Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Anita Seitz is running for Mayor of Westminster. Seitz currently holds the position after previous mayor Herb Atchison resigned earlier in 2021. She was first elected to City Council in 2013 and served as Mayor Protem from 2018 to May of this year. Seitz brings clear headed leadership to the role of mayor and addresses difficult city challenges with grace, confidence, and a forward looking vision. Seitz is a committed climate activist, previously serving as president for Colorado Communities for Climate Action and led Westminster to adopt environmentally conscious ordinances and policies. Her climate work garnered her national recognition as a leader on addressing issues related to climate change at the local municipal level. As Westminster and the northern Front Range grows in population and size, Seitz has a vision for economic and communal development that includes equity, sustainable growth, and increased quality of life.


    Challenging Seitz is Nancy McNally. McNally is a former Westminster mayor and owner of the embroidery/crafting store, “Made and Created.” McNally’s campaign website lacks an “issues” section, but her social media presence makes clear that one of her main priorities is lowering water rates. McNally’s attitude is one that ignores the realities of climate change and dwindling water use in favor of empowering home owners to over-water their thirsty, Kentucky bluegrass lawns. While McNally brings extensive executive experience, her vision for the city does not match its future needs.


    Seitz has the experience, leadership, and sustainable vision for the city of Westminster. She deserves your vote.

    Anita Seitz is running for Mayor of Westminster. Seitz currently holds the position after previous mayor Herb Atchison resigned earlier in 2021. She was first elected to City Council in 2013 and served as Mayor Protem from 2018 to May of this year. Seitz brings clear headed leadership to the role of mayor and addresses difficult city challenges with grace, confidence, and a forward looking vision. Seitz is a committed climate activist, previously serving as president for Colorado Communities for Climate Action and led Westminster to adopt environmentally conscious ordinances and policies. Her climate work garnered her national recognition as a leader on addressing issues related to climate change at the local municipal level. As Westminster and the northern Front Range grows in population and size, Seitz has a vision for economic and communal development that includes equity, sustainable growth, and increased quality of life.


    Challenging Seitz is Nancy McNally. McNally is a former Westminster mayor and owner of the embroidery/crafting store, “Made and Created.” McNally’s campaign website lacks an “issues” section, but her social media presence makes clear that one of her main priorities is lowering water rates. McNally’s attitude is one that ignores the realities of climate change and dwindling water use in favor of empowering home owners to over-water their thirsty, Kentucky bluegrass lawns. While McNally brings extensive executive experience, her vision for the city does not match its future needs.


    Seitz has the experience, leadership, and sustainable vision for the city of Westminster. She deserves your vote.

    Anita Seitz

    Anita Seitz is running for Mayor of Westminster. Seitz currently holds the position after previous mayor Herb Atchison resigned earlier in 2021. She was first elected to City Council in 2013 and served as Mayor Protem from 2018 to May of this year. Seitz brings clear headed leadership to the role of mayor and addresses difficult city challenges with grace, confidence, and a forward looking vision. Seitz is a committed climate activist, previously serving as president for Colorado Communities for Climate Action and led Westminster to adopt environmentally conscious ordinances and policies. Her climate work garnered her national recognition as a leader on addressing issues related to climate change at the local municipal level. As Westminster and the northern Front Range grows in population and size, Seitz has a vision for economic and communal development that includes equity, sustainable growth, and increased quality of life.


    Challenging Seitz is Nancy McNally. McNally is a former Westminster mayor and owner of the embroidery/crafting store, “Made and Created.” McNally’s campaign website lacks an “issues” section, but her social media presence makes clear that one of her main priorities is lowering water rates. McNally’s attitude is one that ignores the realities of climate change and dwindling water use in favor of empowering home owners to over-water their thirsty, Kentucky bluegrass lawns. While McNally brings extensive executive experience, her vision for the city does not match its future needs.


    Seitz has the experience, leadership, and sustainable vision for the city of Westminster. She deserves your vote.

