• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

  • Virginia’s 79th District includes parts of the cities of Chesapeake, Portsmouth, and Norfolk. Voting trends show that the district is strongly Democratic. Democratic candidates for the seat have typically run unopposed since 2002.

    Nadarius Clark was born in Norfolk and attended I.C. Norcom High School in Portsmouth and obtained his bachelor’s from Virginia Union University. Clark co-founded the Generation Now Network, an organization committed to faith-based activism, advocacy, and education. In 2017, he lobbied in Congress for the comprehensive expansion of Medicaid and Medicare. He is currently a radio host on 94.7 The Link and is one of the youngest candidates to run for delegate in Virginia.

    As a native of the Tidewater region, Clark has witnessed the effects of climate change and rising sea levels. He believes the government must take urgent action to address the climate crisis. He opposes the Mountain Valley Pipeline and if elected, will support legislation to stop the construction of new pipelines. He also supports a moratorium on new fossil fuel projects and has vowed not to take campaign contributions from fossil fuel companies.

    Clark wants to hold police accountable for the violence enacted on communities. He believes in using police alternatives to community dispute resolution to nonviolent and mental health-related crises. He supports ending qualified immunity, a practice that shields police officers from lawsuits for committing civil rights violations. Clark advocates for racial justice by promoting reparations to the descendants of enslaved people. He also believes in bringing equity to communities ravaged by the Drug War by directing revenue from the sale of legalized marijuana to Black and Brown communities.

    Clark wants to bring access to quality, affordable healthcare for all Virginians. He also wants to focus on inequities in our healthcare system by improving disparities in the COVID-19 pandemic in Virginia and disparities in the mortality rate of Black and Indigenous mothers. He has raised concerns over the affordable housing crisis stating that it is a public health issue and how he will work to address high eviction rates in the district and bring more funding for public housing.

    Clark will work to provide public schools of every level with adequate funding and resources to benefit both the students and teachers. Understanding that teachers in underfunded schools often pay for materials out of pocket, Clark will ensure that teachers are paid fairly, and students can return to schools safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. He expressed his belief that students should have options outside of college and advocates for more investment in vocational programs and trade schools.

    Clark is running against Republican candidate Lawrence Mason, a Navy veteran and volunteer first responder who is originally from New York. Mason is against keeping our communities safe by passing common-sense measures to prevent gun violence. He opposes shifting resources away from police budgets to community services and affordable housing.

    Due to his support of the environment, racial justice, access to affordable healthcare, and criminal justice reform, Nadarius Clark is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Nadarius Clark

    Nadarius Clark was born in Norfolk and attended I.C. Norcom High School in Portsmouth and obtained his bachelor’s from Virginia Union University. Clark co-founded the Generation Now Network, an organization committed to faith-based activism, advocacy, and education.

  • Incumbent Delegate Don Scott (D) was first elected to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates in 2019. Scott is originally from Houston, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University. He later joined the U.S. Navy and earned a law degree from Louisiana State University after leaving the Navy. Scott founded his own law firm and is a member of the NAACP and VFW. He and his wife live in Portsmouth with their daughter.

    In 1994, Scott was convicted of drug charges and served seven years in federal prison. He believes in second chances and works to reform the criminal justice system to reduce its harmful impact on communities of color. He co-patroned the House bill to legalize marijuana and wants to ensure that legalization will benefit communities ravaged by the Drug War. He voted to abolish the death penalty in 2021 and unsuccessfully sponsored legislation to decriminalize certain drugs. He co-patroned the constitutional amendment to restore voting rights to returning citizens this year as well.

    As a resident of a coastal area, Scott understands the urgency of the climate crisis. In 2020, he supported the Clean Energy and Community Flood Preparedness Act, which reduces carbon emissions from power plants and provides protection to regions experiencing flooding issues. Scott advocates for incentivizing electric vehicle use for marginalized communities and creating infrastructure to support electric vehicles. In 2020, Scott voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050.

