Colorado Working Families Party

Colorado Working Families Party

The Working Families Party is a grassroots, multiracial party of working people coming together across our differences to make our nation work for the many, not the few. We’re electing the next generation of transformational leaders and building durable, independent progressive power in communities across the country.

City Ballot Measures

  • VOTE YES

    We recommend voting YES.

  • Boulder Ballot Initiative 300 would increase occupancy limits for renters so that up to four unrelated people would be allowed to live together in a three-bedroom house, up to five unrelated people would be allowed to live together in a four-bedroom house. The city of Boulder has an inaccessible housing market and a considerable homelessness problem. Young people and students living in Boulder face many barriers due to the current restrictions that are in place. This initiative would bring more housing access to the city of Boulder by breaking down barriers.

    Boulder Ballot Initiative 300 would increase occupancy limits for renters so that up to four unrelated people would be allowed to live together in a three-bedroom house, up to five unrelated people would be allowed to live together in a four-bedroom house. The city of Boulder has an inaccessible housing market and a considerable homelessness problem. Young people and students living in Boulder face many barriers due to the current restrictions that are in place. This initiative would bring more housing access to the city of Boulder by breaking down barriers.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Initiated Ordinance 303 would ban anyone from camping in the Denver area, with the exception of four permitted sites, without receiving written permission from the property’s owner. It would grant the power of enforcement of this ban to residents, who would be allowed to sue the city if it didn’t remove people from these sites within 72 hours.
    The effect would be not only to further criminalize those experiencing homelessness, but it would embolden any un-elected person to act as an enforcement agency unto themselves.


    Homelessness and a dearth of affordable housing is a huge problem in Denver, and one which requires more nuanced solutions and funding. This initiative provides for none of these things, while further endangering our most marginalized neighbors and wasting needed resources.

    The Initiated Ordinance 303 would ban anyone from camping in the Denver area, with the exception of four permitted sites, without receiving written permission from the property’s owner. It would grant the power of enforcement of this ban to residents, who would be allowed to sue the city if it didn’t remove people from these sites within 72 hours.
    The effect would be not only to further criminalize those experiencing homelessness, but it would embolden any un-elected person to act as an enforcement agency unto themselves.


    Homelessness and a dearth of affordable housing is a huge problem in Denver, and one which requires more nuanced solutions and funding. This initiative provides for none of these things, while further endangering our most marginalized neighbors and wasting needed resources.

  • VOTE YES

    We recommend voting YES.

  • The Denver Housing and Sheltering System Bonds would provide $38.6 million funding for shelters and facilities for people experiencing homelessness while not altering Denver's tax rate. It will fund the purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, support the purchase, conversion, or construction of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters, create over 400 jobs, and fund improvements to existing shelters. This will continue efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver which has seen an increase in residents experiencing homelessness due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The Denver Housing and Sheltering System Bonds would provide $38.6 million funding for shelters and facilities for people experiencing homelessness while not altering Denver's tax rate. It will fund the purchase of the 48th Avenue shelter, support the purchase, conversion, or construction of up to 300 motel rooms in Denver to function as shelters, create over 400 jobs, and fund improvements to existing shelters. This will continue efforts to address the homelessness crisis in Denver which has seen an increase in residents experiencing homelessness due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The "Safe and Sound" Measure repeals the group living amendment approved by Denver City Council. The previously approved measure allows up to five unrelated adults to legally live together (the legal limit is currently only two unrelated adults to live together).


    This would take away affordable housing options for low-income and working families, reduce the number of available plots for halfway homes, and undo progress made to provide support for seniors and and those with physical or development disabilities.

    The "Safe and Sound" Measure repeals the group living amendment approved by Denver City Council. The previously approved measure allows up to five unrelated adults to legally live together (the legal limit is currently only two unrelated adults to live together).


    This would take away affordable housing options for low-income and working families, reduce the number of available plots for halfway homes, and undo progress made to provide support for seniors and and those with physical or development disabilities.

District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following district races on your ballot.

  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Suzie Shuckman

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.
    Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.

    Crystal Murillo

    Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.
  • Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."
    Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."

    Bryan Lindstrom

    Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."
  • Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.
    Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.

    Ruben Medina

    Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.
  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Fernando Branch

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • Non-Partisan

    Tom Keefe

  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Tom Keefe

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.

    The Property Tax Assessment Rate Reduction Proposition would: lower the property tax assessment rate for non-residential property from 29% to 26.4%, and lower the property tax assessment rate for residential property from 7.1% to 6.5%.


    This reduction would cut needed public funding -- an estimated $45 million in its first year -- for local government services that all Coloradans rely on, such as schools, fire departments, and police departments. In sum, this proposition would have the effect of primarily benefitting wealthy property owners while robbing funding from crucial public investments like education and infrastructure. When public programs such as these are continually underfunded, the most marginalized in our communities are consistently disproportionally harmed.