• Independent

    Baron Braswell

  • Born in Charleston, SC, Baron Braswell moved to Virginia Beach where he graduated from Kellam High School. He went on to study political science at Virginia State University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude before joining the Army. He was elected to the Spotsylvania School Board in 2014, and is currently serving his fourth term. Braswell sits on advisory boards at the University of Mary Washington and Germanna Community College. He and his wife have two children.

    Braswell has served on the school board for the past seven and a half years. Each year he advocated for better pay for teachers, bus drivers, support staff, and coaches. He was also a major budget driver on restructuring health insurance in the school division. This led to millions of dollars in savings. During his time on the school board, he advocated for more accessible sports participation by lowering fees for student athletes.

    Braswell advocates for updating the county’s infrastructure. While on the school board, he pushed for the major renovation of Courtland High School, as well as the installation of artificial turf at five high schools. The school’s renovation came in at half the average cost of a new high school and led to a gold award for design from the Virginia School Boards Association. In the midst of the pandemic, he recognized the area’s growing need for broadband services.

    Promoting economic development and increasing access to opportunity are high on Braswell’s list of priorities. He praised efforts of the Spotsylvania County Schools to contract two years of state field hockey tournaments with the Virginia High School League. He encourages similar partnerships with businesses across the county. As a school board member, he was a leader in growing support for students’ extracurricular activities and started a region wide chess tournament for students. He advocated for expanding the Career and College pathways programs to include a variety of tracks including veterinary science, visual and performing arts, and cybersecurity.

    Along with his family, he hosts a run in honor of his late son, dedicated to reducing teen violence. Braswell sat on a panel along with area leaders to discuss race relations around Fredericksburg. He also championed the name change of R.E. Lee Elementary School to Spotsylvania Elementary School. He has stated that access to an equitable education must be a priority to end systemic injustice, pushing for local governments to better fund education.

    Baron Braswell is challenging conservative incumbent Supervisor Chris Yakabouski (R). Yakabouski has lived in Spotsylvania for 30 years. He has two children enrolled in Spotsylvania Public schools, and he strongly supports SROs in every school and has pledged to back law enforcement. He has labeled himself the “conservative voice” on the board of supervisors.

    Braswell is also challenging previous House of Delegates candidate Nick Ignacio. Nick Ignacio’s 2017 campaign focused on enforcing immigration laws, strengthening Second Amendment rights, and limiting abortion access. He is regional tea party chairman and was responsible for organizing an anti-mask rally. While making comments at a school board meeting, he refused to wear a mask and removed protective barriers at the podium. During another incident, he had to be removed from a school board meeting. He has been known to make use anti-gay slurs.

    Due to his history of increasing accessibility to opportunities for students, updating infrastructure, and his commitment to reducing teen violence, Baron Braswell is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Baron Braswell

    Born in Charleston, SC, Baron Braswell moved to Virginia Beach where he graduated from Kellam High School. He went on to study political science at Virginia State University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude before joining the Army.

    Baron Braswell

    Born in Charleston, SC, Baron Braswell moved to Virginia Beach where he graduated from Kellam High School. He went on to study political science at Virginia State University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude before joining the Army.
  • Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms. McAuliffe attended The Catholic University of America and Georgetown University Law Center. A lifelong businessman and entrepreneur, McAuliffe has lived in Fairfax County for more than 20 years with his wife, Dorothy. The couple has raised five children together.

    McAuliffe is centering his campaign on building a strong Virginia economy that works for everyone. He plans to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, two years ahead of the current schedule. He wants to require employers to provide paid sick days along with paid family and medical leave to all workers. Because Virginia is the 10th most expensive state for childcare in the country, McAuliffe wants to assist families burdened with childcare costs by providing subsidies, funneling federal money to families, and making it easier for people to qualify for assistance.

    McAuliffe plans to invest $2 billion in Virginia’s education system every year so that teachers are paid above the national average, children have access to universal pre-K, and every student can get online. To make college more affordable to students, McAuliffe will offer more financial aid and expand on current Governor Ralph Northam’s program that makes community college free to low- and middle-income students studying in certain fields. McAuliffe also wants to boost enrollment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing free tuition to students who promise to teach for five years in the state’s high-need areas.