    Scott believes in keeping communities safe by passing common-sense measures to reduce gun violence prevention. In 2020, he voted for universal background checks, keeping guns out of the wrong hands with extreme risk protection orders, and restoring a limit on handgun purchases to one a month. Additionally, he voted to pass legislation to increase penalties for allowing minors to access guns. The following year, Scott supported legislation that bans guns from polling places and Richmond’s Capitol Square.

    Scott wants working families in Virginia to live with dignity and supports raising the minimum wage. He advocated expanding protections offered to tenants during the pandemic to remain in place when the pandemic is over. He also wants to make the pursuit of higher education more affordable so people have more job opportunities and voted for the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back “G3” program, which offers free tuition at community colleges for low- and middle-income students who study in certain fields.

    Scott is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Deanna Stanton, a Portsmouth native, and hospice nurse. Stanton supports using taxpayer money to fund private education and opposes the right of workers to unionize. She opposes holding police accountable for the violence they inflict on communities and does not believe in keeping communities safe by passing common-sense measures to prevent gun violence.

    Due to his support of criminal justice reform, the environment, gun violence prevention, and working families, Scott is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-16

    Don Scott

    Incumbent Delegate Don Scott (D) was first elected to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates in 2019. Scott is originally from Houston, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University. He later joined the U.S.

    Don Scott

    Incumbent Delegate Don Scott (D) was first elected to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates in 2019. Scott is originally from Houston, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University. He later joined the U.S.

  • Virginia’s 83rd District includes parts of the cities of Virginia Beach and Norfolk. Voting trends show that the district is competitive. Delegate Guy won her last election with 49.97% of the vote.

    Incumbent Delegate Nancy Guy (D) has represented the 83rd District since 2020. Growing up in a Navy family in the area, she received her bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary and her law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law. She served on the Virginia Beach School Board from 1997 to 2005 and is an elder at Bayside Presbyterian Church. She and her husband currently reside in Virginia Beach and have two grown children and two grandchildren.

    As a resident of a coastal community, Guy understands the urgency of the climate crisis and supports tackling the climate crisis with legislative action. She successfully sponsored a bill to ban the intentional release of non-biodegradable balloons outdoors. She also carried legislation to encourage localities to plant and preserve trees to help combat flooding and stormwater runoff. She also voted to support the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050.

    Guy supports women’s rights, including access to reproductive healthcare and abortion. During her first year as a legislator, she voted to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment. She advocated for repealing medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers and voted to make abortion coverage available on the state health insurance exchange. She voted to make a 12-month supply of birth control available under state Medicaid plans in 2021. Guy will also fight for women to have equal and fair protections in the economy and job market.

    As a former school board member, Guy is aware of the challenges facing Virginia’s public education system. She will work to ensure that public schools receive proper, equitable funding from state and local governments. Guy supports smaller class sizes and initiatives aimed at providing students with more mental health resources. She supported a 5% raise for teacher pay in 2021 and additional funding aimed at helping schools safely reopen during the pandemic.

    Guy supports keeping communities safe by passing legislation aimed at preventing gun violence. In 2020, she voted for universal background checks, keeping guns out of the wrong hands with extreme risk protection orders, and restoring a limit on handgun purchases to one a month. Additionally, she voted to pass legislation to increase penalties for allowing minors to access guns. She advocates for criminal justice reform by voting to legalize marijuana and abolishing the death penalty. She will continue to address racial disparities in the criminal justice system and high incarceration numbers in Virginia.

    Guy is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Tim Anderson, a lawyer. Anderson supports using taxpayer money to fund private education. He opposes the right of workers to unionize and will fight to keep the state right-to-work law in place. He is also against abortion access and common-sense gun violence prevention measures.

    Due to her support of the environment, criminal justice reform, public education, and gun violence prevention, Del. Guy is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Nancy Guy

    Incumbent Delegate Nancy Guy (D) has represented the 83rd District since 2020. Growing up in a Navy family in the area, she received her bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary and her law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.

  • Virginia’s 89th District includes the city of Norfolk. Voting trends show that the district is strongly Democratic. Del. Jones won his last election with 96% of the vote.

    Incumbent Delegate Jay Jones was elected to represent the 89th District in 2017. A native of Norfolk, his family has a history of political involvement in Virginia starting with his grandfather being the first Black member of the Virginia Board of Education. Jones obtained his bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary and his law degree from the University of Virginia. Jones practices law in Norfolk where he and his wife are active members of the community.

