• Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

  • The 21st District encompasses the cities of Virginia Beach and Chesapeake. Voting trends for the district show that the area is very competitive in general elections. However, Fowler is the first Democratic to hold the seat since the Republican takeover in 2009. She won her 2019 election with 54% of the vote.

    Delegate Kelly Covirs-Fowler is of Filipino-Mexican heritage and moved to Virginia Beach when her father, who was in the Navy, was stationed there. An engaged member of the community, she used to be an elementary school teacher and now owns a small local real estate company that specializes in military family relocation and advocacy. She and her husband reside in Virginia Beach with their three daughters. Fowler was first elected to represent the 21st District in 2017.

    Del. Fowler was motivated to run for office after attending the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. in January 2017. As a delegate, Fowler advocates for women’s issues by voting for the Equal Rights Amendment. In 2020, she voted to repeal medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion providers. She supports a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent and voted to make abortion coverage available on the health insurance exchange.

    As a delegate, Fowler voted to give teachers a 5% raise, believing higher teacher pay will reduce high turnover and make it easier for schools to recruit and retain the best teachers. She also voted to increase school funding in the Commonwealth, including money to help schools reopen safely during the pandemic. She also voted to grant in-state tuition to undocumented students in 2020 and make them eligible for financial aid the following year.

    As a Virginia Beach native, Fowler recognizes the real threat of climate change. She hopes to create long-term solutions to preserving the green spaces in the Virginia Beach and Chesapeake areas. Fowler has patroned legislation aimed at tackling the flooding issues of the 21st District. Additionally, Fowler is in support of clean energy and green jobs and voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which aims to make Virginia 100% clean energy by 2050.

    Fowler believes in making the promise of democracy real for us all by supporting our fair and free elections. In 2021, she voted for the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits discrimination at the polls. She also voted to keep voters safe during the pandemic by removing the signature requirement on absentee ballots during an emergency and establishing drop boxes for voters to leave their ballots. In 2020, she voted to extend early voter registration and to make it easier to vote absentee in Virginia.

    Delegate Fowler is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Tanya Gould. She is an advocate for sex trafficking awareness and directs a non-profit. Gould is against holding police accountable for the violence they inflict on communities. Gould also opposes government efforts to keep our communities and schools safe during the pandemic.

    Due to her support of abortion access, public education, voting rights, and the environment, Delegate Fowler is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Kelly Convirs-Fowler

    Delegate Kelly Covirs-Fowler is of Filipino-Mexican heritage and moved to Virginia Beach when her father, who was in the Navy, was stationed there.
  • The 76th District includes part of the cities of Suffolk and Chesapeake. The district leans Democratic. Del. Jenkins was elected with 56% of the vote in 2019, ousting Republican Delegate Chris Jones, who had represented the district since 1998.

    Incumbent Delegate Clint Jenkins was elected to the House of Delegates in 2019. He is a native of the 76th District, who grew up in Suffolk and graduated from John F. Kennedy High School. He then enlisted in the US Army, where he served as a mechanic before earning his undergraduate degree from Saint Leo University and graduate degree from Southeastern Baptist Theology Seminary. He currently runs a local real estate company with his daughter.

    Since taking office, Jenkins has supported critical criminal justice reforms in the Commonwealth. He voted for probation reform to cap the prison sentence a judge can impose for a probation violation. He voted in favor of automatic expungement processes so that individuals with criminal records have fair access to jobs and housing. He was a co-patron on the bill to legalize marijuana in Virginia. Jenkins also voted to abolish the death penalty.

    Jenkins has worked to ensure well-funded and equitable schools in Virginia. He introduced and successfully passed a bill that requires all teachers, principals, and superintendents to demonstrate cultural competency as part of their yearly evaluations, including all history and social science teachers undergoing certification to teach African American history. Jenkins also voted for a 5% raise for teachers and funded new school counselor and nurse positions. He supported expanding financial aid to undocumented students and the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back “G3” program, making community college tuition-free for low- and middle-income students who study in certain fields.