  • John Voelz is running for reelection to Westminster City Council. With him, he brings 30 years of experience in the public sector and public affairs. Voelz survived a misguided recall attempt last summer from local right-wing zealots upset with higher water utility bills. However, the vote to increase water prices in a tiered-system happened in 2018, before Voelz ever joined city council. The voters of Westminster saw through the recall shenanigans and voted to keep him in office.


    One of his top priorities is expanding and maintaining the city’s open space and parks, which is crucial in attracting new businesses and economic activity. Voelz is committed to setting up the city for a sustainable future and wants to upgrade much needed transportation, water, and sewer infrastructure. Councilman Voelz has shown resilience and deserves to continue his work and is a solid progressive choice.

    John Voelz is running for reelection to Westminster City Council. With him, he brings 30 years of experience in the public sector and public affairs. Voelz survived a misguided recall attempt last summer from local right-wing zealots upset with higher water utility bills. However, the vote to increase water prices in a tiered-system happened in 2018, before Voelz ever joined city council. The voters of Westminster saw through the recall shenanigans and voted to keep him in office.


    One of his top priorities is expanding and maintaining the city’s open space and parks, which is crucial in attracting new businesses and economic activity. Voelz is committed to setting up the city for a sustainable future and wants to upgrade much needed transportation, water, and sewer infrastructure. Councilman Voelz has shown resilience and deserves to continue his work and is a solid progressive choice.

    Jon L. Voelz

    John Voelz is running for reelection to Westminster City Council. With him, he brings 30 years of experience in the public sector and public affairs. Voelz survived a misguided recall attempt last summer from local right-wing zealots upset with higher water utility bills. However, the vote to increase water prices in a tiered-system happened in 2018, before Voelz ever joined city council. The voters of Westminster saw through the recall shenanigans and voted to keep him in office.


    One of his top priorities is expanding and maintaining the city’s open space and parks, which is crucial in attracting new businesses and economic activity. Voelz is committed to setting up the city for a sustainable future and wants to upgrade much needed transportation, water, and sewer infrastructure. Councilman Voelz has shown resilience and deserves to continue his work and is a solid progressive choice.

  • Kathryn Scully is running for re-election to Westminster City Council. Scully is a Community College professor, a mother of two children, and heavily involved in Westminster through her kids’ PTA and a number of other civic organizations. Scully values open communication and accessibility. Her focus on making Westminster a welcoming and equitable community as well as her work with other progressive members of the City Council make her a clear progressive choice. Her endorsements from partner organizations are also helpful.
    Kathryn Scully is running for re-election to Westminster City Council. Scully is a Community College professor, a mother of two children, and heavily involved in Westminster through her kids’ PTA and a number of other civic organizations. Scully values open communication and accessibility. Her focus on making Westminster a welcoming and equitable community as well as her work with other progressive members of the City Council make her a clear progressive choice. Her endorsements from partner organizations are also helpful.

    Kathryn Skulley

    Kathryn Scully is running for re-election to Westminster City Council. Scully is a Community College professor, a mother of two children, and heavily involved in Westminster through her kids’ PTA and a number of other civic organizations. Scully values open communication and accessibility. Her focus on making Westminster a welcoming and equitable community as well as her work with other progressive members of the City Council make her a clear progressive choice. Her endorsements from partner organizations are also helpful.
  • Obi Ezeadi is running for one of four open positions on Westminster City Council. Ezeadi is a successful entrepreneur with experience in the transportation, healthcare, real estate, and technology sectors. As first-generation American and the son of Nigerian immigrants, Ezeadi’s upbringing was rife with poverty and struggle. His background fighting through adversity grounds his vision for a more just and equitable Westminster.


    Ezeadi participates in civic life by giving financial expertise to those without access and has served on the Westminster Election Commission since 2019. In a city that is 36% non-white, Ezeadi would bring much needed diversity and representation to the all-White city council. His upbringing, professional resume, and progressive values make Ezeadi an easy choice for Westminster city council.