    Jones has consistently fought for criminal justice reform in the Commonwealth during his time as a delegate. Jones was a chief co-patron of the bill that abolished the death penalty in Virginia. He voted to hold police accountable by voting to end qualified immunity in Virginia, a practice that shields police from lawsuits for violating people’s civil rights. He supported expunging certain individuals’ criminal records to give them better access to housing, education, and jobs.

    Jones supports protecting the environment and tackling the climate crisis. He advocated for legislation that works to protect Virginia’s coastline and proposed infrastructural changes that would address the flooding and rising sea level of his district. In 2020, the delegate voted in favor of the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050. He received an “A” rating from the Virginia Sierra Club on their 2021 legislative scorecard for his votes to protect the environment.

    Jones continues to make access to affordable healthcare a legislative priority. In 2018, he voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. He voted to lower drug costs, voting to cap the price of insulin in 2020 and establish a state-run health insurance marketplace, which helps uninsured or underinsured residents who aren’t covered by an employer-provided health plan to get affordable coverage. He also supported legislation declaring racism a public health crisis in the Commonwealth.

    Jones supports making the promise of democracy real for us all by expanding access to the ballot. He voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits discrimination at the polls. He fought to keep voters safe during the pandemic by establishing drop boxes for ballots and removing the witness signature requirement for absentee ballots during an emergency. Jones also advocated for bills to extend early voting, remove the requirement for an excuse for absentee voting, open up the polls for Sunday voting hours and opportunities for curbside voting, as well as make Election Day a state holiday.

    Jones is facing a challenge from Republican Hahns Copeland, a Navy veteran, and civil engineer. Copeland opposes criminal justice reforms such as ending qualified immunity and cash bail. He is against efforts to repeal Virginia’s right-to-work law, which prevents workers from forming unions and opposes giving workers collective bargaining rights. Copeland also opposes keeping communities safe by passing common-sense gun violence prevention measures.

    Due to his support of criminal justice reform, access to affordable healthcare, the environment, and expanding access to voting, Delegate Jay Jones is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Jerrauld “Jay” Jones

    Incumbent Delegate Jay Jones was elected to represent the 89th District in 2017. A native of Norfolk, his family has a history of political involvement in Virginia starting with his grandfather being the first Black member of the Virginia Board of Education.
  • The 90th district encompasses part of the city of Norfolk and part of the city of Virginia Beach. It is a strongly Democratic area. Del. Williams Graves ran against Bryant in January and won with 63% of the vote.

    Incumbent Delegate Angelia Williams Graves has represented the 90th District since a special election in January 2021. Prior to her election, Del. Graves served on the Norfolk City Council for ten years and as vice mayor of Norfolk for three years. She attended Tidewater Community College and Old Dominion University, graduating with a degree in business administration and marketing. She owns her own realty company and has two sons. She’s a member of Grove Baptist Church.

    In the General Assembly, Del. Williams Graves advocates for equitable criminal justice reform. She was chief patron of a bill to strengthen civilian oversight of sheriff’s offices, covering a loophole in previous bills and ensuring all law enforcement officers are held accountable. She introduced legislation to expand an individual’s access to a lawyer to include their first court appearance and bail hearing. She voted to legalize marijuana and wants to ensure that legalization is done equitably to support Black and Brown communities ravaged by the Drug War.

    Williams Graves supports making the promise of democracy real for us all by expanding access to the ballot. She was a chief co-patron of legislation that allows localities to expand access to early voting on Sundays. She fought to keep voters safe and healthy during the pandemic by removing the requirement for a witness signature on absentee ballots during an emergency and establishing dropboxes available for voters to leave their ballots. She voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits discrimination at the polls.

    Serving on the Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural Resources Committee, Williams Graves advocates for environmental protection and understands the threat of rising sea levels to her district. She worked with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation to ensure Virginia’s rivers and bays are clean and protected from polluters. She voted in favor of a bill that establishes new fuel efficiency standards and mandates car manufacturers produce a certain percentage of low- and zero-emission vehicles, supporting the Commonwealth’s transition to relying on 100% renewable energy.