    Jenkins has worked to make elections more fair and accessible by voting in favor of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, which prohibits discrimination at the polls. He was a co-patron of a successful bill to move municipal elections from May to November starting in 2022 so that election days are more accessible and known to the public. He voted to give students one excused absence per year in order to vote and participate in other civic activities.

    Jenkins has supported Virginia working families through his work in the House of Delegates. He voted to raise the minimum wage and voted in favor of the Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, which extends labor protections to domestic workers and ensures they are paid a minimum wage. He supports paid family and medical leave, as well as access to affordable childcare and eldercare. He’s dedicated to ending food and housing insecurity in the district, working to provide rent support for those who need it.

    Jenkins is facing a challenge from Republican Michael Dillender, a retired Navy Captain and small business owner. He supports using taxpayer money to fund private schools through school voucher programs. He opposes efforts to shift police funding to social services and mental health support. Dillender is also against government efforts to protect the public from the harmful effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Due to his support for criminal justice reform, working families, public education, and making our elections free and fair, Delegate Clint Jenkins is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Clinton Jenkins

    Incumbent Delegate Clint Jenkins was elected to the House of Delegates in 2019. He is a native of the 76th District, who grew up in Suffolk and graduated from John F. Kennedy High School.

  • The 77th District encompasses part of the city of Chesapeake and part of the city of Suffolk. It is a strongly Democratic district. Hayes has frequently run unopposed and Sen. Kaine (D) won the district with 67% of the vote in 2018.

    Incumbent Delegate Cliff Hayes was born in Chesapeake and has represented the 77th District in the House of Delegates since 2016. He attended Norfolk State University, where he played basketball and completed post-graduate studies at multiple institutes of higher education. He spent his professional career working in information technology and technology policy. He also served as a member of the Chesapeake City Council from 2004 to 2012. He has two college-aged daughters and lives with his wife in Chesapeake.

    Serving as the chair of the Joint Commission on Technology and Science, Hayes is a strong advocate for technological developments that boost the economy and protect the environment. He introduced and successfully passed legislation that created a major offshore wind generation facility. His work on this project led him to receive a certificate of appreciation from the Virginia Chapter of the Sierra Club. Del. Hayes also voted in favor of the passage of the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which will transition Virginia’s energy grid to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

    Hayes has worked to make healthcare affordable and accessible to all Virginians. He voted in favor of Medicaid expansion in 2018, which granted access to affordable healthcare to 400,000 Virginians. Hayes was chief co-patron of a bill that expanded telemedicine services and ensured Virginians could safely see their doctors during the pandemic and beyond. He also voted to make abortion coverage available on the state health insurance exchange. He voted to cap insulin prices at $50 and he introduced and passed a bill to make it easier for pharmacies to distribute marijuana and CBD-based products.

    Hayes has supported increased school funding at all levels. He voted in favor of a budget that gave teachers a 5% raise, increased funding for school counselors and nurses, and additional money to ensure schools can safely reopen during the pandemic. Hayes also worked to make higher education more affordable by voting for the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) program, which makes community college tuition-free for low-and middle-income students who study in certain fields.

    As a member of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus, Hayes has supported bills to ensure racial equity in Virginia. He voted to recognize racism as a public health crisis in the Commonwealth. The caucus also worked to ensure that the tax dollars received from the legalization of marijuana went to the Black and Brown communities that were disproportionately affected by drug enforcement. Hayes also fought for the historical preservation and funding for the maintenance of Black cemeteries in Chesapeake.

    Hayes is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Geoffrey Burke, a Trump supporter. He believes Virginia should remain a right-to-work state, which greatly undermines the strength of unions. Burke also believes in privatizing education and opposes government regulations on polluting companies. He is against abortion access and common-sense measures aimed at keeping our communities safe from gun violence.

    Due to his support of the environment, access to affordable healthcare, public education, and racial justice, Delegate Cliff Hayes is the most progressive choice for the 77th District.