    While serving as Governor of Virginia, McAuliffe took action to reduce carbon emissions in the state and received a $120.5 million federal grant to combat the rising sea level on Virginia’s coast. He wants Virginia to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 and make access to clean energy and transportation infrastructure more affordable by providing subsidies for solar usage and public transit construction. McAuliffe also plans to address the racial impacts of climate change by providing funding to communities hit by extreme heat and rising sea levels.

    McAuliffe pushed for Medicaid expansion during his first term and wants to increase access to affordable healthcare by supporting Virginia’s plan to create a state-run health insurance marketplace. He backs lowering prescription drug costs, reducing health insurance premiums, and creating a Medicaid buy-in option for people who make too much to qualify for the program but still can’t afford out-of-pocket costs on the marketplace. When he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed Republican legislation that would have limited abortion access. If reelected, McAuliffe plans to incorporate Roe v. Wade into Virginia’s constitution to guarantee that abortion access is protected.

    McAuliffe is running against multimillionaire Republican Glenn Youngkin, the former president of Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest private equity firms. Youngkin wants to channel the state’s money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to fund private schools. Youngkin has admitted that he opposes abortion access and will work to dismantle protections for reproductive freedom in the Commonwealth. Youngkin is also against making health coverage more affordable in Virginia.

    McAuliffe is also facing a challenge from activist and educator Princess Blanding, an Independent candidate. Blanding is the sister of Marcus David-Peters, a young Black man who was killed by police in 2018. Blanding wants to hold police accountable by ending qualified immunity and shifting funding away from police departments to invest in community services. She also wants to make health coverage more affordable by creating a public healthcare system.

    Due to his record in providing leadership for the Commonwealth and his support of Virginia working families, the environment, affordable health coverage, and reproductive rights, Terry McAuliffe is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

    Terry McAuliffe

    Democratic candidate for governor, Terry McAuliffe, was the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. McAuliffe was unable to seek reelection in 2017 due to a state law that bars sitting governors from serving consecutive terms.

  • The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017. She worked for over 20 years as a cybersecurity specialist and is the single mother of two grown children. If chosen by voters to be the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, Ayala will be the first woman and Afro-Latina to do so.

    Affordable access to healthcare is a central focus for Ayala. As a first-time mother, Ayala depended on Medicaid to give her son life-saving care. In 2018, Ayala voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians. In 2020, she co-patroned legislation to cap the cost of insulin in the state. In 2021, she voted to make the cost of prescription drugs transparent and to boost Virginia’s capacity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. She also wants to reduce Black maternal mortality and create a universal paid family and medical leave program in the Commonwealth.

    As a graduate of Prince William County schools, Ayala believes that a well-funded education system is critical to a thriving Commonwealth. In 2021, she voted to increase teachers’ salaries by 5%. She also supported the “Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back (G3) Fund and Program, which provides free community college to low- and middle-income students who are studying in certain fields. As lieutenant governor, Ayala will prioritize expanding access to pre-K, reducing overcrowding in classrooms, and dedicate more funding to improve school infrastructure.

    Recognizing the climate crisis as a national security threat, Ayala believes the state needs to play a bigger role in addressing the impacts of climate change. She co-patroned the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, which will eliminate carbon emissions in the Commonwealth by 2050. She also wants to dedicate more funding to communities dealing firsthand with the effects of climate change, believing that solutions to the crisis must be created with racial equity in mind.

    Ayala personally understands how hard it is for families to make ends meet. Her family struggled financially when she was a child, and she worked and raised children while obtaining her degree. In 2020, Ayala voted to raise the state’s minimum wage. She supports making paid family and medical leave available to all Virginia working families. In 2021, she voted to strengthen the rights of tenants and protect them from eviction during the pandemic. She also sponsored legislation to protect workers during the pandemic by requiring employers to provide them with personal protective equipment and hazard pay.

    Ayala is running against former delegate Winsome Sears, a Republican who represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 2002 to 2003. Sears owns a plumbing and appliance repair store in Winchester. Sears opposes legislation that would make our communities safer from gun violence. She also supports using public money to fund private schools and wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access that make it more difficult for people to participate in our democracy.

