently working in the aerospace field. Frizelle does not believe in keeping communities safe by passing common-sense measures aimed at preventing gun violence. He also opposes workers’ right to unionize and wants to keep Virginia’s right-to-work law in place.

    Due to her support of working families, public education, the environment, and access to affordable healthcare, Del. Delaney is the most progressive candidate in this election.

    Karrie Delaney

    Incumbent Delegate Karrie Delaney (D) has represented the 67th District since 2018. The daughter of a U.S. Army veteran, Delaney earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of South Florida.
  • Virginia’s 86th District includes parts of Fairfax and Loudoun counties. Voter trends show that the district is strongly Democratic. Del. Samirah won his last election with 88% of the votes.

    Irene Shin is running to represent the 86th District in the House of Delegates. Shin is the daughter of Korean immigrants and is originally from Los Angeles. She received her bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of California Riverside and currently serves as executive director for the Virginia Civic Engagement Table. She has worked on several political campaigns and nonprofits. Shin also worked as a finance director for Vice President Kamala Harris’ 2015 successful bid for U.S. Senate.

    Access to affordable healthcare is a top priority for Shin. As a teen, she witnessed her father travel back to Korea for life-changing surgery for cancer, as it was more affordable to get treatment in his home country. She supports lowering the cost of prescription drugs and ending the practice of “surprise billing” to protect patients from unexpected charges after undergoing medical treatment. She also wants to make access to mental healthcare available to all Virginians and will push for early mental health screening at public schools.

    If elected, Shin will fight for LGBTQ+ and women’s rights. She will advocate for legislation to prevent bullying or discrimination along the lines of sexual orientation or gender identity. She supports the constitutional amendment that removes the ban on gay marriage in the Commonwealth. Shin believes in protecting abortion access and making birth control affordable. She also wants to pass paid family and medical leave so women can remain valuable members of the workforce.

    Shin wants to work to reform the criminal justice system to reduce its harmful impact on communities of color. She plans to address mass incarceration by ending mandatory minimums for nonviolent crimes. She supports ending qualified immunity for police officers, a practice that shields them from accountability for violating people’s civil rights. She advocates for banning the sale of assault weapons and supports recent legislation that requires mandatory background checks on all gun sales and purchases.

    Shin believes in making the promise of democracy real for us all by expanding access to the ballot. She supports removing deliberate barriers that restrict voting access, making vote by mail easier, and automatic voter registration. In 2020, she successfully led a coalition of organizations to pressure the state government to extend its voter registration deadline after the online registration system failed. Shin will also work to reform Virginia campaign finance laws using her four-step “Ethical Virginia Campaign Reform Package,” to limit the influence of rich donors in our elections.

    Shin is running against Republican candidate Julie Perry, a Fairfax County high school teacher. Perry opposes government efforts to keep people safe during the pandemic. She is also against abortion access and ending qualified immunity for police officers, a practice that shields cops from lawsuits for violating people’s civil rights. She also doesn’t believe in protecting the environment with simple measures like reducing the use of disposable plastic bags.

    Due to her support of criminal justice reform, affordable healthcare, expanding access to voting, and equality, Shin is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Irene Shin

    Irene Shin is running to represent the 86th District in the House of Delegates. Shin is the daughter of Korean immigrants and is originally from Los Angeles.

  • Virginia’s 87th District includes parts of Prince William and Loudoun counties. Voter trends show that the district leans Democratic. Delegate Subramanyam was able to win his last election with 62% of the votes.

    Incumbent Delegate Suhas Subramanyam has represented the 87th District since 2020. He is the first Indian and Hindu American elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates. Delegate Subramanyam obtained his bachelor’s degree from Tulane University, as well as a law degree from Northwestern University School of Law. Subramanyam has worked in both the public and private sectors, including serving as a technology policy advisor to President Obama. Subramanyam and his wife currently reside in Ashburn with their daughter.

    Subramanyam supports policies that boost Virginia working families. He voted to raise the minimum wage in 2020. Subramanyam is committed to providing Virginians with affordable housing and supported legislation that protects tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic. He supports paid family and medical leave for Virginia workers and policies that will make the cost of childcare affordable. He also voted for the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which grants basic labor protections to domestic workers and provides that they are paid a minimum wage.

    Subramanyam understands the urgency of the climate crisis and has worked to support legislation that would reduce the impact of climate change and help reduce utility prices for Virginians. In 2020, the delegate introduced a bill that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the Commonwealth. Subramanyam also voted in favor of the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050. In 2021, he received an endorsement from the Virginia League of Conservation Voters and an A from the Virginia Sierra Club on its legislative scorecard.

    Subramanyam supports criminal justice reform and wants to find solutions to racial disparities in Virginia’s criminal justice system. He sponsored legislation to improve the Virginia bail process and supported the automatic expungement of criminal records. He supports directing resources from police budgets to support more crime prevention. In 2021, Subramanyam voted in favor of marijuana legislation and abolishing the death penalty in the Commonwealth. He also supported the constitutional amendment to restore voting rights to returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    As a member of the House Education Committee, he works to advance legislation that will better the Virginia public education system. He voted for a 5% pay raise for teachers in 2021 and additional funding so that schools can reopen safely during the pandemic. Subramanyam wants to ensure that students have access to quality broadband services. The delegate previously submitted legislation that would diversify teaching staff by collecting public data on a teacher's language proficiencies and racial demographics. He hopes to bridge the achievement gap by fully funding public schools and repairing their failing infrastructure.

    Subramanyam is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Gregory Moulthrop, a small business owner. Moulthrop is against government efforts to keep our communities safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. He supports using taxpayer money to fund private schools and creating deliberate barriers to prevent participation in our fair and free elections.

    Due to his support of criminal justice reform, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Subramanyam is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Suhas Subramanyam

    Incumbent Delegate Suhas Subramanyam has represented the 87th District since 2020. He is the first Indian and Hindu American elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates.