• Kelly Bates

  • Incumbent Director Kelly Bates is running for re-election to represent District D on the Cherry Creek School Board. Bates was first elected in 2017 and currently serves as the board’s Vice President. Bates is a mother of five children who went through the Cherry Creek school district and previously worked as a preschool teacher. She has servedon numerous volunteer committees within the district since 2004, when her first child started elementary school.


    In her time on the board, Bates prioritized student safety by expanding the district’s mental health services, working closely with state and local health departments on COVID-19 protocols, and served as the school board liaison for the district’s Safety and Security Task Force. Bates has participated in the district’s Beyond Diversity Training and is committing to tackling her own unconscious biases and creating a more equitable district. One of her primary goals is to foster a nurturing environment for students of all backgrounds, races, sexualities, and abilities.


    Bates’ opponents are Jennifer Gibbons and Schumé Navarro. Gibbons is a mother of four and a Doctor of Audiology. In 2016, she founded Heritage Heights Academy, a charter school within the district. Gibbons wants to apply her experiences from founding a small charter school to the entire school district, despite significant differences in scale and student population. Gibbons has also played “both sides” when it comes to basic COVID-19 public health practices like mask wearing. When asked about the number one issue facing the school district, Gibbons did not mention the pandemic, closing the achievement gap, or student equity. To her, the number one issue facing the district is “division.” Gibbons is not the progressive choice.


    Bates’ other opponent, Schumé Navarro is a QAnon conspiracy theorist campaigning against the science-backed COVID safety measures of mask-wearing and vaccines. Notably, she attended the January 6th insurrection in Washington DC and is pushing the manufactured hysteria around the teaching of “critical race theory” in schools (they do not teach critical race theory in the district). Navarro would be a disaster for the school district.


    Kelly Bates deserves your vote for District D. Her experience, policies, and endorsements from partner organizations make her the clear progressive choice in this election.

    Incumbent Director Kelly Bates is running for re-election to represent District D on the Cherry Creek School Board. Bates was first elected in 2017 and currently serves as the board’s Vice President. Bates is a mother of five children who went through the Cherry Creek school district and previously worked as a preschool teacher. She has servedon numerous volunteer committees within the district since 2004, when her first child started elementary school.


    In her time on the board, Bates prioritized student safety by expanding the district’s mental health services, working closely with state and local health departments on COVID-19 protocols, and served as the school board liaison for the district’s Safety and Security Task Force. Bates has participated in the district’s Beyond Diversity Training and is committing to tackling her own unconscious biases and creating a more equitable district. One of her primary goals is to foster a nurturing environment for students of all backgrounds, races, sexualities, and abilities.


    Bates’ opponents are Jennifer Gibbons and Schumé Navarro. Gibbons is a mother of four and a Doctor of Audiology. In 2016, she founded Heritage Heights Academy, a charter school within the district. Gibbons wants to apply her experiences from founding a small charter school to the entire school district, despite significant differences in scale and student population. Gibbons has also played “both sides” when it comes to basic COVID-19 public health practices like mask wearing. When asked about the number one issue facing the school district, Gibbons did not mention the pandemic, closing the achievement gap, or student equity. To her, the number one issue facing the district is “division.” Gibbons is not the progressive choice.


    Bates’ other opponent, Schumé Navarro is a QAnon conspiracy theorist campaigning against the science-backed COVID safety measures of mask-wearing and vaccines. Notably, she attended the January 6th insurrection in Washington DC and is pushing the manufactured hysteria around the teaching of “critical race theory” in schools (they do not teach critical race theory in the district). Navarro would be a disaster for the school district.


    Kelly Bates deserves your vote for District D. Her experience, policies, and endorsements from partner organizations make her the clear progressive choice in this election.

    Kelly Bates

    Incumbent Director Kelly Bates is running for re-election to represent District D on the Cherry Creek School Board. Bates was first elected in 2017 and currently serves as the board’s Vice President. Bates is a mother of five children who went through the Cherry Creek school district and previously worked as a preschool teacher. She has servedon numerous volunteer committees within the district since 2004, when her first child started elementary school.


    In her time on the board, Bates prioritized student safety by expanding the district’s mental health services, working closely with state and local health departments on COVID-19 protocols, and served as the school board liaison for the district’s Safety and Security Task Force. Bates has participated in the district’s Beyond Diversity Training and is committing to tackling her own unconscious biases and creating a more equitable district. One of her primary goals is to foster a nurturing environment for students of all backgrounds, races, sexualities, and abilities.


    Bates’ opponents are Jennifer Gibbons and Schumé Navarro. Gibbons is a mother of four and a Doctor of Audiology. In 2016, she founded Heritage Heights Academy, a charter school within the district. Gibbons wants to apply her experiences from founding a small charter school to the entire school district, despite significant differences in scale and student population. Gibbons has also played “both sides” when it comes to basic COVID-19 public health practices like mask wearing. When asked about the number one issue facing the school district, Gibbons did not mention the pandemic, closing the achievement gap, or student equity. To her, the number one issue facing the district is “division.” Gibbons is not the progressive choice.


    Bates’ other opponent, Schumé Navarro is a QAnon conspiracy theorist campaigning against the science-backed COVID safety measures of mask-wearing and vaccines. Notably, she attended the January 6th insurrection in Washington DC and is pushing the manufactured hysteria around the teaching of “critical race theory” in schools (they do not teach critical race theory in the district). Navarro would be a disaster for the school district.


    Kelly Bates deserves your vote for District D. Her experience, policies, and endorsements from partner organizations make her the clear progressive choice in this election.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • No Position

    We are neutral on Proposition 119.

  • The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

    The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

  • Endorsed By: The Bell Policy Center
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

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