    Due to her support of affordable health coverage, the environment, public education, and Virginia working families, Delegate Hala Ayala is the most progressive choice for lieutenant governor in Virginia.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.

    Hala Ayala

    The daughter of a Salvadorian and North African immigrant father and a Lebanese and Irish mother, Delegate Hala Ayala was one of the first Latina women elected to the House of Delegates, having one her first election to represent the 51st District in 2017.
  • Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013. Raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Herring obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia before earning his law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. He and his wife of 30 years, Laura, raised two children together.

    Herring has stood up for access to affordable healthcare by fighting off efforts by the Trump administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2021, Herring defended the ACA by joining a coalition of 21 attorneys general to argue in front of the U.S. Supreme Court against a lawsuit from the Trump administration that would have dismantled the ACA, protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and Medicaid expansion.

    Herring is a champion of reproductive rights and abortion access, and has used his office to support a person’s right to decide when and whether to become a parent. He has signed onto several lawsuits that challenge different states’ restrictive abortion laws. He issued an opinion in 2015 to strike down medically unnecessary Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws that shuttered women’s health centers in the Commonwealth. In 2019, he successfully filed an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to halt contraceptive coverage in health insurance.

    Herring has worked to keep our communities safe from gun violence by standing up to the gun lobby. In 2020, he defended two common-sense laws passed by the General Assembly aimed at preventing gun violence, the one-handgun-a-month law, and extended background checks. The same year, he also successfully defended a challenge to Virginia’s extreme risk protection law, which keeps guns out of the hands of people who pose a risk to themselves or others.

    During his time in office, Herring has fought to keep the promise of democracy real by protecting access to the ballot box. This year, he applauded the passage of the Voting Rights Act of Virginia and joined other attorneys general in urging Congress to pass safeguards that guarantee people’s rights to participate in our democracy by voting. In 2020, he ensured that voters did not face intimidation while casting their ballots in our fair and free elections. In 2016, he defended a decision from former Governor Terry McAuliffe to restore the rights of returning citizens in the Commonwealth.

    Herring is facing a challenge from Delegate Jason Miyares, a conservative Republican who wants to create deliberate barriers to voting access, undermine workers’ rights by keeping Virginia a right-to-work state, and oppose efforts to shift funding away from police budgets to community services. As a delegate, Miyares voted against raising the state’s minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare to hundreds of thousands of Virginians, abolishing the death penalty, and legalizing marijuana. He also opposes abortion access.

    Due to his support of access to affordable healthcare, abortion access, gun violence prevention, and voting rights, Attorney General Mark Herring is the most progressive choice for this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

    Mark Herring

    Incumbent Attorney General Mark Herring is seeking his third term in office after having been first elected in 2013.

House of Delegates

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below House of Delegate races on your ballot.

No Recommendation

The 54th District includes parts of Caroline and Spotsylvania counties. The district leans Republican. Del. Orrock received 58% of the vote in 2019, but Senator Tim Kaine (D) won the district with 50% of the vote in 2018.

Democrat Eric Butterworth is running to represent the 54th district in the House of Delegates. However, no information was available about his campaign at the time of this guide’s publishing, meaning we cannot guarantee he will make progressive choices.

Incumbent Republican Del. Bobby Orrock is a far-right conservative who was elected to the House of Delegates in 1990. Orrock does not support access to abortion and voted against the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. He was a staunch opponent of Medicaid expansion in Virginia. Additionally, he voted against raising the minimum wage, the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, and death penalty abolition. Del. Orrock is not a progressive choice in this race.

We do not have a recommendation in this race. However, we still encourage you to show up to vote on November 2 by writing in a name of your choice for this race and voting in the other races on your ballot.
  • The 55th District includes parts of Hanover, Caroline, and Spotsylvania counties. The district is strongly Republican. Del. Fowler won with about 60% of the vote in the past three elections.

    Rachel Levy is a teacher and long-time resident of the 55th District. The daughter of two civil rights lawyers, she attended Wesleyan University to become a teacher. She earned her doctorate in educational leadership and policy at Virginia Commonwealth University. She currently teaches high school government at Caroline County Public Schools. She is involved with the Hanover NAACP, the Hanover Democratic Committee, the local Parent Teacher Association, and her synagogue. She lives in Ashland with her husband and three children.

