Colorado Working Families Party

Colorado Working Families Party

The Working Families Party is a grassroots, multiracial party of working people coming together across our differences to make our nation work for the many, not the few. We’re electing the next generation of transformational leaders and building durable, independent progressive power in communities across the country.

Colorado Working Families Party Website

City Races

City of Westminster

  • Anita Seitz is running for Mayor of Westminster. Seitz currently holds the position after previous mayor Herb Atchison resigned earlier in 2021. She was first elected to City Council in 2013 and served as Mayor Protem from 2018 to May of this year. Seitz brings clear headed leadership to the role of mayor and addresses difficult city challenges with grace, confidence, and a forward looking vision. Seitz is a committed climate activist, previously serving as president for Colorado Communities for Climate Action and led Westminster to adopt environmentally conscious ordinances and policies. Her climate work garnered her national recognition as a leader on addressing issues related to climate change at the local municipal level. As Westminster and the northern Front Range grows in population and size, Seitz has a vision for economic and communal development that includes equity, sustainable growth, and increased quality of life.


    Challenging Seitz is Nancy McNally. McNally is a former Westminster mayor and owner of the embroidery/crafting store, “Made and Created.” McNally’s campaign website lacks an “issues” section, but her social media presence makes clear that one of her main priorities is lowering water rates. McNally’s attitude is one that ignores the realities of climate change and dwindling water use in favor of empowering home owners to over-water their thirsty, Kentucky bluegrass lawns. While McNally brings extensive executive experience, her vision for the city does not match its future needs.


    Seitz has the experience, leadership, and sustainable vision for the city of Westminster. She deserves your vote.

    Anita Seitz is running for Mayor of Westminster. Seitz currently holds the position after previous mayor Herb Atchison resigned earlier in 2021. She was first elected to City Council in 2013 and served as Mayor Protem from 2018 to May of this year. Seitz brings clear headed leadership to the role of mayor and addresses difficult city challenges with grace, confidence, and a forward looking vision. Seitz is a committed climate activist, previously serving as president for Colorado Communities for Climate Action and led Westminster to adopt environmentally conscious ordinances and policies. Her climate work garnered her national recognition as a leader on addressing issues related to climate change at the local municipal level. As Westminster and the northern Front Range grows in population and size, Seitz has a vision for economic and communal development that includes equity, sustainable growth, and increased quality of life.


    Challenging Seitz is Nancy McNally. McNally is a former Westminster mayor and owner of the embroidery/crafting store, “Made and Created.” McNally’s campaign website lacks an “issues” section, but her social media presence makes clear that one of her main priorities is lowering water rates. McNally’s attitude is one that ignores the realities of climate change and dwindling water use in favor of empowering home owners to over-water their thirsty, Kentucky bluegrass lawns. While McNally brings extensive executive experience, her vision for the city does not match its future needs.


    Seitz has the experience, leadership, and sustainable vision for the city of Westminster. She deserves your vote.

    Anita Seitz

    Anita Seitz is running for Mayor of Westminster. Seitz currently holds the position after previous mayor Herb Atchison resigned earlier in 2021. She was first elected to City Council in 2013 and served as Mayor Protem from 2018 to May of this year. Seitz brings clear headed leadership to the role of mayor and addresses difficult city challenges with grace, confidence, and a forward looking vision. Seitz is a committed climate activist, previously serving as president for Colorado Communities for Climate Action and led Westminster to adopt environmentally conscious ordinances and policies. Her climate work garnered her national recognition as a leader on addressing issues related to climate change at the local municipal level. As Westminster and the northern Front Range grows in population and size, Seitz has a vision for economic and communal development that includes equity, sustainable growth, and increased quality of life.


    Challenging Seitz is Nancy McNally. McNally is a former Westminster mayor and owner of the embroidery/crafting store, “Made and Created.” McNally’s campaign website lacks an “issues” section, but her social media presence makes clear that one of her main priorities is lowering water rates. McNally’s attitude is one that ignores the realities of climate change and dwindling water use in favor of empowering home owners to over-water their thirsty, Kentucky bluegrass lawns. While McNally brings extensive executive experience, her vision for the city does not match its future needs.


    Seitz has the experience, leadership, and sustainable vision for the city of Westminster. She deserves your vote.

