• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.
  • The 53rd District encompasses the entirety of Falls Church and part of Fairfax County. The district is strongly Democratic. Del. Simon has rarely had a challenger in the general election and Senator Tim Kaine won the district with 76% of the vote in 2018.

    Incumbent Delegate Marcus Simon is a lifelong resident of Fairfax County who has represented the 53rd District in the House of Delegates since 2014. He earned a bachelor's degree from New York University and earned his law degree from American University. Since obtaining his law degree, he has worked as a real estate attorney and served in the United States Army Judge Advocate General Corps. He currently lives in Fairfax with his wife and two children.

    As chair of the Privileges and Elections Committee, Simon worked to ensure easy and fair access to our elections. In 2020, he helped pass legislation that established no-excuse absentee voting in Virginia. He also helped expand access to satellite voting sites, early voting, and Sunday voting. He supports the restoration of voting rights to returning citizens. He is also a strong advocate for campaign finance reform and has regularly introduced a bill to prohibit campaign funds from being used for personal use, though it has failed to pass the legislature.

    Simon supported marijuana legalization and sees it as beneficial to the economy, healthcare, and criminal justice system. As delegate, he’s worked to ensure all Virginians benefit from marijuana legalization. He advocated to ensure tax revenue from marijuana sales goes to important causes, including public education, substance abuse programs, and public health organizations. He supported legislation establishing the Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Board and Fund, which puts tax money back into communities disproportionately affected by drug enforcement laws.

    Simon has worked to preserve the environment. He voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act to reduce Virginia’s use of fossil fuels. He supported a program to assist school boards in purchasing electric school buses as well as provide a rebate to those who buy electric vehicles. He also supported a requirement for car producers to sell a certain percentage of electric or hybrid cars. He has also worked to make sustainable transportation options safer and easier, such as voting for a bill to require drivers to change lanes when passing bicyclists.

    Simon has advocated for working families as well. He voted for a bill to require certain Virginia businesses to provide paid sick leave to their employees. He also voted to increase the minimum wage and the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which provides protections for employees like nannies and housekeepers. He supported the Virginia Values Act, which protects workers from discrimination based on race, sex, national origin, or sexual orientation.

    Simon is being challenged by Republican Sarah White. She is from Falls Church and works in the service industry, running her own restaurant consultation company. White supports school vouchers, which fund private schools with public money and increase educational inequities. She opposes reforming police or shifting resources away from their budgets to invest in social services.

    Due to his support for voting rights, the environment, criminal justice reform, and working families, Delegate Simon is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 53rd District.

    Marcus Simon

    Incumbent Delegate Marcus Simon is a lifelong resident of Fairfax County who has represented the 53rd District in the House of Delegates since 2014. He earned a bachelor's degree from New York University and earned his law degree from American University.
  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Incumbent Council Member David F. Snyder, who has previously served as mayor and vice-mayor, is running for reelection to City Council. Snyder was first elected to council in 1994. He was raised in Western Pennsylvania, attended Dickinson College, and came to the area to attend George Washington University Law School. He practices administrative and international trade law. He and his wife have lived in Falls Church for over 35 years and have two adult children.

    Snyder has worked to implement environmental protections in Falls Church, particularly in the transportation sector. He is a member and former chair of the Metropolitan Washington Air Quality Committee, which worked to increase environmental standards in the DMV. He’s a regional leader in the Council of Governments to improve the local environment as well. The group helps create collaboration between local governments and ensure all region members are up to standard when it comes to environmental issues. He also supported a recent policy by the Metro to give free Capital Bikeshare rides to those who pay for their metro rides virtually.

    Snyder is dedicated to investing in city infrastructure. As vice-chair of the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority, he successfully brought over $40 million in transportation funding to Falls Church. He also chaired the Transportation Technology Working Group, which created priorities for environmental and infrastructural improvements to the transportation system, including implementing electric and automated vehicles. Additionally, as a member of the Transportation Planning Board, he led efforts to improve highway safety in the area. He supports utilizing the latest technology to make transportation in the area as safe and efficient as possible, including utilizing electric vehicles and telecommunications.