    Levy has classroom experience as well as policy expertise. She will work to raise the salaries of teachers, as well as other school staff. She supports increasing investment in crumbling school infrastructure, particularly in underfunded areas. She will ensure any state-issued mandates are properly funded and implemented to the Standards of Quality. She particularly supports bolstering history, civics, and language arts education in Virginia’s public schools to strengthen our democratic institutions. She will also work to ensure higher education options are affordable for everyone.

    Levy will prioritize meaningful action to stop climate change. She will work to pass legislation that conserves land resources and bolsters the renewable energy industry. She opposes the construction of new gas pipelines or mining operations in the Commonwealth. She will work to support public transportation in the district to reduce traffic congestion and pollution. She will also work to ensure environmental protections are equitable and protect vulnerable communities, like the Brown Grove community, which is disproportionately affected by climate change.

    As the mother of children with Type 1 diabetes and other disabilities, Levy knows the importance of affordable healthcare. She successfully advocated to cap the price of insulin in Virginia. If elected, she will continue to fight insurance and pharmaceutical companies to ensure all individuals can afford necessary healthcare. She supports further expanding access to Medicaid so more Virginians have affordable health coverage. She also wants to create a medical debt relief program in the Commonwealth.

    Levy also advocates for criminal justice reform that will promote community equity. She supports ending qualified immunity, a practice which shields police officers from accountability when violating residents’ civil rights. She is in favor of ending or minimizing jail time for non-violent offenses. She would like to establish civilian oversight of sheriffs’ offices and police departments. She will also work to improve mental health services in the Commonwealth and ensure the criminal justice system treats drug use as an addiction rather than a crime.

    Levy is running against incumbent Delegate Buddy Fowler, a Republican. Fowler has represented the district since 2014. Prior to serving in the legislature, he was a small business owner. Del. Fowler has voted against increasing the minimum wage, legalizing marijuana, increasing health insurance coverage to include abortions, and abolishing the death penalty.

    As a strong community advocate who supports the environment, criminal justice reform, access to affordable healthcare, and public education, Rachel Levy is the most progressive choice for the 55th District.

    Rachel Levy

    Rachel Levy is a teacher and long-time resident of the 55th District. The daughter of two civil rights lawyers, she attended Wesleyan University to become a teacher. She earned her doctorate in educational leadership and policy at Virginia Commonwealth University.
  • The 56th District includes Louisa County, and parts of Goochland, Henrico, and Spotsylvania counties. The district is strongly Republican. Del. McGuire was elected with about 60% of the vote in 2019 and 2017.

    Blakely Lockhart was born in Henrico County where she attended local county schools. She graduated in 2020 from Christopher Newport University (CNU) with a bachelor’s degree in neuroscience. While studying at CNU, she was involved in helping to reinstate the university's NAACP chapter and started organizing voter registration drives. She decided to put off her career in medicine so that she could run for office, intending to become the first Gen-Z member of the legislature.

    As a person living with chronic illness, Lockhart knows the importance of access to affordable healthcare. If elected, she will work to expand health coverage and prioritize protecting individuals with pre-existing conditions. As someone who hopes to become a doctor and whose mother works in a nursing home, Lockhart will support critical frontline healthcare workers, including fighting for fair pay, sufficient benefits, and paid leave. Lockhart also sees addiction as a critical health problem facing the district. She will increase funding for treatment systems and ensure those living in rural areas have equal access to treatment resources.

    Lockhart is a strong advocate for people with disabilities as well. She will prioritize helping individuals living with disabilities get a good education and employment. She will also work to ensure people with disabilities receive sufficient healthcare coverage and access to housing. Additionally, she will strengthen vocational programs in the district to ensure they have equal access to job training and receive equal treatment in the workplace. She will work to guarantee schools are providing specialized instruction to students with disabilities to ensure every student is able to succeed.

    Lockhart loves the natural environment of the 56th District and will work to protect it from environmental damage. She will prioritize investing in clean energy like solar power, making energy cheaper for residents and creating new, good-paying jobs. She will oppose companies that pollute and protect the district’s air, land, and water. She pledged not to accept donations from Dominion and Appalachian Power, ensuring she does not face a conflict of interest and will work on behalf of her constituents rather than energy companies.