    Williams Graves has also been an advocate for the rights of workers and tenants, ensuring everyone can afford to live and work in Virginia. She voted in favor of a successful bill to establish a housing tax credit for low-income individuals. She voted in favor of expanded legal protections from foreclosures for individuals living in mobile home parks. Williams Graves also received the “Family Friendly Seal of Approval” from the Virginia Campaign for a Family Friendly Economy for her commitment to expanding options for childcare, eldercare, paid sick days, and family leave.

    Williams Graves is facing a challenge from Sylvia Bryant (R), a local mother and business administrator for a construction company. Bryant supports using taxpayer money to fund private education. She opposes a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent and is against keeping our communities safe with common-sense measures to prevent gun violence.

    Due to her advocacy for equitable criminal justice reform, working families, the environment, and voting access, Del. Angelia Williams Graves is the most progressive choice for this race.

    Angelia Williams Graves

    Incumbent Delegate Angelia Williams Graves has represented the 90th District since a special election in January 2021. Prior to her election, Del. Graves served on the Norfolk City Council for ten years and as vice mayor of Norfolk for three years.

  • Virginia’s 100th District is located on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. It includes Accomack and Northampton counties, and parts of Norfolk City. The district is politically competitive. Del. Bloxom won with 52% of the vote in 2019 and Sen. Tim Kaine (D) won the district with 54% of the vote in 2018.

    Finale Norton was born in Exmore, Va., and currently lives in Jamesville, Va. She attended Hampton University. After college, she began working for Bank of America Sovran Bank in Norfolk. She worked her way up the corporate ladder for 26 years, eventually joining a consulting company. She has been involved civically in the 100th district through the United Way, Junior Achievement Mentorship, Habitat for Humanity, the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, March of Dimes, and the Urban League.

    Since the district is a coastal area, addressing climate change will be one of Norton’s top priorities. Norton has witnessed the effects of rising sea levels and extreme weather events and understands how climate events will disproportionately impact certain communities. She supports access to clean air and water, knowing they are critical to community health and the health of future generations. She will work to ensure public utilities and corporations are held accountable for their impact on the environment and are responsible to their communities.

    Norton attended public schools her whole life and graduated from Northampton High School. She is a proponent of well-funded public schools and well-paid teachers. She will advocate for increased funding to ensure schools are safe and have the resources they need to meet every student’s needs. She supports STEM-related programs that prepare students for working in a technologically oriented society. Additionally, Norton believes that expanding broadband access is a critical step to education equity. She will work to ensure all students, regardless of whether they live in a rural or urban area, have access to the Internet.

    Norton is an advocate for working families. She supports labor unions and opportunities for collective bargaining, ensuring that workers are able to receive fair pay, time off, and sufficient benefits. She will prioritize ​​paid sick leave for workers as well as options to increase healthcare coverage for employees of small businesses. She received the “Seal of Approval” from the Virginia Campaign for a Family Friendly Economy for her support of policies that allow parents to engage in the workforce, including childcare, eldercare, and paid family and medical leave.

    If elected, Norton will work to ensure healthcare is affordable and accessible. She supports policies to reign in the rising costs of healthcare, including expanded insurance policies and decreased prices of prescription drugs. She wants to see the creation and funding of patient advocacy programs so that individuals receive the care they need and are better able to navigate the complexities of medical care and insurance. She would like to see greater investment in resources and pay for healthcare workers.

    Norton is running against Republican incumbent Delegate Robert S. Bloxom Jr., a business owner who has represented the 100th District in the House of Delegates for the past seven years. Bloxom received an “A” rating from the NRA and voted against universal background checks and other measures to keep communities safe from gun violence. Bloxom also voted against abolishing the death penalty, legalizing marijuana, and raising the minimum wage.

    Due to her support of the environment, working families, access to affordable healthcare, and public education, Finale Norton is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Finale Johnson Norton

    Finale Norton was born in Exmore, Va., and currently lives in Jamesville, Va. She attended Hampton University. After college, she began working for Bank of America Sovran Bank in Norfolk. She worked her way up the corporate ladder for 26 years, eventually joining a consulting company.

