• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

  • The 11th District encompasses the city of Roanoke. The district is strongly Democratic. Del. Rasoul has held the seat since 2014 and has run unopposed in the general election until 2021.

    Incumbent Delegate Sam Rasoul is the son of Palestinian immigrants and a native of the Roanoke Valley. He is one of two Muslim members of the Virginia General Assembly, where he has served in the House of Delegates since 2014. He received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Roanoke College and a master’s degree from Hawaii Pacific University. He has helped run multiple businesses and nonprofit organizations. He lives in Roanoke with his wife and three children.

    Since his election in 2014, Rasoul has supported policies to make Virginia more equitable, economically successful, and environmentally friendly. He helped create the Green New Deal Coalition in Virginia and co-sponsored the Green New Deal Act, to help Virginia get to 100% clean energy. He proposed a moratorium on new fossil fuel projects in the state and passed tax credits for businesses that utilize or produce renewable energy. In 2020, he championed the passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Rasoul also works to ensure elections are free and accessible. This year, he voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which bans discrimination at the polls. He also created a program called “You Write the Bill,” where citizens were able to participate directly in law-making. The program has been successful in shaping multiple bills, including one to protect victims of domestic violence. Additionally, he patroned the “Civic Youth Engagement Bill,” which gives middle school and high school students one excused absence a year to vote or participate in civic activities.

    Rasoul advocates for policies that will support and protect Virginia’s families including affordable child care, paid family and medical leave, and equal pay for women. He supports raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour. He is an advocate for common-sense gun safety and helped pass Governor Northam's gun violence prevention package that includes background checks and extreme risk orders to keep guns out of the hands of people deemed a safety hazard for themselves or others.

    He has also made access to affordable healthcare a keystone part of his platform and work in the General Assembly. He currently serves as the vice-chair of the House Health, Welfare and Institutions Committee, and in 2021 introduced multiple bills to improve access to healthcare for Virginians. He advocated to expand pharmacists' ability to give vaccinations, license naturopathic doctors, and make it easier for physician assistants to practice medicine. He also supported the passage of Medicaid expansion in 2018.

    Rasoul’s opponent is Republican Charlie Nave, a civil rights attorney. He currently serves as ​​chairman of the Roanoke City Republican Committee. Nave opposes Virginia’s Green New Deal and gun violence prevention regulations. He is also against abortion access and expanding voting access to increase participation in our elections. He supports using taxpayer money to fund private education, like school voucher programs, which increase educational inequities.

    Due to support of the environment, affordable healthcare, Virginia working families, and voting rights, Delegate Sam Rasoul is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 11th District.

    Sam Rasoul

    Incumbent Delegate Sam Rasoul is the son of Palestinian immigrants and a native of the Roanoke Valley. He is one of two Muslim members of the Virginia General Assembly, where he has served in the House of Delegates since 2014.

No Good Choices

The 17th District encompasses Roanoke and Botetourt counties and parts of Roanoke City. Voting trends for the district show that the area is strongly Republican, with a majority of its constituents voting for Republican candidates in elections. Del. Head ran uncontested in 2019, receiving over 93% of the votes.

Incumbent Delegate Chris Head has served in the House of Delegates since 2012. During his time in office, he opposed expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians and voted for legislation to prohibit sanctuary cities in the state. He is against common-sense legislation aimed at keeping our communities safe from gun violence. He also voted against raising the minimum wage, legalizing marijuana, and abolishing the death penalty.

Del. Head is running unopposed in this election. There is no progressive choice on the ballot. However, we still encourage you to show up to vote by writing in a name for this race and casting your vote in the other races on your ballot.

  • Non-Partisan

    Evelyn W. Powers

  • Roanoke is a city in the Blue Ridge Mountains of southwest Virginia with a population of 99,143. The city is reliably Democratic with 62% of the vote going to President Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

    Incumbent Roanoke City Treasurer Evelyn W. Powers received her Master Governmental Treasurer recertification from the Treasurers' Association of Virginia (TAV) and the University of Virginia Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service. Her professional experience includes serving as the Roanoke City Treasurer for over 40 years. In 2018, Powers began charging businesses that did not pay their meals tax with felony embezzlement as a way to get tough on businesses that were delinquent on their payments.

    Powers is running unopposed. An absence of online information about Powers’ campaign means we cannot guarantee she will make progressive choices. We have no recommendation in this race. However, we still encourage you to show up to vote on November 2 by writing in the candidate of your choice for this race and the other races on your ballot.