    As a graduate of Henrico County Public Schools, Lockhart is passionate about improving public education and making sure our schools are fully funded. She wants to ensure the district’s tax dollars are staying in the district and funding public schools, rather than going to private schools through school voucher programs. She supports increasing teacher salaries and ensuring schools are able to reopen safely during the pandemic. She also supports funding for early childhood education and will see to it that parents have access to high-quality, affordable childcare.

    Lockhart is running against Incumbent Delegate John McGuire (R), who has represented the 56th District since 2018. He is a former Navy SEAL and runs a fitness company. While in the House of Delegates, McGuire has voted against raising the minimum wage and abolishing the death penalty. He also voted against the Virginia Clean Economy Act, marijuana legalization, and Medicaid expansion.

    Due to her support of affordable healthcare, people living with disabilities, the environment, and public education, Blakely Lockhart is the most progressive choice for Virginia’s 56th District.

    Blakely Lockhart

    Blakely Lockhart was born in Henrico County where she attended local county schools. She graduated in 2020 from Christopher Newport University (CNU) with a bachelor’s degree in neuroscience.

  • Virginia’s 88th District includes parts of the counties of Stafford, Spotsylvania, and Fauquier, and the city of Fredericksburg. Voter trends show that the district is strongly Republican. Del. Cole won the 2019 election with over 55% of the vote.

    Kecia Evans was born in New Jersey and moved to Virginia with her family when her father was stationed here. She earned a master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a law degree from Regent University. She works for an agency that advocates for indigent adults and juveniles. She and her husband live in Stafford County with their four children. This is Evans’ first time running for political office.

    As someone who works in the criminal justice field, Evans supports initiatives to reform Virginia’s criminal justice system. Before her campaign, Evans led the Legal Redress and Criminal Justice Committee for the Stafford Branch of the NAACP. Evans believes that our criminal justice system’s focus on punitive measures is not making our communities safer. She wants to reduce mass incarceration by introducing legislation that promotes crime prevention, systems of care, and intervention. She also supports expunging the records of non-violent offenders.

    Evans believes access to affordable, quality healthcare is a human right. She wants to expand Medicaid more so that affordable healthcare is available to more Virginians. If elected, Evans hopes to prioritize legislation that addresses disparities in access to coverage across racial, geographic, and gender identities. She will push for lower insurance premiums and lowering the cost of prescription drugs. Evans is a supporter of reproductive rights and quality reproductive healthcare.

    Evans supports increased funding for Virginia’s public education system. She believes that teachers should be paid above the national average to prevent high turnover and Virginia should have universal pre-K. She wants to address Virginia’s educator shortage, repair failing infrastructure, and reduce classroom sizes. Evans also plans to make sure that special education and mental health programs are fully funded so that all students in our schools are receiving the best opportunities.

    If elected, Evans hopes to push for policies so that all Virginians have access to quality jobs and economic opportunities. Her goal is to support legislation that creates more workforce and skills-training programs to prepare Virginians for in-demand jobs. She wants to work towards ensuring small businesses are protected and able to thrive against larger corporations. She also wants businesses that provide employment opportunities to veterans, military families, and people with disabilities.

    Evans is running against Republican candidate Philip Scott and Libertarian candidate Timothy Lewis. Scott is a business owner and supports creating deliberate barriers to voting access. He opposes common-sense measures meant to keep communities safe from gun violence. Lewis is a veteran who wants to use taxpayer money to fund private education and opposes gun violence prevention measures.

    Due to her support of criminal justice reform, access to affordable healthcare, public education, and working families, Kecia Evans is the most progressive choice in this race.

    Kecia Evans

    Kecia Evans was born in New Jersey and moved to Virginia with her family when her father was stationed here. She earned a master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a law degree from Regent University. She works for an agency that advocates for indigent adults and juveniles.

District Offices

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below county races on your ballot.

  • Born in Charleston, SC, Baron Braswell moved to Virginia Beach where he graduated from Kellam High School. He went on to study political science at Virginia State University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude before joining the Army. He was elected to the Spotsylvania School Board in 2014, and is currently serving his fourth term. Braswell sits on advisory boards at the University of Mary Washington and Germanna Community College. He and his wife have two children.