    As former president of the Falls Church Housing Corporation, Snyder has worked to improve access to affordable housing in the City’s development projects. On council, he supported investments in affordable housing and advocated for increasing opportunities for homeownership in the city. This includes increasing the number of condominium units, which allows a more affordable option to gain wealth. Additionally, he voted in favor of a new council policy to require at least 10% of units in the area to be affordable to individuals or households earning between 40 and 80 percent of the annual median income for the region. This is the highest rate in the region.

    Synder has worked to ensure Falls Church remains a great place to live, go to school, shop, and work. On city council, he’s voted in favor of fully funding local schools and ensuring competitive compensation for school staff so that the area can retain high-quality teachers. Additionally, he prioritizes funding for the library and local parks. During the pandemic, he supported increased funding for local businesses and participated as a vaccine trial volunteer and Medical Reserve Corps participant. He also voted in favor of a ban of guns on city property, City Hall, the Community Center, the Farmers’ Market, and the library, which will work to keep community members safe and prevent gun violence.

    Due to his support of the environment, transportation funding, and public education, Snyder is a progressive choice in this race.

    David F. Snyder

    Incumbent Council Member David F. Snyder, who has previously served as mayor and vice-mayor, is running for reelection to City Council. Snyder was first elected to council in 1994.
  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Incumbent Debbie Schantz-Hiscott is running for reelection to the Falls Church City Council. She was elected in 2020 in a special election. Schantz-Hiscott has lived in Falls Church for 24 years and is the executive director of the Falls Church Education Foundation. She attended University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her undergraduate degree. She and her husband, Stephen, raised three daughters in the city who all attended local schools. She volunteered in the schools and served as PTA president.

    One of Schantz-Hiscott’s top priorities is pandemic recovery. She would like to work with the Development Advisory Committee to stimulate the economy in Falls Church City and bring new business to the area. She supports the council’s work with the Economic Development Authority to provide grants and ensure local businesses are supported. Working with the Falls Church Education Foundation, she’s collaborated with local businesses, ensuring she has the skills necessary to build a strong relationship between the city council and local businesses.

    Schantz-Hiscott is passionate about ensuring schools are well-funded and local students are supported. Managing the Falls Church Education Foundation, she nearly doubled donations, ensuring that local schools’ family assistance funds have enough money to support all who need help. During the pandemic, she raised over $120,000 for food and supplies for community members and worked with school social workers to identify where these resources would be most needed. Additionally, she actively supported the bond referendum for a new high school in the area and is dedicated to ensuring its completion and opening go smoothing.

    Schantz-Hiscott will continue to prioritize equity. She would like to initiate more research into the city allowing accessory dwelling units, which would increase housing density and decrease housing prices. Additionally, she supported a commitment by the council to increase investment into affordable housing units by $100,000. She would like for every board and commission in Falls Church to approach city issues with an equity lens, including equity in schools, housing, accessibility, and employment.

    Schantz-Hiscott would also like to ensure that all development and city actions have an environmental focus. She hopes to ensure further development in the city not only takes into account the local charm but also sustainable and smart growth. She would also like to improve local stormwater management processes and ensure residents have opportunities to provide feedback. Locally, she has been involved with Recreation and Parks and the Public Works Departments.

    Due to her support of the environment, pandemic recovery, public education, equity, and affordable housing, Schantz-Hiscott is a progressive choice for this race.

    Debbie Schantz-Hiscott

    Incumbent Debbie Schantz-Hiscott is running for reelection to the Falls Church City Council. She was elected in 2020 in a special election. Schantz-Hiscott has lived in Falls Church for 24 years and is the executive director of the Falls Church Education Foundation.
  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Incumbent vice-mayor of Falls Church Marybeth D. Connelly is running for re-election to city council. Connelly was first elected to the council in 2013. She and her husband moved to Falls Church in 1995, and their three children attended local public schools. She received her master’s degree in education from the University of Virginia and an undergraduate degree from Villanova University. She is employed as a Community Outreach Director at Falls Church City Public School.

    Connelly has worked to ensure the city is able to maintain smart economic growth. She’s proud of the work the council has done in recent years, particularly citing the growth at the Spectrum, on Maple Ave, The Byron, and Kensington as examples of business areas that support the local community. She would like to see more mixed-use development and is prioritizing increasing the number of businesses in the area so that more commercial tax revenue is available.

