School Board

  • Jessica Zamora was appointed to the Poudre School District in August of 2021 and has two children currently attending PSD schools. Zamora served on the District Advisory Board and the Poudre Schools District PTA. Zamora taught high-school mathematics for four years and has taught GED students in all pre-examination content areas including language arts, social studies, science, and mathematics.
    Jessica Zamora was appointed to the Poudre School District in August of 2021 and has two children currently attending PSD schools. Zamora served on the District Advisory Board and the Poudre Schools District PTA. Zamora taught high-school mathematics for four years and has taught GED students in all pre-examination content areas including language arts, social studies, science, and mathematics.

    Jessica Zamora

    Jessica Zamora was appointed to the Poudre School District in August of 2021 and has two children currently attending PSD schools. Zamora served on the District Advisory Board and the Poudre Schools District PTA. Zamora taught high-school mathematics for four years and has taught GED students in all pre-examination content areas including language arts, social studies, science, and mathematics.
  • Kristen Draper was originally elected to the Pourdre School Board in 2017. Draper served as president of the PTO at Tavelli Elementary, where her two children attended before graduation from high schools in PSD. Draper has volunteered with the LGBTQ+ advocacy group Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) since 2014, and has an established record as a champion for equity in public education. Draper holds an MA in Educational Media and technology from the University of Northern Colorado.
    Kristen Draper was originally elected to the Pourdre School Board in 2017. Draper served as president of the PTO at Tavelli Elementary, where her two children attended before graduation from high schools in PSD. Draper has volunteered with the LGBTQ+ advocacy group Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) since 2014, and has an established record as a champion for equity in public education. Draper holds an MA in Educational Media and technology from the University of Northern Colorado.

    Kristen Draper

    Kristen Draper was originally elected to the Pourdre School Board in 2017. Draper served as president of the PTO at Tavelli Elementary, where her two children attended before graduation from high schools in PSD. Draper has volunteered with the LGBTQ+ advocacy group Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) since 2014, and has an established record as a champion for equity in public education. Draper holds an MA in Educational Media and technology from the University of Northern Colorado.
  • Jim Brokish is a former Hewlett-Packard manager and founding Board of Directors member of the Discovery Center Science Museum in Fort Collins. Brokish is running on a platform of "exellence, equity, and support," with a focus on equal access and inclusivity for disadvantaged students lacking basic needs like food and housing, ESL students, and inclusivity for LGBTQ+ students.
    Jim Brokish is a former Hewlett-Packard manager and founding Board of Directors member of the Discovery Center Science Museum in Fort Collins. Brokish is running on a platform of "exellence, equity, and support," with a focus on equal access and inclusivity for disadvantaged students lacking basic needs like food and housing, ESL students, and inclusivity for LGBTQ+ students.

    Jim Brokish

    Jim Brokish is a former Hewlett-Packard manager and founding Board of Directors member of the Discovery Center Science Museum in Fort Collins. Brokish is running on a platform of "exellence, equity, and support," with a focus on equal access and inclusivity for disadvantaged students lacking basic needs like food and housing, ESL students, and inclusivity for LGBTQ+ students.
  • Carolyn Reed grew up in then-rural Wellington and graduated from Poudre High School in 1978. Reed's three children and three step-children have all attended Poudre district public schools, giving Reed a unique perspective on transportation issues in rural areas of the district. Appointed to the PSD Board in 2014, Reed was instrumental in planning and funding high schools for the rapidly growing towns of Wellington and Timnath.
    Carolyn Reed grew up in then-rural Wellington and graduated from Poudre High School in 1978. Reed's three children and three step-children have all attended Poudre district public schools, giving Reed a unique perspective on transportation issues in rural areas of the district. Appointed to the PSD Board in 2014, Reed was instrumental in planning and funding high schools for the rapidly growing towns of Wellington and Timnath.

    Carolyn Reed

    Carolyn Reed grew up in then-rural Wellington and graduated from Poudre High School in 1978. Reed's three children and three step-children have all attended Poudre district public schools, giving Reed a unique perspective on transportation issues in rural areas of the district. Appointed to the PSD Board in 2014, Reed was instrumental in planning and funding high schools for the rapidly growing towns of Wellington and Timnath.
  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Amy Doran

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • No Position

    We are neutral on Proposition 119.

  • The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

    The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

  • Endorsed By: The Bell Policy Center
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.