    Cliff Hayes, Jr.

    Incumbent Delegate Cliff Hayes was born in Chesapeake and has represented the 77th District in the House of Delegates since 2016. He attended Norfolk State University, where he played basketball and completed post-graduate studies at multiple institutes of higher education.

  • The 78th District encompasses part of the city of Chesapeake. It is a strongly Republican area, Del. Leftwich has run unopposed in every general election since 2015 and Senator Tim Kaine (D) lost the district with 42% of the vote in 2018.

    Democrat Melanie Cornelisse is a seamstress, educator, and community organizer running to represent the 78th District in the House of Delegates. Raised in Kansas and Florida, Cornelisse has lived in Chesapeake for the past five years. Previously, she was a public school teacher, and currently owns her own business. She is heavily involved with gun violence prevention advocacy and runs the Chesapeake chapter of Moms Demand Action. Cornelisse lives in the Great Bridge area with her husband and two children.

    As a survivor of gun violence, Cornelisse is passionate about and dedicated to gun violence prevention. She recognizes that gun violence is a public health crisis and has lobbied the General Assembly to implement policies that keep communities safe. She supports increased investment in gun violence prevention programs such as Be SMART, which teaches parents about safe gun ownership and storage. She also supports increased background checks for gun owners and increased restrictions on gun ownership, such as laws preventing domestic abusers from possessing guns. She has pledged not to accept donations from the gun lobby.

    Cornelisse advocates for policies to make the ballot box as accessible as possible. Federally, she supports the passage of the For the People Act, which would expand voting rights and access. In Virginia, she would like to implement policies that make registering and voting as easy as possible. She helped advocate for the “Change the Date, Chesapeake!” and “Change the Date, VA” campaigns, which successfully lobbied the General Assembly to move the date of local elections from May to November, in order to allow as many voters as possible to cast a ballot.

    Cornelisse advocates for policies to protect Virginia’s natural environment. She supports strong regulations on utility companies in order to ensure energy prices stay low and corporations are prioritizing the environment and Virginians’ health. She believes corporations should be held responsible for addressing the pollution and carbon emissions they produce and must pay their fair share in taxes to fund scientific research and climate protections. She also will fight for conservation efforts to protect Chesapeake wetlands.

    As a former public school teacher and parent of kids attending local public schools, Cornelisse will prioritize education funding and school safety. She helped develop and run the Chesapeake School Safety Coalition. The coalition was originally founded to address gun violence in schools but has recently taken efforts to ensure students and school staff have the resources to stay safe during the pandemic. She supports increased investment in school resources at all levels and particularly emphasizes raising teacher and staff salaries. She also supports increased investment in student mental health and counselor services.

    Cornelisse is running against incumbent Republican Delegate Jay Leftwich, an attorney who has represented the 78th district in the House of Delegates since 2014. Since his election, Leftwich has voted against expanding Medicaid coverage, raising the minimum wage, protecting insurance coverage of abortions, legalizing marijuana, and abolishing the death penalty. He also opposes keeping our communities safe by passing common sense measures to prevent gun violence.

    Due to her support for gun violence prevention, expanding voting access, environmental protections, and funding for education, Melanie Cornelisse is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Melanie Cornelisse

    Democrat Melanie Cornelisse is a seamstress, educator, and community organizer running to represent the 78th District in the House of Delegates. Raised in Kansas and Florida, Cornelisse has lived in Chesapeake for the past five years.

  • Incumbent Delegate Don Scott (D) was first elected to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates in 2019. Scott is originally from Houston, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University. He later joined the U.S. Navy and earned a law degree from Louisiana State University after leaving the Navy. Scott founded his own law firm and is a member of the NAACP and VFW. He and his wife live in Portsmouth with their daughter.