City of Commerce City

City of Boulder

City of Longmont

  • Shiquita Yarbrough is running to make history as the first Black woman ever to serve on the Longmont City Council. Yarbrough currently serves as community engagement coordinator for the YWCA of Boulder County, and has served on nonprofit boards including KGNU Community Radio and the League of Women Voters. Yarbrough also serves on the Longmont Housing and Human Services Advisory Board.

    Shiquita Yarbrough is running to make history as the first Black woman ever to serve on the Longmont City Council. Yarbrough currently serves as community engagement coordinator for the YWCA of Boulder County, and has served on nonprofit boards including KGNU Community Radio and the League of Women Voters. Yarbrough also serves on the Longmont Housing and Human Services Advisory Board.

    Shiquita Yarbrough

    Shiquita Yarbrough is running to make history as the first Black woman ever to serve on the Longmont City Council. Yarbrough currently serves as community engagement coordinator for the YWCA of Boulder County, and has served on nonprofit boards including KGNU Community Radio and the League of Women Voters. Yarbrough also serves on the Longmont Housing and Human Services Advisory Board.

City of Aurora

  • Candice Bailey has a long record of racial and social justice activism as a 30-year resident of Aurora. Bailey serves on numerous local boards and committees dedicated to fostering impactful change: City of Aurora Community Police Task Force, the City of Aurora Citizens' Advisory Budget Committee, the City of Aurora Community Mobilization Team, the Youth Violence Prevention Program, the State of Colorado Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Task Force, the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and National Action Network Colorado. Bailey's campaign issues are to promote "economic resiliency, community safety and wellness, and restore trust and accountability" to Aurora's government.
    Candice Bailey has a long record of racial and social justice activism as a 30-year resident of Aurora. Bailey serves on numerous local boards and committees dedicated to fostering impactful change: City of Aurora Community Police Task Force, the City of Aurora Citizens' Advisory Budget Committee, the City of Aurora Community Mobilization Team, the Youth Violence Prevention Program, the State of Colorado Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Task Force, the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and National Action Network Colorado. Bailey's campaign issues are to promote "economic resiliency, community safety and wellness, and restore trust and accountability" to Aurora's government.

    Candice Bailey

    Candice Bailey has a long record of racial and social justice activism as a 30-year resident of Aurora. Bailey serves on numerous local boards and committees dedicated to fostering impactful change: City of Aurora Community Police Task Force, the City of Aurora Citizens' Advisory Budget Committee, the City of Aurora Community Mobilization Team, the Youth Violence Prevention Program, the State of Colorado Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Task Force, the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and National Action Network Colorado. Bailey's campaign issues are to promote "economic resiliency, community safety and wellness, and restore trust and accountability" to Aurora's government.
  • University of Denver School of Public Affairs professor John Ronquillo is running for Aurora City Council in order to "confront policy issues through the use of data and evidence-based decision making and doing so in a collaborative, solution-oriented spirit." Ronquillo serves on the Advisory Council of the Colorado COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project and the Boards of Servicios de La Raza and the Arapahoe County Foundation. Ronquillo was previously a member of the Social Enterprise Alliance—Colorado Chapter Board of Directors and served on the Children’s Hospital Colorado Family Advisory Council.
    University of Denver School of Public Affairs professor John Ronquillo is running for Aurora City Council in order to "confront policy issues through the use of data and evidence-based decision making and doing so in a collaborative, solution-oriented spirit." Ronquillo serves on the Advisory Council of the Colorado COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project and the Boards of Servicios de La Raza and the Arapahoe County Foundation. Ronquillo was previously a member of the Social Enterprise Alliance—Colorado Chapter Board of Directors and served on the Children’s Hospital Colorado Family Advisory Council.

    John Ronquillo

    University of Denver School of Public Affairs professor John Ronquillo is running for Aurora City Council in order to "confront policy issues through the use of data and evidence-based decision making and doing so in a collaborative, solution-oriented spirit." Ronquillo serves on the Advisory Council of the Colorado COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project and the Boards of Servicios de La Raza and the Arapahoe County Foundation. Ronquillo was previously a member of the Social Enterprise Alliance—Colorado Chapter Board of Directors and served on the Children’s Hospital Colorado Family Advisory Council.

Statewide Ballot Measures

Proposition #120

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

Amendment #78

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.