• VOTE YES

    We recommend voting YES.

  • The Denver Housing and Sheltering System Bonds would provide $38.6 million funding for shelters and facilities for people experiencing homelessness while not altering Denver's tax rate. It will fund the purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, support the purchase, conversion, or construction of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters, create over 400 jobs, and fund improvements to existing shelters. This will continue efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver which has seen an increase in residents experiencing homelessness due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The Denver Housing and Sheltering System Bonds would provide $38.6 million funding for shelters and facilities for people experiencing homelessness while not altering Denver's tax rate. It will fund the purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, support the purchase, conversion, or construction of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters, create over 400 jobs, and fund improvements to existing shelters. This will continue efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver which has seen an increase in residents experiencing homelessness due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • No Position

    We are neutral on Proposition 119.

  • The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

    The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

  • Endorsed By: The Bell Policy Center
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Initiated Ordinance 303 would ban anyone from camping in the Denver area, with the exception of four permitted sites, without receiving written permission from the property’s owner. It would grant the power of enforcement of this ban to residents, who would be allowed to sue the city if it didn’t remove people from these sites within 72 hours.
    The effect would be not only to further criminalize those experiencing homelessness, but it would embolden any un-elected person to act as an enforcement agency unto themselves.


    Homelessness and a dearth of affordable housing is a huge problem in Denver, and one which requires more nuanced solutions and funding. This initiative provides for none of these things, while further endangering our most marginalized neighbors and wasting needed resources.

    The Initiated Ordinance 303 would ban anyone from camping in the Denver area, with the exception of four permitted sites, without receiving written permission from the property’s owner. It would grant the power of enforcement of this ban to residents, who would be allowed to sue the city if it didn’t remove people from these sites within 72 hours.
    The effect would be not only to further criminalize those experiencing homelessness, but it would embolden any un-elected person to act as an enforcement agency unto themselves.


    Homelessness and a dearth of affordable housing is a huge problem in Denver, and one which requires more nuanced solutions and funding. This initiative provides for none of these things, while further endangering our most marginalized neighbors and wasting needed resources.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The "Enough Taxes Already" Initiative would lower and cap from here forward, Denver’s aggregate sale sand use tax rate, from 4.81% to 4.5%.
    It would require the city to stop new sales or use taxes — even if voters approve new ones — above this 4.5% cap.

     

    This initiative would impact the city’s overall revenue and reduce funding for services -- an estimated cut of $4.7 to 8 million dollars before the end of 2021, followed by $50-80 million in cuts in 2022 and every year after. This slash in funding would rob Denver residents of the very improvements that they have overwhelmingly voted to approve, such as road repairs, park maintenance, fire protection, mental health and homeless services. The effect would be undermining Denver voters’ stated priorities in favor of small gains for a select few.

    The "Enough Taxes Already" Initiative would lower and cap from here forward, Denver’s aggregate sale sand use tax rate, from 4.81% to 4.5%.
    It would require the city to stop new sales or use taxes — even if voters approve new ones — above this 4.5% cap.

     

    This initiative would impact the city’s overall revenue and reduce funding for services -- an estimated cut of $4.7 to 8 million dollars before the end of 2021, followed by $50-80 million in cuts in 2022 and every year after. This slash in funding would rob Denver residents of the very improvements that they have overwhelmingly voted to approve, such as road repairs, park maintenance, fire protection, mental health and homeless services. The effect would be undermining Denver voters’ stated priorities in favor of small gains for a select few.

  • VOTE YES

    We recommend voting YES.

  • The Denver Housing and Sheltering System Bonds would provide $38.6 million funding for shelters and facilities for people experiencing homelessness while not altering Denver's tax rate. It will fund the purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, support the purchase, conversion, or construction of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters, create over 400 jobs, and fund improvements to existing shelters. This will continue efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver which has seen an increase in residents experiencing homelessness due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The Denver Housing and Sheltering System Bonds would provide $38.6 million funding for shelters and facilities for people experiencing homelessness while not altering Denver's tax rate. It will fund the purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, support the purchase, conversion, or construction of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters, create over 400 jobs, and fund improvements to existing shelters. This will continue efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver which has seen an increase in residents experiencing homelessness due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The "Safe and Sound" Measure repeals the group living amendment approved by Denver City Council. The previously approved measure allows up to five unrelated adults to legally live together (the legal limit is currently only two unrelated adults to live together).


    This would take away affordable housing options for low-income and working families, reduce the number of available plots for halfway homes, and undo progress made to provide support for seniors and and those with physical or development disabilities.

    The "Safe and Sound" Measure repeals the group living amendment approved by Denver City Council. The previously approved measure allows up to five unrelated adults to legally live together (the legal limit is currently only two unrelated adults to live together).


    This would take away affordable housing options for low-income and working families, reduce the number of available plots for halfway homes, and undo progress made to provide support for seniors and and those with physical or development disabilities.