    In 1994, Scott was convicted of drug charges and served seven years in federal prison. He believes in second chances and works to reform the criminal justice system to reduce its harmful impact on communities of color. He co-patroned the House bill to legalize marijuana and wants to ensure that legalization will benefit communities ravaged by the Drug War. He voted to abolish the death penalty in 2021 and unsuccessfully sponsored legislation to decriminalize certain drugs. He co-patroned the constitutional amendment to restore voting rights to returning citizens this year as well.

    As a resident of a coastal area, Scott understands the urgency of the climate crisis. In 2020, he supported the Clean Energy and Community Flood Preparedness Act, which reduces carbon emissions from power plants and provides protection to regions experiencing flooding issues. Scott advocates for incentivizing electric vehicle use for marginalized communities and creating infrastructure to support electric vehicles. In 2020, Scott voted for the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050.

    Scott believes in keeping communities safe by passing common-sense measures to reduce gun violence prevention. In 2020, he voted for universal background checks, keeping guns out of the wrong hands with extreme risk protection orders, and restoring a limit on handgun purchases to one a month. Additionally, he voted to pass legislation to increase penalties for allowing minors to access guns. The following year, Scott supported legislation that bans guns from polling places and Richmond’s Capitol Square.

    Scott wants working families in Virginia to live with dignity and supports raising the minimum wage. He advocated expanding protections offered to tenants during the pandemic to remain in place when the pandemic is over. He also wants to make the pursuit of higher education more affordable so people have more job opportunities and voted for the Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back “G3” program, which offers free tuition at community colleges for low- and middle-income students who study in certain fields.

    Scott is facing a challenge from Republican candidate Deanna Stanton, a Portsmouth native, and hospice nurse. Stanton supports using taxpayer money to fund private education and opposes the right of workers to unionize. She opposes holding police accountable for the violence they inflict on communities and does not believe in keeping communities safe by passing common-sense measures to prevent gun violence.

    Due to his support of criminal justice reform, the environment, gun violence prevention, and working families, Scott is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-16

    Don Scott

    Incumbent Delegate Don Scott (D) was first elected to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates in 2019. Scott is originally from Houston, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University. He later joined the U.S.

    Don Scott

    Incumbent Delegate Don Scott (D) was first elected to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates in 2019. Scott is originally from Houston, Texas, and graduated from Texas A&M University. He later joined the U.S.

  • Virginia’s 81st District includes parts of the cities of Virginia Beach and Chesapeake. Voting trends show that the district is competitive. Del. Knight has represented the district since 2010, winning his last election with 52% of the vote.

    Podiatrist Jeffrey ”Doc” Feld is running to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates. He has lived in Virginia Beach for 20 years where his wife is a public school teacher. A former chief resident at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Feld runs his own medical practice with several locations in the area. He spends a lot of time volunteering with youth sports organizations and at local nursing homes while raising three children with his wife.

    Understanding that strong schools are the backbone of thriving communities, Feld has unique insight into the need to improve equity in the education system because his wife is a teacher and their children attend public schools. He supports fully funding schools, universal pre-K, and raising teacher pay to attract the best talent and prevent turnover. He wants to reduce classroom sizes, increase student access to mental health resources, and make college tuition affordable in the Commonwealth.

    As a resident of a coastal area vulnerable to rising sea levels, Feld knows the urgency of the climate crisis. He believes in using a collaborative approach to find common ground for all stakeholders to implement a just transition from fossil fuels to a clean energy economy. He wants to work with local farmers and the agricultural industry to increase education on environmental issues and make available programs, such as tree planting, to help them protect the environment. Feld also believes that the eco-tourism initiatives in the 81st District can help connect the area’s tourism industry with environmental preservation.

    Feld’s experience in the medical field has led him to believe that all families in the district should have access to quality, affordable healthcare. He wants to lower prescription costs, make billing more transparent, and increase funding for mental health support and substance abuse recovery. He will fight to protect vulnerable populations and people with pre-existing conditions. He is also passionate about providing healthcare to veterans with his experience working at local veteran health facilities.