  • The City of Norfolk has a population of 242,742 people and sits on the Chesapeake Bay in southwestern Virginia. It is the home to the world’s largest naval base. The city is strongly Democratic with President Joe Biden winning with 72% of the vote during the 2020 election.

    Incumbent Daun Hester is running for reelection for her second term as Norfolk Treasurer. Hester earned a master’s degree in education and human development from George Washington University. She worked as an educator and an administrator in the Norfolk Public School System for 22 years. Hester also served on the Norfolk City Council from 1996 to 2010 and was vice-mayor from 2004 to 2008. Hester was a member of the House of Delegates, representing the 89th District from 2012 to 2017.

    As Norfolk Treasurer, Hester implemented an online bill payment system for the city to encourage taxpayers to go paperless and also to offer the convenience of having a portal where taxpayers can view all of their bills to make full or partial payments. When she served on Norfolk’s city council, Hester helped establish the “Norfolk Youth Council” to develop future leaders of the city. She served on a few task forces to guide commercial and residential development by helping business owners and residents identify ways to improve their communities.
    In the House of Delegates, Hester served on the Appropriations, Education, and General Laws committees. As a delegate, Hester patroned legislation to make community college free to qualifying individuals and make higher education institutions more accountable for sexual misconduct. She sponsored a bill to hold child welfare agencies accountable for operating without a license. She also supported reproductive rights by voting to increase access to birth control and against defunding Planned Parenthood.

    She was the co-chair for Norfolk United – Facing Race, a city-wide initiative to foster dialogue on race and reconciliation. Hester serves as co-chair of Black Women for Positive Change, an organization that works to change the culture of violence. Hester has always been an outspoken advocate for young people in Norfolk. In 2009, she was part of discussions to eliminate the school to prison pipeline in Norfolk and the over-representation of minority youth in the juvenile justice system. She was recognized by the Champions for Children Prevent Child Abuse Hampton Roads as the 2016 Legislative Champion for Children.

    She also worked for the Planning Council, a regional agency to help children and families by better connecting them to resources and programs so they can thrive. She runs her own education and training firm, Hester and Company, which provides consulting and programming services in education, family, strategic planning, and community development. Her expertise has been helpful for the Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority, Chesterfield Public Schools, and Norfolk State University.

    Hester is running unopposed. Due to Hester’s history of civic service, advocacy for young people, support of reproductive rights, and dedication to her com

    Daun Hester

    Incumbent Daun Hester is running for reelection for her second term as Norfolk Treasurer. Hester earned a master’s degree in education and human development from George Washington University. She worked as an educator and an administrator in the Norfolk Public School System for 22 years.

No Recommendation

The City of Norfolk has a population of 242,742 people and sits on the Chesapeake Bay in southwestern Virginia. It is the home to the world’s largest naval base. The city is strongly Democratic with President Joe Biden winning with 72% of the vote during the 2020 election.

Incumbent Norfolk Sheriff Joe Baron (D) is seeking a second term in office since his election in 2017. His focus as sheriff is employee morale, inmate care, and improving community outreach. He cooperated with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to lock up hundreds of undocumented immigrants in the city’s jail. He also pulled all of Norfolk’s incarcerated population out of Hampton Roads Regional Jail due to inhumane conditions at the facility.

Baron is facing a challenge from independent candidate Neil Bradley. Bradley does not support keeping communities safe by passing common-sense measures aimed at preventing gun violence. Bradley supports undermining our fair and free elections by creating barriers to prevent voting access. He also opposes holding police accountable for abusing their power.

We have no recommendation for this race. However, we still encourage you to show up to vote on November 2 by writing in the candidate of your choice for this race and the other races on your ballot.
  • The City of Norfolk has a population of 242,742 people and sits on the Chesapeake Bay in southwestern Virginia. It is the home to the world’s largest naval base. The city is strongly Democratic with President Joe Biden winning with 72% of the vote during the 2020 election.

