Depending on where you live, you may have the following city races on your ballot.

  • Candice Bailey has a long record of racial and social justice activism as a 30-year resident of Aurora. Bailey serves on numerous local boards and committees dedicated to fostering impactful change: City of Aurora Community Police Task Force, the City of Aurora Citizens' Advisory Budget Committee, the City of Aurora Community Mobilization Team, the Youth Violence Prevention Program, the State of Colorado Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Task Force, the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and National Action Network Colorado. Bailey's campaign issues are to promote "economic resiliency, community safety and wellness, and restore trust and accountability" to Aurora's government.
    Candice Bailey has a long record of racial and social justice activism as a 30-year resident of Aurora. Bailey serves on numerous local boards and committees dedicated to fostering impactful change: City of Aurora Community Police Task Force, the City of Aurora Citizens' Advisory Budget Committee, the City of Aurora Community Mobilization Team, the Youth Violence Prevention Program, the State of Colorado Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Task Force, the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and National Action Network Colorado. Bailey's campaign issues are to promote "economic resiliency, community safety and wellness, and restore trust and accountability" to Aurora's government.

    Candice Bailey

    Candice Bailey has a long record of racial and social justice activism as a 30-year resident of Aurora. Bailey serves on numerous local boards and committees dedicated to fostering impactful change: City of Aurora Community Police Task Force, the City of Aurora Citizens' Advisory Budget Committee, the City of Aurora Community Mobilization Team, the Youth Violence Prevention Program, the State of Colorado Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Task Force, the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and National Action Network Colorado. Bailey's campaign issues are to promote "economic resiliency, community safety and wellness, and restore trust and accountability" to Aurora's government.
  • University of Denver School of Public Affairs professor John Ronquillo is running for Aurora City Council in order to "confront policy issues through the use of data and evidence-based decision making and doing so in a collaborative, solution-oriented spirit." Ronquillo serves on the Advisory Council of the Colorado COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project and the Boards of Servicios de La Raza and the Arapahoe County Foundation. Ronquillo was previously a member of the Social Enterprise Alliance—Colorado Chapter Board of Directors and served on the Children’s Hospital Colorado Family Advisory Council.
    University of Denver School of Public Affairs professor John Ronquillo is running for Aurora City Council in order to "confront policy issues through the use of data and evidence-based decision making and doing so in a collaborative, solution-oriented spirit." Ronquillo serves on the Advisory Council of the Colorado COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project and the Boards of Servicios de La Raza and the Arapahoe County Foundation. Ronquillo was previously a member of the Social Enterprise Alliance—Colorado Chapter Board of Directors and served on the Children’s Hospital Colorado Family Advisory Council.

    John Ronquillo

    University of Denver School of Public Affairs professor John Ronquillo is running for Aurora City Council in order to "confront policy issues through the use of data and evidence-based decision making and doing so in a collaborative, solution-oriented spirit." Ronquillo serves on the Advisory Council of the Colorado COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project and the Boards of Servicios de La Raza and the Arapahoe County Foundation. Ronquillo was previously a member of the Social Enterprise Alliance—Colorado Chapter Board of Directors and served on the Children’s Hospital Colorado Family Advisory Council.

District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following district races on your ballot.

  • Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.
    Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.

    Crystal Murillo

    Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.
  • Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."
    Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."

    Bryan Lindstrom

    Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."
  • Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.
    Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.

    Ruben Medina

    Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • No Position

    We are neutral on Proposition 119.

  • The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

    The Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program would raise sales tax on marijuana purchases from 15% to 20% over three years to fund out-of-school educational programs for children ages 5-17, with a priority for providing programs for low-income households. It is estimated that this would raise an estimated $137 million per year. Though the outcome of this taxation is of course laudable, continuing to fund needed education and enrichment programs through “sin taxes,” is an unsustainable model and circumvents the necessary major systemic funding issues we need to address as a state.

  • Endorsed By: The Bell Policy Center
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.