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Vote Yes on Measure D San Diego

Measure D would amend the process by which San Diego’s auditor -- the person responsible for investigating waste, fraud, and abuse for the city -- is appointed. At present, the auditor is appointed by the mayor, but Measure D would amend the San Diego City Charter to allow the City Council to appoint the auditor instead. The purpose of the change is to ensure the auditor is as independent as possible, and the measure has unanimous support from the City Council and Mayor’s office itself. In fact, it hasn’t attracted any real opposition. 

Under Measure D, the Audit Committee would forward a minimum of three nominees to the full City Council, which would then make the final hiring decision. It would also limit the auditor to two five-year terms. An independent auditor’s office is important and, after the chaos of the previous auditor’s resignation in 2018 that led to the city government going without oversight for a spell, reforming the process is a worthy goal. 

Vote YES on Measure D.

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D
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Vote Yes on Measure D San Diego
Call to Action
Vote YES on Measure D, City Auditor Selection and Term Charter Amendment
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Yes
State

Vote YES on Measure C San Diego

As is so often the case with local propositions and ballot initiatives, the debate over San Diego’s Measure C has taken a bizarre, nit-picky turn. The bulk of the measure is relatively non-controversial and would slightly increase the tax rate on certain San Diego hotel rooms to pay for an expansion of the convention center itself. Much of the tourism industry is in favor of the measure because the convention center provides a hefty chunk of business, and local taxpayers wouldn’t be on the hook for any of the funds. 

Advocates claim the measure could raise more than $6 billion over the next four decades, with 59% of the money going to the convention center project and the remaining 41% going to community projects. That’s where the controversy starts, however. That 41% would be earmarked for infrastructure spending and programs combating homelessness. Opponents are worried that the measure isn’t specific enough about what kinds of homelessness programs that money will be spent on, and advocates for the chronically unhoused are additionally concerned that the sum Measure C would raise will fall far short of the $1.9 billion necessary to enact the city’s already-written 10-year homelessness plan. That could give the appearance of a funding solution while simultaneously making it incredibly difficult to get their plan - a $900 million housing bond that would pay for new units of affordable housing - onto the ballot in November. Several City Council members have even indicated that if Measure C passes, they will no longer support that bond measure, which is a frustrating turn.

Ultimately, San Diego residents should push for both, not allow themselves to be backed into picking one or the other. Measure C would require a two-thirds majority to pass and is not a substitute for other funds necessary to combat homelessness, but funding is funding and the city should devote as many resources to addressing their housing crisis as possible. 

Vote YES on Measure C.

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C
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Sample Ballot Description
Vote YES on Measure C San Diego
Call to Action
Vote YES on Measure C, Lodging Tax for Convention Center Expansion, Street Repairs, and Homelessness Programs
Sample Ballot Checked?
Yes
State

Todd Gloria

Todd Gloria is a lifelong San Diegan, and grew up in Clairemont. According to campaign materials, he is running for San Diego Mayor to continue to work to align his public service with his philosophy that public systems should work dynamically to benefit all members of a community, not just the wealthy and connected.

Gloria is a California State Assemblymember representing the 78th Assembly District, and does this work to find legislative solutions to the issues affecting his community, like affordable housing, gun violence prevention, and climate change. He was elected to this seat in 2016, and served as the Assistant Majority Whip before assuming his current role of Majority Whip. Early in his career, Gloria worked for the County of San Diego's Health and Human Services Agency, and worked as the District Director for Congresswoman Susan Davis. He served 8 years in the San Diego City Council, eventually acting as Interim Mayor, and authoring an aggressive and nationally recognized Climate Action Plan. Gloria was a popular and accessible member of city government, advocating for local infrastructure projects, championing LGBTQ rights, and working to raise the city's minimum wage. 

Gloria is running against Barbara Bry, Rich Riel, Scott Sherman, Gita Applebaum Singh, and Tasha Williamson for this open seat. As an Assemblymember in 2019, he scored a 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of a legislator's progressive voting records. Gloria is the progressive choice because of his history of demonstrated leadership, and his track record of successfully working to pass legislation that benefits diverse communities in the region.

According to our analysis, Todd Gloria is the strongest choice for progressive leadership in office.
 

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https://toddgloria.com/
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https://toddgloria.com/endorsements/
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