    Obi Ezeadi is running for one of four open positions on Westminster City Council. Ezeadi is a successful entrepreneur with experience in the transportation, healthcare, real estate, and technology sectors. As first-generation American and the son of Nigerian immigrants, Ezeadi’s upbringing was rife with poverty and struggle. His background fighting through adversity grounds his vision for a more just and equitable Westminster.


    Ezeadi participates in civic life by giving financial expertise to those without access and has served on the Westminster Election Commission since 2019. In a city that is 36% non-white, Ezeadi would bring much needed diversity and representation to the all-White city council. His upbringing, professional resume, and progressive values make Ezeadi an easy choice for Westminster city council.

    Obi Ezeadi

    Obi Ezeadi is running for one of four open positions on Westminster City Council. Ezeadi is a successful entrepreneur with experience in the transportation, healthcare, real estate, and technology sectors. As first-generation American and the son of Nigerian immigrants, Ezeadi’s upbringing was rife with poverty and struggle. His background fighting through adversity grounds his vision for a more just and equitable Westminster.


    Ezeadi participates in civic life by giving financial expertise to those without access and has served on the Westminster Election Commission since 2019. In a city that is 36% non-white, Ezeadi would bring much needed diversity and representation to the all-White city council. His upbringing, professional resume, and progressive values make Ezeadi an easy choice for Westminster city council.

  • Sarah Nurmella is an urban planner running for one of Westminster’s four at-large city council seats. She has lived in Westminster for the last 10 years and has a very impressive background and qualifications for a City Council job including masters degrees in architecture and urban planning. Nurmella worked as a Westminster city-planner for 8 years, giving her granular knowledge perfect for the job. Lead comprehensive city planning. She has also served in a volunteer capacity on the city’s Environmental Advisory Board, ensuring that the city growth and actions have thorough environmental impact analysis.


    Nurmella’s platform emphasizes strategic growth for the city, increasing affordable housing, diversifying industries, and updating the city's aging infrastructure to be resilient in the face of climate change.


    In a city like Westminster where resource management and growth are hugely important issues, Nurmella would be an excellent addition to this City Council. Her resume and her endorsements speak to her progressive strengths.

    Sarah Nurmella is an urban planner running for one of Westminster’s four at-large city council seats. She has lived in Westminster for the last 10 years and has a very impressive background and qualifications for a City Council job including masters degrees in architecture and urban planning. Nurmella worked as a Westminster city-planner for 8 years, giving her granular knowledge perfect for the job. Lead comprehensive city planning. She has also served in a volunteer capacity on the city’s Environmental Advisory Board, ensuring that the city growth and actions have thorough environmental impact analysis.


    Nurmella’s platform emphasizes strategic growth for the city, increasing affordable housing, diversifying industries, and updating the city's aging infrastructure to be resilient in the face of climate change.


    In a city like Westminster where resource management and growth are hugely important issues, Nurmella would be an excellent addition to this City Council. Her resume and her endorsements speak to her progressive strengths.

    Sarah Nurmela

    Sarah Nurmella is an urban planner running for one of Westminster’s four at-large city council seats. She has lived in Westminster for the last 10 years and has a very impressive background and qualifications for a City Council job including masters degrees in architecture and urban planning. Nurmella worked as a Westminster city-planner for 8 years, giving her granular knowledge perfect for the job. Lead comprehensive city planning. She has also served in a volunteer capacity on the city’s Environmental Advisory Board, ensuring that the city growth and actions have thorough environmental impact analysis.


    Nurmella’s platform emphasizes strategic growth for the city, increasing affordable housing, diversifying industries, and updating the city's aging infrastructure to be resilient in the face of climate change.


    In a city like Westminster where resource management and growth are hugely important issues, Nurmella would be an excellent addition to this City Council. Her resume and her endorsements speak to her progressive strengths.

District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following district races on your ballot.

  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Suzie Shuckman

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • Non-Partisan

    Tom Keefe

  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Tom Keefe

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • No Position

    We are neutral on Proposition 119.

  • The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

    The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

  • Endorsed By: The Bell Policy Center
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.