    Connelly prioritizes ensuring every child has access to well-funded and high-quality schools in the city. She understands that one of the city council’s most important roles is providing sufficient funding so that schools can maintain their high-quality teachers, programs, and facilities. She would also like to improve the city council’s relationship with the school board, school staff, University of Virginia & Virginia Tech, and the local community.

    Connelly is passionate about preserving and celebrating the history of Falls Church. She is the co-founder of the Falls Church Women's History Walk, which gives local community members the chance to take a walk and learn historical information about female leaders in Falls Church. She believes history is still being made and would like to ensure that Falls Church is prepared for its growing population. She wants to make sure the City is a place where all can come to live, go to school, work, shop, and have a sense of community.

    Connelly is also supportive of policies to make Falls Church more equitable. She spoke out about the need to change the name of George Mason High School and Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, both named after slave-owners. The board successfully voted to change the school names to Meridian High School and Oak Street Elementary, respectively. Additionally, she initiated a discussion with the council on renaming city-owned buildings, streets, statues, and parks, making the concept part of the city’s 2021 Work Plan.

    Due to her support of equity, smart economic growth, and public education, Connelly is a progressive choice in this race.

    Marybeth D. Connelly

    Incumbent vice-mayor of Falls Church Marybeth D. Connelly is running for re-election to city council. Connelly was first elected to the council in 2013. She and her husband moved to Falls Church in 1995, and their three children attended local public schools.
  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Stuart Whitaker is a local businessman running for Falls Church city council. Whitaker is originally from Illinois. He attended the University of Chicago for his undergraduate and master’s degrees. He has worked for many years as a financial economist and currently runs his own firm. He is involved with the Falls Church League of Women Voters, the Village Preservation and Improvement Society, the Falls Church American Legion, the Citizens for a Better City, and the Falls Church Chamber of Commerce.

    Whitaker’s top priority is addressing the climate crisis, citing this as the top reason he decided to run for city council. He would like to see the city dedicated to reducing carbon emissions and looking at every decision through an environmental lens. He would prioritize investing in features that not only make the community more sustainable, but also enhance quality of life, such as parks, trails, and the natural environment. He is a supporter of the Green New Deal.

    Whitaker would also like to see major investment in transportation. He believes the city is far too auto-centric. He would like to see the prioritization of biking and walking, so that community members are not forced to get in their cars every time they need to go somewhere. Additionally, he would prioritize options for public transportation, including buses and rail, to make transportation more environmental, accessible, and affordable. He opposed the city council’s decision to extend I-66, citing environmental concerns with the project.

    Whitaker would also prioritize making council decisions through an equity lens. He would like to increase opportunities for community input and highlight diverse community voices. He wants to ensure all community members have equal and full access to opportunities. He supports anti-racist education. He would like to address residential segregation and ensure all community members have equal access to affordable housing. Additionally, he supports policies to ensure all individuals have access to the ballot box and combat voter suppression.

    Whitaker would like to ensure Falls Church is a livable community, meaning all individuals can afford to live, work, and attend school in the area. He supports sufficient funding for city resources like schools and libraries, as well as community programs. He supports actions to keep communities safe, including common sense gun violence prevention legislation. Additionally, he believes that the government’s top priority should be serving the community and ensuring economic equity.

    Due to his support of the environment, equity, transportation funding, and working families, Whitaker is a progressive choice in this race.

    Stuart M. Whitaker

    Stuart Whitaker is a local businessman running for Falls Church city council. Whitaker is originally from Illinois. He attended the University of Chicago for his undergraduate and master’s degrees. He has worked for many years as a financial economist and currently runs his own firm.

Other Candidates

Caroline S. Lian is a first generation immigrant from Indonesia who works in financial services. Lian supports investment in public schools and efforts to address the lack of affordable housing in the area. She would like to see more commercial growth in the area. She is also dedicated to ensuring transparency and clear communication from the city council.

Scott C. Diaz is also running for City Council. However, no information was available about his campaign at the time of this guide’s publication. Due to the lack of information, we cannot guarantee he’ll make progressive choices.