    Evelyn W. Powers

    Incumbent Roanoke City Treasurer Evelyn W. Powers received her Master Governmental Treasurer recertification from the Treasurers' Association of Virginia (TAV) and the University of Virginia Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service.
  • Roanoke is a city in the Blue Ridge Mountains of southwest Virginia with a population of 99,143. The city is reliably Democratic with 62% of the vote going to President Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

    Roanoke native Antonio Hash has been a member of the law enforcement community since 2008. Hash, currently a school resource officer, has served in the Roanoke City Sheriff’s Office for 13 years in multiple capacities, including Master Deputy Sheriff. Hash has been honored with multiple awards, including the NAACP Impactors of Excellence Award (2017) and the Urban Professional League: Citizen of the Year Award (2016).

    Hash is committed to creating a positive influence in the criminal justice system for both inmates and employees with an emphasis on mental health treatment. He wants to ensure that both incarcerated people and people who work in the jails have the mental health resources they need to recover from trauma that can be a part of the carceral system. That includes ensuring that only everyone is able to get correct mental health diagnoses, but also ensuring they have the resources they need to treat their conditions.

    Hash also is an advocate for a positive transition for inmates returning to society. 95% of inmates return to society at some point, and as they do, they should have the support they need to thrive in our community. Hash would create a cooperative bridge between the Sheriff’s Department and programs within the city that can provide resources to returning citizens. These programs would help avoid recidivism and help returning citizens live full lives after incarceration.

    He believes the role of the Sheriff’s Office is to support a diverse and inclusive community. He wants to create an environment where people in detention, deputies, and members of the community are all treated with understanding and respect. Hash would like to create a program that would allow first-time non-violent offenders to participate in weekend community service projects rather than sitting in jails.

    Hash also wants to create a quarterly community forum where community members can come together, ask questions, and gain a better understanding of how the Sheriff’s Department operates. This will foster a stronger sense of community and allow people to get to know their police better.

    Antonio Hash is running unopposed. Due to his stance on criminal justice reform and positive transitions for returning citizens, Hash is a progressive candidate in this race.

    Antonio Hash

    Roanoke native Antonio Hash has been a member of the law enforcement community since 2008. Hash, currently a school resource officer, has served in the Roanoke City Sheriff’s Office for 13 years in multiple capacities, including Master Deputy Sheriff.

No Recommendation

Roanoke is a city in the Blue Ridge Mountains of southwest Virginia with a population of 99,143. The city is reliably Democratic with 62% of the vote going to President Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

Incumbent Donald Caldwell (I) has served as the City of Roanoke’s Commonwealth’s Attorney for over 40 years. After his 1973 graduation from Virginia Military Institute he was obligated to do two years of active duty. He served in the United States Army Reserve until 2004. Caldwell previously ran as a Democrat for election to the position but changed his party affiliation to independent after his 2015 bid to state Senate in the 21st District.

In his 2015 campaign, Caldwell ran on a platform that included expanding access to healthcare for low-income residents, as well as the support of coal jobs and bringing the Mountain Valley Pipeline through the Commonwealth. He was appointed as special prosecutor in the petition scandal of former Virginia Congressman Scott Taylor’s 2018 campaign. Caldwell’s investigation is ongoing but has resulted in four indictments of election fraud for Taylor’s campaign staff members.

Caldwell is facing a challenge from Democrat Melvin Hill, a former assistant commonwealth’s attorney. He obtained his law degree from Washington & Lee School of Law. Hills’ stated campaign priorities are criminal justice reform, gang prosecutions, neighborhood crime, and treatment rather than incarceration. He seeks to involve various members of the community— churches, non-profit organizations, neighborhood groups — to create a criminal justice system that is fair for everyone. Recent information published by the Roanoke Time revealed that Hill used the city’s bankruptcy court to clear nearly $200,000 in unpaid tax debt.

An absence of online information about Caldwell’s policies or proposals means we cannot guarantee he will make progressive choices. We do not have a recommendation in this race. However, we encourage you to cast your ballot in this election by writing in a candidate of your choosing and voting in the other offices.

No Recommendation

Roanoke is a city in the Blue Ridge Mountains of southwest Virginia with a population of 99,143. The city is reliably Democratic with 62% of the vote going to President Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

First-time candidate Ryan LaFountain is running to be Roanoke’s Commissioner of the Revenue. He has lived in Roanoke for seven years and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in business administration from Virginia Tech. He wants to bring substantial changes to the office in the way of improving customer service, utilizing current technology, working with small business incubators, and increasing community outreach in the city. He wants to reduce red tape for people applying for small business licenses and make it easier for people to submit online applications with electronic signatures.

A lack of online information about LaFountain’s policies means we cannot guarantee he will make progressive choices. We do not have a recommendation in this race. However, we encourage you to cast your ballot in this election by writing in a candidate of your choosing and voting in the other offices.