    Ramin Fatehi, a Hampton Roads native, has served as a prosecutor since 2006, the last eight years in the Norfolk Commonwealth’s Attorney Office. Prior to his service in Norfolk, Fatehi was an assistant public defender in Richmond, an assistant commonwealth’s attorney in Chesapeake, and a federal prosecutor in Charlottesville. He received a bachelor's degree from Yale University in 2000 and a law degree from Columbia University School of Law in 2003. Fatehi and his wife have two sons together.

    Fatehi advocates using his office to fight for a fair and equitable justice system in Norfolk. He believes in building community trust by stopping the criminalization of poverty, homelessness, mental illness, and substance use disorder. He is a proponent of community prosecution, which seeks to make prosecutors responsive to the needs of the communities they represent. Fatehi supports victim advocacy efforts like the Family Justice Center in Norfolk, which caters to the needs of survivors of domestic and sexual violence by providing them with services and treatment. He also advocates for funding the Virginia Witness Protection program.

    Fatehi believes in restorative justice initiatives and wants to prevent violence before police are called by involving community leaders to defuse tensions that often lead to violence. Fatehi wants to establish a “Conviction Integrity Unit” at the prosecutor’s office to prevent sending innocent people to prison. He promises for faster review of police shootings and misconduct. He also wants to address racial disparities in prosecution by requiring all prosecutors to undergo implicit bias training and study the history of systemic racism and mass incarceration in the U.S.

    Fatehi wants to end cash bail in Norfolk, a system that punishes poor people by keeping them incarcerated because they can’t afford to post bail. He supports full marijuana legalization and regulation. He wants to get rid of mandatory minimums and non-waivable court fees. He believes that simple possession of certain drugs should be reclassified as a misdemeanor. Additionally, he supports making it easier for people convicted of certain crimes to expunge and seal their records.

    Fatehi supports the efforts of other progressive commonwealth’s attorneys in Virginia to reform the state’s funding formula for prosecutors that incentivizes them to seek harsher sentences instead of leniency. Fatehi opposes the death penalty and believes in abolishing it on the federal level. Fatehi supports the removal of Confederate statues and memorials in the Commonwealth. He also advocates for a 21st Century Presidential Task Force on Prosecutor Reform to invest in structural changes in the country’s criminal justice system.

    Fatehi is running unopposed. Due to his support of equity, ending mass incarceration, community prosecution, abolition of the death penalty, and other criminal justice reforms, Fatehi is the progressive choice in this race.

    Ramin Fatehi

    Ramin Fatehi, a Hampton Roads native, has served as a prosecutor since 2006, the last eight years in the Norfolk Commonwealth’s Attorney Office.

No Recommendation

The City of Norfolk has a population of 242,742 people and sits on the Chesapeake Bay in southwestern Virginia. It is the home to the world’s largest naval base. The city is strongly Democratic with President Joe Biden winning with 72% of the vote during the 2020 election.

Incumbent Blythe Scott (D) is running for reelection for Norfolk Commissioner of the Revenue in Virginia. She earned her law degree from the University of Virginia in 1998. Scott was appointed to the position in April after the former commissioner of revenue resigned in April, making her the first Black person to hold the post. Scott emphasizes the importance of small business and financial health in a thriving community.

Also running for commissioner of revenue in Norfolk is independent candidate Adam Goldberg, a Navy veteran. He wants to make the office more responsive to city residents, restructure property tax rates, and offer tax breaks to first-time homeowners. Goldberg wants to offer tax reduction programs to elderly and disabled residents.

The third candidate for Norfolk Commissioner of the Revenue is Nicole Sanders (I), a small business owner and community activist. Sanders wants to use the office to promote financial literacy for residents of Norfolk. She also promises more accountability, transparency, and technological advancements with the office while working on an improved relationship with city council.

We have no recommendation for this race. However, we still encourage you to show up to vote on November 2 and vote for or write-in the candidate of your choice for this race and the other races on your ballot.

  • Jackie Glass is a Navy veteran and small-business owner. Originally from Chicago, she moved to Virginia eight years ago and currently resides in Ballentine Place. Glass has years of experience working toward a more just society. Glass worked with state Senator Lionell Spruill to bring the Crown Act to Virginia, making it illegal to discriminate against the way a person chooses to wear their hair. She was a leading force in the citizen fight against the Pamunkey Indian Tribe’s casino deal with the city. Glass currently serves as a member of the Mayor's Commission for Social Equity and Economic Opportunity.