    Braswell has served on the school board for the past seven and a half years. Each year he advocated for better pay for teachers, bus drivers, support staff, and coaches. He was also a major budget driver on restructuring health insurance in the school division. This led to millions of dollars in savings. During his time on the school board, he advocated for more accessible sports participation by lowering fees for student athletes.

    Braswell advocates for updating the county’s infrastructure. While on the school board, he pushed for the major renovation of Courtland High School, as well as the installation of artificial turf at five high schools. The school’s renovation came in at half the average cost of a new high school and led to a gold award for design from the Virginia School Boards Association. In the midst of the pandemic, he recognized the area’s growing need for broadband services.

    Promoting economic development and increasing access to opportunity are high on Braswell’s list of priorities. He praised efforts of the Spotsylvania County Schools to contract two years of state field hockey tournaments with the Virginia High School League. He encourages similar partnerships with businesses across the county. As a school board member, he was a leader in growing support for students’ extracurricular activities and started a region wide chess tournament for students. He advocated for expanding the Career and College pathways programs to include a variety of tracks including veterinary science, visual and performing arts, and cybersecurity.

    Along with his family, he hosts a run in honor of his late son, dedicated to reducing teen violence. Braswell sat on a panel along with area leaders to discuss race relations around Fredericksburg. He also championed the name change of R.E. Lee Elementary School to Spotsylvania Elementary School. He has stated that access to an equitable education must be a priority to end systemic injustice, pushing for local governments to better fund education.

    Baron Braswell is challenging conservative incumbent Supervisor Chris Yakabouski (R). Yakabouski has lived in Spotsylvania for 30 years. He has two children enrolled in Spotsylvania Public schools, and he strongly supports SROs in every school and has pledged to back law enforcement. He has labeled himself the “conservative voice” on the board of supervisors.

    Braswell is also challenging previous House of Delegates candidate Nick Ignacio. Nick Ignacio’s 2017 campaign focused on enforcing immigration laws, strengthening Second Amendment rights, and limiting abortion access. He is regional tea party chairman and was responsible for organizing an anti-mask rally. While making comments at a school board meeting, he refused to wear a mask and removed protective barriers at the podium. During another incident, he had to be removed from a school board meeting. He has been known to make use anti-gay slurs.

    Due to his history of increasing accessibility to opportunities for students, updating infrastructure, and his commitment to reducing teen violence, Baron Braswell is the most progressive choice in this race.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Baron Braswell

    Born in Charleston, SC, Baron Braswell moved to Virginia Beach where he graduated from Kellam High School. He went on to study political science at Virginia State University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude before joining the Army.

    Baron Braswell

    Born in Charleston, SC, Baron Braswell moved to Virginia Beach where he graduated from Kellam High School. He went on to study political science at Virginia State University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude before joining the Army.
  • Nicole Cole is a Virginia native who holds a bachelor’s degree in management from the University of Maryland College Park and a master’s degree in finance from Northwestern University. She owns and operates two financial planning businesses, The College Money Team and Nicole Cole Financial Services Group, LLC. She currently serves as a member of the Citizens Budget Review Committee. She is a mother to three children that are currently enrolled in the Spotsylvania school system.

    Cole is an advocate for the emotional developmental needs of children. She hopes to develop a school system that is an open and safe environment for students and staff to receive mental health services as needed. She supports investing in mental health programs for students and educating students and staff on mental illness. If elected, she plans to direct funds from the county’s annual budget to support mental health awareness and information for students and educators.

    She pushes for education that encourages goal creation and provides children with better focus and more opportunities. She believes this is the key to achieving high student success and graduation rates. Cole believes the county should invest more in programs that help to integrate career pathways into curriculums and learning objectives. By connecting learning with career options, she hopes kids will graduate with rewarding careers or vocations. Cole is also in support of innovative learning centers for those interested in STEM programs, the arts, or teaching.

    Cole stresses the importance of accountability in regards to the finances of the school district, having advocated for increased school funding since 2018. She believes that children and education are the best investments and supports increasing resources for teachers. Cole voiced her dismay towards the Spotsylvania Board of Supervisors who voted against fully funding the 2022 SCPS budget. She also notes that Spotsylvania education has been defunded for over a decade.