  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    David Ortiz works for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. He is a Princeton and University of Michigan graduate. During his time at the RAND Corporation, he built a program around policy research in energy and the environment. Ortiz has worked for federal agencies, developing budgets and implementing public policy. He and his family moved to Falls Church in 2013, citing the school system as the main reason for relocating. His children attend Falls Church public schools.

    Ortiz seeks to help children in the city be better prepared for their future. He believes that holding the superintendent accountable is a key to better results for the school system. He has expressed support of mask mandates in schools. He also supports rights and protections for transgender students, school faculty participating in unions, and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) training for teachers and administrators. He does not support the use of school resource officers in schools.

    No further information was available at time of publication.
    Due to his commitment to protect transgender student rights, DEI training, and support for unions, Ortiz is a progresssive choice in this race.

    David Ortiz

    David Ortiz works for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. He is a Princeton and University of Michigan graduate. During his time at the RAND Corporation, he built a program around policy research in energy and the environment.

  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Jerrod Anderson moved to Falls Church with his family from Jackson, Tennessee. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Rhodes College, a master’s degree from George Mason University, and a doctorate from the University of California. He currently works as a statistician for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Anderson previously worked in the Memphis public school system to help integrate mathematics-focused education technology. He and his wife, a data scientist, live in Falls Church with their two children.

    As a member of the School Board, Anderson plans to bridge communication between the school system and other stakeholders. While he praises the Falls Church County Public School system for their actions during the pandemic, he believes they failed to communicate why decisions were made and what factors were considered. He promises to open clear lines of communication for teachers and administrators while ensuring the School Board listens to all perspectives of community members.

    Anderson seeks to bring his expertise as a statistician to the School Board. He hopes to contribute efficient and systematically developed decision-making to the School Board. He believes that decisions made should be goal-driven and informed by data above anything else. He supports government efforts to keep students safe during the pandemic, including the mask mandate.

    No further information was available at time of publication.

    Due to his support of data-driven decision making, Jerrod Anderson is a progressive choice in this election.

    Jerrod Anderson

    Jerrod Anderson moved to Falls Church with his family from Jackson, Tennessee. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Rhodes College, a master’s degree from George Mason University, and a doctorate from the University of California.
  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Kathleen Tysse is a former public school educator and former president of Falls Church Elementary PTA. Tysee has a master of teaching degree. She currently serves on the Mary Riley Styles Public Library board. She is passionate about literacy and social justice. Tysse is a member of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

    She supports government driven initiatives to combat climate change. Tysse is also in support of raising taxes on the rich to help raise state revenue. She is also a member of the Gifted Education Advisory Committee, which supports the superintendent and school board in identifying and educating gifted and talented Falls Church students.

    No further information was available at the time of publication.

    Due to her support of increased literacy rates and social justice, Tysse is a progressive choice in this election.

    Kathleen Tysse

    Kathleen Tysse is a former public school educator and former president of Falls Church Elementary PTA. Tysee has a master of teaching degree. She currently serves on the Mary Riley Styles Public Library board. She is passionate about literacy and social justice.

  • Falls Church is an independent city in the Washington metropolitan area. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, Falls Church is the fastest growing locale in Northern Virginia with its population jumping by 20% in the last decade to 14,568 people. All eligible voters in the city of Falls Church are able to cast ballots in this election.

    Lori Silverman is originally from Chicago, Illinois. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and obtained her law degree from the George Washington University Law School. She owns a political consulting firm, Lori Silverman, LLC, and previously worked as an attorney for a top DC lobbying firm. She moved to Falls Church in 2016 and is mother to two children.

    Silverman believes that the Falls Church City School System will benefit from more open and transparent processes for teachers and parents. She supports diversity, equity and inclusion within the school system. She also believes in keeping our communities safe by passing common-sense measures aimed at preventing gun violence.

    No further information was available at time of publication.

    Due to her support of transparent communication for parents and teachers, gun violence prevention, and inclusive policies, Lori Silverman is a progressive candidate in this election.

    Lori Silverman

    Lori Silverman is originally from Chicago, Illinois. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and obtained her law degree from the George Washington University Law School.