    Glass is running on a platform that says there is no room for racism, sexism, classism, or ableism in economic and community development. Glass lists quality, affordable childcare as a priority. She wants to support working parents as they return to their workplaces and invest in childcare work and business opportunities through grants and business development courses.Glass is committed to increasing renter protections with a focus on underserved and renting families, domestic violence survivors, and residents with disabilities.

    Glass also supports implementing rank choice voting. She will work with historically disenfranchised and underrepresented groups, such as people of color and women, who are among those most likely to benefit from the adoption of ranked-choice voting. She plans to support a charter amendment to elect certain offices by ranked-choice voting.

    She passionately believes that residents should be able to ensure that developments in the City of Norfolk will allow them to provide for their own and their family’s basic needs. She would advocate for a robust online database of subsidized projects so residents know where and how their money is being spent and if their best interests are being served.

    Due to her strong support and advocacy for an inclusive community, affordable childcare options, protections for renters, and commitment to addressing racism, homophobia, classism, disablism, and sexism, Jackie Glass is the progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Jackie Glass

    Jackie Glass is a Navy veteran and small-business owner. Originally from Chicago, she moved to Virginia eight years ago and currently resides in Ballentine Place. Glass has years of experience working toward a more just society.

    Jackie Glass

    Jackie Glass is a Navy veteran and small-business owner. Originally from Chicago, she moved to Virginia eight years ago and currently resides in Ballentine Place. Glass has years of experience working toward a more just society.

Other Candidates

Also running for the Norfolk City Council Superward 7 seat are Danica Royster, Michael Muhammad, Fred McRae, Jason Inge, and Phillip Hawkins Jr.

Danica Royster is a graduate of Old Dominion University and currently works as a wealth consultant. She has stated that her priorities would include economic and community development for the Superward 7 and public safety. Royster is committed to progress, through leading and advocating for policies that are rooted in equality and equity. She is a strong supporter of locally owned businesses, as well as Norfolk Public Schools, and can often be seen visiting them in her free time. Royster participates in and encourages the planning of city clean ups, and advocates for a strong, thriving community by vaccine and mask wearing.

Michael Muhammad is an activist and political consultant, as well as a life-long Norfolk resident. Previously, Muhammad ran in 2014 as a nonpartisan candidate for Mayor of Norfolk. One of Muhammad’s most pressing concerns for the city of Norfolk is gun violence impact the city’s youth. On his campaign website, he cites more burials of Norfolk children than opening of new Norfolk businesses. According to his website, he is one of the only city council candidates with experience in the creation of policies at the local, state, and federal level. Muhammad hopes to increase funding for local barbershops and salons, and would like to bring back neighborhood sports leagues, to “bring our youth together.”

Fred McRae, is a 48-year-old community activist, contractor and barbershop owner, who comes to the City Council race with no political experience.

McRae was born and raised in Norfolk, and is motivated to run for office due to the lack of communication he has experienced with current City Council members. McRae’s desire to serve as a City Council member is his way of representing the people of Norfolk who come from a similar background as him. McRae has expressed concern regarding the current economic and social direction of the city of Norfolk and has previously stood before the City Council to discuss disparities that exist across several areas in Norfolk.

Jason Inge is a 33-year old transportation mobility manager for Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia who is running for office for the very first time. In the past, he has served on state and local boards and commissions, and has a strong desire to build coalitions to improve the city of Norfolk. Inge consistently shows support of the people and neighborhoods of Norfolk, through expressing his concern over the lack of affordable housing within the city. He is the current president of the Urban League of Hampton Roads Young Professionals.


Phillip Hawkins Jr is a Norfolk Public Schools teacher and the president-elect of the Education Association of Norfolk. Hawkins was endorsed by Virginia State Senator Lionell Spruill Sr. and was awarded gun sense candidate distinction from Moms Demand Action for his advocacy to end gun violence. He lists equity, affordable quality housing, better wages, and protecting the environment among his top priorities.