    When it comes to COVID-19 recovery efforts, Cole has expressed that leading by example is a civic duty. She has shared support of vaccination efforts, as well as masks, noting the latter as a necessity for children returning to school in person. She also showed support for the Child Tax Credit from the American Rescue Plan. Additionally, Cole recognizes the connection between the pandemic and the teacher shortage, as well as its impact on the community.

    Cole is running against Larry DiBella for the Battlefield district school board seat. DiBella is a former SRO who advocated for ending the school-to-prison pipeline. Due to her support of mental health services for students and a history of advocating for school funding, Cole is the more progressive choice in this election.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Nicole Cole

    Nicole Cole is a Virginia native who holds a bachelor’s degree in management from the University of Maryland College Park and a master’s degree in finance from Northwestern University.

    Nicole Cole

    Nicole Cole is a Virginia native who holds a bachelor’s degree in management from the University of Maryland College Park and a master’s degree in finance from Northwestern University.
  • Spotsylvania native Erin Grampp was first elected to the school board in 2014 and previously served as its chairwoman. She attended Spotsylvania County Public Schools and graduated from Mary Washington College with a bachelor’s degree in economics. Grampp is the owner of EKG Stables at Hill Valley Farm and a certified riding instructor. After her election, she received the Virginia School Board Association’s Distinguished School Board Member award for three years (2014, 2015, and 2016).

    As a member of the school board, Grampp has become well known for her strict interpretation of Virginia law. When matters are presented to the school board, she reminds fellow board members and the community that the school board does not have the authority to make laws. During the COVID-19 pandemic, as many people formed opposing opinions in regards to state and CDC guidelines, Grampp has been a leading force in reminding community members that the school board does not have the power to overturn any federal or state mandates.

    Grampp uses her knowledge of economics to assist and educate community members on budget constraints. She was responsible for a budget amendment that allowed for a 5.5% increase for all Spotsylvania County Public School employees. This same budget amendment was intended to attract and retain more bus drivers and other school staff members. By investing in school staff, she hopes to see improvements in the quality of the education students receive.

    Grampp continues to support a more individualized approach to education, and she pushes for programs that allow students to learn and pursue different educational tracks. She was an instrumental supporter in establishing new cyber technology programs for the school system. In adapting to the pandemic, she supported a hybrid education model that would keep students safe and still provide them with in-person learning. She also is in support of providing schools with funding for more mental health resources.

    Grampp is facing a challenge from April Gillespie., who previously challenged Grampp for the Berkeley seat in 2017. Gillespie is an active member of the Spotsylvania school community and previously served as vice president of the PTO. She opposes mask mandates in schools and has stated that she would never seek an endorsement from teachers’ unions or the NAACP.

    Due to her commitment to raising teacher and school staff pay, Grampp is the progressive choice in this election.
    Last updated: 2021-09-15

    Erin Grampp

    Spotsylvania native Erin Grampp was first elected to the school board in 2014 and previously served as its chairwoman. She attended Spotsylvania County Public Schools and graduated from Mary Washington College with a bachelor’s degree in economics.

    Erin Grampp

    Spotsylvania native Erin Grampp was first elected to the school board in 2014 and previously served as its chairwoman. She attended Spotsylvania County Public Schools and graduated from Mary Washington College with a bachelor’s degree in economics.

No Recommendation

Incumbent Lisa Phelps was first elected to the Lee District seat in 2017 after defeating Kathryn Palmer. That same year, Phelps received the Spotsylvania Republican Committee’s endorsement. As schools prepared to open, Phelps voted against CDC guidelines requiring universal masking. Phelps once used an Anti-Racism Resolution as means to suggest she was being targeted by another member of the board; even going as far as suggesting that a black member of the board would not understand her trauma.

Lisa Phelps will be challenged by independent Richard Lieberman. He is self-employed in the insurance industry and sports memorabilia industry. However, a lack of other online information about him means we cannot guarantee he will make progressive choices.

Given Phelp’s opposition to government efforts to protect communities during the pandemic, we do not have a recommendation in this race. However, we still encourage you to show up to vote by writing in a name for this race and casting your vote in the other races on your ballot.