    Feld wants to boost economic opportunities for working people to live with dignity and supports a living wage. He understands the hardships people are facing during the pandemic and will work to ensure that federal and state money is funneled to the district to create jobs and build infrastructure. He wants to ensure that local businesses have access to grants and loans to stay afloat during the pandemic and will collaborate with local banks and creditors to make resources available as well.

    Feld is challenging incumbent Delegate Barry Knight (R), a hog farmer. Knight opposes keeping communities safe with common-sense measures to prevent gun violence. In 2020, he voted against increasing the minimum wage and the Virginia Clean Economy Act, which commits the Commonwealth to 100% clean energy by 2050. This year, he opposed abolishing the death penalty and the Voting Rights Act of Virginia.

    Due to his support of public education, the environment, access to affordable healthcare, and working families, Jeffrey Feld is the most progressive choice in this election.

    Jeffrey Feld

    Podiatrist Jeffrey ”Doc” Feld is running to represent the 80th District in the House of Delegates. He has lived in Virginia Beach for 20 years where his wife is a public school teacher.

  • Larachelle "Shelly" Wood is a native of Chesapeake City and the daughter of a Filipino immigrant. She obtained her bachelor's degree in political science from Old Dominion University and her law degree from Regent University School of Law. Before starting her law firm, she worked as a public defender for the City of Norfolk. She now practices law as the managing partner of Parks Zeigler. Wood previously served as the president of the Chesapeake Bar Association and served as a substitute judge for the Chesapeake Circuit Court Judges. She and her husband live in Great Bridge with their three children.

    Wood is an advocate for criminal justice reform, noting her support of the red flag law, as well as recent legislation from the 2020 Virginia General Assembly which abolished the death penalty and decriminalized marijuana. Additionally, she supports drug treatment efforts as an alternative to jail sentencing for minor drug offenses and looks to medication management as preventative to a cycle of crime. She supports programs for re-entry and opposes cash bail for low-level offenses.

    Wood supports policies that center on mental health, advocating for treatment over prosecution for non-violent offenders. She supported the passing of a bill to establish an Amber Alert for all people with autism. She praises Chesapeake City’s behavioral health docket in the general district court and hopes to have the same docket in the circuit court, as well as the juvenile court. She has also voiced her support for increasing services to veterans in need of mental health care. She believes that by addressing issues of mental health, the city can reduce recidivism and crime.

    Another top priority for Wood is law enforcement accountability, maintaining her office would have a zero-tolerance policy for police misconduct. When it comes to accusations of police misconduct and brutality, Wood has expressed her desire for an outside investigation, independent of the commonwealth attorney’s office. She has also referenced body cameras on police as a tool for fairer trials. She looks to community outreach as a way to restore trust with the police.

    Wood also hopes to bring change to the city’s court system. She wants to address the imbalance of information between the prosecution and defense by streamlining the process for discovery requests. At the time of this publication she stated that while she hopes the city council would give more funding to better fund the commonwealth attorney’s office, she does not have specific plans for the issue. She also voiced concern regarding low wages for public defenders and court-appointed attorneys. She supports individualized attention to each case, in comparison to grouping cases together based on the offense.

    Wood is running Republican candidate Matthew Hamel. Hamel currently serves on Chesapeake City’s City Council and is a Navy JAG Reservist attorney, as well as a former Navy JAG prosecutor. He is the founder of a law firm that focuses on military service members and their spouses. Hamel and his wife have four children.

    Due to her support of mental health awareness and criminal justice reform, Wood is the progressive choice in this election.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Shelly Wood

    Larachelle "Shelly" Wood is a native of Chesapeake City and the daughter of a Filipino immigrant. She obtained her bachelor's degree in political science from Old Dominion University and her law degree from Regent University School of Law.

    Shelly Wood

    Larachelle "Shelly" Wood is a native of Chesapeake City and the daughter of a Filipino immigrant. She obtained her bachelor's degree in political science from Old Dominion University and her law degree from Regent University School of Law.